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Sectional mold for concrete walls, floors, ceilings, &c.

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US1204177A
US1204177A US1911665425A US1204177A US 1204177 A US1204177 A US 1204177A US 1911665425 A US1911665425 A US 1911665425A US 1204177 A US1204177 A US 1204177A
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mold
plates
sections
wall
corner
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Milton Dana Morrill
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Read & Morrill Inc
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Read & Morrill Inc
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G11/00Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs
    • E04G11/02Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs for rooms as a whole by which walls and floors are cast simultaneously, whole storeys, or whole buildings

Description

M. D. MORRILL. SEC TIONAL MOLD FOR CONCRETE WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, m.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. I3. 1911. 1,26%,1 7'7. Patented Nov. 7, 1916.

4 SHEETS-SHEET I.

I awvewbo c 33 HIM T" FY M. D. MORRILL.

SECTIONAL MOLD FOR CONCRETE WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, 6w.

APPLICATION FILED DEC. I3. 19H.

Patented Nov. 7, 1916.

4 SHEETSSHEET 2.

m j fiww Wows; Wm y? m 3- W M. D. MORRILL. 'SECTIONAL MOLD FOR CONCRETE WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, Sec.

APPLICATION man DEC. 13'. 191:.

Patented Nov. 7, 1916.

4 SHEETSSHEET 3.

A /o 2 6 \w 5] me M206 W M. D. MORRILL.

SECTIONAL MOLD FOR CONCRETE WALLS, FLOORS, CEILING'S, 8m. APPLICATION FILED mac, I3. IQII.

1 ,20%,1 7'? Patented Nov. 7, 19m.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 4'.

moans.

"' *rn TATES PATENT @FFICE.

MILTON DANA MORRILL, OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, sASsIG-NOR TO READ & MORRILL, INC.. A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

SECTIONAL MOLD FOR CONCRETE WALLS, FLOORS, CEILINGS, &g.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, MiL'roN DANA MOR- RILL, a citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of Washington, District of Columbia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Sectional Molds for Concrete Walls, Floors, Ceilings, &c., of which the following is a specification. This invention relates to sectional molds such as are employed in the construction of monolithic concrete buildings, Walls, partitions, floors, ceilings, etc.

The mold embodying the invention consists in the main of Wall-sections of similar design, adapted to be assembled edge-toedge, bothqvertically and horizontally, in two parallel mold-walls, the space between such mold walls being the mold-space in which the concrete or other plastic material is to be placed to form the wall; such sec; tions, which are customarily of rectangular form, being cut away atthe corners somewhat so that at each meeting point of four plates there is an aperture through which a transverse tie-bar-may be passed. In order'that the said transverse tie-bars may be thrust through such apertures of the inner and outer. mold walls, it is of course necessary thatcorresponding apertures of such walls shall register; wherefore it follows that corresponding mold-sections of the inner and outer walls must be substantially opposite one another. As such molds have been constructed in the past, this has introduced a certain complication in providing for mold corners; for if the corners of the mold be formed by mold sections adapted, like the other mold sections, to

abut at their vertical edges against vertical edges of adjacent mold-sections, there must be special corner sections for each different thickness of wall, otherwise, registry 'of the said apertures of the mold walls can not be assured. -Furthermore, such molds as heretofore constructed, have not provided any convenient means for adjusting the mold for odd lengths, 2'. 0., lengths other than those produced by setting up standard plates edge-to-edge.

According to the present invention, moldsections are employed, at the corners of the mold, which permit adjustment of the mold for various thicknesses of wall, and for various odd lengths of wall, while pre- Specification of Letters Patent.

- fractions of the unit of measurement.

Patented Nov. "Z, 1916.

Application filed December 13, 1911. Serial No. 665,425.

serving registry of the apertures in the mold walls through which the said transverse tle-bars are to be passed.

According to the present invention the corners of the outer mold-wall are formed by abutting edges of mold-sections on one side of the corner against the faces of the mold sections on the other side of the cor-v ner, the latter of which mold-sections, which for the present purposes may be termed adjusting-sections, differ from the ordinary mold-sections in having certain rows of fastening means (usually apertures) permitting other sections to be secured to them at various points; and these ad ustlng-sectlons are permitted to project beyond the corner by a greater or less distance, according to circumstances. Through appropriate apertures of these adjustingsectlons, and of the sections abutted against them, suitable fastening means are placed, thereby securing the; sections together at the corners.

