US1188061A - Device for the automatic control of engines. - Google Patents

Device for the automatic control of engines. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1188061A
US1188061A US73333512A US1912733335A US1188061A US 1188061 A US1188061 A US 1188061A US 73333512 A US73333512 A US 73333512A US 1912733335 A US1912733335 A US 1912733335A US 1188061 A US1188061 A US 1188061A
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Prior art keywords
engine
vacuum
rod
manifold
oil
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Expired - Lifetime
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US73333512A
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Frank J A Franquist
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Frank J A Franquist
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M11/00Component parts, details or accessories, not provided for in, or of interest apart from, groups F01M1/00 - F01M9/00
    • F01M11/02Arrangements of lubricant conduits
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/20Control lever and linkage systems
    • Y10T74/20207Multiple controlling elements for single controlled element
    • Y10T74/20238Interlocked

Description

F. J. A. FRANQUIST. DEVICE FOR THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF ENGINES.

' APPLICATION FILED NOV- 25.19l2. 1,188,061.

3 SHEETS-SHEET l- J MM I m OZMQ J Patented June 20, 1916.

F. J. A. FRANQUIST. DEVICE FOR THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF ENGINES.

' APPLICATIOV FILED NOV. 25. 1912. 1,188,061.

Patented J M620, 1916.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2- 3mm MAW/L WWW:

Mga 3 J) se i em F. J. A. FRANQUIST.

. DEVICE FOR THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF ENGINES.

APPLICATION FILED NOV-25,1912.

Patented June 20, 1916.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3- FRANK .r. A. FRANoUIs'r, or NEW BRUNSWICK, new JERSEY.

DEVICE FOIt THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF ENGINES.

. peciflcation of Letters Patent. Patented June 20, 1916.

- Application filed November 25, 1912. Serial 'No. 733,335. c

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK J. FRAN- UIsT, a citizen of the United States, residing at New Brunswick, in the county of Middlesex and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and nesful Improvements in Devices for the Automatic Control,

of which the following is a full,

of Engines, clear, and exact descrlption.

' This invention relates to thecontrol of engines and more particularly to the a uto-' matic control .ofinternal combustion engines.-

As is well known, in engines of this kind, the gas mixture in passing to the engine is ordinarily under a vacuum or reduced pressure as long as the engine is running, due to suction of the mixture into the ignition chamber or chambers, and this vacuum varies in accordance with the speed of. the motor or the pistonspeed with a given throttle. It has been found that the vacuum as well as the variance thereof can be made to do efficient work in connection with the controloiling, throttling and the like. I

This invention has for its principal object therefore to provide a simple, practical device enabling the use'of a vacuum for effecting various kinds of engine control.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of of various features of an engine such as elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter set forth and claimed.

f In the accompanying drawings wherein are shown some of the various possible em-. bodiments of my invention, Figure-1 representsan end view of an engine with a pop 1 tion broken away showing the device used in connection with an oiling means of the splash type; Fig. 2 represents a side view of the. device in cross-section associated with an oil pipe of an oil supply system; Fig. 3

represents a side view of the motor (partly in-cross-section) showing the device as used in connection with a throttle; Fig. 4 represents a side view, partly in section, of the device used in connection with an automobile starter switch; and Figs. 5 and 6 are side yiews of the motor showing the device.-

used in connection with the gears and associated apparatus of a self-starter.

Similar reference numerals refer to similar parts throughout the'various views of 1 the drawings. I 1 Referring now to Fig. 1 of the drawings,

shown as a ring and rivet structure. rod is adapted to be guided by the wall of an aperture passing through 'a head 13 of the lower section 9. The lower extremity of trough 1 designates the cylinders of a fluid operated engine here shown as an internal combustion engine, provided with flanges 2 on either side thereof, to one of which is attached in any suitable manner the intake manifold 3 serving to conduct the fuel mixture to the explosion chambers; the other flange 2 may be utilized for the attachment of a manifold or piping for the exhaust gases from the engine. The intake manifold extends along and joins the various combustion chambers of the engine in a well known manner. The

