US1215865A - Internal-combustion engine. - Google Patents

Internal-combustion engine. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1215865A
US1215865A US6185615A US1215865A US 1215865 A US1215865 A US 1215865A US 6185615 A US6185615 A US 6185615A US 1215865 A US1215865 A US 1215865A
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Prior art keywords
cylinder
power
ports
compression
pistons
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Philip E Rishel
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Solon E Rose
Julia B Rishel
Philip E Rishel
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/02Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke
    • F02B2075/022Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle
    • F02B2075/025Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle two

Description

P. E. RISHEL, DECD.

1. B. RISHEL. ADMINISTRATRIX.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED ocT.22.1910. RENEWED Nov. 16,1915.

Patented Feb. 13, 1917.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

P. E. RISHEL, DECD.

1. B. RlSHEL. ADMINISTRATRIX.

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED 0CT.22, I910. RENEWED NOV. 16,1915.

Lm5,65. Patented Feb.13,1917.

2 SHEETSSHEET 2 I!/IIIIII cation.

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INTERNAL-commerce Enema.

Specia sation. of Letters JPatent.

Patented Felt. fi gilt ilt.

Application filed October 22, 1910, Serial No; 588,466. Eenewed November 16, 1915. Serial Ito. 81556.;

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, PHILIP E. Rrsnma, a citizen of the United States, residing at Washington, in the District of Golumbia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Internal-Combustion lEngines, of which the followin is a specifi- This invention relates to internal combustion engines, particularly ofthe so-called multiple-piston type, the primary object of the invention being the provision of a simple, compact and eflicient internal combustion engine, which shall bewell balanced and capable of operating if desired at very high speeds. The engine may be either" horizontally. or vertically disposed, and of either the'twoor four-cycle type. It mayeompriseone or more power cylinders as desired." In its preferred embodiment the engine comprises a power cylinder having two'pistons, and a compression cylinder of.

larger diameter than the power cylinder and arranged concentrically therewith, one of the.pistons'having bearing surfaces upon both the power and compressed "cylinders.

Both pistons are operatively connected to opposite throws of a common crank-shaft. The invention will be illustrated and described as applied to a vertical, single-cylinder engine of the two-cycle type.

For a full' understanding of the invention reference is made to the accompanying drawings wherein Fi e 1. is a central verticalsection of one iin of internal combustion engine embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a transverse section onan enlarged scale on the line III][ of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section on, an enlargedscale on line TIL-III of Fig. 1;

Fig.4 is a fragmentary elevationof the inlet ports;

Fig. 5 is a fragmental transverse section through onexof the inlet ports;

and carried by a crank-casing der. The power cylinder 1 has fitted therein with'the usual bearing rings upper and lower pistons 5, 6. The piston 6 is directly connected with the crank-shaft 7' bya connecting rod 8. The upper piston 5 is likewise connected with the crankshaft 7 by means of lateral connecting rods 9-9 at points which are diametrically opposite the point of connection of the rod .8 with reference to the axisof the shaft, the construe t1on being such-that the shaft is rotated-by the movement'of the pistons as they simuh-- tancously approach or recede from each other. The lateral connecting rods 9 are formed integral with the fuel compression cylinder 4;. As illustrated the power and fuel compression cylinders are mounted upon crank-casing is not included in the COIHPI'QS? sion chamber for the incoming gasesand'is preferablyopen to the atmosphere as indicated for example at 1212.

The upper piston 5 is hollow or recessed and opens outwardlyinto me full compression c amber 13, whereof the recessed body of the piston forms a portion. The inlet ports 14 are disposed around the walls of'the power cylinder in alinement with a corresponding number of by ass recesses 15 formed in the cylinder wal s. A like number of radial ports 16 in the walls of the piston 5 near its inner end, are adapted to 11. The

. preferably, but not necessarily, incased in housings 10 which maybe castorotherwise.

register with the by-pass recesses 15 .as the piston 5 approaches its uppermost or outermost position.

tial to the walls ofthis Cylinder. These in;

let ports are preferably contracted and curved laterally at their inner endsas shown in detail in Figs. 4 and 5. The effect of this form and disposal of the inlet ports is" to impart a whirling motion to the body of enterlng gas, whereby such body tends to retain its integrity and to expel theburned gases without appreciably commingling with them.

