US1197575A - Automatic musical instrument. - Google Patents

Automatic musical instrument. Download PDF

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US1197575A
US1197575A US6039315A US6039315A US1197575A US 1197575 A US1197575 A US 1197575A US 6039315 A US6039315 A US 6039315A US 6039315 A US6039315 A US 6039315A US 1197575 A US1197575 A US 1197575A
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tone
ducts
operating
emitting
connections
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US6039315A
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Heinrich Bockisch
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M Welte & Sons
Welte & Sons M
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Welte & Sons M
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS, HARMONIUMS OR SIMILAR WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ASSOCIATED BLOWING APPARATUS
    • G10B3/00Details or accessories
    • G10B3/08Pipes, e.g. open pipes, reed pipes

Description

H. BOCKISCH.
AUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. APPLICATION FILED NOV. 8. $915.
4 SHEETS-SHEET I.
' 1 ,1 97,575. Y Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
HYLQboco f 39x z 1/ I @H'oznu H. BQCKISCH. AUTOMATIC MUSICAL msmumzm.
APPLICATION FILED NOV- 8' 1915- 1,197,575. PatentedSept. 5,1916.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 2- H. BOCKISCH.
AUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.
APPLICATION FILED NOV- BI 915.
1,197,575. PatentedSept. 5,1916.
. 4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
72 q gnventou 4 96 7 v H. BOCKISCH.
AUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT- APPLICATION FILED NOV. 8, 1915.
1,1 97,575 Patented Sept. 5, 1916.
4 SHEETSSHEET 4.
UNITED STATES PATENT omen:
HEINRICH BOCKISCH, POUGHKEEPSIE, NEWYORK, ASSIGNOB, TO M. WELTEdL SONS OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF YORK.
AUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. l
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented S p 1 Application filed November 8, 1915. -.Scria1No. 60,393,
, ments for manual scales and pedal scales,
its employment in such case being as a means.
for selectively operating the tone-emitting elements so that the tones emitted will be manual tones alone, pedal tones alone, or both manual and pedal tones together, in any of the infinite variety of combinations of manual and pedal tones necessary to the proper playing of musical compositions.
In the production of organ compositions, the manual scales as well as the pedal scales should be operable independently each from the other. This permits, for example, the
playing of a chord on a very soft stopas violin, '-on' the first manual, while at the same time a solo in a diiferent tone'color, as oboe-is being played on the second manual and a very deep soft note on a 16 foot bourdon is being sounded in the pedal. The provision of each manual and pedal scale with a separate series of tone-ducts would necessitate a great number ofv such ducts and the operating element (hereinafter called record) for opening and closing the ducts would have to be correspondingly large. If this record be a paper perforated music roll, as preferred, its increased size would lay it open to serious objections owing to its susceptibility to atmospheric changes, difliculties of storage and handling, and a cylinder with projections for openingthe ducts would, also, be objectionable, if large.
I would have it understood that any suitable record may be employed and that the term record wherever used in the description or claims forming part of this application is intended generically to refer to any suitable element or means for opening and closing the ducts.
One of the important purposes of the present invention, therefore, is to provide an automatic musical instrument with mechamsm whereby a plurality of tone-emitting elements may be controlled from a common tone-duct, the said mechanism being of a selective nature such that either of the toneemitting elements controlled from the common duct may be sounded alone or they may be sounded together, at will, the selective nature of the mechanism being further such that the tones of the two scales may be emitted in an infinite variety of combinations, or in other words, without 1n anywise reducing the combinations which would be obtainable if each note-emitting element were provided with a separate tone duct.
Another of the important objects of the invention is to accomplish the hereinbe-fore stated purpose by a pneumatic mechanism of simple and practicable nature,
These stated purposes or objects and others which will be apparent to those familiar with the present invention and the art to which it has reference, are secured by the construction illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of a form of the invention arranged to be operated pneumatically throughout; Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view of a form of the in vention arranged to be operated in part pneumatically and in part electrically; Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic section through the portions of the wind chest for themanual effects and pedal efiects respectively showing also the bellows which are connected to the valve rods thereof; Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Figs. 1 or 2; Fig. 5 is a detail view partly in section and partly in perspective, showing a part of one of the wind boards and the pedal tone chest associated therewith, of the embodiment shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 6 is a detail representation of a perforated note sheet and part of a tracker board, the note sheet having note perforations and control apertures so correlated that certain notes will be sounded in the manual scale only while other notes will be sounded in both the manual and pedal scale; Fig. 7 is a like view of the same parts showing a correlation of note perforations and control apertures such that certain and control apertures such that various effects are produced.
Similar characters of reference denote corresponding parts in the several views.
A and A designate portions of the wind chest for the manual scale and pedal scale, respectively. These portions are provided with chambers, marked a, and a respectively, to whichthe tone-emitting elements 13 and B are connected. Organ pipes are a desirable form of such tone-emitting elements and hence have been selected, merely, however, to exemplify this particular part of the invention. There are a series of tone-emitting elements connected with each chamber a; and a, each element giving forth a different note. When, as in an organ, orchestrion or the like, it is desired to embody in the instrument a plurality or series of tone-producing elements, giving forth diiferent qualities of tones of the same note,it is preferred, as is usual in organs, to provide each portion A and A of the wind chest with a plurality of chambers corresponding in number with the number of the qualities of tones which are to be produced. To exemplify this, the portion A of the wind chest appropriated to the manual scale or effects is shown as having two chambers a and a in addition to the chamber a, and each of said chambers, in practice, has connection with a series of tone-emitting elements B and B which are preferably so arranged that those which emit different qualities of tone of the same note will be in line with each other but connected to the different chambers, as shown. Similarly, the portion A of the wind chest appropriated to the pedal scale or effects, is, for the sake of example, illustrated as having two chambers aand a,
provided with two lines of tone-emitting elements B and B of different qualities of tone. The same lineal arrangement of the elements giving forth different qualities of tone of the same notes explained with reference to the portion A, is illustrated with respect to the portion B.
