US1013121A - Fluid-operating mechanism. - Google Patents

Fluid-operating mechanism. Download PDF

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US1013121A
US1013121A US61464011A US1911614640A US1013121A US 1013121 A US1013121 A US 1013121A US 61464011 A US61464011 A US 61464011A US 1911614640 A US1911614640 A US 1911614640A US 1013121 A US1013121 A US 1013121A
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fluid
piston
pistons
chamber
chambers
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US61464011A
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Arthur Augustus Brooks
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Arthur Augustus Brooks
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01CROTARY-PISTON OR OSCILLATING-PISTON MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01C1/00Rotary-piston machines or engines
    • F01C1/08Rotary-piston machines or engines of intermeshing engagement type, i.e. with engagement of co- operating members similar to that of toothed gearing
    • F01C1/12Rotary-piston machines or engines of intermeshing engagement type, i.e. with engagement of co- operating members similar to that of toothed gearing of other than internal-axis type
    • F01C1/14Rotary-piston machines or engines of intermeshing engagement type, i.e. with engagement of co- operating members similar to that of toothed gearing of other than internal-axis type with toothed rotary pistons
    • F01C1/20Rotary-piston machines or engines of intermeshing engagement type, i.e. with engagement of co- operating members similar to that of toothed gearing of other than internal-axis type with toothed rotary pistons with dissimilar tooth forms

Description

A. A. BROOKS.
FLUID OPERATING MECHANISM.
APPLIOATIO'H FILED MAR. 16, 1911.
1,01 8,121, Patented Jan. 2, 1912.
3 SHEET8-BEEET 1.
M W flying COLUMBIA PLRNOURAPH CO" WASHINGTON, D- C.
A. A. BROOKS.
FLUID OPERATING MECHANISM.
APPLICATION FILED MAR. 15, 1911.
1,01 3,121 Patented Jan.2, 1912. 3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.
con/mi CO.,WASHINUTON n c A. A. BROOKS.
FLUID OPERATING MECHANISM.
APPLICATION FILED MAR.15, 1911.
1,013,121 Patented Jan.2, 1912.
3 QHBBTS-SHEET 3.
COLUMBIA PLANDGRAPH 60., WASHINGTON, D. c
ARTHUR AUGUSTUS BROOKS, OF ASHTONUPONMERSEY, ENGLAND.
FLUID-OPERATING MECHANISM.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Jan. 2,1912.
Application filed. March 15, 1911. Serial No. 614,640.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, ARTHUR AUcUsTUs BROOKS, a subject of the King of Great Britain, residing at Ashton-upon-Mersey, in the county of Chester, England, have invented a new and useful Fluid-Operating Mechanism, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to engines or pumps having annular piston chambers.
The improved engine is characterized by the piston chambers intersecting one another at diametrically opposite points. Each chamber has a separate piston, and one piston forms an abutment for another, that is to sayin a prime mover, having two piston chambers the piston of either chamber is impelled by the pressure acting between its end and one side of the piston of the other chamber, which crosses its path behind and thereby divides the chamber with a continuously moving abutment. The pistons are operatively connected to the engine shaft, preferably by toothed gearing. The admission and discharge may be carried out with a suitable valve arrangement such as by ports uncovered by the pistons or by tappet or by independent slide valves, or by a combination of such valves.
In the drawings attached hereunto, an engine made in accordance with my invention is illustrated in two forms.
Figures 1 to 9 refer to an engine designed for a working fluid under constant pres sure such as steam or compressed air. It is provided with a controlling and reversing valve, and also a cut off valve.
Reference will first be made to Figs. 1 to 9. Fig. 1 represents a longitudinal section of the engine and Fig. 2 a cross section through the casing along line 2 z of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 represents a plan of the pistons shown in Fig. 2; Figs. 1 and 5 diagrammatic vlews of the positions of the pistons and the valve ports. Fig. 5 represents a plan of the ends of the pistons when in contact. Figs. 6 and 7 represent two views of the pistons in side and end elevations respectively; Fig. 8, the gearing between the pistons and the motor shaft in elevation, and Fig. 9, a plan of the cut off valve.
The casing or body of the engine may be conveniently built up in four segments of a sphere 1, 2, 3 and 4, Fig. 1. These are formed with flanges 5 which are faced up to make a pressure tight joint, the flanges being clamped together with bolts and nuts or studs not shown in the drawing, in the known way. The ends of the casing or body are recessed and fitted with flanged covers 6 and 7 having bosses 8 and 9 which form the bearings for the power shaft 10. The end of the latter in the boss 9 is provided with a thrust bearing and this is represented by the hardened steel block 11, a screw 12 being provided for adjustment. The body or casing is shown with a base part 13 for bolting to a foundation.
