US1246651A - Record for talking-machines. - Google Patents

Record for talking-machines. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1246651A
US1246651A US16214417A US16214417A US1246651A US 1246651 A US1246651 A US 1246651A US 16214417 A US16214417 A US 16214417A US 16214417 A US16214417 A US 16214417A US 1246651 A US1246651 A US 1246651A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
record
groove
talking
walls
machines
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US16214417A
Inventor
Ademor N Petit
Albert O Petit
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
JOHN L LOTSCH
Original Assignee
Sysmex Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Sysmex Corp filed Critical Sysmex Corp
Priority to US16214417A priority Critical patent/US1246651A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1246651A publication Critical patent/US1246651A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B3/00Recording by mechanical cutting, deforming or pressing, e.g. of grooves or pits; Reproducing by mechanical sensing; Record carriers therefor
    • G11B3/68Record carriers
    • G11B3/70Record carriers characterised by the selection of material or structure; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for manufacturing record carriers

Description

A. N. PETIT, DECD.
. TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT R.
RECORD FOR TALKING FILED MACHINES.
Patented Nov. 13, 1917,
Ygb
UNITED STATES mm onmon.
ADEMOR N. PETIT, OF ORANGE, NEW JERSEY; ALBERT 0. PETIT, ADMINISTRATOR 0F SAID ADEMOR N. PETIT, DECEASED, ASSIGNOR TO JOHN L. LOTSCH, TRUSTEE, OF
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.
RECORD FOR TALKING-MACHIN ES.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Nov. 13, 1917.
Application filed February 12, 1914, Serial No. 818,349. Renewed April 14, 1917. Serial No. 162,144.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, ADEMOR N; Pn'rrr, a citizen of the United 7 States, residing at Orange, county of Essex, and State of New Jersey, have invented a certain new and useful Record for Talking-Machines, of which the following is a speclfication.
Myinvention relates to records of the type wherein a sinuous groove of substantially uniform depth, is cut into a tablet which is caused to rotate beneath a cutting tool of the proper shape and configuration, and its object is to produce an improved record groove, the walls of which are so proportioned and shaped as to reproduce the sounds which were employed to produce the original record, with more clearness and distinctness than has been possible from records heretofore devised.
Another object is to produce a record groove which will retain its shape and reproduce the recorded sounds .with fidelity and without false tones.
A further objectis to produce a record groove wherein the reproducing tool will always properly engage therecord surface notwithstanding the wear to which the tool may be subjected.
These and further objects will more fully appear in the following specification and accompanying drawings taken together or separately. a
Numerous patents have been granted on records having grooves of various configurations. The earliest form was that traced on a smooth surface covered with carbon dust. This dust was displaced and left a shallow groove in the carbon. The next step was the. production of a groove by indenting in a metal foil or in wax or by the concurrently devised method of tracing through a wax film deposited upon metal and then etching; then followed a cutting tool which formed a groove with sloping walls and a fiat bottom similar to a standard screw thread. Then followed a shallow round bottomed groove cut in relatively hard material- This was followed by grooves of semi-elliptical shape and of considerable depth. Then came the V shaped groove. These forms are mentioned as commercially developed but in fact the early experimenters tested many thereof concurrently, being limited only by their several choices of material. Various other forms of record grooves have been suggestedbut all of them are along the same general lines as those noted above.
In all of the record grooves with which I am familiar the Walls of the groove terminate at the plane of the record surface in sharp angles and form sharp and consequently thin fragile edges. are, because of the nature of the material of which records are composed, more or less ragged or what is known in cutting tools as wireedged, and the rough edges produce false vibrations even upon the first use of the record. The fact that the edges of the grooves are ragged causes them to crumble and disintegrate by reason of the friction of the reproducing stylus against them and in a comparatively short time the edges are broken down and the effect of the false vibrations induced by them is greatly increased. The rough edges of the groove also act. as grinding surfaces against which the stylus is held and consequently it is soon worn to such an extent that shoulders are formed, which shoulders rest upon the surface of the disk and further tend to produce discordant sounds. This grinding ac-- tion on the stylus or needle is so rapid that in most cases, before the needle reaches the end'of the record groove on its first reproduction the same is clearly noticeable and the nearer to the end of the groove the needle approaches the greater the wear on the needle and the record and the more apparent becomes the distortion of the sound reproduction.
By means of my improved record the objectionable features above described will be completely eliminated and this advantage is obtained by so fashioning and forming the record groove that the side walls'will not join the plane of the record surface at angles, but will merge into that surface by easy curves thereby eliminating the sharp angles with their consequent weakened and friable edges. The cutting tool for forming my improved record groove is not claimed herein, but is made the subject matter of a separate application filed on even date herewit In the drawings- Figure 1 is a sectional view of a portion of a talking machine showing a recording tool in operative relation thereto.
The sharp thin edges Fig. 2 is a sectional view of the same, taken at right angles to Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of a record groove and cutting tool.
Fig. 4 is a similar View of the groove showing a reproducing stylus of ordinary construction engaging with the groove.
Figs. 5, 6, 7 and 8 are sectlonal views of modified forms of groove.
Fig. 9 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of the record groove.
' the turntable and the recorder is adjudged in proper position, the cutter will engage the blank and, when the same is rotated against the cutting edge and slowly moved diametrically under the cutting tool, a spiral groove of the required, uniform depth will be cut in the blank. If now the diaphragm be vibrated, by atmospheric compressions or sound waves impinging thereon, the recordin tool will be moved from side to side and t e groove or record instead of being a true spiral will be a sinuous groove extending spirally over the surface of the blank.
The preferred form of my improved record groove 14 is shown particularly in Figs. 3 and 4. The groove is trough shape with a rounded bottom 15, and diverging walls 16. The upper parts of the walls are curved as at 17 and these curves merge into the fiat surface 18 of the disk 10. The record so made is used as a master for the production of a matrix and from this any number of hard reproducing records.
WVhen reproducing, the stylus in traversing the record groove will bear against both sides thereof in being fed across the surface of the disk and will bear against a rounded and relatively long surface instead of bearing against a thin sharp ed e as heretofore, and the rounded portions eing part of the record of the sound vibrations, the'reproductions will be true, due to the rounded edges of the groove, and both record and stylus will wear and remain serviceable much longer.
It is obvious that vvarious modifications may be made without departing from the object of my invention.
It is to be understood that I do not limit myself to a disk record and it is obvious that the invention herein described and disclosed is equally applicable to the cylindrical and other types of record.
In accordance with the provisions of the patent statute, I have now described my invention together with the apparatus which I consider to represent the best embodiment thereof, but I desire it to be understood that the apparatus is merely illustrative and that my invention is not to be so limited, but may be carried out in other ways.
Having now described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. A sound record having a laterally undulatory cut groove of substantially uniform depth, the Walls of said groove merging into the surface of the record.
2. A sound record having a laterally undulatory cut groove of substantially uniform depth, and curved surfaces joining the walls of the groove to the surface of the record.
3. A sound record having a laterally undulatory cut groove of substantially uniform depth, the walls of said groove diverging from the bottom thereof and merging into the surface of the record.
4. A sound record having a laterally undulatory cut groove of substantially uniform depth, the walls of the groove diverging from the bottom thereof and joining the surface of the record by easy curves.
This specification signed and witnessed this 11th day of February, 1914.
ADEMOR N. PETIT.
Witnesses:
JOHN L. Lorsorr, ELIJAH F. MUNN, Jr.
US16214417A 1917-04-14 1917-04-14 Record for talking-machines. Expired - Lifetime US1246651A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US16214417A US1246651A (en) 1917-04-14 1917-04-14 Record for talking-machines.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US16214417A US1246651A (en) 1917-04-14 1917-04-14 Record for talking-machines.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1246651A true US1246651A (en) 1917-11-13