chambers are provided with pistons (not shown) in the usual manner. From the lowerportion of the manifold, at a point here shown adjacent to the flange 2, extends downwardly a pipe 4 which is of relatively small diameter as compared with that of the manifold. The lower extremity of the pipe 4 passes through the wall of the upper section or vacuum compartment 5 of a. diaphragm chamber, thus forming a conduit furnishing. communication" between the manifold and the interior of the section 5 of the diaphragm chamber. The section 5 of the diaphragm chamber is dished and isprovided with a dome 6 and a circular flange 7. Corresponding to this flange 7 is a flange 8 of the other section 9 of thediaphragm chamber, and between flanges 7 and 8 rests .the diaphragm 10 which may be of any suit- Through the center of the able material. diaphragm passes a rod 11 which is secured thereto by means of a fastening 12 here This the rod 11 passes within the hollow upper portion of a rod 14 in which it may be ad-v justably secured by means of a set-screw; To the lower end of the rod 14 is pivotally attached a splash-trough lever 15 whose other extremity is attached to a rod 16 on the interior of the crank case 17 of the motor.

This rod is suitably. supported by the crank case. Within the crank case and connected to theaxial rod 16 is a shallow basinor Oil splash trough 18 which is adapted to Inpve with the rod 1.6. The trough 18 is adapted to be supplied with oil in any con'venie'ntl manner throughan oil pipe 18. This U is. situatedimmediately beneath the cran and pitman 19 of the engine. To this pitman is'secured a scoop or paddle 20 which 'is adaptedto into'thetrough 18. The

trough 18 and the rods 11 and 14 andthe lever 15 substantially counterbalance eachother. Attached to the fastening disk in the section 5 of the diaphragm chamber is a spring 21. 'whose other extremity extends into the dome 6 and is attached to the adjusting set screw 22 passing through the wall thereof. The screw 22 may adjust the tension of the spring and may thereby effect an adjustment of the diaphragm. The lower section 9 is provided with spaced orifices 23 to provide for access of the atmosphere to this section. According to this construction, the trough 18 will be raised or lowered according to the vacuum produced in themanifold 3, and thus the spoon on the pitman will dip into a greater or less depth of oil in the trough 18 according as to whether the trough is raised or lowered. The amount of oil taken up by the spoon is thus regulated, and since the spoon is adapted to feed oil to the piston, shaft bearings, etc., by splashing them in a well known manner, it will be seen that the supply. of oil is thus effectively controlled. In the operation of this particular embodiment, the suction created by the vacuum or reduced pressure in the manifold 3 is transmitted to the interior of section 5 and pulls the diaphragm upward against the pressure of the spring 21. The diaphragm transmits its motion to the rods 11 and 13, forcing them upwardly and thereby lowering the basin 18. The oil in the basin 18 is thus lowered and the amount taken up by the spoon 20 for distribution by splashing is consequently lessened. This lessening of the amount of oil is proper in view of the fact that the engine requires less oil when running with a small throttle opening under slight load, and under these conditions the vacuum in the manifold will be greatest and'hence the basin 18 will be lowered to it lowest point. As the vacuum in the manifold becomes less, as by applying the load, or by opening the throttle, the diaphragm will tend to move under the action of the spring to raise the basin to thereby increase the oil supply.

In the embodiment shown in Fig. 2, the diaphragm is shown actuating an oil regulating valve which serves to control the supply ofoil passing through a pipe 24, which leads to the various bearings, pistons, etc. of the engine. Here, as in' Fig. 1, the pipe 4 is connected to the manifold 3, a vacuum being thereby created in the upper section 5 in accordance with the vacuum in the -manifold. The. diaphragm is here shown as raised to its uppermost position against the pressure of thespring 21 by this vacuum and thereby carries with it the rod 11, to the lower end of which is integrally or otherwise attached the valve disk 25. This valve disk serves to close the aperture 26. The

aperture communicates with the inlet and the aperture 26. As the vacuum in the manifold becomes less, the valve 25 is forced off its seat by the spring 21, thus-permitting a greater flow of oil to the parts of the engine.

