US1247604A - Valve mechanism for pneumatically-operated musical instruments. - Google Patents

Valve mechanism for pneumatically-operated musical instruments. Download PDF

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US1247604A
US1247604A US15792817A US15792817A US1247604A US 1247604 A US1247604 A US 1247604A US 15792817 A US15792817 A US 15792817A US 15792817 A US15792817 A US 15792817A US 1247604 A US1247604 A US 1247604A
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valve
wall
valves
diaphragm
chamber
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George P Brand
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

G.IP. BRAND.-
VALVE MECHANISM FOR PNEHMATIGALLY OPERATED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
APPLICATION FILED MAR, 28. 19!].
Patented Nov. 20, 1912-.
2 SHEETSSHEET I.
I a. P. 5mm VALVE MECHANISM FOR PNEUPw'JATIGALLY QF ERATED FJUSiCM. ENSYRUMENW. APPLICATION HLEE! ENE. 213. i917.
crease its power.
UNITED s re GEORGE P. BRAND, OF NEW WERE, as. ff.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, GEORGE P. BRAND, a-
citizen of the United States, and a resident of New York, in the county of the Bronx and State of New York, have invented certain new-and useful Improvements in Valve Mechanism for Pneumatically-Operated Musical Instruments, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part thereof. I
The invention relates to musical instruments and more particularly to the action chest and valve mechanisms employedfor actuating the player or power pncumatics.
The object of the invention is to provide a-very condensed form of structure which may be readily and accurately assembled, and inw'hich the'various valve mechanisms and their elements are accessible.
A further object is to provide a valve mechanism which will act with great oer tainty and rapidity, and which maybe assembled within the. action chest and in and upon one wall ofsaid chest in cooperative relation with. striker or power neumatics mounted exteriorly of the chest.
It has for a further object to provide an improved form of pouch or diaphragm,or primary pneumatic construction so as to ohtain greater freedom-of movement of the diaphragm to augment its delicacy and in- I obviate the resistance inherent in the usual form of annular diaphragms by making the same substantially rectangular with but two supporting sides offering resistance, the other sides being Y practically free and unsupported.
The invention, as hereinafter illustrated, shows a player action of a unit form providing a very compact structure which may be placed in an instrument directly behind the fall hoard where ordinarily there is a limited space. The advantages of its condensed form are, therefore, apparent.
Still a further object of the invention is to provide simple, yet efiicient means for muffiing the sound or noise usually made by the valves and the air when in operation.
Referring to the drawings:
Figure l is a View in elevation of'a 'por-' Specification of Letters Patent.
tion of the action chest with broken away. i
Fig. 2 1s a vertical crosssection, on enthe front hoard:
larged scale, through the action chest illur Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the component parts or the pouch illustrated in 4., said parts being disassembled.
Like numerals of reference indicate like parts in the several views.
Referring to the drawings,
i denotes a suction and action chest which may be formed in .any convenient man er and, as illustrated, has a rear sunpo ing wall 2' for the valve actions and player pneumatics, a removable front wall 3 to give access to the chest 1,,a base 4, end blocks 5 (which are shown in Fig. 3), and a head block 6.
Suction or pressure for the. chest 1 is produced in any well known manner by apps. ratus not herein shown, the connection to the chest being preferably made through a. channel 7 formed in the end blocks.
The head block 6 is formed in sections 8, 9.
The section 8 has borings, as at 10, which, through ducts 11, connect with the trackerboard oi the instrument. The section 9 has b-orings 12 which register with the borings 10, and also has intersecting borings 13, which, through suitable conduits 14,-connect with the primary neumatics or pouches of the valve actions.
Upon the exterior of the back wall. 2 of the chest are arranged supporting bars or ledges 15, or sectional form which support the striker pneumatics 16. As illustrated, there are three supporting ledges extending from end to end of the chest and which support three tiers of striker or power pneumatics. Each of the supporting bars or ledges has a base section 17, and an outer section 18, suitably secured together and secured to the wall The joints between" the sections of the V Patented Nov. 20.19 5 3.- Applicstion filed March 28, 191?. Serial Ho. 157,9fts.