Walls usually differ in length and thickness by definite units of measurement; for erample, inches; and it is ordinarily sufliclent to so construct the mold sections that walls of different multiples of such unit of measurement may be molded. In other words, it is not necessary, ordinarily, to provide for the molding of walls the thickness of Which must be expressed in partA in ccordingly, it is required only that the adustmg-sections referred to shall be provided with fastening means (fastening apertures, for instance,) so located and spaced apart that other mold sections may be abutted against their faces at various points distant from one another by dis tances equal to the unit of measurement employed (inches for example) or a multiple thereof. As it may be considered that holes spaced only one inch apart between centers across the face of these adjusting sections,- are undesirably close together, these holes are commonly spaced apart, between centers, a distance equal to some multiple of such unit of measurement. That is to say, if the inch be the unit of measurement, these holesare commonly spaced two inches apart, between centers, and each such adjusting-section is provided with a plurality of corresponding rows of such holes or fastening means, spaced equi-distant from the upper and lower edges of the mold section, but spaced unequally from the two vertical edges of such mold section; that is to say, at one side of the plate the end apertures are spaced from that edge of the plate by a distance equal to the unit of measurement employed (less a very slight allowance for clearance between adjacent plates) and at the other side of the plate the end apertures are spaced from that edge of the plate by a distance equal to twice the unit of measurement employed, (less a. very slight allowance for clearance between adjacent plates). The adjusting plates, provided with rows of fastening means so spaced, when set up on one edge provide for the molding of walls differing in length by even multiples of the unit of measurement; andlwherkset up on the opposite edge, provide for molding of walls differing in length by odd multiples of the unit of measurement.

The corners of the inner mold-wall are" formed by means of corner-sections adapted to overlap more or less, according to circumstances, adjacent mold-sections, Such adjacent mold-sections being adjusting sections such as above referred to; the cornersections of the inner mold being provided with apertures or fastening means suitably spaced to register with apertures or fastening means of the mold-sections which they overlap, whereby these corner-sections of the inner mold-wall may be secured to the mold-sections which they overlap. These corner-sections of the inner mold-wall' are further provided at their top and bottom edges, with slots, suitably spaced apart, to receive the tIiLIlSVGI'SQ-tiG-bilIS before mentioned. These corner-sections of the inner mold-wall are further provided, on the inner sides of their corners, with reinforcing angle-bars projecting upward beyond the 'upper edges of such corner-sections, which angle-bars are provided with fastening means (apertures for example) adapted to register with corresponding fastening means or apertures of other corner-sections placed above the corner-sections to which such angle-bars aresecured; whereby the inner-wallcornersections of one tier may be locked to corresponding sections of the tier next above; and so on. Similar inner-wall corner-sections are employed where partition-molds departfrom the main wall-mold, and where .fioor inelds and ceiling-molds depart from themaln wall-mold.

The mold-sections employed (except the corner-sections of the inner mold-wall) are,

commonly, metal plates provided along both their horizontal and their vertical edges with flanges. The transverse tie-bars are provided with suitable apertures through which wedge-keys may be driven close up against the top andbottom flanges of such plates,

to secure together the plates of adjacent tiers. The vertical flanges of these plates are commonly provided with registering apertures whereby plates of the same tier may be secured together; the fastening means employed being, commonly, headed U-shaped staples which may be passed through said apertures, and wedge-keys adapted to be driven through the projecting portions of such staples. Commonly, one such staple is I suflicient to secure together two adjacent plates. To facilitate raising the plates, after the concrete has set, hinge-bars are provided connecting the said staples of one tier of plates with the corresponding staples of the tier next above.

When it is desired to fasten adjacn'fl plates together at more than one point, other staples are employed, passing through other registering apertures of the flanges of said plates, and wedges are driven through the projecting portions of such other staples, but

1n such case such other staples are not pro vided with hinge bars. 1

For spacing apart the inner and outer mold-walls tubular thimbles of suitable length, fitting over the transverse tie-bars, are commonly employed.

