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Paper receptacle.

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US1229751A
US1229751A US2669215A US1229751A US 1229751 A US1229751 A US 1229751A US 2669215 A US2669215 A US 2669215A US 1229751 A US1229751 A US 1229751A
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Prior art keywords
cup
paper
lip
rim
plaits
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Henry A House
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Henry A House
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D3/00Containers having bodies or peripheral walls of curved or partially curved cross-section made by winding or bending paper without folding along defined lines
    • B65D3/02Containers having bodies or peripheral walls of curved or partially curved cross-section made by winding or bending paper without folding along defined lines characterised by shape
    • B65D3/06Containers having bodies or peripheral walls of curved or partially curved cross-section made by winding or bending paper without folding along defined lines characterised by shape essentially conical or frusto-conical

Description

"H11. HOUSEQ PAPER REC-EPTACLE.

, APPL'ICATION FILED MAY 8. I915.

Patented June 12, 1917 WITNESSES:

UNITED STATES. PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY A. HOUSE, OF BBIDGEPOBT, GOII'NEO'I'IGU'I.

PAPER BECEP'IAGLE.

' To all whom it may concern:

the receptacles.

Be it known that I, HENRY A. House, a citizen of the United States of America, and a residentof Bridgeport, in the county of Fairfield and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Paper Receptacles, of which the following is a specification.

Thisinvention relates to improvements in and relating to paper receptacles, and has for its object to provide a receptacle of this character which is substantial, durable, and

ofa stiffness commensurate with the resembling and manipulatin is saved, and to these advantages are adde the efiicient simplicity and beauty of finish in favor of the onepiece cup. But in the making of a one piece plaited cup heretofore, paraiiin has been used for strengthening the same, and in some cases for cementing the folds together, and in other cases also for providing a beaded rim of paraflin which served to strengthen the lip portion of the cup.

By the invention, the use of adhesive or water-proof substances, such as parailin and the like, usually employed in the construction of some cups, may 'be obviated. Objection has been heretofore made by persons to whom parafiin is distasteful, and by others who believed that it affected the contents in Also, in the use of some plarafiined drinking cups, the tongue and 'ps of the user coming in contact with the paraflin was thought by some to destroy the pleasurable efl'ects of the use thereof, and in some cases, even pieces'of parafiin broke ofi from the cup by the pressure applied by the teeth and lips of the user.

A further disadvantage of some of the plaited cups used heretofore was that due to inaccuracies in plaiting sometimes occurrin places of weakness in the lip resulted, so t at by'the pressure applied during the use of the cup, a kinking at the lip resulted, and a collapsing of the cup followed.

A disadvantage of some of the one piece Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 12, 1917.

tical seam thereo Underlying all these features, at all times.

is the ob ect to provide a receptacle which is sim la in construction and inexpensive to manu acture.

With these and other objects in view, m invention is shown in the accompan ing drawings, and. will be hereinafter more ully described and finally pointed out in, the claims.

I have heretofore filed an application for Letters Patent on April 30, 1911 now pending, and also have obtained Letters Patent No. 1,117,848 on November 17, 1914, for a drinking vessel.

In the drawings, in which I have shown a receptacle adapted for drinking purposes,

Figure 1 shows a cup formed from a single piece or disk of paper and plaited and molded to cup form as shown.

Fig. 2 -is a side elevation of my improved cup in completed form with the lip upset and compressed to form a rim, and formed from the cup blank shown in Fig. 1, i

Fig. 3 is a perspective view thereof, showing the circumferential rim,

Fig. 4L is a sectional view of a portion of the same, showing various superposed layers at the lip before upsetting of the same to form the rim, and this view would corre- V spond to any vertical section ofFig. 1,

Fig. 5 is a detail sectional view of a portion of the rim of the cup after upsetting and pinching and compression,

Fig. 6 is a greatly enlarged detail sectional view of 5,'showing one method of form- 1 ing the rim,

Fig. 7 is an enlarged side view of the cup showing a portion of the rim of the cup,

Fig. 8 is a perspective-view of a form of rim upset substantially like Fig. 5, but additionally compressed to present a beaded smooth contour,

Fig. 9 is a sectional view of a portion of a cup formed of two unparaflineddisks and an intermediate parafiined disk; Fig. 10- is a part of the" blank or disk, showing the serrated edges used in some cups, and r 11 is a sectional view of a form of rim upset in parallel strata, and then com pressed under heat and. great pressure, and showing a bell-like flare instead of the conof Figs. 1 and 2.

responding parts throughout the several views.