Nit
head block and the sections of the supporting bars have suitable gaskets. There is a distinct advantage in forming these parts in section as they may be more readily bored and more readily assembled.
Formed in the inner face 01 the wall 2 are valve chambers 19, there being a valve chamber with its valve mechanism for each of the striker pneumatics 16. Each valve chamber has an atmospheric port 20, and each row or tier of valve chambers con uects through its respective ports 20 with a channel 21, formed in the base 17 of the support ing bar, said channel being connected with the atmosphere through borings 22. This arrangement provides an eilicient mufiiing, as pressures are equalized, and also provides for very economical manufacture. It is well known that valves make a noise in moving from one seat to another. After a pneumatic is deflated by the closing of the atmosphere port and upon release of thepneumatic by reason of the valve opening the inflation port and closing the exhaust port,
the air required to inflate the pneumatic causes an air noisein passing through the space between the valve and itsseat, and
it is desirable to dispense with this noise as much as possible. By the present construction this is accomplished by deadening' the sound so that it cannot be heard outside of the instrument. llhe bases 17 may be bored, as at 23 to correspond with. the ports 20, and when grooved give a maxi"- mum of area for passage of the air without materially diminishing the strength of the base piece. Borings 24-, formed through the outer face of the wall 2, intersect the valve chambers 19 at one side. These borings 2st register with openings 25, which are formed in part in the bascpiece 17 and in part in the outer section 18 as seen in Fig. 2.
intersecting borings 26 connect them. with the player pneumatics 16.
' rranged in the base-piece 1'? are valve pins 27, which extend centrally through the ports 20, and support the valves 28. Said valves 28 are freely movable upon the pins and serve to control the exhaust ports 20' and the suction ports--29, the latter being formed through plates 30., which form on haust valve seats for the valves and which are applied to the innerside of the wall hear/neatrally of which there is a perforation '39 serving as a bleed hole.
The diaphragm member .32 is placed over the block 3 1- and upon the heads .36, being securedby glue or the like to said heads, the diaphragm being drawn over the sides of the block and glued or otherwise secured to the outer faces thereof, as seen in Figs. 3 and 1. By this means, as will be evident upon reference to Fi s. 3 and 4, the diaphragm finds no resistance at the opposite edges, being free to move with case at these points, the body portion of the diaphragm being free to move throughout its area and giving greater lifting power and offering less resistance. Over the diaphragm and the heads 36 are secured space bars 42. A boring 4.3 is formed through the upper edge off the block and connects with the boring 3'7. This serves, through the duct 14, to connect the pouch member and the rear of the diaphragm to the tracker-duct. The blocks34 may be cut from achannel strip of indefinite length; thus, there is a great advantage in manufacture.
In assembling the unit form of pouch and exhaust valve plates 30 upon the wall 2, the plates 30 are centered with reference to the valve stem 31. The unit pouch members or primary pneumatics are applied thereto and each adjoining pair or pouch members is held securely in place by a resilient pla'te 14 and a screw L5. A suit able strip 30 of leather or the like, may be applied to the inner surface of the wall 2, and acts as an air seal for the plates 30.
The resilient plates 44 are cut away at their.
ends to clear the bleed holes of the pouches, and thus they bear upon the central line or the pouch members and appurtenant parts.
It will be obvious from the above that all of the valve mechanisms are readily accessible upon removal of the front plate 3 of the action'chest 1, and that any of the valves, pouch members, or appurtenant parts may be readily removed, replaced, or examined with minimum of inconvenience.
The stri pneumatics 16 are secured to the bars 18 ml each has its movable board 1 3 j ivotally connected, as at 1-6, with a plun er 417, which, through an adjustable member 4-8, actuates the corresponding wippen 49 of the piano action. The plungers 17 pass through perforated uides 4:7.
