US1236002A - Coating apparatus. - Google Patents

Coating apparatus. Download PDF

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US1236002A
US1236002A US9130016A US9130016A US1236002A US 1236002 A US1236002 A US 1236002A US 9130016 A US9130016 A US 9130016A US 9130016 A US9130016 A US 9130016A US 1236002 A US1236002 A US 1236002A
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liquid
size
receptacle
pipe
pipes
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US9130016A
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Walter A Nivling
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Walter A Nivling
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C23COATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; CHEMICAL SURFACE TREATMENT; DIFFUSION TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL; INHIBITING CORROSION OF METALLIC MATERIAL OR INCRUSTATION IN GENERAL
    • C23CCOATING METALLIC MATERIAL; COATING MATERIAL WITH METALLIC MATERIAL; SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC MATERIAL BY DIFFUSION INTO THE SURFACE, BY CHEMICAL CONVERSION OR SUBSTITUTION; COATING BY VACUUM EVAPORATION, BY SPUTTERING, BY ION IMPLANTATION OR BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION, IN GENERAL
    • C23C18/00Chemical coating by decomposition of either liquid compounds or solutions of the coating forming compounds, without leaving reaction products of surface material in the coating; Contact plating
    • C23C18/16Chemical coating by decomposition of either liquid compounds or solutions of the coating forming compounds, without leaving reaction products of surface material in the coating; Contact plating by reduction or substitution, e.g. electroless plating
    • C23C18/1601Process or apparatus
    • C23C18/1617Purification and regeneration of coating baths

Description

W. A. NWHNG,

COATING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR.15, 19:6.

Patented Aug". '7, 1917.

4 SHEET SHEET 1 qw l/tmwo W. A. NlVLiNG.

COATING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 15. 91s.

Patented Aug. '7, 1917.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

avwe/who a W. A. NIVLING,

COATING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR. l5. I916.

Patented Aug. 77, 1917.

4 SHEETS SHEET 3.

N w M M W A W A 0 M m W 9% W W m W W My; 1

W. A. NIVLING.

COATING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR.15. 19:6.

jj JZLQ .27

Q/Vi fmeoo a chemy Apgflication filed rlprii 15, 191%.

0 (1 Z who m may concern:

it known that l, V'Vznrnn A. Nivtrne, zen of tne United States, and residing ioston, in the county of Suffolk and rate of Massachusetts, have invented a new and Improved Coating Apparatus, of which the following is a specification.

This application is a continuation in part of my application Serial Number $642,402, filed October 1st, 1914.

This invention relates to means for and a process of maintaining the supply of liquid, such as starch sizing, in receptacles wherein yarn, webs, fiber or other material is .to be immersed and coated or impregnated.

The strength or sizing value of starch sizing is dependent upon preserving the liquid in the same condition as when freshly made. The starch-solution is not a true solution but rather a crude or colloidal solution carrying in suspension undissolved skeletal forms of starch granules, and whenever these skeletal forms are removed, or broken down by agitation, or if the solution isallowed to cool and then re-heated, the service is greatly impaired. The condition is more clearly understood after microscopic tests by the web of the cloth after the yarn or cloth passes the squeeze of two solutions of the same percentage strength-one fresh and the other having been subjected to long boiling, to cooling and re-lieating, or to excessive agitation. In the first case the skeletal forms are seen to crowd one another and to influence the rate of How or viscosity; in the latter, the viscosity has been largely reduced by a breaking down of the skeletal forms. The de-' terioration to a point wholly unfitting it for sizing work can, in extreme cases, be

brought about in as short a time as thirty ininutes.- -v v The ei ect of lessening the body or viscosity by destroying these skeletalforms that less size is taken up by the yarn or and less retained rollers. Every slasher attendant or cloth finisher recognizes the efiect of running down of his size. At frequent intervals he passes his fingers vloetween the opening threads at the lease rods.

The difference in the adhesive bond between adjoining threads is immediately apparent. When there is an evidence of insuiiicient size on the yarn or specification of Letters i Serial n0. erect.

cloth, he tries to restore the desired condition by adding a fresh lot of size which has not become vitiated or run down. It is evident therefore that conditions are constantly changing and at no two times is the size exactly the same. A greater or less amount is obviously on diiferent parts of the Warp, due in part to there being strong size in the size box at some times and weak size at others, due also to the variations in the amount (volumelof size in the size box.