The connection between each chamber and the tone-emitting elements associated therewith, includes a suitable valve for each toneemitting element. Each valve is marked C in the accompanying drawings. These valves open and close passages 0 between the chambers and the respective tone-emitting elements. The valves for the elements emitting different qualities of tones of the same note are connected with each other, preferably by rods C, as shown, having springs c for closing the Valve. A mechanism, hereinafter described, is provided for opening the valves against the action of these springs.
The chambers a, a a a, a are connected with a suitable source of supply of air under pressure and have valves D' suitably operated to admit the air to the respective chamber s. In the ordinary humanly played organs, these valves I) are connected with the stops of the organ. In the present instance, they are ope ated automatically, but the particular means for this purpose forms no essential part of the present invention and for this reason is not illustrated or described herein. A suitable arrangement for operating the valves D is illustrated in my application filed of even date herewith and numbered, serially, 60,391.
The tone-ducts are designated 20. These ducts have connection with the valves C, through intervening mechanism which forms the essence of the present invention, Their mouths preferably are arranged in a trackerboard E, such as is commonly employed in automatic musical instruments, and for opening and closing them I prefer to use a perforated music roll, as shown at E. In this invention, certain of the ducts 20 are common to valves C of both portions A and A of the chest. For example, if the manual chest has tone-emitting elements ranging through a scale of sixty-one (61) notes and the pedal chest has tone-emitting elements ranging through a scale of thirty (30) notes additional to those of the manual chest, the ducts 20 for the lowest 30 notes of the manual scale will be employed for the pedal scale also, the remaining thirty-one (31) notes of the manual scale having a separate duct for each such note. As this invention is concerned with a scale for ducts common to a plurality of notes, it is considered to be un necessary to illustrate or to further refer to provision for causing the sounding of the additional notes which may be employed in said manual scale and also in additional manual scales, if desired.
The mechanism connecting the ducts 20 with the valves C includes a set of valve-opcrating pneumatics F (preferably bellows) which are common to both manual and pedal effects. There is one such pneumatic F for each duct 20. The connections between the ducts 20 and thepneumatics F, respectively, include valved chambers 12 from which the pneumatics are operated. These chambers are preferably arranged in a chest F having a passage 10 on one side of the chambers 12 and common thereto, and a series of chambers 11 on the other side of the passage 10. Each chamber 12 is provided with a port 13 by which it has communication with the passage 10 and also has a port 14 through which it may have communication with a source of supply of air of a pressure different from that in the passage 10. Each chamber 11. is
separated from the passage 10 by a flexible membrane 15. In each chamber 12 there is a valve 16 mounted on a stem 17 which is connected. to the corresponding membrane 15. The membranes are arranged to be in-.
menace &
dependently operated by variations in the differences of pressures of the air the chambers 11 and passage 10. The chambers 11. are severally connected to the ducts 20,
which are shown as entering them below the membranes. They are also severally connected with the passage by bleed-holes 18.
In this particular illustrated embodiment of the invention the passage 10 contains air at 10 less than atmospheric pressure in which.
event the port 14; will open to the atmosphere. In the particular embodiment illustrated the passage 10 is connected with a reservoir G by a pipe 10* and substantially 15 constant suction is maintained in said reservoirby a suitable pumping device, not shown. The chambers 12 are connected with the particular pneumatic l? associated therewith by ducts 19. It will be noted that when any one of the tone-ducts 20 is opened to the atmosphere the corresponding chamber 11 similarly is opened to the atmosphere, whereupon the flexible membranes 15 of said chamber will operate to move its valve 13 so as to uncover the port 13 and cover the port 1% of the particular chamber containing said. valve. This will cause the pneumatic F,
' connected with said cha.mberwl1ich has been thus thrown into communication with '80 the passage lO-to be collapsed. When the chambers 11 respectively are closed against the atmosphere the membrane thereof imediately returns to its position shown in the drawing, being assisted in its return by $5 the suctionentering the chamber through the bleed-hole '18, the valve 16 similarly returning and. cutting ofi' communication of the chamber 12 with the wind passage 10 and opening communication of said chamber to with the atmosphere, whereupon the collapsed bellows will be expanded by the air now entering the same through port 14:, chamber 12 and passage 19.
