US1220725A - Mold-making machine. - Google Patents

Mold-making machine. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1220725A
US1220725A US1913763563A US1220725A US 1220725 A US1220725 A US 1220725A US 1913763563 A US1913763563 A US 1913763563A US 1220725 A US1220725 A US 1220725A
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Prior art keywords
valve
cylinder
brackets
cross
position
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Edwin S Carman
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OSBORN Manufacturing Co
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OSBORN Manufacturing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22CFOUNDRY MOULDING
    • B22C15/00Moulding machines characterised by the compacting mechanism; Accessories therefor
    • B22C15/10Compacting by jarring devices only

Description

E. S. CARMAN.

MOLD MAKING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR.25,1913.

mww. Patented Mar. 2 7, 1917 4 suans susn 1.

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E. S. CARMAN.

MO-LD MAKING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 25, 1913.

Patented Mar. 27, 1917.

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44 m n5 4 W 1 d M 7 8 3 o 4 3C 4 a tnease E. S. CARIVIAN.

MOLD MAKINGMACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 25, 1913. Q35, Patented Mar. 27, 1917.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

m: Nmems PEYERs Co Prlom-urna. wAsMmcmN. o c,

mmmwmw E. S. CARMAN.

MOLD .MAKING' MACHINE. 7 v KPPLICATION FILED APR-25,1913. N

,Q0,?5., Patented Mar.21,1917.

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1-; rarnivr o ti EDWIN S. CARIVIAN, F CLEVELAND, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO THE OSBORN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO, A GOR'PURATION OF OHIO.

MOLD-MAKING MACHINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 2'7, 1917.

Application filed April 25, 1913. Serial No. 763,563.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, EDWIN S. CARMAN, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Cleveland, county of Cuyahoga, andState of Ohio, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Mold-Making Machines, of which the following is a specification, the principle of the invention being herein explained and the best mode in which I have contemplated applying that principle, so as to distinguish it from other inventions.

The present invention belongs to that class of mold making machines in which the frame that carries the pattern plate is oscillatory about a substantially central axis, whence the name roll-over given such machines in the trade. The object of the invention is the provision, in combination with a machine of this kind, of combined jarring and pattern drawing means, so that the operations of packing and jolting the sand in the box, inverting such box, lowering the same, and then drawing the pattern, may be easily performed and with a minimum of time and labor. Another object is to provide a machine of the class referred to, which will be readily adjustable to receive pattern-plates of various sizes within a considerable range. lPhe invention, furthermore, comprises im provements in various details, including the combined jolting and drawing mechanism, in the control valve for actuating such mechanism, in the holders for the pattern plate, and in the leveling table which receives the completed mold. To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

The annexed drawings and the following description set forth in detail certain mechanism embodying the invention, such disclosed means constituting, however, but one of the various mechanical forms in which the principle of the invention may be used.

In said annexed drawings Figure l is a plan view of a machine embodying the present improvements; Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of the same; Fig. 3 is an end elevation thereof; Fig. 4: is a central transverse cross-section taken on the plane indicated by the lines 4- 1 in Figs. 1 and 2, respectively; Fig. is a central'longitudinal cross-section of the machine, as indicated by the lines 5 5 in Figs. 1 and 3, respectively; Fig, 6 illustrates in elevation the contacting faces of two complementary elements of a trunnion bearing forming a feature of the invention; Figs. 7 and 8 are sectional views of cylinder-and-piston mechanism forming another feature, the plane of the section being the same as in Fig. 4, but the parts being shown in two different operative positions, respectively; Figs. 9 and 10 are sectional views of said cylinder-andpiston, the plane of the section being the same as in Fig.5, and the positions of the parts corresponding with those shown in Figs. 7 and 8, respectively; Figs. 11 and 12 are sectional views of details of the leveling table, asindicated by lines 11l1 and 1212, Figs. at and 5, respectively; Fig. 13 is a plan view, on a larger scale than in Fig. 1, of a control valve for the cylinder-andpiston mechanism; Fig.14: is a section on the line l414l in Fig. 18, but with the handle disposed in the position marked Jolt; Fig. 14: is a central vertical section through the valve and handle when the latter is in the neutral position; Figs. 15, 16 and 17 are transverse sections of said valve all taken on the same plane, viz., that indicated by the line a e, Fig. 1 1, but showing the parts in different operative positions respectively; Figs. 18, 19 and 20 are similar transverse sections of said valve, with parts correspondingly disposed, taken on the plane indicated by the line Z)b, Fig. 14; and Fig. 21 is a vertical section of a detail taken at right angles to the plane of the section of Fig. 14.