It will be seen from the foregoing that an ideal condition would be constant level (volume) of size in the size box and a continuous renewal with strong size that would keep a uniform consistency every hour of the day.

This requires a continuous addition of prime size equal. to or preferably in excess of the requirements of the yarn or cloth passing through the size box or mangle. lnasmuch as therate of travel is subject to many variations due to stopping to change beams, slowing down or speeding'up after breakout or laying in a set, etc, it is impossible to so regulate a stream of size as to meet these'variations.

From what has been previously pointed out relative to causes of deteriorationof starch size solutions, measures for securing full service from starch in sizing must also go back of the size box or mangle and include the proper preparation and handling of size. In many starches not Well made or purified there will be found agglomeration of starch grains, held together by im-' purities, gluten, or cellular tissue. Unless every granule of starch is separated from its neighbor a uniform'solution free from lumps cannot be secured. It is therefore ad- This kettle should pref lll the pipes to cool and congeal; or, in-

those cases in which efiorts' were madeto a pump andpipe standing, which lessens their sizing-value. It is therefore advantageous to supply several slashers from one kettle, as by so doing the size is used up while in prime condit1on. In the customary arrangement, size sufi'ers great impairment of quality fromthe sizing liquid or size? has been drawn into the size boxes intermittently, usually through pipes of from one and one-half to two and one-half inches in diameter so as to fill the boxes quickly. The valves were then closed, which allowed the size remaining maintain a circulation, the path oftheliquid was a circuit from the supply kettle throu h line back to the kettle. This gave riseto dead ends adjacent the Slashers or elsewhere; in other words, did not include the .whole size supply lines, which merelylocalized the trouble. Also, on account of the continuous and rapid pumping of the major portion of the whole mass in previous systems, the circulation referred to is rapida kettle ofsize being ordinarily handled by the pumps in from three to five minutes, the size therefore being subject 'to violent agitation, which takes away from its body. One often hears the expression the life has all been pumped out of the size. This is actually the case -the size has been deteriorated; it

not only lacks its original value but the last.

of the kettle is very much inferior to the first portion from this cause alone;

It was impossible to reduce the supply through these pipes of relatively large diameter so as to get a stream approximately equal to the rate of consumption of size by the yarn traveling through the size box, owing to the elliptical opening formed when throttling down a valve of large diameter. The valve and valve walls were in such clos proximity, when the opening was reduced to correspond to orslightly exceed the rate of consumption of size, that they would not permit a continuous flow. Very small particles of foreign matter or congealed size, carried in the size, would obstrx-ct the opening so that no continuous supply could be maintained except by a large opening and large volume of size, which is objectionable for reasons already pointed out.

I have found that a specially constructed feed device giving a circular opening of,

say, one-half to one-fourth of an. inchin and the head under which the opening is placed, and optionally a largerLgpening for quickly starting up the machine, will not become clogged and will supplya substantially uniform quantity of sizing liquid sufficient to equal or slightly exceed that consumed in the sizing box. The slight excess which, for example, may be ten to twenty per cent. of that brought to the machine can be returned to the source and reused, thus preventing the impairment of the remaining eighty or ninety per cent.

With the foregoing in mind, the nature of the present invent on will be mpre readily understood. It consists in means for and a process of preparing, distributing and applying the size whereby the deterioration caused by cooling and re-heating, by an excess or by an insuflicient quantity in the size machine, by agitation and by time is i much reduced, and whereby the size in a particular slasher or size box may be renewcd' and sizing quality maintained, ap-

proximately in accordance with the demands of the material being treated therein; also in'means whereby the strength of the size in the size box may be continuously and accurately controlled and whereby a constantvolume may be maintained; in means whereby an active size of a desired strength may be supplied to a given slasher by blending sizes of different strengths contained in separate storage receptacles; in means whereby active sizes of different strengths maybe supplied to diflz'erent size boxes by separately blending in different proportions sizes of different strengths derived from a plurality of storage receptacles; in means for rapidly mixing a batch of size by violently agitating the ingredientsthereof when means for agitating the batch less violently; in means for delivering the batch from the mixer to either one or a plurality of storage receptacles; in means for circulating the size through a path that includes the size box and the storage receptacle, thus avoiding dead ends; in means for applying steam to the pipes for the purpose of heating or cleaning; in sight devices sodocated as to allow ready observation of the flow of size from the several sources together with the action of the steam; means whereby the level of the sizing liquid in the receptacles may be controlled and whereby the'receptacles may be readilydrained; and in the use of valves having small and large circular passageways, as above suggested.