Extending in opposite directions from as each pneumatic F are arms f and f which,
through intervening mechanism presentl described, control the operation of valves 2( in members H and H for the manual effects and pedal efi'ects respectively. These mem- 59 bers H and H are hereinafter called manual tone chest and pedal tone chest respectively. In the preferred form thereof,
shown in both of the herein illustrated embodiments of the invention, each chest has a 56 wind passage 21, on one side of which as sage there is a series of chambers 22 an on the other side a like series of chambers 23,
there being in practice a separate pair of chambers 22 and 23 in the manual tone chest for each manual note and a like separate pair of chambers 22 and 23 in the pedal tone chest for each pedal note. The several chambers 23 of the chest H and the like chambers 23 ofthe chest H'have communication It with the passage 21 of the respective chests,
through ports 24 and each of said chambers 23 has aport 25. The ports 24 and 25 in each chamber 23 are alternately opened and closed by a valve 2? having a stem 28 by which it is connected to a flexible membrane 29. These membranes are disposed between the respective chambers 22 and the wind passage 21 in position to be independently operated by variations in the differences of pressures of the air in said chamber and passage. The chambers 22 also have connection with the passage 21 by bleed-holes 30.
In practice, it is preferred to utilize in the passage 21 air at less than atmospheric premure, and in such case the ports 25 will 30 preferably open to the atmosphere, as shown inFlg. 2, or lnto a passage 26 which contams air at atmospheric pressure, as shown 1n Fig. 1. For maintaining less than atmospheric pressure in the passages 21 these 35 passages are preferably suitably connectedas by pipes 32 and respectivelywith the constant suction reservoir G hereinbefore referred to.
It will be noted that when air is admitted 99 to any of the chambers 22, as by the opening of the same to the atmosphere'the inem brace 29 of said chamber, will be moved and will operate the valve 27 in such mannor that the corresponding passage 23 will be opened to the passa e 21, the valve at the same time cutting 0 communication between said chamber 23 the atmosphere. Each chamber 23 of the member H is connected with a pneumatic 34 by a duct 34 and each chamber 23 of the member H is connected with a pneumatic 35 by a duct 35 These pneumatics 34 and 35 are preferably in the form ofbellows, which are normally distended and are collapsed when. the chambers 23 connected with them are in communication with the passages 21. The bellows 34 are severally connected with the valve-rods C of the manual chest A and the bellows 35 are severally connected with the valve-rods G of the pedal chest A. The connection in each instance preferably comprlses a suitably supported bell-crank lever 37, one arm of which is connected by a linlr 38 with the movable board of a bellows and the other arm of which is connected to the appropriate rod C. Hence, it will be seen that when any one of the chambers 23 of the pedal or manual tone chests H, H is in communication with the passage 21 of said chest the particular bellows 34 or 35 connected with said chamber will be collapsed and will. open the appropriate valve or valves C controlled thereby. vVhen communication of the chamber 23 with the atmosphere has been cut oii the membrane 29 will instantly return, whereupon the valve 27 connected with said membrane will cut off communication of its chamber 23 with the passage '21 and will open communication of said chamber with the atmosphere, thereby causing the bellows 34 or 35 to be expanded and the valve C in the wind chest to be again closed, the spring 0 connected with the rod, as hereinbefore set forth, assisting in the closin of the latter.
The opening of the chambers 22 to the atmosphere is effected automatically through the operation of intermediate connections with the projections f and f from the operating pneumatics F. Included in the connection between each operating pneumatic F and the corresponding chambers 22 of the manual and pedal tone chests H, H are a pair of arms or other suitable devices, hereinafter called sticks, and 41, preferably having flanges40 and 41 to be engaged by the free ends of the respective projections f and f'.' In practice, one set of sticksthe sticks 40 associated with a manual tone chest H, for examplehave their flanges 40 normally in the path of the projection 7, while the sticks associated with the other chest (H) have their flanges, 4P, normally out of operative relation with the projections f, and the sets of sticks are independently movable automatically into or out of operative relation with the respective sets of projections referred to, in order that the tones emitted may be those of the manual chest H alone, or the pedal chest H alone, or both together, according to the requirements of the particular composition being rendered. To permit of such movement of the sticks each is pivoted at its end, as shown at 42, and to accomplish the automatic movement thereof I prefer to. em-
loy for each set of sticks a means which includes a movable board of any suitable construction. The board for the set of sticks 40is marked 43 and the boardfor the set of sticks 41 is marked 44. These boards preferably have apertured edges, as indicated'at 43 and 44 and the sticks extend through such apertures, respectively. The sticks are preferably held with their edges against the rear walls of the apertures by springs 45 and 46.
The independent movement of the boards 43 and 44 and the corresponding selective adjustment of the sets of wicks 40 and 41, in the herein exemplified form of the invention, is accomplished automatically under. control of special apertures in the music roll E which control the operation of pneumatics I and I for the manual effects and pedal effects respectively.
