US1035021A - Safety-weight for submarine vessels. - Google Patents

Safety-weight for submarine vessels. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1035021A
US1035021A US1908428149A US1035021A US 1035021 A US1035021 A US 1035021A US 1908428149 A US1908428149 A US 1908428149A US 1035021 A US1035021 A US 1035021A
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Prior art keywords
weight
vessel
weights
pocket
valve
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Maxime Alfred Laubeuf
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Maxime Alfred Laubeuf
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63GOFFENSIVE OR DEFENSIVE ARRANGEMENTS ON VESSELS; MINE-LAYING; MINE-SWEEPING; SUBMARINES; AIRCRAFT CARRIERS
    • B63G8/00Underwater vessels, e.g. submarines; Equipment specially adapted therefor
    • B63G8/14Control of attitude or depth
    • B63G8/24Automatic depth adjustment; Safety equipment for increasing buoyancy, e.g. detachable ballast, floating bodies

Description

M. A. LAUBEUP. SAFETY WEIGHT FOR SUBMARINB VBSSBLS.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 20, 1908.

Patented Aug. 6, 1912.

2 8HEETB-8HEBT 1.

amaenl'oz:

M. A. IJAUBEUF. SAFETY WEIGHT FOR SUBMARINE VESSBLS. APPLICATION FILED APR.20, 1908.

1,035,021. Patented Aug. 6, 1912.

2 SKEETBSHEET 2,

. Lesson.

mars

STATES PATENT OFFICE.

MAXIME ALFRED LAUBEUF, OF PARIS, FRANCE.

SAFETY-WEIGHT FOR SUBMARINE VESSELS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 6, 1912.

Application filed April 20, 1908. Serial No. 428,149.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MAXIME ALFRED LAoBnUF, a citizen of the Republic of France, residing at Paris, in the Department of the Seine, France, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in SafetyWeights for Submarine Vessels, of which the following is a specification.

My present invention pertains to improvements in submarine vessels, and has reference more particularly to the arrangement and manipulation of safety weights.

The invention is illustrated in the annexed drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a submarine vessel showing my invention applied thereto; Fig. 2 a vertical sectional view of a portion of the hull, showing the weight and the operating mechanism on a somewhat enlarged scale; Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view, taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 a diagrammatic view, showing a modified arrangement, whereby the weights may be released at any desired point or automatically released when the vessel has attained a predetermined depth; Fig. 5 a detail View showing a modified arrangement of the valve-actuating mechanism; and Fig. 6 a detail sectional view of the valve used in conjunction with the primary form of the apparatus.

The main object of the present invention is to provide a system of safety Weights which may be manipulated from a single point to instantly release either weight, or both, as occasion may require.

A further object of the invention is to provide, in conjunction with the manuallyoperated releasing mechanism, an automatically-operated releasing mechanism, which when the vessel has attained a predetermined depth will automatically release the weights. The arrangement of the weights in the hull is such that they may be released notwithstanding the fact that the vessel may be grounded or resting upon the bottom at the particular oint or points where the weight or Weig ts are located. The arrangement contemplates the use of at least two weights, one fore and the other aft, withmeans for releasing one or the other or a both of said wei hts.

nates the weight which is placed fore, and C the corresponding weight ilaced aft. A. pocket or recess D is formed 1n the hull for the reception of each weight, the pocket being of a height greater than that of the Weight and the weight-sustaining mechanism, which is locatcd'in the upper portion of the pocket. The pocket will be made in the form of a truncated cone or pyramid, and the weight will have the same general shape but will be somewhat smaller than the pocket, in order that when suspended within the pocket the bottom of the weight, may be at a point higher than the general line of the bottom of the hull. The weight is suspended above the bottom for the purpose of allowing said weight to be disengaged when the vessel is resting upon the ground in linewith the pockets in which the weight is located. The upper end of each weight is provided with a ring or eye E, into which passes the free end of a hook or L-shaped member F, the latter being secured upon or rigidly aftixed to a horizontally-disposed rocker-shaft G, which extends through a stuiling-box H, secured to one side wall of the pocket. The outer end of the shaft will by preference be supported in a hearin I (Fig. ,3), secured to that wall of the poc lret which is opposite the wall carrying the stutlingdoox. To the inner end of the shaft is secured an arm J, the free or outer end of the arm (when the weight is in its elevated position) extending beneath a pin or pistonrod K, which latter is secured to and movable with a piston L mounted in a cylinder M. So long as the piston-rod is projected out and extends over the arm J, as shown in the drawings, the weight will be held in its suspended position.