The invention also consists in the details of construction shown, described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure l isadiagrammatic persplectiveof one embodiment of my invention. Fig. 2 is a lon- ,first preparing, and thereafter delivering the batch to a storage receptacle that includesgitudinal section through a three-way valve shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2. Fig. 4 is a vertical'section through one of the tanks. Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevation showing a modification in the piping. Fig. 6 is a similar view illustrating another. modification. Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section through the fluid level controlling device. Fig. 8 is a section on the line 88 ofFig. 7 with one of the gates lowered. Fig. 9 is a plan view corresponding to Fig. 7. F ig. 10 is a perspective view of the gate shown in Figs. 7 8 and 9. Fig. 11 is a vertical section through a sight device whereby the flow of sizing liquid may be observed. Fig. 12 is a section on the line -12 12 of Fig. 11. y

Similar reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views.

In the embodiment of the invention shown, the sizing is mixed in the make-up kettle or tank lOO (which is provided with an agitator of any approved character, such, for example, as the agitator 101 driven-by gearing 102, shaft 103 and pulley 104:, illustrated in Fig. 4) and is pumped therefrom through the pipes 105, 106, 107 and 108 and valves 109 by a pump 110 and delivered through screen boxes 111 of suitable form into storage receptacles 1 and 2 in batches of different strengths. The storage kettles 1 and 2, for convenience, are made of greatercapae ity than the kettle 100. The make-up tank and the storage tanks, particularly the latter, are each preferably jacketed to receive steam from a'main 39 through the pipes 112 and valves 113, and each of the tanks is provided in its to with a door 114 which may be latched in c osed position by any desired means (not shown). Each of the storage receptacles is also equipped with an agitator which may be the same as or different from that heretofore described. In use, ,however, the agitator in the mixing tank is run at high speed to cause a rapid mixing of the ingredients, whereas the' agitators in the storage receptacles run but slowly, thus avoiding the deterioration due to excessive agitation.

The sizing liquid is supplied from the storage tanks 1 and 2 by piping hereinafter described, to the sizing boxes or Slashers 3 in which yarn, Web or other material to be coated may be subjected to the sizing liquid by the action of the rolls 6, 7, 8 and 9, or in any other "desired manner. The level of the "liquid in the sizing receptacles may be controlled and the excess liquid may be returned to the storage tanks by instrumentalities, the details of which will be pointed out later.

Leading from the storage tanks 1 and 2 through the valves 11 and 12 are the supply pipes 13 and 14 that connect, respectively, to the line pipes 15 and 16. Each of the latter is provided with a T 17 from which a short pipe 18 leads to a three-way valve 19, best shown in Figs. 2 an d 3.' The valves 19 are preferably provided with a longitudinal circular passage 20, and the transverse rela 'which force may be applied in an obvious manner. The rotatable member is preferably provided with the circular opening 27 of substantially the same. size as the-passage 20, from which leads the circular lateral v opening 28 of substantially the same diam- V eter as the passage 21. The valve may ob viously be turned to afiord an unobstructed flow ofli uid through the passage 20 and opening 27 through the opening 28, the opening 27 and the passage 21 (Fig. 3); it may be turned so as to entirely prevent the flow, or it may be turned to connect ,the passage 21 with the lower end of the passage 20.

The said lower ends of the passages 20 communicate with the Y 31 through the nipples 32, fittings 33 and pipes 3 1; and from the lower end of the Y the pipe 35 or to afford a restricted flow r leads downwardly into the sizing receptacle. v The passages 21 may lead laterally through v the pipes 36 to a sight device 37 that may be 35, after which it may be positioned to afl'ord a smaller flow through the pipes 3642, steam being admitted at the same time through the pipe 38, if desired, to heat the liquid or to dilute it and render-it less viscous. Should the pipe 18 become clogged, the valve 13 may be closed and the valve 41 opened, whereupon steam will flow through the pipe 36, passage 21 and openings 2728 up into the pipe 18; and should the pipes below the valves 19 become clogged, the

valve plugs can be so turned that the openings 28 face downwardly, whereupon the steam will pass down into the pipes 3435. Usually, however, the smaller pipes only are liable to clog, and these pipes can be easily cleared by the ets of steam.

