US1152363A - Stove or furnace. - Google Patents

Stove or furnace. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1152363A
US1152363A US81391614A US1914813916A US1152363A US 1152363 A US1152363 A US 1152363A US 81391614 A US81391614 A US 81391614A US 1914813916 A US1914813916 A US 1914813916A US 1152363 A US1152363 A US 1152363A
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fire
magazine
front
pot
combustion
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US81391614A
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Theodore Weisberger
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Theodore Weisberger
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS
    • F24B1/00Stoves or ranges
    • F24B1/02Closed stoves
    • F24B1/024Closed stoves for pulverulent fuels

Description

T. WEISBERGER.

STOVE 0R FURNACE.

APPLICATION FILED JAN. 23. 1914.

Patented Aug. 31, 1915.

3 SHEETS-SHEET T. WEISBERGER.

STOVE 0R FURNACE.

APPLICATION FILED IAN.23.1914.

Patented Aug. 31, 1915.

3 SHEETSSHEET 2.

COLUMBIA PLANouR/mh 60-. WASHINGTON. D. c.

Patented Aug. 31, 1915.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

T. WEISBERGER.

STOVE 0R FURNACE.

I APPLICATION 'FI'LED JAN.23, I914. 1,1525%.

burr

THEODORE WEISB ERGER, OF NORTH YAKIMA, WASHINGTON.

s'rovn'on runnu cn.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed January 23, 1914. Serial No. 813,916. 7

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, THEODORE Winsnnncnn, a citizen of the United States, residing at North Yakima, in the county of Yakima and State of TWashington, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Stoves or Furnaces; and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates to improvements in stoves or furnaces for heating or cooking purposes, and especially tothat class of stoves known as magazine stoves adaptedto burn soft or bituminous coal, in which the magazine is charged nearly to the top with fuel, and fire burns from the base of the charge; the rising gases passing through the fuel being conducted downward through suitable passages, and being drawn along with the incoming air through said passages down, through and across the incandescent fuel into a heating chamber, whence it is drawn upward through said chamber and through suitable fines to thelsmoke pipe under the natural draft of said pipe, I

The invention is especially, intended'to provide an apparatusin which the fuel is automatically fed toward the back of the fire-pot, and in which the major portion of the mixed air and hydrocarbon gases are brought down to the rear of the fire-pot and are carried from the incandescent fuel to the front, whereby the green fuel has its volatile gases carried forward through the incandescent fuel in the front of the fire-pot, and complete combustion is secured. The products of combustion passing forward through the fire-pot are then caused to pass over a deflector, which tends to throw the heat downward in front of the stove, causing a wide angle of, dispersion of the heat rays. To prevent ignition of the fuelin the upper portion of the magazine I provide suitable insulating material, such as fire bricks, or the like. In the bottom ofpthe fire-pot, I provide suitable grates, preferably of the dumping type so that'the ashes may be expelled as the charge of fuel in the magazine settles downward.

According to my present invention I provide a heating chamber in front of the firepot which projects downward, and is separated from the ash-pit by an air space with an open air passage between the two, so that the air passingthrough said space may be heated and increase the radiation surface of the stove. Moreover, I preferably provide a straight front to the stove, which is heated from top to bottom by the products of combustion from the fire-pot.

In the usual method of constructing stoves, the lower portion of the stove is entirely devoted to the ash-pit, which has practically no heat radiating surface whatsoever. Above this is the grate, and above this is the fire-pot, the result being that the heating portion of the stove is at a considerable distance from the base thereof, with the result that a large portion of the surface of the stove which might be made effective for radlating purposes is practically useless; but according to my invention I arrange the heating chamber in such a way that the entire face and sides thereof are efficient heat radiating surfaces, while the back of the bottom also transmits heat to the air pass ing behind the same, while even the bottom of this heating chamber alsois heated and serves to heat the air currents adjacent to same.

My improved magazine may be applied not only for use in connection with heating stoves, but also for use in connection with cooking stoves, or furnaces, for hot water or steam heating.