The drawings which accompany and form a part of this specification, illustrate mold structures built up as above described, also details of the parts employed in such struc-- tures. I

In said drawings: Figure 1 shows a plan view of a portion of a wall-mold built up of sections as previously described, the. view including two mold-corners and the portion of a partition-mold adjacent to the main wall-mold. Fig. 2 shows a central vertical section on the line w-w of Fig. 1; being therefore, a vertical section of the inner mold-wall only. Figs. 3 and 4 are details of one form of hinge-bracket-carrying staple and associated parts, Fig. 3 showing a top view of the staple applied to a mold plate, and Fig. 4 showing a side view thereof and showing the wedge, which coacts with such staple, in place, Fig. 5 is a detail side view of one of the transverse tie-rods. Fig: 6 shows a transverse section on the line 3/ of Fig. 1, and looking in the direction indicated by arrows in that figure. Fig. 7 is a detail view showing two mold-plates and the hinge-bar connecting same, said view illustrating how the plates. are swung upward. Fig. 8 is a detail perspective view of one form of fastening staple employed and Fig. 9 is a detail view showing one of the fastening wedges employed. Fig. 10

is a perspective elevation of one of the adjusting-plates 1 employed in various portions of the mold. Fig. 11 is a perspective elevation of one of the inside corner-plates of the mold. Fig. 12 is a perspective elevation of one of the hinge-rod staples and brackets, and a portion of one of the hinge rods. Fig. 13 is a perspective elevation of a.

- 17 is a plan view of mold-plates arranged to form a bay occurring in a mid-portion of a wall. Fig. 18 is a view illustrating an alternative arrangement of fastening apertures in an adjusting plate. Fig. 19 illustrates the use of mold-sections to form approximately circular structure, such for example as silo-towers. Fig. 20 is a perspective section of a portion of a mold plate, illustrating that the fastening apertures of such plate need not be completely punched through in the first instance.- Fig. 21 shows a plan View of a column-mold comprising a series of plates such as herein described.

In the drawings, numerals 1 designate the ordinary mold-sections before referred to, whlch sections, as shown, are metal plates flanged backward at the side and top and bottom edges, the flanges and the plates themselves being cut away at the corners so that, at the meeting point of four such plates, there is an aperture for the passage partly set, the second tier of mold plates is of transverse tie-bars 2. These mold plates 1 are set up edge-to-edge, horizontally, and

also vertically, to form an outer mold-wall a 3 and an inner mold-wall 4, the space between these inner and outer walls being the space into which the concrete is placed. Numerals 5 designate the spacing cores spacingthese inner and outer mold-walls apart, said cores being mounted upon the transverse tie-bars 2, which tie-bars pass through the apertures 6 at the meeting cor-- ners of the mold plates; and 7'designate the taper keys or wedges, driven through apertures in the tie-bars 2, whereby the plates 1 are pressed against the ends of the cores or spacing-thimbles 5. In practice these spacing cores or thimbles are commonly pieces of metal pipe or pieces of sheet metal wound in cylindrical form of suitable length; their length varying according to the intended breadth of the mold. Two tiers of these mold plates are commonly erected one upon another, the first tier being erected, the mold-space so formed then filled with concrete, and after such concrete has set up, and the mold space so formed is in turn filled with concrete, and then when Fig. 16-is a this latter concrete has partially set, the

mold plates of the lower tier are moved up into position above the mold plates of the second tier, so forming a third mold-space, which in turn is filled with concrete; and so on.

8 designates the vertical hinge-rods connecting corresponding plates of the two tiers, which hinge-rods materially facilitate the shifting of the mold plates upward, permitting said mold plates to be swung up instead of being lifted up bodily, and pernection with the tie-bars, to tie the two mold.

walls together, also serve to secure together corresponding mold plates of the two tiers.

The ordinary mold plates 1 are, customarily, of the same design and dimensions, and therefore are interchangeable. These plates are commonly made about two feet wide and about two feet high, but may of course be made of other dimensions. It is convenient, however, to have some mold plates of fractional width, for example, half of the ordinary width; and at 1", in Fig. 1, one such half plate is shown.