Duplicate installations are indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 1, but it is apparent that these may be omitted. The primary purpose of the provision of two tanks 1 and 2 is to allow the use of sizing liquids of different strengths. It is clear that, by properly manipulating the valves, the weak liquid,

say, may be brought to the receptacle 3 from the tankl, or the strong-liquid may be brought from the tank 2, or liquid may be .comprises .a tubular body having the threaded ends 51 on which are received the threaded glass retaining rings 52 having the inwardly extending flanges 53 whereby the sight glasses 54; are secured in place, pack ing rings 55 and 56 being interposed between the glass and the adjacent surfaces. The inner surfaceof the body merges. at

both top and bottom into the flaring deflectors 57 and 58 that, -as shown, are of frusto-conical form and surround, respectively, the extended lower end 59 of the pipe 38 (that may enter the body through a bushing 60 whereby pipes of different sizes may be accommodated by a single opening in the body), andathe upper end of the pipe 42.

(which may likewise be received'in a bushing 61). The pipes 36 enter the body, from the side and extend out over the upper'end of the deflector 58 so as to discharge their contents well within the latter. .The flow of liquid and steam is thus rendered visible and contact of the liquid with the glasses 5% is prevented.

The supply of liquid to the'tank 3 in excess of that required is conducted through the short pipe 63 to the level-controlling device 64, from which a pipe 65 leads through the valve 66 to the sewer 67. Also leading from the level-controlling device is a second 1 pipe 68 that may be brought, by means of the three-way valve69 and pipes 70, into I should be closed by plugs 74:. a The level-controlling device (Figs. 7, 8,, 9 and 10) comprises the tank having the bottom 76 and the preferably curved ends 77. The pipes 63 and 65 enter the tank near one end, and the pipe 68 is threaded into the bottom of the tank near the opposite end. At a point between the pipe 68 and the pipes 63-65 the side walls of .the tank are joined by a partition 78, the lower end of which is cut away to form the passage 79 and the seaooe upper end of which is cut away to form the opening 80. Adjacent the edges of the pas sage 79, the partition is provided with the short opposed dove-tailed guides 81, between which a gate 82 having the handle 33 is adapted to slide. Upon the opposite side, the partition has formed thereon the dovetailed guides 84:, between which the gate 85 may be guided. This gate preferably includes a threaded lug 86 through which passes the adjusting screw 87, the lower end of which contacts with the bottom of the tank and the upper end 88 of which may be squared or otherwise adapted to receive an application of force whereby it may be turned about its axis.

' The gate 82 may be positioned to close the passage 79 and the gate 85 raised until its upper edge is at the level .at which the liquid is to bemaintained in the sizing receptacle.- The excess sizing liquid then merely runs over the top of the gate and passes oil through the pipe 68. Since the adjusting screw 87 is not connected to the body of the box in any way, it is obvious that it, as well as the gate 85, may be lifted bodily out of the guides, which is convenient through the pipe 130 and valve 131; and a pipe 132 (equipped with a valve 133 in case steam is to be used) afi'ords venting means whereby a better circulation is insured.

Review of operation.

Batches of size of diiferentstrengths are rapidly mixed in the mixer 100/by running the agitator at a high speed, and are then pumped, respectively, into the tanks land 2, in which, as before stated, the agitators run slowly to avoid deterioration. The liquid from the tanks passes to the mains 1516 from which the size boxes maybe rapidly filled through the passages of larger cross-section. The valves are then turnedto direct the flow through the smaller pipes which may be cleaned or heated as heretofore described. The level-controlling device 64 'insured'immersion of the fiberat a constant depth, which, however, maybevaried at will, and excess size is returned to either..one or both of. the storage banks by the pumps 121- (A single pump and proper piping may, of course, be substituted for the duplicate installation shown). It will be observed that this circulation includes the storage receptacles and the slasher and avoids the usual dead ends. The quantity of liquid flowing being small, it follows that deterioration due to circulation is practically avoided. Whenever it is desired to empty a size box, the corresponding valve 66 is opened, thus preventing the formationof skins and the like.

The use of a plurality of slashers supplied from the sources of different strengths proportionately reduces, the time in which the size issubjected to cooling, and allows the simultaneous treatment of the material passing through the difierent slashers by active sizes of strengths which may differ from each other and from either of the sources.