In the body or casing are formed two annular chambers 16 and 17 preferably of the sectional form shown. These chambers are conveniently machined by'reason of the body or casing being made in separate sections mechanically fixed together so that the joint lies in the central plane of each chamber. The chambers in this example being of the same diameter and having a common center 18, intersect one another in two places that is to say upon opposite sidesv diametrically.
One piston is employed in each chamber and each is one hundred and eighty degrees in length. The pistons are represented by 20 and 21, see also Figs. 6 and 7 which show a piston in side and end elevations. Each end of the pistons is beveled desirably at an angle of forty five degrees and the pistons being one hundred and eighty degrees in length, each comes in contact with the other every half revolution of the piston. in its chamber, the beveled faces 22 being then in rubbing contact, see Fig. 5 for approximately fifteen degrees with a piston of the proportions illustrated. The pistons being long, that is to say half the circumference of the annular chamber in length, and a good sliding fit, no packing of any kind is generally required. Along the outer edges of each piston on the flat sides are cut racks 23 suitable for a bevel gear wheel fixed on the power shaft to. engage with. Two bevel gear wheels 24and 25 are fixed on the power shaft 10 and are inclosed in the recessed part of the casing by the covers 6 and 7 The recessed parts are cut through into each chamber as seen at 26 Fig. 2, the rims of the bevel wheels 21 and 25 projecting through the openings so formed, so as to engage with the racks of the pistons. Each piston in making one revolution in its chamber engages alternately with the upper part of one bevel wheel and the lower part of the other one, so that during one half of a revolution it drives the power shaft through one bevel wheel and during the other half revolution it drives through the other bevel wheel. The bevel wheels are made as large as possible, that is to say the pistons are engaged thereby at approximately their largest diameter and the teeth of the gears are long so that each piston can engage one bevel wheel before being quite out of gear with the other. In Fig. 8 a plan of the pistons and the bevel gearing alone is shown, the two pistons and 21 being in engagement with the bevel wheel 25.
The working fluid is directed into and out of the annular chambers and the direction of rotation of the power shaft is controlled, in the following way :F irst, a stop and reversing valve Fig. 1 shown in spigot form, consists of a taper shell formed with two cavities 31 and 32. From the cavity 31 is led the exhaust pipe 33. The inlet passage for the working fluid is indicated at A and passes to the outside of the casing where it is joined up to the supply pipe. There is I an exhaust port 35 in the side of the cavity 31. and an inlet port 36 in the opposite side of the cavity 32. The bottom of the cavity 32 of the valve 30 is open and comes opposite to a cavity 37 in the body i nto which the passage A runs. The working fluid thus passes first into the cavity 37 and then into that 32 of the valve. From the valve, the working fluid is led along the passage B to a rotating valve portion 38 of the bevel wheel 25, see also Fig. 9. A segmental recess 39 is formed in the face of the bevel wheel and this recess permits communication between the passage B and the inlet ports to the annular chambers. In each annular chamber there are four ports, two diametrically opposite ones being for exhaust and likewise two being for inlet. The inlet ports in the annular chamber 16 Fig. 2 are marked S, Y, and the exhaust ports Q, X. In the annular chamber 17 Fig. 3, which is in the plane at right angles to that of 16 Fig. 2, the inlets ports are marked T, W,
V and the exhaust ports R, V. The inlet ports of both chambers are connected together, W being 1n communication wlth Y, and T communicating with S. Llkewise the exhaust ports are connected,Vwith X and Rwith Q. In Fig. 4, the pistons 20 and 21 are in elevation and assumed to be projecting from the back half of the casing while the passages indicated by dot and dash are in the front half. In Fig. 5, which is a view in the. same plane, the p stons are in section and the passages in the back half. Now assuming the working flrid to be admitted to the engine through the passage A it passes through the cavity 37 and into the cavity 32 of the stop and reversing valve 30, Figs. 1 and 4. Thence it passes through the port 36 in. the valve into and along the passage indiiosition, also in Fig. 9, along the passages b and G and into the inlet .port Y, see also Fig. 2, thence to the annular chamber 16 and also through the passage 6 and along the passage D see Fig. 5, to the inlet port T of the annular chamber 17 Figs. 3 and 5. The piston 20 is covering the exhaust port V and the piston 21 likewise the exhaust port Q. The fluid pressure entering at Y and T drives the pistons in the direction of the arrows see Figs. 3 and 4, the piston 20 acting as the abutment of the piston 21 and the latter acting at the same time as the abutment of piston 20. l/Vhen theback end of the piston 20 has uncovered the exhaust port V, the working fluid is directed therethrough to the port 35 in the valve 30 along the passages V X and X J, into the passage K. V hen the piston 21 has uncovered the port Q, the working fluid which entered Y passes through the port Q to R along the passages Q, R and R J and thence by the passage K Fig. 4; to the cavity 31 of the valve 30. The passage K is duplicated and marked is, likewise the passage B and marked Z). The valve 38 indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 4, is also duplicated andmarked 38 one being formed in each bevel wheel. The length of the cavity 39 therein is so proportioned that each bevel may act as a cut off valve thus allowing the working fluid to expand in the chambers, and also, the covering portion 6 Fig. 9, prevents the working fluid being admitted to the chambers during the time the end of each piston is crossing the intersecting parts of the chambers and the pistons are in contact, as seen in Fig. 5, thus preventing the free escape of the working fluid to the exhaust outlet. hen the valve 30 is reversed, the cavities 35 and 36 thereof are brought opposite the exhaust and inlet passages 70 and 7) respectively and the engine will work in the opposite direction. A handle such as 40 may be fixed to the part 33 of the valve 30 by which it can be turned around. The bearing of the shaft in the boss 8 is shown with a packing 41.