Referying to the drawings, and more particularly to Fig. 1 thereof .a cup 10 s formed from a disk or blank of paper, and having the sides thereof turned upwardly from the base 11. substantially perpendicularly thereto. The bottom or base -11 is ndented or dished, having a. wall 11" and slopin parts 11. The bottom is dlshed inwarly as indicated, the dished portion orannulus serving togreatly strengthen and brace not only the. bottom, but also the side walls -of the vessel, renderi the same more stifi. The sides are formed mtoplaits 12, the said .plaits' being tapered from the lip 13 toward the base, anddisappearing at the base, thereby providing three folds sub stantially continuously around the hp of the cup and of a thickness of three sheets of paper. In casetwo disks are superposed and used, of courseja thickness of SIX sheets of paper result's. The cilp after having been plaited either-by hand or by machmery, 1s molded to the desired shape, which may be straight, or curved, or in the form of an ogee curve, a form of which isshown in my copending application and in my Letters Patent No. 1,117,848.

This molding is carried out whlle the paper of the cup is somewhat moist. The

i sidewalls and bottom form a corner curve at their. contacting point. The molding pressure 1s exerted'also against the layers or thicknesses of the plaits so as to compress them uniformly and equally from, top to bottom to the shape thereof, the said thick-- nesses being compressed against each other uniformly and equally from top .to bottom, and along .a line perpendicular to the said thicknesses of paper. One way of moistening the paper is to have the roll of paper in a casing wherein a pan of: water is placed.

Someof the evaporated water is absorbed by the paper. Then this moistened paper, after having been plaited, is subjected to heat and molding pressure, and by reason of the sizing contained in the paper is renderedadherent. This molding takes place while the cup is still.warm and thus also slightly moist, andwhile the gluten or sizing of the 'paper isvthus rendered adherent, an

by'the pressure exerted the cup is shaped, and all the parts, including all the ,plaited parts thereof, are forced tightly together. The pres'sureapplied, in some cases, is extreme, that is, thirty thou'sandpounds, and as much as the paper stand without rupture while in the forming dies.

,S imultaneously therewith, or later ifdesired, a special treatment is given by suitable dies to the lip of the cup by upsetting, by pinching, by pressure and by compression under heat and moisture. The action of these dies causesthe paper forming the and serve to form a compact mass.

or lip of the cup to be upset on iiself in some cases, as shown in Fig. 2, and to give paraflin bath when such is desired. But in the cup shown in Fig. 1, extreme pressure is used, that is, the pressure is so great that the particles or molecules of paper. are molded and compactly compressed against each other under heat, moisture, and ressure. The lip is then given,as. state an additional upsetting action, to -form'the' cup of Fig. 2, and as a consequence of all this,

no such paraflin bath or other paraflin coating is necessary.

n the case of a cup having a plurality'of layersat the lip, the outer layer 140i double paper, with an extension like the extension 60, beyond the lip portion, is brought by upsetting, into the shape of an S, as at 1-5, the lower portion thereof interlocking with the middle layer of paper 16, and the middle layerof paper interlocking with the inner layer 17, as'clearly shown in Fig. '3. This is. also shown in enlarged view in Fig. 6. In this form,vpressure is exerted on the inner and outer sides of the rim at the points 18 and '19, as indicated by arrow points, and

downward pressure is-exerted at the upper edge of the rim, as indicated by the arrow 20, thereby forminga continuous binding rim circumferentially around the lip of the cup, which causes the plaits' to interlock with each other. by the pressures exerted during the warm and moistened condition and sizing of the paper. These parts "form, when, finished, a continuous bead or cord like structure 25 and'26, circumferentially around the upper edge of the cup as. shown in-Figs. 3 and 5.