1, in Fig. 1, designates one of the special adjusting-plates, for use in forming outside corners in one of the mold-walls: these plates 1 being in all respects similar to the ordinary plates 1 except that they are provided with two rows of fastening means (apertures, in the construction shown) 9,

extending across the plate parallel to and equidistant from the top and bottom edges of the plate, respectively; the extreme holes 9 near one vertical edge of the plate, being spaced from such edge by one half the distance of spacing of said holes between centers, (less a very small allowance for clearance between adjacent plates), the extreme holes 9! near the opposite edge of the plate being spaced from such edge by a distance equal to the distance of spacing of the holes between centers (less a very small allowance for clearance between adjacent plates). The holes 9 are spaced apart between centers by a distance which is twice the unit of measurement (the inch for example) by which, or by a multiple of which, the length of different walls may differ. In

setting up plates for .an outer corner of the length of the wall to be molded. Owing to the fact that the plates 1 have a number of holes 9, the plate so abutted against a' plate 1 may be located, with reference to such plateso as to provide for any length of wall which is a multiple of the unit of measurement employed. Thevertical flanges of the plates 1 have in them fastening-holes 10 (see Fig. 10), which register with the rows of holes 9, when the plates are so abutted. If the holes 10 of one of the plates 1 so abutted come opposite spaces between holes 9 of the plate 1*, said plate 1 is inverted, as a result of whichthe holes 9 of that plate 1= will be caused to register with the holes 10 in'the flange of theplate abutted against said plate 1. The plates 1 and 1 when so abutted, are secured together by suitable means, a convenient means fob the purpose being U-shaped headed loops or staples 11, Fig. 13, adapted to pass. through the registering holes 9 and 10, and wedges 12, similar to wedges 7, driven through the projecting portions of the staples. 1

For forming inner corners in the mold walls, special comer-plates 13 are employed, which plates are without flanges, either on their'vertical or on their horizontal edges, and therefore may overlap the adjacent wall plates more or less, as required to produce a mold-space of the desired breadth within the dimensions fixed for the wall. The wall plates which are overla ped by these corner plates 13 are plates si iilar in all respects to the outside corner plates 1 and are provided with rows of holes 9, and these corner plates 13 are provided with holes 14 so located as to registerwith eertain of the holes of the plates overlapped by said corner plates; and when these corner plates have been set up, they .are locked to the wall plates which they overlap by suitable means, such for example as the staples and wedges previously described.

In order to stiffen the corner plates 13 and also in order to permit securing together of corner plates of the different tiers,

7 each such corner plate is provided on the inside of its corner, with an angle-bar .15 projecting above the cornerplate, and provided at suitable points with apertures 16, adapted to register with other apertures 17 provided in the corner plates, whereby the angle bar of one corner plate may be locked to a corner plate next above by means of staples and wedges such as previously described. The corner plates 13 are further provided, at their top and bottom edges, with slots 18 adapted to receive tie-bars 2;

itbeing desirable to have the inner and outer mold-walls tied together transversely as close to the corners as practicable. To further tie and brace the mold walls, at the corners, other rods 19 are passed through apertures 20 of the corner-plates 13 and through registering apertures 9 of the plates at the corner of the outer mold-wall, spacing thimbles being placed over these rods 19 also.

Where partition-molds depart from the main-wall mold, corner plates 13 are employed in the same manner as at inside corners of the main wall-mold. At 21 in Fig. 1 one such partition mold is shown. As illustrated in Fig. 15, the same inside cor-' ner-plates 13 are employed where a floormold, or ceiling-mold, departs from the main wall-mold, the only diflerence being that in such case the corner-plates 13 are set horizontally instead of vertically.

When the concrete of the wall, partitions, floors, ceiling, etc., has set sufliciently, and. the mold plates have been removed, the tie bars 2 are pulled out, and the ends of the spacing thimbles 5 are covered over with concrete or cement; or, if desired, the said spacin thimbles are themselves withdrawn from t e mold, and the holes in the wall thereby left are filled with concrete or cement.

As shown particularly in Fig. 5, the transverse tie-bars 2 are provided with a plurality of perforations 22 for the reception of the wedge-keys 7, these holes being spaced apart between centers near one end of the bar, by a distance equal to unit of measurement by which the thickness of walls maydiffer, and being spaced apart, near the other end of the bar, by twice such unit; such arrangement of holes permitting proper location of the wedges 7 for every thickness of wall which is a multiple of such unit of measurement. Preferably, these tie-bars 2 are of such length that they extend considerably beyond the mold walls, so that they constitute convenient scaffold-supports, upon which planks 23 may be laid, as shown in Fig. 15, to form scaffolding. Upon this scaffolding so formed, the workmen commonly stand when raising the plates from one tier to another, and when fastening plates in place, and also when filling the mold.