While I have shown and prefer to use branch conduits comprising three -way valves for conducting the sizing fluid, it is obvious that, in some cases, the three-way valves may be dispensed with and other conduits and gate valves, with passages corresponding to those in the three-way valves, used in lieu thereof. It is also clear that many other changes may bemade in the de tails of construction without departing from the spirit of my invention; and that, while the present embodiment is intendedfor use in sizing yarn and the like, the apparatus,

isalso applicable to coating operations generally. It will be understood that by the word fabric employed in some of the claims, it is meant to include either the woven fabric or the yarns from which it is made. I do not, therefore, wish to be limited otherwise than as indicated by the subjoined claims.

I claim 1. A coating apparatus comprising a source of supply of coating liquid, a conduit leading therefrom, a three-way valve connected to the conduit, discharge pipes of larger and smaller diameters connected to said valve, a steam pipe connected to'said smaller discharge ipe, and a receptacle in whichthe coating iquid is used.

- 2. A coating a paratus comprising a source of supply of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid is used, conduits having passageways of different cross-sectional area'leading to the receptacle and through which liquid from the source may pass, and means for conducting steam to the interior of one of the conduits whereby the conduit may be cleaned or the liquid may be heated.

3. A coating apparatus comprising a source of supply of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid is used, conduits having passageways of larger and smaller cross sectional area-leading to the receptacle and through which liquid from the source may pass, and means for conducting heating "fluid to the interior of the pasterior 'of the directing means.

sageway of smaller cross-section whereby the liquid passing therethrough may be heated.

-4t. A coating apparatus comprising a source of supply of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid isused, conduits having passageways of larger and smaller cross-sectional area leadingto the receptacle and through which liquid from the source may-pass, and means for conducting steam to the interior of the passageway of smaller cross-section whereby the liquid passing therethrough may be heated or the passageway may be cleaned.

5. A coating apparatus comprising a plurality of sources of coating liquid, the llquid in one of the sources being of a strength different from that in another, a

receptacle in which the liquid is used, means for.;directing the flow of liquid from the sonrces to the receptacle and for'regulating '?"the'amount of flow from one of the sources 4 inv respect to the flow from another source,

and .means for supplying steam to the ina A coating apparatus comprising a plurality of sources of coating liquid,,the liquid mom of the sources being of a strength different from that in another, a receptacle in whlch the liquid is used, means for directing the flow of liquid from the sources :to the receptacle, and means for supplying steam to the interior of the directing means. I 7. Coating apparatus comprising a source of coating liquid, a receptacle in which it may be used, conduits of larger and smaller cross-section through. which liquid may flow on its way from the source to the receptacle, means for determining the conduit through which the liquid may flow, the arrangement being such that the receptacle may -be quic rly filled through the conduit of larger cross-section, and thereafter supplied with a regulated amount through the conduit of smaller cross-section. 8. Coating apparatus comprising a source ,of coating liquid, a receptacle in which it may be used, conduits of larger and smaller cross-section through which liquid may flow on its way from the source to the receptacle, means for determining the conduit through which the liquid may flow, the arrangement being such that the receptacle may be quickly filled through the conduit of larger cross-section, and thereafter supplied with a "regulated amount through the conduit of cross-section through which liquid may flow from the source to the receptacle, means for determining the conduit through which the liquid may flow, the arrangement being such that the receptacle may be quickly filled through the conduit of larger cross-section and thereafter supplied with a regulate amount through N the conduit of smaller cross-section, and-adjustable means for determining the level of the liquid in the receptacle.

10. Coating apparatus comprisinga source of supply of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid is used, a pipe leading from-the source of supply, a three-way valve connected to the pipe, discharge pipes .of larger and smaller cross-section connected to the valve and leading to the receptacle, said valve having a passage corresponding to the pipe of larger cross-section, and also having a circular passage corresponding to the pipe of smaller cross-sectlon, w ereby the receptacle may be quickly filled through 1 valve connected to the pipe, discharge pipes of larger and smaller cross-section connected to the valve and leading to the receptacle, said valve having a circular passage corresponding to the pipe of larger cross-section, and also having acircular passage corresponding to the pipe of smaller cross-section, whereby. the receptacle may be quickly filled through the pipe of larger cross-section, and whereby coating liquid may thereafter be supplied uniformly to the receptacle to compensate for the amount used in the coating operation and clogging of the passages may be largely avoided.