By employingsuitably shaped I dies and" suflicient well-directed pressure,- a. smooth,

continuous rim 21, such as shown in Fig. 8,

is obtained by upsetting and compact compression under the condition "described, ac cordmg to my invention, whichsmooth rim corners, crevices, or roughness y In Fig. 10, a-serrated edge is shown with serrations 32, which on the upsetting of the lip serve to give astrong rim as aresult of the compacted material. By the tongue; and

has the added advantage of presentingno groove fittings of the serrations of. two or more layers or disks, the said serrations give a close knitting together of the edges and of the cup against each other. This band or zone, specially treated and intensely compressed and upset and compactly solidified under heat and moisture and pressure, results in a strong external pressure resisting part of the cup, which strengthens the entire cup, and much resembles glass in smoothness of finish and in resisting quality.

A paper on having an upset, or pinched, or compresse tion, may be formed on either a plaited cup as shown in Fig. 1, or a plain unplaited cup as in Fig. 8, which may be of the two piece construction, and in the case of such two piece cups, where one piece is held together at one scam, the improved rim strengthening serves to lock together the seam and make a pressure resisting cup. My rim is also applicable to equivalent one piece cups with respectto the present invention made under my crimped paper invention, Serial Number 774,768, filed by me on June 20th, 1913, and Fig. 8 is typical of such non-plaited cups. The walls of the vessel, of the embodiment shown-, are plaited, as stated, each plait adually increasing in width from the ower end to its upper end or from the bottom of the vessel to the upper part. These plaits are made of considerable number so as to distribute the reinforcing which they provide uniformly around the vessel. The plaits will more or less cover the surface of the vessel, and thereby reinforce the same, as also provide vertical ribs of several thicknesses of material, which act by themselves to give a strengthening power to the vessel. The ribs are inclined to the vertical axis of the cup in some cases, that is to say, the tops of the'ribs or plaits are vertically at one side outward of the .bottom of the plait. This constructionprovides resistance to torsional or horizontal stress, and increases the strength of the cup. It has also the advanta e that when one such vessel is placed wit in another, with the plaits or ribs oppositely inclined, one of said vessels serves as a lining attached to the other, the direction 0 greatest resistance of one set of plaits being opposed to that of the other, and the combined structure, by reason of each set of plaits resisting the other, is therefore rendered resistant to a twisting strem in both directions. These features are attendant on the straight line cup, the straight line with the flare atits upper end, and the ogee line 011E.

In t e case of the ogee. or reverse curve cup, the lower curve causes the strain by the thrust of the liquid contained in the vessel to be resisted, in-that the force is and the bulgequall taken up by this curve, ing 0 the vessel is thereby preven being stratified in superposed transverse layers longitudinally compressed rim, according to my inven-' trees and the like, an

the use of the upper curve, the material of which the vessel is made is given a stifiness, whereby a collapsing of the vessel is-prevented. The intermediate part between the curves serves to strengthen the action of both, and in this connection the lower curve serves also to resist inward pressure by the use of the cup. ,Thus, upper curves, the necessary stiffness is given to the vessel to withstand the stresses to which it is subjected, and the curves and straight line portion coii'perate with each other to withstand the total strains to which the vesselis subjected.

With my improved construction, provided which is constructed entirely paper, and which has the strengthening rim and strengthening zone described. Also, the

a cup is use of such a rim or zone does not require the use "of any foreign substances, such as parafiin and the like, for strengthening purposes, or for binding purposes for causing the plaits to adhere toeach other, in the case of plaited cups. The intense pressure emplo ed, and compact compression of the mo ecules with the inherent sizing of the paper under heat and moisture, brings about so compact a cup that it holds li uids without s ecial waterproofing, as eretofore. There ore my cup possesses many advantages over such cups employing these expedients, and at the same time provides a cup which may be more quickly and simply manufactured, and which will be less ex than such cups heretofore in 'use. y the beaded rim obtained by upsetting the lip, any inequalities otherwise present are avoided, and the smooth and rounded edge ives a pleasing sensation during use.

While I have described my invention with reference to a cup, it will be understood that the same may be used for receptacles or containers for holdin candies, cakes, en-

other such uses, as also paper caps for bottles, as will become obvious from the resent disclosure.

Also, the outsi disk or layer may be made, fancy or colored. In Fig. 9, I have shown a part of a cup composed of two layers 29 and 30 of unparaflined paper, and one layer 31 of paraffined paper intermediate thereto, with all three upset on and interlocked and compressed to form a rim. Also, a diskor layer of paraffin may be molded and interposed between two unparaffined cups, for waterproofin' and the lips pinched togetheiz, The para n is thus not seen or tasted by the user, great advantage.