The frame of the machine, which supports the various operative parts, is of general rectangular form, comprising end members or standards 1 connected at their lower ends by a base 2 formed laterally with plates 3, one on each side, extending some distance above the floor line. Said standards are joined at their upper ends'by two bars 1-, likewise disposed one on each side. Located midway between the end members of the frame is a stationary piston 5 on which is reciprocably fitted an inverted cylinder 6, the upper end of which has integrally formed therewith, or rigidly attached thereto, as most convenient, a longitudinally extending cross head 7 The latter is of inverted V-shape in cross-section and forms a sliding support for two brackets 8, which are designed to carry the pattern plate at their upper ends. The movement of the cross head thus carried by the reciprocable cylinder is steadied by means of guide pins 9, one on each end, which are secured at their upper and lower ends in the corresponding end members 1 of .the frame and project upwardly through snugfitting apertures in the ends of'said cross head.

' The two brackets S are designed to be symmetrically disposed at all times with respect to the central transverse plane of the maplates 12, moreover, are fitted, one on each side of the pistonand-cylinder mechanism, so as to substantially inclose the space betweenfsuch' cross-head inits lower position and the side walls 3 of the base. The sand that may drop from above is accordingly not only prevented from accumulating on the cross-head'support, but is diverted to either side, entirely free of the machine frame.

As has been indicated, theupper ends of the two brackets 8 are designed to holdor carry the pattern-plate, as also the mold box, when the latter is attached to such plate,

- as will be the case in the actual operation of the machine while such mold box is being filled and inverted. The pattern-plate carrying means comprise two end bars or strips 18 removably attached to the inner faces of two'disk-like members 14 secured by means of pins 15 to central bores in complementary disk-like members 16, that form the upper ends of said brackets 8. (See Fig. The

pattern plate, shown in dotted outline only in the drawings, is designed to be held between thetwo transverse bars 13, the latter being selected of the proper length to suit the width of said plate, and the brackets 8 themselves being adjusted longitudinally of the supporting cross-head to vary the space between these bars to suit the length of such pattern-plate, as will be readily understood.

As shown in Fig. 6, the disk members 16 are circularly recessed, and the other complementary members 14 are formed with a corresponding circular projection 17 such projection and recess being provided at dia- .metrically opposite points, respectively, with raised faces or lugs 18 and 19 of limited ex tent which are adapted to have closefitting or bearing contact with each other when the two disks are properly disposed about their axes, viz., when the pattern plate is supported in horizontal position either face up or face down.

In such position it will be observed the weight of the pattern plate, as also of the mold box and the contents of the latter which are suspended from such pattern plate, is taken off the trunnion pins to a large extent by these contacting faces of the disks. As soon, however, as the pattern plate is swung to one side a trifle from the position thus described, these faces cease to be in engagement, and the further turning movement occurs with only the friction of the pins in their bearings to be overcome. By virtue of the foregoing arrangement, it will be seen that in the position which the pattern plate will occupy when it is being jarred, the strain or shock of such jarring is taken off the trunnion bearings and sustained by the contacting faces of the disks; whereas for the turning over movement the increased friction, which would be involved, were the bearings between such disks to extend for the full 360 degrees, is eliminated, and the rolling over of the pattern plate and mold box rendered correspondingly easy.

For the purpose of locking the pattern plate in either its normal or inverted position, a locking bolt or pin 20 is provided in one of the brackets 8, such pin tending normally to engage one or the other of two apertures 24: in the adjacent disk member under the influence of a compression spring 21. A handled lever 22 on the end of said pin, however, co-acts with a circular cam face 23, so that by rotating said lever in the one direction, the pin is withdrawn from such engagement, leaving the pattern plate free to be rolled over; whereupon it may be locked in its reversed position by swinging the lever back again to its initial position.