The operation of the mechanism is obvious. All of the valve actions, being lo cated within the action or su tion chest 1, are subject to the tension or suction of said chest, and the valves normally rest upon the seats of the suction ports 29. As soon as a tracker-duct is subjected to atmos pheric pressure, the diaphragm of its pouch or primary pneumatic is subjected to the full suction of the chest and moves the valve 28, which instantly covers the atmospheric port 20, simultaneously opening the suction port'29, and subjects the striker or power pneumatic 16 to" the'suction of the chest. The collapse of the power pneumatic actuates its correspon ing wi'ppen of thepiano action. Upon closing of the tracker-duct, pressures are equalized on both sides of the diaphragm member 32 and the valve 28 is re-seated, closing the suction port 29.
There is particular advantage in having theprimary pneumatic formed as herein above described. Being of rectangular form,it has a greater area for a given size block than would bepossible with a circular diaphragm such as has been commonly used 1n pouch structures. It permits uslng a smallerblock for-a given maximum area of diaphragm. Furthermore, the circular form of diaphragm is morelimited as to its extent of movement, there is greater resistance owing to the cup-form of the chamber, and it tends to strain and pucker at the center. This results in the breaking down of the diaphragm causing almost constant renewals.
In the rectangular form, as defined, practically'the whole surface of the diaphragm moves and gives a direct, firm thrust to the valve stem. By using suitable spacing means as the spacing blocks 42, the entire surface of the diaphragm is opened to the suction of the chest, and there is ample space at the sides of the blocks .forthe passage of air.
As illustrated, in the center of the diaphragm 32, there is a buffer disk 32 which forms a staple base and wearing surface to bear against the buffer 31, mounted upon the end of the valve spindle; 31. In using the rectangular form of diaphragm, there is little or no tendency to throw off the buffer disk. 32', which may be of a considerable size. Where .a circular diaphragm" is employed, there is constant trouble and annoyance due to the throwing off of the buffer when one is used.
There are special advantages in the va rious features of construction and arrangement hereinabove set forth. The striker pneumati'cs may all be assembled upon their supporting members. The supporting members may be readily bored and assembled With reference to their sections and with reference to the wall 2. The base-piece 17 may beeasily and accurately formed and its valve pins maybe arranged with precision The boring of the valve chambers may be effected with harmony and the parts upon the outer face of the board may be assembled or taken down with greatest facility. Similarly, the pouch or primary pneumatic units maybe formed as'completc structures and assembled upon the inner face of the wall 2, with their valves with the least possible inconvenience and trouble. Each individual part of the mechanism is thus made accessible'and renewable,-an-d the parts are interchangeable. It.
is obvious that the chest, as a Whole, is very much condensed inasmuch as the valve chambers and valves are located directly in one -W2tll of the ch st and that there is nothing extending Within the chest except the pouch members and suction valve port plates.
Another advantage is that I am able to.
primary pneumatics removably secured to the Wall of said chamber.
2. In a device of the character described, the combination of a vacuum chamber cas: ing, valve chambers formed in-one Wall of said chamber, valves arranged in said chambers, primary pneumatics within the vacuum chamber for actuating; said valves, said primary pneumatics removably secured 'to the wall of said chamber, striker pneumatics mounted upon the exterior Wall of the chamber and ducts formed through the wall of the chamber directly connecting said striker neumatics with said valve chamhers.
3. In a device of the character described, the combination. of a vacuum chamber,
valve chambers formed in one Wall of said chamber, valves arranged in said chambers,
perforated plates partially covering said chambers and forming suction valve seats for the valves, primary pneumatics Within the vacuum chamber mounted on sai lates and cotiperating With the valves for a uating thelatter, and atmospheric portsextending through the wall of the casing.