12. Coating apparatus comprising a plurality of sources of liquid, a receptacle in which said liquid is used, a sight device, pipes leading from said sources of supply to said sight device, and a conduit leading from said sight device to said receptacle, means for determining the flow of liquid through the first mentioned pipes, said sight device allowing the relative .amounts of liquid flowing through the first mentioned pipes to be observed.

13. Coating apparatus comprisinga plurality ofsources of liquid, a receptacle inwhich said liquid is used, a sight device,

' pipes leading from said sources of supply to said sight device, means for conducting steam to the sight device at will, and a conduit leading from said sight device to said receptacle, means for determining the flow of llquid through the first mentioned pipes, said sight device allowing the relative amounts of liquid flowing through the first mentioned pipes as well as the flow ofsteam to be observed, whereby the conduits for the r liquid may be cleaned.

. 1 4. Coating apparatus comprising a source of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid is used, a sight device, a pipe leading from said source of supply to said sight device, a second pipe leading from the sight device to thereceptacle, a steam pipe also leading to saidsight device, said sight device comprising a body, a transparent member supported by the body, and a deflector supported. by the body in position to prevent contact of the coating liquid passing through the sight device with the transparent member.

15. Coating apparatus comprising a source of coating liquid, a receptacle in which the coating liquid is used, a sight device, a pipe leading from said source of supply to said sight device, a second pipe leading from the sight device to the receptacle, a steam pipe also leading to said sight device, said sight device comprisin a body, 99 a transparent member supporte by the I body, and an upwardly flaring deflector supported by the body in position to receive the discharge of coating liquid from the first mentioned pipe and prevent contact of said liquid with the transparent member, and to guide the liquid to the second mentioned pipe.

16. Coating apparatus comprising a source of coating liquid, a receptacle in 100 which it may be used, conduits of larger and smaller cross-section through which liquid may flow on its way from the source to the receptacle, means for determining the conduit through which the liquid may flow, the

smaller conduit being circular in cross-sec-' tion, the arrangement being such that the receptacle may be quickly filled through'the conduit of larger cross-section, and thereafter supplied with a regulated amount liquid may'flow, said valve means including a passage of largercross-section and a passage ofsmaller cross-section, said last mentioned passage being circular in cross-section, the arrangement being such that the receptacle may be quickly filled through the conduit of larger cross-section, and thereafter supplied with a regulated amount through the conduit of smaller cross-section.

18. Coating mechanism comprising a receptacle for coating liquid, a plurality of line pipes, a pair of three-Way valves, pipes connecting the same to the line pipes, main discharge pipes extending "downwardly, smaller pipes extending across between the valves and joining a steam pipe and a discharge pipe, and means for controlling the flow of steam;

l9. Coating apparatus comprising a re ceptacle for coating liquid, a source of supply and a pipe extending therefrom, a threeway valve connected to said pipe and com- IISlII a revolublemember havin assa es of unequal size, discharge pipes of unequal size connecting to said valve so as to receive the liquid according to the position of the movable member, and means for conducting steam to the smaller discharge pipe. I

20. Coating apparatus comprising a receptacle for coating liquid, a pair of pipes parallel to each other, a pair of threeway valves, a pair of discharge pipes connecting to said valves and then bent toward each other, means uniting said discharge pipes, a fitting between the valves, a small discharge pipe connecting each valve to said fitting, a pipe extendin from said fitting to convey away the material brought to the fitting by the small discharge pipes, and a steam pipe also connecting to said fitting.

21. Coating apparatus comprising a receptacle for coating liquid, a pair of pipes parallel to each other, a pair of three-way valves, a pair of discharge pipes connecting to said valves and then bent toward each other, means uniting said discharge pipes, a fitting between the valves, a small discharge pipe connecting each valve to said fitting, a pipe extending from said fitting to convey away the material brought to the fitting by the small discharge pipes, a steam pipe also connecting to said fitting, and means mounted in the steam pipe whereby the passage of condensed steam may be observed.

22. Coating apparatus comprising a receptacle for coating liquid, a supply pipe, a three-way valve connected thereto, a large discharge pipe' connected to said valve, said valve comprising a revoluble member having communicating transverse passages of unequal size, discharge pipes connecting to said valve in such a manner that either one may convey away the material passing through the valve according to thepo'sition of the revoluble member, a fitting connect-- the liquid from the mixer to either of the sources being of a different strength than that from another, a plurality of receptacles in which the liquid is used, means for directing the flow of liquid from the several sources to one only of the receptacles at a time or to a plurality of the receptacles simultaneously, and means for regulating the amount of flow from one of the sources in respect to the amount from another whereby the strengths of the liquid in the various receptacles may be accurately and continuously controlled.