Centrally supported upon the two bars 4,

which connect the upper ends of the end standards 1, is the leveling table 25, the general construction of which is the same as that shown in the pending application of Harry R. Atwater, filed May 19, 1910, Serial No. 562,165. In other words, said table consists of a spider-like frame having four arms, in the ends of which are mounted independently depressible members, consisting specifically of pins 26, which normally project some distance above the frame under the influence of compression springs '27, as shown in Fig. 11. Disposed to coact each with a pair of such pins, are two bars 28 of general U-shape, the bent or curved portions of which lie one on each side of the center of the table so as to be engaged by the corresponding faces of a rotatable disk cam 29, while their ends lie in adjacent position to the aforesaid depressible pins. When the cam 29 is operated, by means of a lever 30 provided for the purpose, to force these bent bars outwardly, their ends frictionally engage the pins with sufiicient force to lock the same in whatever position they may chance to be. The upper ends of the pins are slotted transversely of the longitudinal axis of the machine, and, disposed so as to slidably lie in such slots, are two bars 31, the front ends of which are bent downwardly to form handles 32, while the rear ends are held against dislodgment from the corresponding pins by means of longitudinal recesses 33 formed in the bars through which pass rivets 3a in the slotted ends of the pins.

In the operationof the machine, when the pattern plate, together with the mold box attached thereto, are in the position shown in Figs. 4: and 5, the pattern plate will be lowered until such mold box rests on the table just described. The bars 31 will thus be brought into contact with the bottom board of the mold box, the pins 26 being independently depressed the proper amount to perfectly accommodate the bars to the inequalities in such bottom. When this adjustment has occurred, the lever is actuated to look the pins, and thus the bars, in set position. Thei'eupon the mold box may be released from the pattern plate with the assurance that no distortion of such mold box or its contents will occur, such as might otherwise interfere with the smooth withdrawal of the pattern from the sand in said box.

Turning now to the detailed construction of the piston and cylinder means which have only been incidentally referred to heretofore as the agency whereby the jolting of the mold box and its contents is secured when attached to the pattern plate, and whereby such pattern plate, either alone or with the mold box may be lowered or raised in the drawing operation, especial attention is called to Figs. 4, 7 and 8, and to Figs. 5, 9 and 10, which show in sectional form and in various positions the aforesaid piston and cylinder. It will be noted that the position of parts is the same in Figs. l and 5, 7 and 9, and 8 and 10 of the foregoing series, the difference in such paired figures consisting in the planes of the sections, which are substantially at right angles to each other.

in the normal down position of the cylinder 6, its lower open end rests on the annular base of the piston 5, such base serving as an anvil to produce a jolting effect when said cylinder is allowed to seat suddenly by the exhaust of the air supplied under pressure to its interior above the end of the piston. Such air under pressure is adapted to be thus supplied through an inlet pipe 36 leading from a suitable source and controlled by a suitable valve as will be presently described, while the exhaust occurs through an outlet pipe 87, which is likewise controlled by a suitable valve, in order to produce various operative effects in the cylinder-and-piston mechanism.

The piston is centrally cored out to receive a piston valve 38, the upper end of which is secured in the closed end of the cylinder, so as to'be capable of a limited reciprocable movement relatively thereto, within a cap 39 that closes said cylinder end. This piston valve, incidentally to its movement with the cylinder and to that which it has independently of said cylinder, serves to control the admission and exhaust of the compressed air to produce either a jolting effect, when that is desired, or a straight up-anddown movement of the cylinder, when that is de sired.