It is desirable, for various reasons, that the staples 11, employed as fastening means, shall be of such construction that when thrust through the flange holes of the plates they may stay in place, independent of the wedges. Therefore, as illustrated particularly in Figs. 13 and 14, these staples are provided with an oflset 24, on at least one side, and as shown in Fig. 14, the flange-holes 10 on one side of each plate 1 are large enough to receive this oflfset 24, while the flange the staple abuts against the flange of the plate, whereupon the sides of the staple will spring apart, or may be forced apart by a suitable tool, to retain the staple in said hole 10. -When the plate 1 provided with such staple is placed against a flange of a corresponding plate 1, the staple projecting be yond the flange of the first plate will pass through the larger holes 10 of the second plate freely; and the wedge 12 is then driven through the projecting portion of the staple, so fastening the two plates together. By this construction of staple, the use of a large number of loose parts is avoided, the staples, when in place in the holes 10*, being practically parts of the plate. Nevertheless these staples may be removed when desired, as for example, when the plates are to be packed together closely for shipment. In the case of the adjusting plates 1*, however, it is not practicable to provide such plates with flange holes 'on one side which are larger than the flange holes on the other side, since these plates 1 must at times be inverted. In the case of the plates 1 therefore the flange holes are all of the size 10; and therefore, for securing these plates 1 in place, and also in certain other parts of the mold, it is convenient to employ staples 11 such as shown in Fig. 8, which have no offset 24.

At obliques or bevel corners, such for ex-Q ample as corners occurring where bay WlIL- dows begin at a wall-corner, much the same construction is employed as illustrated in Fig. 1 at the corners, except that, for forming the outer mold-wall corner, the sections which in Fig. 1 are abutted edge to face at right angles, are in Fig. 16 abutted as nearly as possible edge to face, but at'the appropriate angle. If, as will frequently happen, with plates abutted at such angle, fastening staples such as previously described cannot be used, the abutted plates are wired together. For the inner mold wall, corner sections 13 of appropriate angle, but otherwlse similar in construction to the corner plates 13 shown in Figs. 1 and 11, are employed. 1 WVhen a bay occurs at a mid-point in a wall, the mold sections may be set up as shown in Fig. 17.

Since it will frequently happen, particularly when setting upthe molds for bay windows and the like, that plates of standard dimensions do not quite meet the requirements, in such cases special spacing pieces 26 formed of wood or other suitable material may be inserted between the flanges of regular mold-sections 1, the sections between which such spacing piece 2Q is placed being suitably connected, as by wires.

Mold plates such as previously described, may also be used in molds for forming c rcular structures, such as silo towers. Fig. 19 illustrates a portion of such a mold, the .outer wall of the mold consisting of sections that the locking apertures of the moldplates be punched completely through; but to the contrary, the holes may be so punched that a tongue 28 of metal is left, which substantially closes the aperture until driven back, as indicated at the right of Fig. 20.

It will be obvious that the principle of spacing holes in the adjusting plates, illustrated in Fig. 10, may be extended when, for any reason, it is desired that the spacing of the fasteningholes be greater than twice the unit of measurement by which length or thickness of walls may differ. In Fig. 18 I have illustrated a plate wherein the fastening holes are spaced apart between centers by a distance equal to four times such. unit of measurement.

For supporting the mold plates used when forming floors, ceilings, etc., I commonly employT-bars 29 zontally beneath the mold plates, and sup ported by longitudinal and vertical timbers 30; such T-bars forming a sort of grid into which the mold plates may be dropped.

Sections 1 such as hereinbefore described, may also be used in setting up molds for pillars, columns and the like. Fig. 21 illustrates such a column-mold, comprising four plates 1*.

What I claim is a 1. A mold-section for molds, for concrete walls and the like, having two rows of means whereby another section may be secured to the face of said first section, the said two rows of fastening means being equi-distant from two opposite edges of said section, cor- H:

responding ends of said rows being less distant from one edge of the section than are the other ends of said rows from ,the op- I posite edge of the section; whereby'by inverting the section such fastening means are caused to occupy positions intermediate the positions of such fastening means before inversion of the section.