There need be only one pneumatic I for the entire manual scale and one pneumatic I for the entire pedal scale. Each preferably comprises a suction chamber respectively connected with the suction reservoir G byducts 50 and 50". At one side each is provided with a port 51 opening into a chamber 52. The chamber 52 of the pneumatic I is connected by a duct 52 with a motor 60. The corresponding chamber 52 of the pneumatic I is connected by a pipe 52 with a motor 61. Each chamber 52 has a valve 53 mounted on a stem 54 which is carried by a flexible membrane 55. The membrane 55 of the respective pneumatics I and I separate the chambers 50 from chambers 56. These chambers 56 are provided with ducts 56 and 56 respectively. The chambers 56 are also connected with the suction chambers 50 by bleed-holes 57. Hence, it will be seen that when either duct 56 or 56 is opened to the atmosphere the flexible membrane 55 controlled thereby is operated to move the valve 53 connected with said membrane so' mosphere and these ports are closed by the respective valves 53 when the latter have been moved to open the ports 51. As already stated, the chambers 52 are respectively connected with motors 60 and 61. These motors are preferably in the form of bellows, as shown, which will be collapsed when the chambers 52 connected therewith, respectively, are in communication with the suction chamber 50, and expanded when said chambers 52 are in communication with the atmosphere. These bellows 60 and 61 have their movable boards respectively connected with the boards 43 and 44. A preferred form of connection, herein illustrated, includes bell crank levers 62 and 63 fulcrumed at 62 and 63 to appropriate fixed parts of the instrument. One arm of the bell crank lever 62 is pivoted at 62 to the board 43 and the other arm of said lever is connected by a link 64 with the movable board of the bellows 60. Similarly, one arm of the bell crank lever 63 is pivoted at 63 to the board 44 and its other arm is connected by a link 65 with the movable board of the bellows 61. It is apparent that when the bellows 60 is collapsed the movable board 43 will be drawn back and will correspondingly move the sticks 40 away from operative relation with the projections f, the sticks being connected to said boards by the sprin s 45: and that when the bellows 61 is co lapsed the movable board 44wvill be moved forward, thereby forcing the sticks 41 into operative relation with the projections f. The boards 43 and 44 are moved in opposition to the respective bellows 60 and 61, preferably by means of springs 66 and 67.
The sticks 40 and 41 should be so mounted as to be capable of moving longitudinally with the projections f and f as well as pivotally relatively to the said projections. To this end, they are preferably carried by levers 68 and 69 fulcrumed at 68 and 69" to suitable fixed parts of the instrument.
menses cation with the atmosphere, these ducts being controlled by valves appropriately connected with the sticks.
The form exemplified in Fig. 1 is particularly intended to be used when the selecting mechanism is mounted in the instrument or close to the instrumentas, for example, when it is in console arranged at the instrument itself, and which permits of a short direct connection of a mechanical nature between the sticks 40 and 41 and the respective valves which control the opening and closing of the ducts leading to the chambers 22, it being understood that there is an advantage in having the latter ducts of short length. The ducts last referred to, in the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 1, are marked 70 and 71 and lead from wind boards 72 and 73, said boards having suitable apertures 72 and 73 through which the ducts 70 and 71 may have communication with the atmosphere. These apertures 72 and 73 are respectively closed by suitable valves 74 and 7 5, the valves here shown being mounted on spring arms 74 and 75 arranged to keep them normally closed. The spring arms 74; and 75 are connected with the respective sticks 40 and 41 by links 76 and 77. When, however, the selecting mechanism is arranged at a place distant from the instrument, it is advisable to provide connections of an electrical nature betending to a contact 89 carried by the arm- 69 supporting the stick 41, it being understood that there are separate wires 83 and 87 p and contactsSt and S9 and magnets 86 for eachstick 41 or, in other words, for each note of the pedal chest. From the bus-bar 82 a wire 90 extends to one side of a magnet 91, from the other side of which magnet a wire 92 leads to a flexible connection 93 extending to a contact 9tcarried by the arm 68 supporting the stick 40.- The bus bar 81 is connected by a wire 95 with a yielding contact 96 which is so disposed as to be engaged by the contact 94. In practice, each stick 40 is associated with its individual contacts 91 and 96 and magnets 91in other words, there are separate magnets 91 and contacts 9% and 96, with separate connections to the bus-bars 81 and 82, for the several sticks 40, and, consequently, for the several manual notes which are to be coupled with pedal notes. In this embodiment of the invention, the ducts which respectively are connected with the chambers 22 of the manual tone chest H and pedal tone chest H are marked 100 and. 101 and the wind boards are marked 102 and 103 and the valves through which the respective ducts 100 and 101 are opened and closed, are marked. 104 and 105. Each valve 104 is provided with a. member 97 forming thearmature of the adjacent electro-magnet 91. Hence, it will be apparent that when any one of the arms 68 carrying a. stick -10 is moved by the operation of the operating pneumatic 1* appropriated to said stick and arm, the contact 94: of the arm is brought into engagement with the corresponding contact 96, thereby closing the circuit through the appropriate electro-magnet 91,
causing the latter to attract its armature 91 and open the valve 104, whereupon air at atmospheric pressure will enter the appropriate chamber 22 and cause the proper bellows 3 1 to be deflated. Similarly, when the arm 69 supporting the stick 41 is raised, its contact 89 will be brought into engage- 'ment with the adjacent contact 84, thereby establishing a circuit through the particular electro-magnet 86 connected with said con tacts, causing the armature 98 of the latter to be attracted and the valve 105 connected to said armature to be raised, whereupon atmospheric air will be admitted to the particular chamber 22 controlled by said valve and the particular bellows 35 connected with said chamber will be collapsed.
It will be understood that the circuit through an electro-magnet 91 is as follows: from bus-bar 81 to contacts 96. and 94:, through flexible connection 93 to wire 92, through magnet 91 and wire 90 to bus-bar 82; and that the circuit through an electromagnet 86 is as follows: frombus-bar 81 through wire 83, contacts 8% and 89, flexible connection 88, through wire 87, electromagnet 86, and wire 85 to bus-bar 82.