These and other features of my improved construction will be more fully understood after reference to the accompanying drawings, in which similar parts are indicated by similarreference symbols throughout the several views. v

- Figure 1 shows a front elevation of my improved heating stove, and showing the door or front wall of the right-hand side thereof removed, and showing the parts broken away, and parts in section; Fig. 2 shows a central vertical section along the line 2--2 of Fig. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows; Figs. 3 and 4lshow, respectively, sections along the lines 33 and :irQiflf Fig. 2, and looking down; Fig. 5

shows a section through the grate, the same being on an enlarged scale, and also shows in dotted'lin'es the gears for dumping the gate; Fig. 6 shows a central vertical section through one of the grate members shown in Fig. 5; Fig. 7 shows in section a modified form of the deflector used instead of the water-back of Figs. 1-3; Fig. 8 is a similarview to Fig. 2, showing as a modifi- Patented Au 31, ref-5.

--; cation a simplified arrangement for conducting the incoming air andthe rising gases down from the top of thestove, wherein the back of the stove forms the rear-wall of the air passage; Fig. 9 shows a section along th line 9v9; of Fig.- 8,.an-dlooking down;

Fig. is a perspective view ofthe inner I v portions of the heatingstoveshown in Figs.

1,3 but with the addition of dampers for controllingthe side passages provided at the upward movement of the products of combustion and Fig. 11 shows the improved magazine of Figs. 13 and 10 as reversed and applied to a cooking stove. This figure shows the magazine in a similar section to that of Fi 2 but reversed and connected to a cooking stove, shown in central Vertical section.

Referring first to Figs. 1-6,"A represents the fire pot below the magazine whose top is closed by a door A provided with the register, or valve, a, which door is-hinged,

great a, and is provided with an outwardlyprojecting rib a which swings in the grooved recess a? mounted at the top of the plate A and thus keeps this clean of ashes, coal dust,

. and the like, thus automatically protecting the hinge from clogging up withco'al dust :when'the magazine is be ngcharged with I 7 The magazine is provided with interior walls A and A and with the outer walls outward as at a? and terminates ma suspended vertiealgrate a, having passages '6 therethrough between vertical bars.- This grate is bent at an angle a terminating the inclined face a. I The outer'shell of the stove is composed ofq he' side wallsv -A, A and A and the front plateA The frontplate and sides of the stove may be made either of metal,

I or ,ofisinglass, as desired. The shape of the stove is preferably rectangular in cross section, though the same may have one or 1 more of its sides curved, rounded, or of any desired shape.

Inv the lower portion" of the magazine the grate bars B are mounted, which are preferably composed of a series of cam-shaped disks B slid over the squared portion of the shafts B, as shown in Figs. 5*and 6. One, end of each of these shafts is reduced, as at Z to slip through the openings in the center of the plates 13 and to be journaled in the plates A and A The last one of these plates B maybe locked to the shaft B in any convenient way, as by the pin 6 This shaft is journaled near its other end, as at 6 the plate A7, and'is provided with a squared end 12 to which may be attached the handle B forroc'king the said shaft,

and through the gearing hereinafter to be described for simultaneously rocking the shaft of the other grate member.

Mounted between the plates A and A are the gear wheels H and H, which are connected to the corresponding shafts B in any convenient way, as by the cotter pins Z)".

These gear wheels have meshing teeth It,

whichterminate in the blanks it, see Fig.

5, and thus permit the grate bars to be rocked through the desired angle in one direction, and to be automatically prevented from turning too far in the reverse direction, as shown in Fig. 5. Below the grate bars a removable ash pan C is mounted.

The front portion of the stove comprises a heating chamber D, having the front plate A and theside plates A and A either of metal or ininglass, or both, as may be desired. These front and side plates preferably extend from the top to the bottom of the stove, and the bottom of this chamber D is closed by the bottom wall D and the inclined rear wall D terminating just below and supporting the short comb-like grate In this heating chamber D is mounted a deflector E which is shown as a water-back in which water flows through the inlet pipe E, and escapes out of the outlet pipe E2, see Fig. 2, for heating or culinary purposes This deflector has a curved or straight inclinedoverhanging face 6.