A 4:.1111 adevice of the character described, the combination ofa vacuum chamber casing, valve chambersformed in one wall of said chamber, suction ports connecting said chambers with a suction chamber, atmospheric ports formed through the .wall of the vacuum-chamber and providing atmospheric ports for the valve chambers, valves arranged in said valve chambers for controlling said ports, primary pneumatics arranged on the same Wall of the chamber for controlling the valves, and striker pneu matics mounted exteriorly to the chamber and having ducts communicatiig with the valve chamber through the Wall" mf"'the vacuum chamber.
5. In a device of the character described, the combination of a vacuum chamber casing, valve chambers formed in one Wall of said chamber, said valve chambers arranged in a series of rows, atmospheric ports ex tending through the wall or the vacuum chamber to the valve chambers, supporting bars for striker or power pneumatics exteriorly mounted upon the wall of the vacuum chamber and provided with a groove registering with a series of the atmospheric ports, striker pneumatics arranged upon one section of said supporting bars, one for each valve chamber, and connected therewith through ducts formed in the bars and Wall of the vacuum chamber, suction ports for the valve chambers opening to the vacuum chamber, and primary pneumatics within the vacuum chamber operatively associated with the valve chambers and their valves, and valves Within said valve chambers.
6. In a device of the character described, the combination of a vacuum chamber casing having valve chambers formed in one Wall of the casing and arranged in a series of tiers, supporting bars removably secured to the exterior pf the wall, one for each tier, an atmospheric port for each of the valves formed through the wall of the casing, a groove in the supporting bar registering with all the atmospheric ports of one tier of valves, valve pins secured to supports and extending into the valve chambers, valves supported on'said pins, suction ports for said valves, primary pneumatics removably associated with said valves and arranged interiorly of the vacuum chamber, striker pneumatics one for each valve supported upon the supporting bars, and ducts extending through said bars and the Wall of the vacuum chamber for connecting the valve chambers and respective striker pneumatics.
7. In a device of the character described, 7
the combination of a vacuum chamber casing, valve chambers arranged in tiers and formed in one wall thereof, atmospheric ports for each of the valve chambers extending through said Wall, removable perio rated plates for each of said chambers pro- VIClHK suction port seats for the-valves, primary pneumatics for actuating the valves menace removable front wall, valve chambers formed within the back Well, said chambers ar-.
ranged in {series of tiers, atmospheric ports for the chambers extending through the back Wall, sectional supporting bars, one for each tier of valves arranged exteriorly of said wall, a groove in'one section of each of solid bars registering with the atmospheric ports Or a tier of valve chambers, said groove communicating with the atmosphere, a valve pin for each valve chamber secured to the I supporting bar, valves within the chambers mounted upon the pins, a removable plate for each valve chamber having a suction port, a primary pneumatic for each valve arrangedwithinthe vacuum chamber and clamped against the plate, striker pneumatics supported on said sectional bars. and in communication with the respective valve chambers, and tracker duct connections for each of said primary pneumatics.
9. In a device of the character described,
the combination of a vacuum chamber haV:
ing a back wall and a removable front wall, a series of removable valve mechanisms arranged interiorly of the vacuum chamber and in tiers, sectional supporting bars secured to the. exterior of theback well, one
upon the back wall, and controlling striker pneumatics, the latter removably secured to the exterior of the back wall and controlled by the valve mechanisms, and a sectional head for the casing having registering ducts, there being a duct for each valvemech'anism, one section of the head having means for the attachment of tracker con: nections, and the other section oitsaid head having'means of connection with the primary pneumatics.
11. In a ,valve mechanism for pneumatically operated; instruments, a primary pneumatic embodying a base piece and a diaphragm of substantially rectangular Form secured thereover with two edges see l thereto in one plane and the other edges unattached in said plane but affixed in another plane with portions practically free nd unsupporte-l, .vhereby minimum resi ance is prov l cod, and means disconnected ,drom the diaphragm ,and bearing against sail base piece for supporting said primary pneumatic "in operative position.