The different positions of the valve incidentally to the production these several effects is shown in Figs. 4, 7 and 8 and in Figs. 5, 9 and 10 respectively, as has been previously indicated. In the first of each of the two'series of figures just named, the valve, as well as the cylinder, is shown in its lowermost position in which the exhaust port d0 in the piston is closed, but the air inlet port all. is opened. If, accordingly, air under pressure be supplied through the inlet pipe 86, and the outlet pipe 37 at the same time be open, such air under pressure will enter the annular space left by the reduced section of the" valve at 4-2,

whence it is admitted by way of port as i into a passage i l that extends longitudi nally of the piston to the upper end of the same, and there is effective to raise the cylinder. The valve 38, of course, will be carried along with the cylinder, and the conjoint upward movement of the two continues until the exhaust port d0 has been opened, such exhaust port communicating with the same passage 44, whereby air was previously admitted to the upper-end of the cylinder, the air supply through port l3 being simultaneously shut off. 7 (See Figs. 7 and 9 when the exhaust port is just being uncovered by said valve.)

Following this position of the valve, the upper end of a by-pass 45 is uncovered by the valve, the lower end of such by-pass ing in communication with the space left by the restricted portion 42 of the valve, to which air under pressure is still admitted. The effect-"of such by-passing of the air is to lift the valve relatively to the cylinder, an annular shoulder at on the valve serving as a piston. This movement of the valve is a quick one and serves to raise it to the position shown in Figs. 8 and 10; before such movement is consummated, however, the supthe upward movement of the valve is like wise arrested, and so cylinder and valve descend until the end of the former strikes the base 35.

l The 'port 47 in the valve is closed again betorerthe valve resumes its lowestposition peated, thereby giving rise to a more or less rapid series of jolts or shocks to the cylinder as it repeatedly'strikes the base on its descending movement.

When it is desired to impart to the cylinder and parts sulpported thereby a continuous movement, instead of the jolting one just described, it is merely necessary to shut off the exhaust or outlet pipe or to supply air under pressure thereto at the same time that air is thus supplied to the inlet pipe, proper. The cylinder, in this way, may be raised until the cross-head reaches its upper limiting position on its guides, it being understood that the piston valve in the piston is in the full up position shown in Figs. 8 and 10. Upon relieving the air pressure under the cylinder gradually, the reversal of such cylhinder-movement results, the cross-head gently settling down to its normal position.

It has already been explained that a single valve is utilized to control the operation of the cylinder-and-piston mechanism which fas has just been described. This valve, as will clearly appear from an explanation of Figs. 1, 2 and3, is disposed at one end of the machine at a convenient height to be reached by the operator. The valve is of the plug type, and with the casing 52 of the valve are connected both the air inlet pipe 36 of the aforesaid cylinder-and-piston -me'chanism, and the outlet pipe 37. There is also connected with the valve casing an oil supply pipe 53, whereby proper quantities of oil may from time to time be injected into the cylinder-and-piston mechanism for the purpose of lubricating the latter.

Thevalve proper, or plug 54, is provided with a number of passages adapted to variously connect the openings of such air inlet, air outlet, and oil supply pipes in the casing with each other, or with an air supply connection 55 and a connection 56 opening to atmosphere, which are formed in the casing, the relative positions of said openings being best shown'in Figs. 13 and 14:. The plug of the valve is kept seated by means of a compression spring 59 in the lower end of the casing and may be rotated to occupy any one of three angular positions in the casing by means of a handle 57, a spring-pressed latch 58 serving to retain the handle and can pass to the inlet pipe 36, but on the contrary, the latter is connected by means of the port 68, the vertical passage 60 in the valve, the transverse passage 61, central longitudinal passage 62, and a second transverse passage 63, with a recess or channel 64 in the inner wall of the casing, that communicates with the opening 56 to atmosphere (see Fig. 2.1). As a result, in this position of the valve parts, no air remains under pressure in the cylinder-and-piston mechanism, and the cylinder rests dead in its lower position.

When it is desired to jolt said cylinder, this requiring that the air inlet and outlet pipes be respectively connected with the air supply and with the atmosphere, the handle of the valve is turned in a counter clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 13, thereby positioning the valve plug as shown in Figs. 14, 15 and 18. In such position the air supply pipe is directly connected with the air inlet pipe 36 by means of a transverse port or passage 65in the valve, while the air outlet pipe 37 is similarly directly connected with the atmosphere by another larger passage 66 in said valve.