As will be seen upon reference to Fig. 1, there is a piston and cylinder for each weight, and pipes N N extend from the respective pistons to a valve mechanism 0, by which the admission of compressed air or other fluid under pressure from a pipe P to either of said pipes N or N is controlled. Said pipes discharge into the cylinders in front of the pistons, so that compressed air or other agent passing into the cylinders will force the pistons rearwardly and withdraw the rods K from over the arms J, thereby permitting the rocker-shafts to rotate and the weights to slip oil the hooks F. In Fig. 6 I- have shown a valve arrangement whereby either weight. may-be released, or

both released simultaneously. In said figure, P denotes apipe leading to a chamber P, exit from which to the pipes N, N is controlled by the two valves 1? a'ndI, normally held closed by springs. An actuating lever P fulcrumed .in a sliding block P underlies the downwardly-projecti11g valvestems, and by rocking it in one or the other direction, one or the other valve may be opened, as desired. By operating a screw P9, mounted in the yoke P of the valvecasing, lever P will be bodily raised, and both valves will be simultaneously opened, and as a consequence both weights likewise released. It is conceivable, of course, that separate valves may be employed to control the supply of compressed air to the two pylinders, but in order that-the apparatus may be under the control of the navigator the valves should be located ata single point. While a single weight only is shown at each end of the vessel, a plurality of weightsmay be employed at each end, but as this is mere duplication it is not deemed necessary to illustrate the same. The angle of inclination of the side walls of the pocket in which the weight is normally housed is such that when the weight is released it will pass out of the pocket under the action of gravity, this notwithstanding the fact that the vessel may be in an inclined position.

In Fig. 4 is illustrated a modified arrangement, under which the weights may be either released manually or automatically when the vessel has reached a predetermined depth. In said figure the weight and suspending means therefor are similar to those shown in the previous figures, and are designated by the same reference letters. Opening into the cylinder M at the lower end thereof to one side is a pipe N, con-' trolled by the valve 0, as in the former construction. A second pipe Q also opensinto the lower end of the cylinder, said pipe terminating in a valve-chamber R, in which is mounted a valve S that normally closes the port or passage leading to the pipe QQ Air or other fluid under pressure enters the valve-chamber through a pipe T, which may be a branch of the pipe'that conveys the compressed air to the pipe N. Valve S is mounted upon a stem U, provided wit-h a quick pitchthread V, which. works in a suitable bearing secured in the valve-casing. To the'outer end of the valve stem U is secured an arm W, which in turn is pivotally connected by alink WV to the lower end of the solenoid X of a magnet The winding of the magnet is included in a normally open circuit which may be c osed by a solenoi switch Z, whid h latter is in a normally open circuit A. Included in the circuit- A is a gage, co prising an adjustable contact member B, which may be set to any desired point upon the scale, and a neeformed in the vessel.-

a Bourdon tube D, to which is attached a rack F, said rack meshing with a pinion G made integral with or secured to an internal gear H, which in turn meshes with a pinion I, to which the needle is attached. The rack is held to the pinion by a roller J It will, of course, be understood that the pinion I Will-be insulated, so that until the needle 0 contacts with the member B the circuit A will be open. The contact member B may be adjusted to close the circuit at any predetermined point, and'as will be readily appreciated when the vessel reaches a given dept-h the needle will close the circuit A, thereby energizing the magnet E and actuating the solenoid switch Z to close the air-- cuit in which the magnet Y is located. A

relatively weak current is all that it is necessary to employ in conjunction with the gage and the magnet .E. A heavy current, however, will be passed through the line which controls the action of the magnet Y and its solenoid. The upward movement of the solenoid X will, through the connections hereinbefore described, rotate the valve-stem U and unseat the valve S, permitting air to pass through the pipe Q, and move the piston inwardly into the cylinder M. This will have the effect of releasing the weights in the manner here-inbefore described.

It will be readily appreciated that in so far as the connections for actuating the valive are concerned they may be changed without departing from the spirit of the present invention. For instance, in Fig. 5 the valve-stem is shown as provided with a worm-wheel F, actuated by a wormformed upon the end of the shaft G. ofa jmotor H.

Said motor will occupy the same relative position as the magnet Y and its solenoid,

which arein effect a motor. It will like- 'wise be understood that the pipe Q may be provided with a branch or lateralextending fro the weight located in the other pocket In so far as the generic invention is concerned, any means for releasing the weights instantly may be employed, though the arrangement s'hown will be found efiicacious in practice.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A submarine vessel provided with water-tight pockets or recesses in its hull, said pockets being placed fore and aft; a weight located in each pocket; and means under.. the control of the navigator for Wholly freeing and releasing at will either of said weights or, simultaneously, both of said weights, and permitting the same to pass freely out of their respective pockets.

2. A submarine vessel provided with 1,os:s,oa1 v a pockets located fore and aft; a weight suseach'shaft; an eye upon each of said-weights pended. within each of said ockets, the botadapted to engage a hook; an arm rig1dl .tom portion of the weight ein at a point secured to the inner end of the rock-she t 50 abov'ethe-line of the bottom of t e hull; and" within the hull of the vessel; a pair of cylmeans under. the control of the navigator inders; a piston mounted ineaehof said cylfor releasing dither of said weights, or both inders; a piston-rod extending outwar ly of said weights simultaneously at will. I, from each of the cylinders,'the piston-rods 3. A submarine vessel provided withf passingpver the respective arms; a source of 55 pockets fore and aft; a weight mounted in fluid pressure; pi es leading therefrom to to each of said pockets, the bottom voft the the cylinders; an a valve for controlling weight standin' at a point above the bottom the passage of the fluid to said cylinders, of the hull of" t e vessel; and means located Whereb one or both-of said-weights may be amidship for releasing one or the other or release by the simple'manipulation of the 60 both of'said weights and permitting the valve. same to pass out of the pockets 7. A submarine vessel provided with a 4. A submarine vessel provided with ocket or recess in its hull; a weight located pockets located in the lower portion thereof in the pocket; means under the control of fore and aft; 'aft weight mounted in each of the navigator for releasing the weight and 65 "said pockets,the wei ht being of suchheight permitting the same to pass out of the. that ltsbottom stan s at a pofiit above the pocket while the vessel'is at any point of bottom of the hull of the vessel; means for snbmergence; and au omatic means for resustaining'said weights in the ockets; and leasing the weight when the vessel has meansunder the control of' t is 'navigator reached a predetermined depth. 70