In the embodiment shown in Fig. 3, the section 9 of the diaphragm is provided with a plate 30, through a stud on which passes the rod 11. This rod 11, here constituting a throttle rod, is attached to a piston-valve 31 forming part of a well-known type of Water jacketed throttle controlling the flow of the mixture to the manifold. As here shown, 32 represents the air-intake port, and a-conventional type of spray is shown at 33. The mixture of air and gasolene, or similar fluid, passes into the manifold past the piston-valve 31 which controls the flow according to its position in the passageway 34 leading to the manifold. As here shown, the vacuum in the manifold is high and the diaphragm has consequently become sucked to almost its extreme position for high vacuum and has thereby moved the pistonvalve 31 to a position to closely throttle the 7 mixture. When the vacuum in 3 becomes less, of course the diaphragm will move to force thepiston-valve toward the spray member 33 to thereby admit more mixture to the manifold.

In the embodiment shown in Fig. 4, the rod 11 is shown as connected to a wire 34 leading from a storage battery, not shown. The rod 11 is shown as providing a-gap between its end and the end of a contact 35 of a blade-switch 36, here shown as mounted on the dash-board of a vehicle. This switch is connected by means of a wire 37 to a starting motor. In connection with the use of the terms engine and starting-motor herein, it is to be understood that engine refers to the main driving mechanism, shown in this embodiment as an internal combustion engine, while starting-motor refers to any of the well-known auxiliary mechanisms used to start the engine. As here shown, the engine has been started, a vacuum has been formed in the manifold 3, the diaphragm 10 has acted, to withdraw the rod 11 to break the contact therebetween and the contact member 35. Under these conditions, the circuit to the starting motor is broken and the clashing of the gears of the starting-motor and those on the shaft of the engine is avoided, even if the bladeswitch has not been thrown to off position. Of course, under ordinary circumstances it the contact member 35, thus'making it possible upon the closure of the blade-switch 36 to start the engine by the starting motor in the usual manner.

. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 5, there is set forth an automatic means for throwing out the gear of a starting motor. .As there shown, the rod 11 is connected to a pinion 38 by means of a collar 39 attached to the pinion and a stirrup 40, through the fork of which passes the rod 11 which is thereby so joined to the stirrup 40 that the latter may rotate thereabout. The pinion 38 and collar 39 are adapted to slide along the groove 41 in the shaft 42 of the starting motor 43. The stirrup 4O embraces the end of the shaft 41 and this sliding motion is controlled by the motion of rod 11 which in turn is controlled by the motion of the diaphragm. As there shown, the diaphragm has been moved manually so that the pinion 38 engages with the gear 44 on the; flywheel 45 of the engine and therefore the starting motor 43 is in position to start the latter. When the vacuum in the manifold 3 operates on the diaphragm 10, this pinion 38 will be moved along the groove 42 throughrod 11, stirrup 40 and collar 39, out-of engagement with the gear 44, so that clashing of this gear with the pinion will be prevented.

' In the embodiment shown in Fig. 6, the rod 11 is shown as adjustabl ,attached by means of a set-screw 46 to a ocking-bar 47 adapted to travel back and forth in guides or bearings in a locking-bar hanger 48 and locking-bar guide 49 attached to the under sidel of the foot-board of. an automobile. On the rod 47 is screwed a locking-finger 50 which is positioned to contact with the lower end of a starter-palal, 51, extending upwardlythrough the foot-board; and pivotally attached to a yoke 52 which is attached to a collar 53 secured to the pinion 54 whichv is adapted to co-act with'the gear 44 on the fly-wheel 45. As described inconnection with Fig. 5, the pinion is adapted to travel backward and forward on the shaft 42 of a starting motor 43. As shown in Fig. 6, the

ermit the thrown in' mesh with the gear 44 through the yoke 52 and the engine will be actuated by the starting motor. When the engine has been started and it is no longer necessary for the starting motor 43 to act, the starter-pedal is released and a spring 55 then throws the pinion 54 out of mesh with the gear 44. vWhen the rod 11 moves under the influence of the diaphragm 10, in accordance with the vacuum in 3, however, the locking-finger 50 will come under the end of the starter-pedal 51 thus locking the starter-pedal in position so that as long as the vacuum remains in the manifold 3, or, in other words, substantially as long as the engine runs, the starter-pedal for the starting motor may not be thrown in. 1