, On the top of the deflector E I provide a shelf 0 to support the loose fire brick F, used to keep the heat from the magazine. Inthe interior of the water-back is a plate 6, leaving a water passage 6 at one end for the passage of the water from the lower side of said plate to the upper side thereof, as shown in Fig. 1. This deflector E preferably extends entirely across the interior of the chamber D between the outer walls A and A and is carried by brackets a cast on said walls.

The operation of the device shown in Figs. 16 is as follows :Referring to Fig. 2, the

fire is laid as follows :Fill the fire-pot full.

of coal up to the inverted funnel-shaped mouth of the magazine, then lay on the kindling wood with paper, waste, or other material, to ignite same, then set fire to same from above, and there will be a down draft through the fuel through the open space 7 in the front of the fire-pot into the heating chamber D. The incoming air passes through the register a, and down through the throat of the magazine and through the fuel, and is drawn up again through the chamber D and the side passages 8 and 9 to the flue 10, and thence through the opening 11 into the smoke pipe 12. After the fire is started, the magazine is charged with fuel up to the bottom of the openings 2 and 4, and the incoming air now passes down through the passages 3 and 5 between the walls A and A and the walls A and A respectively. Mingled with this air are any volatile gases which rise from the'fuel in the magazine,

and these are brought down to the top and back of the fire. The amount of airpassing forward through the opening 2 and down through the passage 3 to the top of the fire is controlled by any suitable register 2 The major portion of the air with the commingled gases is caused to pass to the rear of the fire pot through the opening i and the passage 5, and through the opening 6 in the vertical grate a and enters the burning fuel in the fire pot. p

The front wall of the mouth of the magazine is preferably straight, while the rear wall is inclined in the form of an inverted funnel, as at a, so that any swelling of the fuel due to the coking of same as it is heated will not choke the outlet of the throat of the magazine, and interfere with .the free downward movement of the superposed fuel therein. Moreover by havingvthis inclined.

face in rear of the throat of the magazine, there will be a tendency of the green fuel to fall backward and feed to the back of the fire pot in front of the vertical grate a Now the air and gases passing through this grate will strike this green fuel and the com bustion will be progressive until the products of combustion will escape through the incandescent fuel at the front of the fire-box, thus insuring perfect combustion and intense heatat the front of the fire. The front of the fire, which constitutes the primary radiation surface, is intensely hot, while the back of the fire is comparatively (3001. Parts of the products of combustion, together with part of the radiant heat, will be deflected by the curved surface of the deflector E, and

will heat the whole front and bottom of the heating chamber D, thus giving a very wide angle of dispersion of the heat rays from the front of the furnace, and at the same time providing a very large radiating surface for the heating chamber D. Thus it will be seen that thepart E not only serves to deflect the products of combustion, but also to reflect downward and outward a material part of the radiant heat. The radiating surface of the heating chamber D comprises not only the top, side walls, and front, but also the bottom D, and the in clined wall D back of which the air tends to pass through the opening D which. is spaced away from the ash-pit so that practically no heat is wasted in heating up the ash-pit, but an increased radiating surface is secured by said construction;

Thus, it will be seen that I provide a very wide angle of dispersion of the heat rays, and a very large radiating surface for the heat. Moreover, by this construction the heat radiating surfaces of the heating chamber Dare near'the floor of the roo1n,where the air is normally coldest, and thus convection currents are started near the floor of the room.