To position the valve for elevating the pattern plate and attached mold box preparatory to rolling the same over, or for drawing the pattern from the mold, it is necessary, as previously explained, that the exhaust or air outlet connection 37 from the cylinder-and-piston mechanism be closed, while air is simultaneously supplied to such mechanism through the air inlet pipe 36. This is effected by turning the handle in a clockwise direction from the position indicated in Fig. 13, whereby port 67 in the valve is placed in register with said pipe 36, said port being connected through passage 61 and the longitudinal chamber 60 with the central passage 62 in said valve, which latter in turn has communication with the transverse port 65, by a passage 70 (shown only in Fig. 14). In the position of the handle in question, this port 65, as shown in Fig. 17, registers with air supply connection 55, thus admitting air under pressure, through the passages and parts just named to the air inlet pipe 36 of the pistonand-cylinder mechanism. At the Cir same time that the foregoing connection is effected, all communication through the valve between the air outlet pipe and atmosphere is shut off, as shown in Fig. 20.

The supply of air, in the position of the valve part, shown in Fig. 17, is adapted to be regulated by means of a needle valve 72, which is alined with the passage 62 so as to more or less completely shut 0d the passage 61 connecting the same with the chamber 60. The stem of this needle valve extends beyond the smaller end of the valve where oil supply pipe 53. The small quantity of oil which accumulates in such passage, whenever the valve is in this position, is carried along with the air when the valve is turned into the position shown in Figs. 17 and 18 for raising the cylinder and the pattern plate carried thereby.

It will thus be seen that the oil designed to lubricate the cylinder and pistonmechanism is supplied to the latter when the valve of such mechanism as well as the cylinder and piston proper are in their full raised positions, thus insuring the thorough lubrication of all the moving parts in said mechanism.

Having thus described the various cooperative parts of my improved machine and their individual operation, the general mode of using the machine may be briefly set forth. With the parts in position illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the brackets 8 being adjusted and the bars 13 at-the upper ends of said brackets being selected to accommodate the desired pattern plate, a suitable mold box will be attached to such pattern plate and filled with sand which may be preliminarily tamped down, if desired, but which is finally packed about the pattern plate by properly turning the lever of the controlling valve to admit air into the piston and cylinder mechanism so as to cause the cylinder to rise and fall in rapid succession, thereby j citing the mold box and its contents. Such jolting may be repeated if necessary after more sand has been added. When the box is finally full, the bottom board is placed on such box and board and box securely clamped to the pattern plate. The valve lever is now turned in the opposite direction so as to admit a steady supply of air for lifting the cylinder and the parts supported thereby. In this Way the pattern plate and mold box are elevated to a suflicient height to admit such pattern plate to be turned completely over, the locking pin being first withdrawn and then inserted to lock the plate in its new position. Thereupon lowering the cylinder the pattern plate, mold box and bottom board are likewise lowered until the latter rests upon the leveling table, the depressible members on the latter automatically attaching themselves to such bottom are locked, and the mold box thereupon unclamped from the pattern plate. Air is then again admitted to raise the cylinder and thereby withdraw the pattern plate from the mold or sand in the box. As soon as the pattern plate is clear of the mold box, the latter is removed from the machine by pulling on the bars, and then either lifting the box bodily with the hands or attaching thereto a suitable crane or other mechanical lifting device. The pattern plate is now reversed to its normal position ready to receive a fresh mold box, and the operation proceeds as before.

It will be seen from the foregoing that a number of advantageous features are incorporated in the present improved machine. Not only is the machinereadily adjustable to cover a considerable range of work, but by utilizing a single mechanism for both the jolting of the mold box and the drawing of the pattern therefrom, both the mechanism is simplified and the operation much expedited. In fact by simply turning the lever that controls the valve, the whole op eration of themachine is substantially accomplished, save for the attaching of the mold box to the pattern plate, the shoveling in of the sand, and the inverting of the pattern plate and the mold box. The advantages of the several details of construction to which attention has hereinbefore been called need not be further dwelt upon.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards the mechanism herein disclosed, pro vided the means stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention 1. In mechanism of the character de scribed, the combination with a frame; of a 1:;

mechanism adapted to reciprocate cross-head; brackets mounted on and adjustable along said cross-head; and a double screw rotatably held in said cross-head and adapted simultaneously to adjust said brackets in or out.