Thus, my im roved cup enables the use of paraflin to be dispensed with, and still a cup of strengthand efficiency is obtained. If in addition, it is desired to useparaifin, as by some this is considered advantageous,

e, inside, or intermediate which is a s by the lower and ensive to themselves and pinched then the cups as described herein are immersed in a paraflin bath course, if desired, beaded cups then having ent therein.

The mechanism ticle of manufacture is no part of this application, and box plaits may also be used. The cups as described form a ractical, cheap, attractive, and'sanitary dri ing vessel, and are especially adapted to be used in public places, and by with paraflin, such all the advantages inherhospitals, schools, and reason of their structure and rigidity, they are enabled to retain water or other liquid for hours, making them especially adapted beyond their casual use, for use by doctors and dentists.

I have illustrated and described a preferred and satisfactory form of my invention, but it is obvious that changes may be made therein within the spirit and scope thereof, as defined in the appended claims.-

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A paper receptacle having its bottom, sidewall, and lip integral, and its sidewall and lip plaited to form sections of a lurality of thicknesses of paper pressed mt-o permanent plaits ta ering from the top toward the bottom 0 the sidewall with the edge of the lip formed bythe widest part of the plaited sections, and the lip compressed upon itself for permanently holding the plaits of the sidewall at the lip portion thereof, the lip being in unbroken continuity with the sidewall, and circumferentially plaited transversely to the longitudinal plaits of the sidewall. 2. A paper receptacle having its bottom, sidewall, and lip integral, and its sidewall and lip plaited to form sections of a plurality of thicknesses of paper pressed into permanent plaits, tapering from the top toward the bottom of the sidewall, with the widest part at the edge of the lip, the sideor coated, and, of

used for'forming the ar-.

I pressed rim,

perpendicular to the lug upset on itself wall being substantiall bottom, and the lip near the upper ed of the lip, to form in? terlockin'g plaits or holding the plaits together at the lip and thereby preventing the opening of the plaits of the sidewall, the edge of the lip having the same number of thicknesses as the thicknesses of the sidewall, and the upset part having a greater number of thicknesses.

3. A receptacle of the character described, formed of a paper disk having a serrated edge, the side walls of said cup consisting of compressed plaits forming a substantial. continuous lip of a plurality of thicknesses of paper, said cup having an upset comthe plaits of the said rim inter looking with the plaits of the said side wall,

the said plaits being caused to adhere by the inherent sizing ofthe paper.

4. A receptacle of the character described, formed from a plurality of superposed layers of unparalfined paper, and an intermediate layer of paraifined paper, the side walls of said cup consisting of compressed .plaits, the said cup having an upset and compressed rim, the plaits of the said unparafiined layers of paper being caused to adhere by the inherent sizing of the said, paper.

5. A aper, receptacle, having a bottom, and a sldewall substantially perpendicular to the bottom and 'having a lip upset on itself near the upper edge of the sidewall to form a circumferential plait transversely to the sidewall and substantially in line therewith, and the thickness of the edge of the lip and sidewall being less than the upset portion.

In testimony, that 'I claim the foregoing as my invention, I have signed my name in presence of two subscribing witnesses.

HENRY A. HOUSE.

Witnesses:

GEO. D. PHILLIPS, FRANK B. JAYNEB.

US1229751A 1915-05-08 1915-05-08 Paper receptacle. Expired - Lifetime US1229751A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7767049B2 (en) 2006-10-12 2010-08-03 Dixie Consumer Products Llc Multi-layered container having interrupted corrugated insulating liner
US8960528B2 (en) 2004-04-22 2015-02-24 Dixie Consumer Products Llc Insulating cup wrapper and insulated container formed with wrapper
USD752972S1 (en) * 2015-05-04 2016-04-05 Barrie House Coffee Co., Inc. Single serving cup

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8960528B2 (en) 2004-04-22 2015-02-24 Dixie Consumer Products Llc Insulating cup wrapper and insulated container formed with wrapper
US7767049B2 (en) 2006-10-12 2010-08-03 Dixie Consumer Products Llc Multi-layered container having interrupted corrugated insulating liner
USD752972S1 (en) * 2015-05-04 2016-04-05 Barrie House Coffee Co., Inc. Single serving cup

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