After passing upwardthrough the cham ber D, the products of combustion are carried through'the side passages 8 and 9 to the fine 10, and thence escape through the outlet 11 into the smoke pipe 12, where they are carried offby the natural draft. The escape of the products of combustion through these side passages 8 and 9 may be controlled, if desired, by a suitable damper arrangement,

such as that shown in Fig. 10, in which I, I,

all the products of combustion will pass above said deflector and over said dampers into the upper portions of the passages 8 and 9, and thence to the flue 10 and out through the smoke pipe; but if the dampers are turned to the vertical position thiswill close the passage for the products of combustion through said passages 8 and 9 above thedefiector E, buttwill leave the passage for said products of combustion open beneath said deflector E, and back of the dampers, so that these products of combustion may becaused either to escape from the top of the chamber 1), or from the bottom of the chamber, as may be preferred; or the relative, amount of the products of combustion passing above or below the deflector E may be regulated. by adjustmentof the dampers aforesaid. Air may also be let into the bottom of the furnace in the usual way through the door C of the ash-pit shown in Fig. l, but this will rarely be required.

In place of the water-back constituting the deflector E shown in Fig. 2, a solid deflector made of fire clay, or other suitable material, such as E in Fig. 7, maybe used if desired.

In the modification shown in Figs. 8 and 9, the walls A and A of Fig. 2 are combined in one, and the-down draft coming through the register a enters the opening a, passes down the opening a at the back of the magazine, and then flows into the combustion chamber above the dumping grate. through the opening 6 shown in Fi g. 2. The products of combustion pass from the combustion chamber into the front chamber 1) as before, and then pass upward through the side passages 8 and 9, and the openings a intov the flue a, which is con- I I nected the sinoke' pipe 12 Thus the fiow of the gasesis substantially the same as before, butthere is a slight simplifica'tion of construction inthe rear portion of the stove.

In both cases, there is a downdraft at the rear of the magazine which passes through the-fuel;forward and upward, as above 'eX- ained; f '1 i f the adaptation. of the magazine to a cooking stove, shown in Fig. '11, the front portion of the-heating stoveis removed entirely,

and 'thejmagazine I is turned through 180 to connect with the open end of the'cooking ofthefuel, and instead of passing into the bumper stoveK', which is provided with the ordinary,"or any suitable, oven K, with air passages,'7c, 7c, k ,]c 'and 71: for conducting the heated products of f'combustion up and around the oven, and then into the side passages 70]? and up to the smoke pipe L, .which iscontrolled the damperL. This cookingstove is preferably provided with an auxiliary grate M mounted .on a shaft m, and adapte'dto be rocked down against the M when it is desired to dumpthe grate.

The construction of-the other grate memhers is similar to that already described. In this form of device, there is a down draft through the side passages 3 and '5 of the magazine' which fiows into-theback and top front?heating'chaniber D, as shown in Fig.

2, the "products of combustion flow into the upper passage is of the cooking stove, as'already described. 7

, In. order "to prevent the front wall of the I oven from being burnt out, a removable false front 70 may be provided, which can be removedwhen worn out. In thismodification, 1 have shown a slightly different handle a 'from that shown at a in Figs.

2 and 8, for turning the'rcgistera and for lifting the door A.'

- apparatusand' in the construction, combination and arrangement ofparts whichcan' be my invention:-

'nsed'; without departing'from the spirit of Having thus described m'y invention, what lfclaini and desire to secureb'y Letters Pat'- entfof the United States is 1. A combu'stion apparatus for stoves or furnaces, comprising a fire pot having plane parallel s des" and an openlng 1n the front wall thereof, a magazine ELbOVQSdld. fire pot inclined rearward near its base, an air inlet in the top ofsaid magazine, a verticalgrate mounted across the rear of said fire pot below saidma'gazine'and extending ent rely across the rear end of the fire pot between said parallel sides, and front and back walls spaced away from said magazine to form downwardly-directed air passages for the front and-top of the fire pot, and to the rear thereof, respectively, said back wall being inclined rearward corresponding to the rearward incline of the base of the magazine, in combination with a heating chamber mounted in the front of said fire pot and receiving the products of combustion through the opening in the front wall thereof, said heating chamber being provided with fine connections to the smoke pipe, substantially as described.