The operation of the invention will readily be understood to be as follows :As already stated, the ducts 20 are those which are common to both man'ual and pedal scales, the opening and closing of the ducts 56 and 56 determining whether the tones emitted are manual tones-only, or pedal tones only, or both manual and pedal tones together. When the parts are arranged as herein shown, the tones of the manual only will speak when both ducts 56 and 56 are closed, it being noted that the sticks are in position to be operated by the projections from the operating bellows F while the sticks 41 are in such relation to the projections f from said bellows that their bent ends 41 are outside the path of movement of said projections. If now, any one of the tone apertu s of the'music roll is brought into registration with the mouth of the corresponding duct 20, the latter will be opened, this opening to the atmosphere the particular chamber 11 connected with said duct, whereupon thecorresponding valve 16 will be raised and will open corresponding port 13 and close corresponding port 14. The bellows F which is connected with the chamber 12 which has thus been opened to the suction passage 10, accordingly is collapsed, thereby moving the corresponding stick 40 and opening the corresponding valve 74 or 104, according to which of the herein-exemplified. forms of the invention is being used: the movements of the bellows F having now no effect on the corresponding I stick 41 because the latter sticks are out of o erative relation with the projections f.
' heopening of the valve 74 or 104, as al- 30- ready explained, places the corresponding chamber 22 of the chest H in communication with the atmosphere, whereupon the corresponding valve 27 will be raised and corresponding chamber 23 will be opened to suction passage 21 and closed against the atmosphere, thereby causing the corresponding bellows 34 to be collapsed and the appropriate manual tone to speak. As soon as the duct 20 has been again closed, by the passing of the tone aperture in the music roll out of registration therewith, the chamber 11 connected to said duct is closed against the atmosphere, and the membrane 15Vreturns to its former position, where it remains until the chamber 11 is again opened to the atmosphere, the sub-normal pressure which reaches the underside of the membrane through the bleed hole 18 assisting the force of gravity in keeping the membrane in this position, normally. It will be understood that the valve 16 connected with the membrane returns with the latter and closes communication between its chamber .12 and the passage 10 and opens communi cation of said chamber with the atmosphere. Air at atmospheric pressure now enters the collapsed bellows F causing the latter to expand and be ready for another operation.
If both manual and pedal tones are to be simultaneously emitted, the duct 56 is opened through a special aperture in the music roll, whereupon the valve .53 of pneucorresponding bellows F will now cause the projections f and f connected to said bellows to operate the corresponding sticks 40 and 41it being remembered that the sticks 40 have remained in operative relation with the projections f. The corresponding sticks 40 and 41 which are thus simultaneously operated cause the collapsing of the corresponding bellows 34 and 35 by opening the corresponding valves 74, (or 104, 105) which puts the corresponding chambers 22 of chests H and H in communication with the atmosphere.
When both ducts 56 and 56 are opened tothe atmosphere (which occurs when special apertures in the music roll are simultaneously in registration with the mouths of said ducts) the pedal tones only will speak for the reason that the valves 53 of both pneumatics I and I will be raised, thereby causing the bellows 61 and 62 to be collapsed, these bellows in. their collapsing movements moving the boards 43 and 44 and consequently the sets of sticks 40 and 41- the direction of the movements of the boards and sticks being such that the sticks 41 are forced into operative relation with the projections f while the sticks 40 will be with drawn from out of the paths of the projections The opening of a tone duct 20 now will cause the corresponding stick 41 to be operated by the bellows F connected to the chamber 12 whose valve is controlled by said duct, and this stick 41 will operate the corresponding valve 75 or 105 whereupon the corresponding chamber 22 of chest H will be opened to the atmosphere, thus causing the corresponding valve 27 to be raised and open its chamber 23 to the suction passage 21 and close it against the atmosphere, whereby the corresponding bellows 35 will be collapsed.
When both of the special apertures of the music roll which caused this operation have passed out of registration with the special ducts 56 and 56", the valves 53 of the pneumatics I, I return to their former positions, thereby causing air to be admitted to the collapsed bellows 60, 61, the springs 66 and 67 assisting the entering air to expand said bellows and to return the boards 43, 44 to the positions shown in the drawings.