3. In mechanism of the character described, the combination of a frame; of a cross-head reciprocable in said frame; said cross-head; brackets supported in said crosshead; a pattern-plate carrier oscillatorily mounted on said brackets; and a leveling table located between said cross-head and said carrier.

4; In mechanism of the character described, the combination of a frame; of a cross-head reciprocable in said frame; mechanism adapted to reciprocate said cross-head; brackets mounted on and adjustable along said cross-head; means adapted simultaneously to adjust said brackets in or out; and a pattern-plate carrier oscillatorily mounted on said brackets.

5. In mechanism of the character described, the combination of a frame; of a cross-head reciprocable in said frame; mechanism adapted to reciprocate said cross-head; brackets mounted on and adjustable along said cross-head; means adapted simultaneously to adjust said brackets in or out; a pattern-plate carrier oscillatorily mounted on said brackets; and a leveling table located between said crosshead and said carrier.

6. In mechanism of the class described, the combination-with a frame; a cross-head reciprocable in said frame, said cross-head having its upper face convex in transverse section; mechanism adapted to reciprocate said cross-head; two brackets slidably rest ing on the upper face of said cross-head; and means adapted to move said brackets in or out.

7. In mechanism of the class described, the combination with a frame; a cross-head reciprocable in said frame, said cross-head having its upper face convex in transverse section; mechanism adapted to reciprocate said'cross-head; two brackets slidably resting on the upper face of said cross-head: and means adapted to simultaneously move both brackets: in @or out, said means includ ing a double screw'secured to the under side of said cross-head and having threaded-engagement with said brackets. I

a 8. I11 mechanism of the character described, the combination with a frame and a cross-head vertically reciprocable therein; of spaced brackets mounted on said crosshead; a pattern plate carrier; bearings in said brackets, said pattern plate carrier be ing oscillatorily supported'on said bearings; and auxiliary bearing surfaces on said carrier and brackets, said auxiliary bearings being operative in certain positions only of said carrier.

9. In mechanism of the character described, the combination with a frame and a cross-head vertically reciprocable therein; of spaced brackets mounted on said crosshead; a pattern plate carrier; trunnion bearings in said brackets adapted to oscillatorily support said pattern plate carrier thereon; and additional complementary bearing surfaces formed on said brackets and carrier and adapted to be in operative. contact in certain positions only of said carrier.

10. In mechanism of the character described, the combination with a frame and a cross-head vertically reciprocable therein; of spaced brackets mounted on said crosshead; a pattern plate carrier; trunnion bearings in said brackets adaptedto oscillatorily support said pattern plate carrier thereon; additional bearing surfaces formed on said brackets above and below said trunnion bearings; and means on said carrier adapted to contact such additional bearing surfaces in one position only of said carrier.

11. In mechanism of the class described, the combination with a frame; of a vertically reciprocable carrier; a pattern-plate; and means for pivotally attaching said plate to said carrier, said means comprising two spaced brackets secured to the carrier and movable toward and from each other, two rotatable members secured to the respective brackets on horizontal axes, and two bars removably secured to the respective rotatable members and adapted to hold the pattern-plate.

12. In mechanism of the class described, the combination with a frame; of a vertically reciprocable carrier; a pattern-plate; and means for pivotally attaching said plate to said carrier, said means comprising two spaced brackets secured to the carrier, and movable toward and from each other, said brackets being provided with recessed disks facing each other and the disks having diametrically opposite lugs, two rotatable members secured to the respective disks on horizontal axes with their faces loosely fitting in the recesses of the disks, the members having diametrically opposite lugs adapted to bear face to face with the lugs on the disks when the members are in one rotative position, and two bars, removably secured to the respective rotatable members and adapted to hold the pattern-plate.

Signed by me this 24th day of April,

EDWIN S. CARMAN. Attested by ROBERT M. SEE, ANNA L. GILL.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2686945A (en) * 1953-02-04 1954-08-24 Grinnell Corp Mold making machine with rollover device

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2686945A (en) * 1953-02-04 1954-08-24 Grinnell Corp Mold making machine with rollover device

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