12 111 a valve mechanism for pneumatically operated instruments, 2. base piece having projections at opposite ends forming a channel, a diaphragm secured to said projections and to the outer faces of the opposits sides of said base picce, means engaging said dlaphragm at said pro ections, a. member having a valve seat and a resilient member pressing said means against said first-named member.
"13. In a valve mechanism for pneumaticallyr operated instruments, a base piece with projections forming an open-ended channel, a diaphragm secured to said projections and overlapping the opposite edges of the base piece and secured thereto with substantially the entire area of the body portion for movement, a plate having a valve seat,
means interposed between said plate and portions of the diaphragm over ections, and means holding said base piece said means against said plate.
is. In a valve mechanism for pneumatically operated instruments, at base piece with a channel extended therethrough, said base piece having-end projections, a diaphragm secured to said projections and overlapping the opposite-edges of thebase piece and secured thereto with'substantially the entire area of the body portion free-for movement, a plate having a valve seat, means'interposed between said plate and portions of the diaphragm over said projections, and
means bearing against the outer of said for sustaining the parts in position.
15. A. primary pneumatic for valve ac tions comprising a block having a channel providing heads, an atmospheric connection to said channel, a bleed hole extending thereto, a diaphragm member extending over-said heads and block and inclosing the channel, and a bufizer centrally arranged with reference to said rectangular dia phragm. v
'16. A. primary pneumatic for valve actions, comprising a base piece with a rectangular chamber therein and projections at opposite ends forming opposed walls of said chamber, said base piece being bored and havinga boring through one end oommunicating with said boring, a diaphragm surrounding said chamber and secured to projections and to the opposite sides of base piece, with opposite portions sup- I ported in one plane and the other portions unattached in the same plane free and unsupported to reduce resistance and give base piece and removed from the diaphragm 'matic-support outside of said'casing having a groove communicating with said port and with the atmosphere and an opening for afi'ording communication between said boring and a power pneumatic.
19. In a device of the character described, a vacuum chamber casing with a plurality of atmospheric ports, and a pneumatic-support outside of said casing having a groove communicating with said port arycl'yvith the atmosphere. x
20., lin a device of the character dehchibed, a vacuum chamber casing with a plurality oi atmospheric ports, a pneumatic-support outside of said casing having a groove com municating with said ports and with the atmosphere, and valve guiding pins mounted in said support and extending into said orts.
P 21. In a device of the character described, a vacuum chamber casing with a plurality of atmospheric ports, a pneumatic-supportoutside of said casing having agroove communicating with said ports and withv the atmosphere, and valve guiding means extended through said ports.
22. In a device of the character described, a vacuum chamber casing with a plurality of atmospheric ports, a pneumatic-support outside of said casing having a groove communicating with said ports and with the atmosphere, and valve guiding means in said support.
23. In a device of the character described, the combination of a vacuum chamber casing, valve chambers formed in one wall 01" said casing, valves arranged in said chambers and primary pneu'matics within the vacuum chamber and supported independently of one wall thereof for actuating said valves.
24. An action chest having a vacuum chamher with a back board, and a removable front board,,and valve seats and diaphragms within the vacuum chamber and supported entirely independently of the front board.
25. An action chest having a vacuum chamher with a back board, and a removable front board, and valve seats and diaphragms withinthe vacuum chamber and supported entirely independently of the front board, said back board having valve chambers, and valves therein.
26. An action chest having a vacuum chamher with aback board, and a removable front board, and valve seats and diaphragms within the vacuum chamber secured to the back board and supported entirely independently of-the front board. A
27. An action chest having a vacuum chamher, with a back board. and a removable front Laymgsm said. chamber and holding said seats ta the back board indepeniiently of the from, back board lndependeml'y of the frcnt board, there bemg a space between sand dm board. phmgms and meats.
28. An actlon chest ha'vmg a vacuum cham- GEORGE P. BRAND 5 her, wlth a back board and a removable from Wmnesses:
board, valve seats, and chaphra'gms wlthm. W. R BAUM L 1 T7 szud chamber and holding sald sears 0 me L. r BOND.
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