It should be noted that the passing of the special'apertures of the music roll out of registration with the special duct 56 or ducts 56" and 56 can have no effect upon any operating bellows F connected at that moment with an open tone duct 20, for the reason that said bellows will remain 001- lapsed as long as its tone duct is open. Ac-
issuers cordingly, it will be apparent that while the closing of the special duct 56 orof both ducts 56 and 56 will effect corresponding movement of the board 44 or of both boards 43 and l4 and of sticks which are associated with closed tone ducts, yet tones which at that moment are being sounded are unaffected because the bellows associated. with the open tone ducts remain collapsed and hold their sticks against movement with their respective boards. W hen these tone ducts are again closed the corresponding bellows expand and release the sticks and the springs 4:5 or 46 connecting the latter with the boards thereupon become operative to draw the sticks into operative relation with the boards. When the sticks have been released from their operating bellows they are also automatically returned to their raised positions, by the spring arms 74 and 75 In view of the fact that there can be no movement of the particular sticks 40 and 41 while their operating bellows F are engaged. therewith. and are under suction and hence collapsed, it follows that the opening or closing of control ducts has no efiect on tones which at the moment of such opening or closing are being sounded. The opening or closing of control ducts, however, does effect the movement of sticks associated with bellows F which are not under suction when said control ducts have been opened or closed. Hence by the use of a properly prepared operating element it is practicable to sound any note or notes of the pedal scale with any note or notes of the manual scale without affecting other notes already being played, and similarly other notes of either the pedal or manual scales may be introduced. For example, as exemplified by Figs. 6, 7 and 8, when a perforated music roll is utilized as the record, the special perforations 56 and 56 which control the ducts 56 and 56 act only in relation to those tones which are controlled by note perforations 20 whose forward ends are substantially in line with the rear ends of the control apertures: that is to say, only those correspond: ing tones controlled by the perforations 20 are sounded simultaneously in both the pedal and manual scales, when the control duct 56 is open and the control duct 56* is closed, as exemplified by Figs. 6 and 8, the tones controlled by the other perforations, 20*, whether the latter be already in registration with respective tone-ducts 20 or later come into registration with. ducts while the perforation 20. is in registration with a duct 20, sounding only in the manual scale: and similarly, as exemplified by Figs. 7 and 8, only those corresponding tones controlled by 'perforations 20 are sounded in the pedal scale alone when both control ducts 56 and 56 are open, the tones controlled by the note perforations 20 sounding only in the manual scale. It will be noted that the production of various effects are exemplified by Fig. 8, namely, the lowest right hand perforation 520 causes the sounding of a note in the manual alone and just before this is discontinued a chord consisting of six notes in the manual is introduced with two supporting notes in the pedal, thepeda-l notes corresponding with two of the notes sounding in the manual; this is followed by the discontinuance of five notes of the chord sounding in the manual and one of the corresponcing notes of the pedal, the remaining note continuing to sound in both manual and pedal, unaffected by the opening of the two control ducts 56 56, the opening of said control ducts similarly having no effect with respect to the two notes which are caused to sound by the registration of the two note perforations 20 in the second line with their respective tone ducts, these two notes hence sounding in the manual alone while the one long note is continuing to sound in both pedal and manual; this in turn is followed by the discontinuance of the long note referred to in both pedal and manual and the introduction at or about the same time of a note in the pedal alone-controlled by said opening of the two ducts 56, 56 while the two notes previously referred to, related to the second line of note perforations are being sounded in the manual alone: this is succeeded. by the discontinuance of the manual notes corresponding to the second line of perforations and the introduction of other manual notes alone, corresponding to the third line of perforations, immediately before the sounding of the pedal note corresponding to the second line of note perforations ceases, and while these notes of the manual alone are still sounding an additional note is introduced which sounds in both the pedal and manual and while the latter is sounding another note in the manual only is introduced.
it will'be understood of course that the length of the special control apertures should be such-proport al to the speed of travel of the music roll l the inertia of the pneumatic Valves and adjusting boards l?) and -llthat all the sticks which are not held by collapsed bellows wil be promptly returned to their normal positions.
I would have it understood, among other things, that the invention may be embodied in an instrument having provision for playing it humanly as well as automatically, or may be embodied in an instrument confined to automatic playing and that in either case any suitable means for opening and closing the tone ducts may be employed and other tone-emitting elements, or speakers, than pipes may be used: and, further, that the parts may be arranged to he operated by air of other relatively different pressures than atmospheric or normal and less than atmospheric or subnormal: all without departing from the spirit of the in vention or the scope of the subjoined claims.
I further would have it understood that while I have herein exemplified the invention as having a series of operating pneumatics common to the two series of toneemitting elements, yet in its broader aspects the invention is not restricted to the use of such common operating pneumatics and claims of a generic nature with respect thereto accordingly have been made.
I also would have it understood that while reference herein has been particularly made to an organ or the like having one manual scale and apedal scale, the invention is in nowise restricted to two scales only and that the claimswhether referring to two scales or to a plurality. of scalesare intended to include either two scales or more than two scales of tone-emitting elements. .Tzrch additional scale or scales may be embodied merely by adding a control duct and appropriate connections between the latter and the tone-emitting elements for each such additional scales, together with the neces sary additional elements, all'corresponding to those herein. shown and described for accomplishing the necessary operations of the operating pneumatic and adjustments of the connections. The operating characteristics of such additional scale or scales will preferably be similar to those described with relation to the pedal scale, that is to say, the sticks of the additional scale will normally be out of operative relation with their respective operating pneumatics. As it is apparent that such additional scale or scales are not only contemplated but may be provided by those skilled in the art and familiar with the present construction, it is considered to be unnecessary to illustrate or to set the same forth more particularly herein.
Having now described the invention what I believe to be new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, and what I therefore claim, 1s:
1. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatics, connections between the operating pneumatics and the tone ducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and are held against such movement when their operating pneumatics are in communication with open tone-ducts, and record-controlled means for moving said connection. members, whereby any one or more tones in either scale may be sounded alone or any one or more tones in one scale may be sounded in combination with any one or more of the tones in the other scale. r
2. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting element, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatic, connections between the operating pneumatic and the toneducts and connections between the operating pneumatics andtone-emitting elements, the last named connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and are held against such move ment when their operating pneumatics are in communication with open tone-ducts, control ducts the opening and closing of which controls the movement of said mem-' bers relatively to the operating pneumatics, and a record having means for controlling the tone-ducts and the control ducts.
3. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together,- into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatics, connections between. the operating pneumatics and the tone-ducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and are held against such movement when their operating pneumatics are in communication with open toneducts, control ducts the opening and closing of which controls the adjustment of said members relatively to the operating pneumatics, and a note sheet having tone perforations and control. apertures, said sheet being movable over the tone and control ducts and controlling the same.
4. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatics, connections between. the operating pneumatic and the toneducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and are held against such movement when their operating pneumatics are in communication with open tone-ducts, control ducts the opening and closing of which controls the movement of said members relatively to the operating pneumatics, and a note sheet having tone perforations and control apertures, said sheet being movable over the tone and control ducts and controlling the same, the rear ends of the control apertures being disposed substantially in line with the front ends of note perforations related to tones which are to be controlled by said apertures.
5. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatics, connections between the operating pneumatics and the tone-ducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including a series of members for each scale of toneemitting members, one series of said ment bers being normally in operative relation and the other normally out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and said members being movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and each held against movement when its operating pneumatic is in communication with an open toneduct, and means for adjusting said connection members.
6. In a record-controlled musical instru ment, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism ineluding operating pneumatics, connections between the operating pneumatics and the tone-ducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including a series of laterally movable members for each scale of tone-emitting elements, adjusting devices for moving the series of connection-members laterally, the connection-members being also independently movable longitudinally with their operating pneumatics and held against lateral, movement with said devices when engaged by operating pneumatics which are in communication with open tone ducts, and means for moving the members so held into, operative relation with said devices when they are released from the operating pneumatics.
7. In a record-controlled musical instrument, the combination of a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to said plurality of scales and mechanism to bring any one or more of the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communicationwith their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including operating pneumatics, connections between the operating pneumatics and the tone-ducts and connections between the operating pneumatics and tone-emitting elements, the last named connections including a series of laterally movable members for each scale of tone-emitting elements, a movable board for so moving each said series of connection-members, the connection members being also independently movable longitudinally with their operating pneumatics and held against movement with their boards when engaged by operating pneumatics which are in communication with open tone 7 ducts, and means for moving the members so held into operative relation with the adjusting boards when they are released from the operating pneumatics, the last named means including springs which connect the members with their adjusting boards.
8. A record-controlled musical ment, comprising a plurality of scales of tone-emitting elements, a series of tone-ducts common to the scales of tone-emitting elements and mechanism to selectively operate predetermined elements of either scale alone or of both scales together from the series of tone-ducts common to both scales, the said mechanism comprising collapsible operating pneumatics, connections between said operating pneumatics and tone-ducts, respectively, connections between the operating pneumatics and the tone-emitting elements, respectively, the latter connections including a series of laterally movable members for each scale, and means for automatically so moving said members, including a movable instruboard for each series of said members, springs connecting the members with their boards, and automatically operable, pneumatically controlled means for moving the boards independently of each other, the latter means including control ducts and means for opening and closing the control ducts at the tone-emitting elements of either scale alone or any one or more corresponding or non-corresponding elements of both scales together, into communication with their tone-ducts, the said mechanism including a series oi? operating pneumatics common to the scales of tone-emitting elements, con-- nections between the operating pneumatics and the tone-ducts, respectively, and connections between the respective operating pneumatics and corresponding tone-emitting elements of the different scales of tone emitting elements, the last named connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatics and means for automatically so moving them, the connection-members being held against movementwhen their operating pneumatics are in communication with open tone-ducts, whereby any one or more tones in either scale may be sounded alone or any one or more tones in one scale may be sounded in combination with any one or more of the tones in the other scale.
10. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic having connection with the toneduct, and connections between the operating pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatic, and means for so moving them.
11. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone duct, an operating pneumatic, means through which the operating pneumatic has. communication with said duct, said means having a valve by which the communication is controlled, connections between the operating pneumatic and the tone emitting elements respectively, the said connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative [relation with the operating pneumatic, and
means for so moving them,
12. A record-controlled musical instru ment comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic having projections extending in opposite directions therefrom, connections between the operating pneumatic and tone duct and connections between said pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including reversely arranged members which are so disposed that they will be operated by the re spective projections from the operating pneumatic and are mounted to be independently movable into or out of operative relation with the projections, and means for so moving them.
13. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic having projections extending in opposite directions therefrom, connections between the operating pneumatic and toneduct, and connections between said pneumatics and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including reversely-arranged members which are so disposed that they will be operated by the respective projections from the operating pneumatic, ducts having valves connected with said members, respectively, and con nections between the ducts and the respective tone-emitting elements, the said members being independently movable into b:- out of operative relation with the projections from the operating pneumatic, and means for so moving them.
14. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic having projections extending in opposite directions therefrom, connections between the operating pneumatic and toneduct, and connections between said pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including reVcrsely-arranged members which are so disposed that they will be operated by the respective projections from the operating pneumatics, ducts having valves connected with said members, respectively, and connections, including relay pneumatics, be-
tween the ducts and the respective toneemitting elements, the said members being independently movable into or out of operative relation with the projections from the operating pneumatic, and means for s0 moving them. r
15. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, an operating pneumatic having projections extending in opposite directions therefrom, means through which the'operating pneumatic has communication with the tone-duct, said means having a valve by which the communication is controlled, and connections between the operating pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the said connections including members which are so disposed that they will be operated by the respective projections from the operating pneumatic, the said members being independently movable into or out of operative relation with the projections from the operating pneumatic, and means for so moving them.
16. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a
common tone-duct, an operating pneumatic having projections extending in opposite directions therefrom, means through which the operating pneumatic has communica tion with the tone duct, said means having a valve by which the communication is controlled, and connections between the operating pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the said connections including members which are so disposed that they will be operated by the respective projections from the operating pneumatic, ducts having valves connected with said members respectively, and connections, including relay pneumatics, between the ducts and the respective tone-emitting elements, the said members being independently movable into or out of operative relation with the projections from the operating pneumatic, and means for so moving them.
17. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating member, connections between the operating member and tone-duct and connections between said member and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating member, and means for so moving them automatically, including valved pneumatics, motors connected with the valved pneumatics respectively, and connections between said motors and the movable members.
18. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating member, connections between the operating member and tone-duct, and connections between said member and the tone-emitting elements respectively. the-latter connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating member, and means for so moving them automatically, including valved pneumatics, motors connected with the valved pneumatics respectively, and connections between said motors and the movable members, said connections including movable boards.
19. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic. connections between the operating pneumatic and the tone-duct and connections between said pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members which are independently movable into or out of operative relation with the operating memher, and means for so moving them auto matically, including valved pneumatics, motors connected with the valved pneumatics respectively, and connections between said motors and the movable members, said connections including movable boards having springs by which they are connected to the movable boards and springs by which they are moved in opposition to the motors.
20. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic, connections between the operating pneumatic and tone-ducts, connections between said pneumatic and the tone emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members having pivoted supports, said members being pivoted to their support, whereby they are movable longitudinally and are also movable pivotally into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatic, and means for antomatically moving them relatively to the operating pneumatics.
21. A recordcontrolled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone duct, a common operating pneumatic, connections between the operating pneumatic and tone-duct, connections between said pneumatic and the tone-emitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members having pivoted supports, said members being pivoted to their supports, whereby they are movable.
longitudinally and are also movable pivotally into or out of operative relation with the operating pneumatic, ducts having valves, connections between the pivoted sup ports and the valves of said ducts and connections, including pneumatic relays, between the ducts and the respective tone emitting elements.
22, A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, a common tone-duct, a common operating pneumatic, connections between the operating pneumatic and tone-duct, connections between said pneumatic and the toneemitting elements respectively, the latter connections including members having pivoted supports, said members being pivoted to their supports, whereby they aremovable longitudinally and are also movable pivotthe operating pneumatic, ducts having valves, electrical connections between the pivoted supports and the valves of said ducts and connections between the ducts and the respective tone-emitting elements.
23. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements, and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including separate valved ducts having connection with the respective tone-emitting elements and means for operating the valves of said ducts, the latter means including members having longitudinal and pivotal movement, means through which electrical circuits are closed when the members are moved longitudinally, said circuits opening the valves of said ducts respectively, and means for moving said members longitudinally and pivotally.
2%. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including separate valved ducts having connection with the respective tone-emitting elements and means for operating the valves of said ducts, the latter means including longitudinally and pivotally movable sticks, means through which electrical circuits are closed when the sticks are moved longitudinally, said circuits opening the valves of the ducts respectively, means for moving "the sticks longitudinally and means for moving the sticks pivotally into and out of operative relation with the means which moves them longitudinally.
25. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including separate valved ducts having connection with the respective toneemitting elements and means for operating the valves of said ducts, the later means including pivoted members, sticks pivotally supported by said members, means through which electrical circuits are closed when the supporting members for the sticks are moved pivotally, said circuits opening the valves of the ducts respectively, means to engage the sticks and move the same longitudinally and the supporting members pivotally, and means engaging the sticks and operable to move the same pivotally intoand out of operative relation with the means which moves them longitudinally.
26. A recordcontrolled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including separate valved ducts having connection with the respective tone-emitting elements and means for operating the valves of said ducts, the
latter means including a common operating pneumatic, members having movement pivotally into and out of operative relation with the operating pneumatic and also being movable longitudinally by the operating pneumatic,- independently of each other, means for moving them pivotally, and means through which electrical circuits are closed when the said members are moved longitudinally, said circuits opening the valves of the ducts respectively.
27. A recordcontrolled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including separate valved ducts having connection with the respective tone-emitting elements and means for operating the valves of said ducts, the latter means including members to be operated by the operating pneumatic, pivotallymounted supports for said members, the members being pivoted to their supports, respectively, whereby they are movable into and out of operative relation with operating pneumatic, means for so moving them, and means through which electrical circuits are closed when said supports are moved pivotally, the said circuits opening the valves of the ducts, respectively.
28. A record-controlled musical instrument comprising tone-emitting elements and means for operating either of the same alone or both together, at will, including a common operating pneumatic, a tone-duct, means through which said pneumatic has communication with the tone-duct, having a valve for controlling such communication, sticks, pivoted supports for the sticks, respectively, whereby the sticks are movable longitudinally and are also movable pivotally with relation to the operating pneumatic, means for moving them into and out of operative relation with the operating pneumatic, ducts having valves, connections between the ducts and the respective toneemitting elements, and means through which electrical circuits are closed when the sticks supporting members are moved pivotally, the said circuits opening the valves of said ducts.
In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in the presence of two witnesses HEINRICH BOCKISCH.
Witnesses: I
MARIAN L. TIMMINS, JonN Rown.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patentl,
Washington, D. C.
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