According to these embodiments, then, it will be seen that a very useful and highly practical invention for securing the automatic control of internal combustion engines is secured. The device is extremely cheap to manufacture and may be installed with substantially no difficulty and at an extremely low cost upon all makes of engines. In action, the device not only achieves economy in the use of oil and fuel, but also, as will be obvious from the foregoing description, provides safety locking means in connection with self-starters.

The action of the apparatus herein de scribed in connection with the lubrication of the engine has a peculiar and advantageous significance. In all mechanical oilers heretofore devised, the feed of oil depends upon crank-shaft speed, so that when the engine is running at high speed with no load or a light load, the same quantity of oil is delivered as when the engine is running at the same speed on a heavy load. But when running at no load or a light load, less .oil is required than when running on a heavy load. Consequently there is a waste of oil and a condition approaching engine flooding, fouling of spark'plugs and so forth arises.- With a controller such as I have invented, the feed of the oil depends upon the load on the engine, because the load is responsible for the degree of vacuum in the manifold. As the load increases, the vacuum drops. Applicant has utilized this fact in a mechanism which feeds more oil as the load increases, and vice versa, thus preventing waste and flooding under no load or light load conditions. Sight 'feed lubricators have the same defect as .the mechanically driven libricators, i, 6., they feed fastest at light loads when the least lubrication is required.

- Having thus described my invention what I claim is p 1. In an internal combustion engine provided with a fuel inlet passage, a source of lubricating fluid and means for automatically supplying an increased amount of said lubricating fluid to a part of said engine upon a decrease of vacuum in said passage.

2. In an internal combustion engine provided with a fuel inlet passage, a source of lubricating fluid, a device connected with said source for controlling the supply of lubricant from said source to a part of said engine and means for automatically actuating said device to increase the supply of lubricant upon a decrease of vacuum in the fuel inlet passage of the engine.

3. In an internal combustion engine provided with a fuel inlet passage, a source of lubricating fluid and means for automatically supplying an increased amount of said lubricant to a part of said engine upon a decrease of vacuum in the fuel inlet passage, comprising a device for controlling the supply of lubricant from said source to .said part, means acting on said device conlubricating fluid to a part of said engine upon a decrease of vacuum in said passage, said means comprising a conduit connecting said source with a part of the engine other than the fuel inlet passage, a valve in said conduit for controlling the flow. of the lubricating fluid, and means for automatically opening said valve upon a decrease of vacuum in the fuel inlet passage of the engine.

5. In an internal combustion engine provided with a fuel inlet passage, a source of lubricating fluid and means for automatically supplying an increased amount of said lubricating fluid to a part of said engine upon a decrease of vacuum in said passage, said means comprising a conduit connecting said source of lubricating fluid with a part of the engine other than the fuel inlet passage, a valve in said conduit controlling the flow of the lubricating fluid, means acting on said valve to normally maintain it open and means opposing said last named means to automatically close said valve upon an increase of vacuum in said fuel inlet passage.

In Witness whereof, I subscribe my signature, in the presence of two witnesses.

.FRANK J. A.-FRANQUIST. Witnesses: I

WALDO M. CHAPIN, IDA M. PATTERSON.

US73333512A 1912-11-25 1912-11-25 Device for the automatic control of engines. Expired - Lifetime US1188061A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2602467A (en) * 1945-05-21 1952-07-08 Clayton Manufacturing Co Power-operated check valve
US2776722A (en) * 1954-10-05 1957-01-08 Germanich John Electrical vehicle speed controller

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2602467A (en) * 1945-05-21 1952-07-08 Clayton Manufacturing Co Power-operated check valve
US2776722A (en) * 1954-10-05 1957-01-08 Germanich John Electrical vehicle speed controller

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