2. A mold-section for molds for concrete walls and the like, consisting of a substantially rectangular wall-member having two rows of means whereby another section may be secured to the face of said first section, the said two rows of fastening means arranged parallel to and equi-distant from two opposite edges of said section, corresponding ends of said rows being distant from the proximate edge of said section by approximately half the distance of the other ends of said rows from the opposite edge of the section; whereby by inverting the section Fig. 15) arranged horisuch fastening means are caused to occupy positions intermediate the positions of such like, the combination of outer and inner mold walls each formed of sections arranged edge to edge, said mold walls spaced apart one from another, one of said mold walls having at the meeting corners of a plurality of its mold plates, an opening for the passage of a transverse tie bar, the other mold wall formed in part of mold plates having in their edges a plurality of suitably spaced slots adapted to receive such tie bars, such slotted plates overlapping more or less the adjacent wall plates and provided with means for securing such overlapping plates together; whereby the length of one of said mold walls may be adjusted with respect to the other mold wall, and whereby tie bars may be passed from the tie bar openings at meeting corners of the plates of one wall, directly across either into similar tie bar openings, or into slots, as the case may be, of the other mold wall.

4. In a mold for concrete walls and the like, the combination of outer and inner mold .Walls .eachformed of sections arranged edge said mold walls spaced apart from the outer mold wall having a corner formed by abutting edges of plates on one side of the corner against the faces of plates on the other side of the corner, certain of the plates so abutting provided with means whereby the point of abutment may be adjusted, said outer mold wall having also at the meeting corners of its mold plates, openings for the passage of transverse tie bars, the inner mold wall formed in part of mold plates having in their edges a plurality of suitably spaced slots adapted to receive such tie bars, such slotted plates overlapping more or less the adjacent wall plates and provided with means for securing such overlapping plates together, other of the mold plates of the inner wall formed to proto edge, one another,

' vide openings, for the passage of transverse tie bars, at the meeting corners of such plate; whereby by varying the overlap of the slotted plates with reference to the adjacent plates, the length of the inner mold wall may be adjusted to bring the tie bar openings at the meeting corners of the plates of the inner mold walls, opposite the corre- I sponding openings of the outer mold wall.

5. A mold for concrete walls and the like comprising a mold wall formed of a plurality of similar ordinary wall sections flanged on one face and of corner sections and adjusting sections, the latter likewise flanged on one face, said adjusting sections located at the ends of tiers'of ordinary wall sections and located in the planes of adjacent ordinary wall sections, and overlapped at the back more or less according to conditions by said corner sections, said adjusting sections and corner sections provided with coacting means whereby the corner sections may project more or less beyond the adjacent adjusting sections as conditions may require, said sections secured together.

6. A mold for concrete walls and the like comprising a mold wall formed of a plurality of similar ordinary wall sectionsflanged on one face and of corner sections and ad justing sections, the latter likewise flanged on one face, said adjusting sections located at the ends of tiers of ordinary wall sections and located in the planes of adjacent ordinary wall sections, and overlapped at the back more or less according to conditions by said corner sections, said adjusting sections and corner sections provided with coacting means whereby the corner sections may proj ect more or less beyond the adjacent adj usting sections as conditions may require, and means securing said sections together, the securing means for the corner-sections and adjusting sections comprising means passed through registering apertures in the overlapping portions of said corner and adjusting sections.

7. A mold for concrete walls and the like, comprising a plurality of backwardlyflanged mold-wall sections adapted to be placed edge to edge and having in their proximate flanges registering fastening-apertures, one of each two such registering apertures being larger than the other, and fastening means for such sections comprising a headed staple passin through such registering apertures and a ey passing through the projecting loop portion of such staple, such staple provided on one side with an off-set adapted to prevent backward passage of the staple through the smaller of said registering apertures without pressing the sides of the staple together.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

MILTON DANA MORRILL.

Witnesses: v

H. M. MARBLE,

D. A. DAvms.

US1204177A 1911-12-13 1911-12-13 Sectional mold for concrete walls, floors, ceilings, &c. Expired - Lifetime US1204177A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2862277A (en) * 1955-06-14 1958-12-02 Superior Concrete Accessories Concrete wall form with preformed filler panels
US5355602A (en) * 1990-01-23 1994-10-18 Nsm Aktiengesellschaft Display device

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2862277A (en) * 1955-06-14 1958-12-02 Superior Concrete Accessories Concrete wall form with preformed filler panels
US5355602A (en) * 1990-01-23 1994-10-18 Nsm Aktiengesellschaft Display device

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