Family

ID=3314419

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US16214417A Expired - Lifetime US1246651A (en) 1917-04-14 1917-04-14 Record for talking-machines.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1246651A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1297885B (en) * 1968-03-27 1969-06-19 Rabe Erich Method and device for cutting records

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1297885B (en) * 1968-03-27 1969-06-19 Rabe Erich Method and device for cutting records

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
CA1043270A (en) Method and apparatus for electromechanical recording of short wavelength modulation in a metal master
GB1493114A (en) Mould for use in forming video discs
GB1392206A (en) Information records
Copeland Manual of analogue sound restoration techniques
SU568400A3 (en) Record carrier
GB1400274A (en) Recording supports and reproduction apparatus
US3826877A (en) Information playback system stylus
US4031546A (en) Disc player and stylus therefor
ES459642A1 (en) Vibration transmission mechanism for a phonograph
GB190721009A (en) Receptacle for Keeping and Conveying Talking Machine Discs.
US3737582A (en) Flat magnetic heads
US1080953A (en) Diaphragm for sound-boxes.
GB1020747A (en) Improvements in or relating to apparatus for recording and/or reproducing information
GB1091981A (en) A new or improved record disc and play-back apparatus
US3946149A (en) Apparatus for embossing information on a disc
US3035295A (en) Magnetic tape cleaner
US2422140A (en) Frequency modulated recording and reproducing system
US2816056A (en) Phonograph pickup
US2283797A (en) Phonograph disk
KR960025390A (en) Manufacturing method of optical disk stamper
US2955170A (en) Phonograph pickups
US2187512A (en) Recording stylus
US870961A (en) Multogram record.
US793140A (en) Talking-machine.
GB1208915A (en) Method of cutting a groove in the surface of a signal recording medium