2. A combustion apparatus for stoves or furnaces, comprising a fire pot having an openingin the front wall thereof, a magazine above the same and inclined rearward near its base, an air inlet in the top of said magazine, a vertical grate mounted a the rear of said fire pot below said magazine, and front and back walls spaced away from said magazine to form downwardly-directed air passages to the front and top of the fire pot, and to the rear thereof, respectively, said back wall being inclined rearward and corresponding to the rearward incline of the base of the magazine, in combination with 'a heating chamber mounted in front of said firepot, and receiving the products of combustion through the opening in the front Wall of the fire pot, said heating chamber being provided with fine connections to the smoke pipe, with a deflector having an inclined lower face and a reverselv inclined upper face terminating in a shelf, said deflector extending across said heating chamber above said fire pot, with heat insulating material mounted on said shelf, substantially as described.

3. Thecombination'with a magazine stove having a fire-pot opening in the front thereof, and means for supplying air to the rear of said fire-pot, and an ash pit located below said fire-pot, of a rectangular heating chamber mounted in front of said fire-pot and receiving the products of combustion therefrom, said heating chamber projecting downwardly below the opening in said firepot and being separated from said ash pit by an air space, and a deflector projecting into said heating chamber and located above the opening in said fire-pot and adapted to reflect the heat rays downward into the lower portion of said heating chamber, with means for carrying the products of coin bustion from said heating chamber to the fine, substantially as described.

The combination with a magazine stove having a fire pot opening in the front thereof, of arectangular heating chamber mounted in front of said fire pot and receiving the products of combustion therefrom, said heating chamber projecting downwardly below the opening in said fire pot, and a curved deflector projecting into said heating chamber and located above the opening in said fire pot, with side passages connecting said heating chamber with the smoke stack, and dampers mounted. in said side passages and adapted to throw the products of combustion above or below said curved deflector as desired, substantially as described.

5. A combustion apparatus for stoves or furnaces, comprising a fire pot having an opening in the front wall thereof, a magazine above said fire pot inclined rearward near its base, an air inlet in the top of said magazine, a vertical grate mounted across the rear of said-fire pot below said magazine and extending entirely across the rear end of the fire pot between said parallel sides, and front and back walls spaced away from said magazine to form downwardly-directed air passages for the front and top of the fire pot, and to the rear thereof, respectively, in combination with a heating chamber mounted in the front of said fire pot and receiving the products of combustion through the opening in the front wall thereof, said heating chamber being provided with flue connections to the smoke pipe, substantially as described.

6. A combustion apparatus for stoves or furnaces, comprising a fire pot having an opening in the front wall thereof, a magazine above said inclined rearward near its base, an air inlet in the top of said magazine, a vertical grate mounted at the rear of said fire pot below said magazine, and front and back Walls spaced away from said magazine to form downwardly-directed air passages to the front and top of the fire pot, and to the rear thereof, respectively, in combination with a vheating chamber mounted in front of said fire pot, and receiving the products of combustion through the openingin the front wall of the fire pot,

said'heating chamber being provided with flue connections to the smoke pipe, with a deflector having an inclined lower face and a reversely inclined upper face, said deflector eXtendmg across said heating chamber above said fire pot, substantially as described,

In testimony whereof, I aifix my signature, 1n presence of two witnesses.

rnnonoan WEISBERGER.

Witnesses:

D. LEWIS MATTERN, H. T. MCKEEVER.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,

Washington, .D. G.

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430594A (en) * 1947-11-11 Magazine stove with gas combustion
US2579213A (en) * 1951-12-18 Smokeless solid fuel heater with
US5074225A (en) * 1989-10-18 1991-12-24 Petrie A Stephen Mechanism for feeding solid materials
US5099769A (en) * 1989-10-18 1992-03-31 Petrie A Stephen Door mechanism

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2430594A (en) * 1947-11-11 Magazine stove with gas combustion
US2579213A (en) * 1951-12-18 Smokeless solid fuel heater with
US5074225A (en) * 1989-10-18 1991-12-24 Petrie A Stephen Mechanism for feeding solid materials
US5099769A (en) * 1989-10-18 1992-03-31 Petrie A Stephen Door mechanism

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