would tend to break on disturb the'rotating column, and to afford opportunity for the The exhaust ports-17 comprise a'plurality of apertures in the walls of the cylinder 1 in position to be uncovered by the piston 6' as it approaches its innermost position. These exhaust ports are preferably of larger size than the inlet ports and arearranged to aifordfree. exit for the burned gases from the periphery of the power cylinder, a preferred arrangement of the ports being .as shown in Fig. 3. -The inner facesof both-pistons are preferably slightly coned-as shown, this construction not only aiding in maintaining the whirling motion to the incomin more complete elivery of the burned gases. These eifects are attributable to the action-of the coned cylinders in centralizingthe axis of the rotating body of gas, or in'preventing the lateral displacement of this axis which pocketing of unburned gases.

The upper piston 5- s prov ded near its outer end with a deep annular shoulder or flange 18, to the lower face'of which the lateral connecting rods 9, 9 are attached as indicated at 19. The outer periphery of the shoulder '18 carries piston rings 20 making a gas-tight joint with the inner wall of the compression cylinder' l.

, A. preferred form of intake valve, mount ed upon'the' compression chamber, is illus trated in detail in Figs. 67. In said figures 21 represents the valve, mounted to slide upon a threaded stem 22 engaging the wall of the-valve-casing 23. A helical spring 24 is carried'by the valve-stem and serves to keep the valve normally, closed, the compression of the spring being'adjustable by rotating the stem 22. .A conduit 25 for liquid fuel is mounted upon the valve-casing, and communicates with the valve-seat at a plurality of points around its periphery by means of chan nels 26 in the casing wall. The conduit25 carries a closely fittingplu'nger 27, which is movable longitudinally to uncover successive ports 26 as the conditions of operation may require.- 28

rts 14 are inclined'to-radii of v gases, but resulting in a r indicates -a spring-retaining for 'the plunger 27, and 29 a series of notches correspondm in position to-the several operabe readily understood. As the pistons'mutually recede and reach the position illustrated in Fig. 1 the exhaust and'inlet ports are uncovered, the former,- preferably slightly in advance-of the latter. The combustible mixture which has been compressed in thechamber 13 and the recessed p ston 5,

is admitted through the inlet ports 14 to, the

power. cylinder, the whirling motion imparted to the incoming gas by the form and arrangement of the ports servingto scavenge .the cylinder thoroughly and with but little loss of imburned gases. On'the return or mutually approaching stroke of the pistons the gases are compressed in the power cylinder and are ignited when the proper degree of compression is attained.

As the outer piston moves inwardlythe intake valve 21 is withdrawn from its seat by the suction, thereby permitting the liquid fuel to flow through pne.or more of the channels 26, in accordance withthe position of'the plunger 27. The gasolene'or other liquid fuel flowing upon the seat of the valve is vaporized by the'*inflowing air -current, The resulting fuel mixture passes dl', rectly to the compression chamber 13 and to the interior of'the piston 5 forming a part of this chamber, and is thereby highly heated and very thoroughly gasified. These gases flow directly. through the short bypasses '15 'to the explosion chamber when the proper phase of the cycle is reached, and enter this chamber at a comparatively high temperature. I

The arrangement of the fuel-compression chamber 13, in communication with and including the recessed power piston 5,presents'several important advantages. Firstly, the fuel is delivered directly to a ,heated compression chamber, and is thereby so uickly and thoroughly gasified as'to result in important economies of operation; secondly, the incoming gaseous mixture serves to cool the pistonto the extent that it absorbsheattherefrom, and thus aids in maintaimng the properjworking. temperature at very high engine speeds; and thirdly, the

construction aifords a direct and short pa'ssage from thecompression chamber to'the power cylinder, to, which the compressed gases are-delivered at a high temperature. The engine may of course be provided with any suitable carbureting or vaporizing device instead of that above described, or

may be operated with gaseous fuel. Howlamest balance as between the oppositely movingmasses, whereby the-pistons may attain high speeds and with but little vibration. A fly- I wheel may be usedor not as desired. The.

opposite movement of the pistons secures the efiect o'fvery high piston speeds, and the ar-.

rang'ement of the ports is such as to render possible an almost instantaneous. dischar e of the burned gases, and a corresponding y rapidinfiow of the fresh. mixture. Under these conditions the engine is economical of fuel, efiicient, is not subject to overheating, and is capable of developing a high degree of power in proportion to the weight of metal employed. The .engine is readily adapted to the four-cycle mode of operation, and may be constructed of such units and with such number of cylinders as may be desired. I

I claim: I

1.. In an internal combustion en e, a power cylinderhaving tangentially ec inlet ports and having two power pistons, a

closed compression cylinder for fuel gas coaxial and communicating with said power cylinder and of larger diameter, means for admitting a combustible mixture to the-com pression cylinder, one of. said power pistons having bearing surfaces upon both of said cylinders, a crank-shaft, a. central connecting rodoperatively connected with one of said pistons, and lateral connecting rods operatively connected with the other of said pistons.