for releasing either of said weights orboth 8. A submarine vessel provided with a of them simultaneously at will. pocket or recess in its hull; a weight located 5. A submarme vessel provided with a 1n the pocket; mechanism under the control pocketlocated in the bottom portion there of the navigator for releasing the weight; a of; a weight, said weight being of such depthage; and means controlled by said 75 height that the bottom thereof stands at a gage 5oz actuatin the weight-releasing point considerably above the bottomline of mechanism when t e vessel has reached a r the hull; a rockshaft extending into the predetermined depth.

pocket; a hook-shaped member carried by '9. A submarine vessel provided with a the rock-shaft; an e e upon the upper por pocket or recess in its hull; a weight located 80 tion of the weight a apted normally to pass therein; fluid-pressure mechanism under the over the hook-she ed member; means for control of the navigator for releasing the normally holding 1: 1e rock-shaft against moweight when desired; and independent autotion; and means for releasing the rock-shat t matic means for throwing the fluid-pressure so as to permit it to move and disengage the mechanism into 0 eration when the vessel 85 hook from the eye and the weight. has reached a pre etermined depth.

6. A submarine vessel provided with In testimony whereof, I havesigned my pockets fore and aft, each of said pockets name to this specification'in the presence of having infilinfed silde walls; a wgeight mounttwo subscribing witnesses.

e in eac o sai poc ets, sai wei hts being of the same general form as the pockets MAXIME' ALFRED LAUBEUF' and bein of a height materially less than Witnesses:

that of the pocket; a rock-shaft extending Cues. H. Wm'rmo, into each of said pockets; a hook carried by H. C. (30KB.

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2439211A (en) * 1924-11-13 1948-04-06 Us Navy Submarine mine
US2482106A (en) * 1941-12-30 1949-09-20 Robert C Duncan Device for controlling the buoyancy of subfloating bodies
US3012502A (en) * 1942-01-06 1961-12-12 Moon Charles Depth regulating device for subfloating bodies
DE1198696B (en) * 1961-10-09 1965-08-12 Dr Kurt Hoernig Yacht with Kiel and weighting
DE1244009B (en) * 1961-10-16 1967-07-06 Dr Kurt Hoernig Yacht with Kiel and weighting
US4054132A (en) * 1975-04-14 1977-10-18 Douglas Allen Deeds Integrated diving system
US4493281A (en) * 1983-04-01 1985-01-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Shallow depth lead weight ejection circuit
US4869190A (en) * 1988-06-27 1989-09-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Solid state power failure squib ignition control
US4951587A (en) * 1989-08-09 1990-08-28 Honeywell Inc. Recovery system for a training torpedo
DE102010010161A1 (en) * 2010-03-03 2011-09-08 Technische Universität Berlin Triggering device for a load at a facility and underwater equipment

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2439211A (en) * 1924-11-13 1948-04-06 Us Navy Submarine mine
US2482106A (en) * 1941-12-30 1949-09-20 Robert C Duncan Device for controlling the buoyancy of subfloating bodies
US3012502A (en) * 1942-01-06 1961-12-12 Moon Charles Depth regulating device for subfloating bodies
DE1198696B (en) * 1961-10-09 1965-08-12 Dr Kurt Hoernig Yacht with Kiel and weighting
DE1244009B (en) * 1961-10-16 1967-07-06 Dr Kurt Hoernig Yacht with Kiel and weighting
US4054132A (en) * 1975-04-14 1977-10-18 Douglas Allen Deeds Integrated diving system
US4493281A (en) * 1983-04-01 1985-01-15 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Shallow depth lead weight ejection circuit
US4869190A (en) * 1988-06-27 1989-09-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Solid state power failure squib ignition control
US4951587A (en) * 1989-08-09 1990-08-28 Honeywell Inc. Recovery system for a training torpedo
DE102010010161A1 (en) * 2010-03-03 2011-09-08 Technische Universität Berlin Triggering device for a load at a facility and underwater equipment
WO2011107093A1 (en) 2010-03-03 2011-09-09 Technische Universität Berlin Release apparatus for a load on a device and underwater device
DE102010010161B4 (en) * 2010-03-03 2012-04-12 Evologics Gmbh Triggering device for a load at a facility and underwater equipment
US9126662B2 (en) 2010-03-03 2015-09-08 Evologics Gmbh Release apparatus for a load on a device and underwater device

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