24. The process of sizing which consists in mixing sizing liquid to form batches of different strengths by agitating the ingredients thereof in a mixing receptacle, delivering the size of a given strength to one storage receptacle and' the size of another strength to another storage receptacle, agitating the sizes in the storage receptacles less violently than in the mixing receptacle, combining the liquids from the storage receptacles in predetermined ratio to form an active size of strength 'difierent from the strength of either of said liquids and caus ing the active size to circulate in a path that includes one of the storage receptacles and a slasher in which it may be used.

25. The process of sizing which consists in mixing sizing liquid to form batches of difi'erent strengths by agitating the ingredients thereof in a mixing receptacle, delivering the size of a given strength to one storage receptacle and the size of another strength to another storage receptacle, agitating the sizes in the storage receptacles less violently than in the mixing receptacle, combining the liquids from the storage receptacles in predetermined ratio to form an active size of strength difierent from the strength of either of said liquids and causing the active size to circulate in a path that includes one of the storage receptacles, and a plurality of slashers in which it i may be simultaneously used at the same or difierent'strengths.

26. A sizing ,apparatus comprising a source of sizing liquid, a receptacle in which the'liquid is used, means for rapidly filling the receptacle through an opening of relatively large cross section and for thereafter maintaining a limited continuous flow through a free opening of smaller cross section, said last named opening being of a shape such that substantially the greatest .area is secured with substantially the least peripheral dimension whereby a relatively small continuous flow of liquid 15 lnsured without clogging.

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2417102A (en) * 1943-11-19 1947-03-11 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for coating heels
US2545445A (en) * 1946-04-05 1951-03-20 American Can Co Supply system for liquid substances
US2623496A (en) * 1949-06-02 1952-12-30 Max Pollack & Company Inc Machine for processing synthetic threads
US2658471A (en) * 1950-04-07 1953-11-10 Bledsoe Ophard Apparatus for applying paste to wallpaper
US2766721A (en) * 1952-09-22 1956-10-16 Bjorksten Res Lab Inc Apparatus for applying thixotropic material to a continuous web material
US2873718A (en) * 1955-06-15 1959-02-17 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Apparatus for coating continuously produced filaments
US2963002A (en) * 1957-04-15 1960-12-06 Steinemann Ulrich Ag Varnish feeding arrangement for pouring machines
US3067056A (en) * 1959-10-15 1962-12-04 Robert K Remer Improvements in printing with ink composition having volatile solvents
US3176964A (en) * 1961-01-05 1965-04-06 Sonic Eng Corp Method and apparatus for producing acoustic vibrations in fluids
EP0127345A2 (en) * 1983-05-04 1984-12-05 Burlington Industries, Inc. Automated sizing system controlling

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2417102A (en) * 1943-11-19 1947-03-11 United Shoe Machinery Corp Machine for coating heels
US2545445A (en) * 1946-04-05 1951-03-20 American Can Co Supply system for liquid substances
US2623496A (en) * 1949-06-02 1952-12-30 Max Pollack & Company Inc Machine for processing synthetic threads
US2658471A (en) * 1950-04-07 1953-11-10 Bledsoe Ophard Apparatus for applying paste to wallpaper
US2766721A (en) * 1952-09-22 1956-10-16 Bjorksten Res Lab Inc Apparatus for applying thixotropic material to a continuous web material
US2873718A (en) * 1955-06-15 1959-02-17 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Apparatus for coating continuously produced filaments
US2963002A (en) * 1957-04-15 1960-12-06 Steinemann Ulrich Ag Varnish feeding arrangement for pouring machines
US3067056A (en) * 1959-10-15 1962-12-04 Robert K Remer Improvements in printing with ink composition having volatile solvents
US3176964A (en) * 1961-01-05 1965-04-06 Sonic Eng Corp Method and apparatus for producing acoustic vibrations in fluids
EP0127345A2 (en) * 1983-05-04 1984-12-05 Burlington Industries, Inc. Automated sizing system controlling
EP0127345A3 (en) * 1983-05-04 1985-11-21 Burlington Industries, Inc. Automated sizing system controlling

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