2. In an internal combustion engine, a power cylinder having tangentially directed inlet ports and exhaust ports near opposite ends thereof, .a crank-shaft, a power piston in said cylinder operatively connected with said crank-shaft, a closed compression cylin-' der for fuel gas larger than and communieating with said power cylinder and coaxial therewith, means for admitting a combustible mixture to the compression cylinder, asecond power piston havin bearing surfaces upon both of said cyl ers, and operative connections between said second cylinder'andsaid crank-shaft. v i

3. In an internal combustion engine a power cylinder, a closed compression cy inder co-axial with said power cylinder and of larger diameter, means for admitting a combustible mixture to the compression cylinder, a crank-shaft,-two power pistons in said power cylinder operatively connected with said crank-shaft, one of said power pistons having a bearing surface in said compression cylinder, inlet ports communi;

cating with said. compression cylindenand disposed near one end of the power cylinder and inclined to radii of the cylinder,

and exhaust ports near the opposite end or said power cylinder.

In an internal combustion en e, a power cylinder having a plurality of inlet and exhaust-ports near opposite ends therea of, said inlet ports disposed at an angle to radii of the cylinder, a closed compression cylinder having ports at its lower end and co-axial with said power cylinder and of larger diameter, means for admitting a combustible mixture to the compression cylinder, two power pistons in said power cylinder, one of said pistons havin a bearing surface on the compression cy der, and conduits extending between said compression cylinder ports and said inlet ports.

5. In an internal combustion engine, a

power cylinder provided with tangentially directed inlet ports and having twopistons,

a closed compression cylinder for fuel gas co-axial with said power cylinder and of larger diameter, means for admitting a combustible mixture to the compression cylinder, means for transferring the u. m when compressed from the compression cylinder to the inlet ports of the power cylinder, one of said power pistons having an annular flange providing a bearing surface in said compression cylinder, a crank shaft,

a central connecting rod operatively connected with one of said pistons, and lateral connecting rods secured to theflange of the I other pi'ston.

6. In an internal combustion ene," a power cylinder having two power pistons, a closed compression cylinder, means for admitting a combustiblemixture thereto, one of said pistons being hollow and having bearing surfacesupon 'both of said cylinders, said hollow piston having one end open and in communication with said compression cylinder j and its other end closed and provided with ports, inlet ports in the power cylinder, conduits arranged to connect the ports in the hollow piston and the ports in the power cylinder when the piston is at the end of its working stroke, a crankshaft, a central connectin connected with-one of sad pistons, and lateral connecting rods operatively connected with the other of saidpistons.

7. In an internal combustion so, a ower cylinder having an open-ended holow' piston, a closed compression cylinder coaxial with said power cylinder, said piston having bearing surfaces upon both said 0 linders, means for admitting a combusti le mixture into said compression cylinder, ports near the. closed end of said hollow piston, and means coiiperating with said rod operatively opening into such cylinder through ports inclined to the radii ofthe cylinder.

8. In an internal combustion engine, a

power cylinder having a piston with a coned inner face and inlet ports disposed near one end of said cylinder so as to be opened at the 'end ofthe working-stroke, saidv inlet ports being. inclined to radii ofthe'cyl-' inder.

9. In an internal combustion engine, a power cylinder having a plurali of inlet and exhaust ports at opposite en thereof 15 said inlet ports disposed at an angle to radii of the cylinder and two power plstons havin coned inner faces.

testimony whereof, I aflix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

PHILIP E. RISFEL.

Witnesses:

G. P. Townsmm, E. DANIELS.

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2925073A (en) * 1956-12-17 1960-02-16 Ford Motor Co Free piston engine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2925073A (en) * 1956-12-17 1960-02-16 Ford Motor Co Free piston engine

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