It will be noted in the foregoing explanation, that the inlet ports are as follows :In chamber 16, S and Y, Figs. 4 and 5, and in chamber 17 Figs. 3, 4 and 5, T and IV. The exhaust ports are as follows2-In chamber 16 Fig. 2, and Figs. 4 and 5, Q and X and in chamber 17 Fig. 3, and Figs. 4 and 5, R and V. If it is desired that the engine should work in the opposite direction to that described and indicated by the arrows in Pig. 1, then the valve 30 is reversed so that the passage K is closed and the passage Is 1s opened to the exhaust. At the same tlme, passage B is closed to the entering fluid and passage 5 is opened, the fluid thus passing through valve 38 Fig. 4, instead of through 38 as before. The inlet ports now become Q and X in chamber 16, see Fig. 2, and R and V in chamber 17, see Fig. 3. The exhaust ports also, now become S and Y in chamber 16, see Fig. 2, and T and W in chamber 17, see Fig. 8. The functions of the ports are thus changed.
The annular chambers may be of any suitable form in cross section, that shown namely, a segment of an annulus is however at present considered to be most convenient.
The valve 38, by closing the passages B and I), while the ends of the pistons are crossing the intersecting parts of the chambers, acts as a cut off valve thus allowing the Working fluid to expand in the chambers.
The engine described with reference to Figs. 1 to 9, may be used as a rotary pump or as an air compressor by driving the shaft 10. The method of driving the shaft from the pistons by means of bevel gearing is at present considered to be the most suitable one.
What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. A fluid operating mechanism compris ing in combination, a casing having circular chambers angularly disposed with respect to each other and intersecting at a plurality of points, said chambers having crosssections of trapezoidal formations, a sliding piston in each chamber adapted to be operated by a suitable fluid, and means controlling the movement of said pistons to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to effect fluid propulsion of the other.
2. An engine having two piston chambers intersecting at diametrically opposite points, a sliding piston in each chamber of a length approximately one hundred and eighty degrees, and having a beveled rack along two opposite sides, a power shaft with its axis intersecting the axis of the two annular chambers and having a bevel wheel fixed near to each end so as to gear with the racks of the pistons and be revolved thereby, each piston being always in gear with one of the bevel wheels and being relatively positioned so that both pistons canact simultaneously as abutments, each for the other at the points of intersection of the chambers.
8. In engines having piston chambers intersecting at diametrically opposite points at a relative angle of ninety degrees and sliding pistons each of which can act simultaneously as a moving abutment for another, a toothed rack on opposite sides of each piston and two bevel toothed wheels fixed to the power shaft so as to engage with the pistons substantially as described.
4. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having chambers angularly disposed with respect to each other and intersecting each other, a sliding piston in each chamber adapted to be operated a fluid pressure, means controlling the movement of said piston to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to eflect fluid propulsion of the other, and a shaft extending through said mechanism and connected with said means.
5. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having a plurality of circular chambers intersecting each other, a bodily slidable piston in each chamber disposed radially outwardly with respect to its axis of rotation and each piston being driven by fluid pressure, and means engaging the pistons at points remote from their axes of bodily rotation to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to effect fluid propulsion of the other, substantially as described.
6. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having a plurality of chambers intersecting each other, a bodily slidable piston rotatably mounted in each chamber and disposed radially outwardly with respect to its axis of bodily rotation and each piston being driven by fluid pressure, and means engaging the pistons to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to eflect fluid propulsion of the other, substantially as described.
7. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having a plurality of chambers intersecting each other, a bodily slidable piston in each chamber driven by fluid pressure and each rotating about its own axis, and means engaging the pistons at points removed from their axes of bodily rotation to cause one piston to act .as a fluid abutment to effect fluid propulsion of the other, substantially as described. 8. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having chambers angularly disposed with respect to each other and intersecting each other, a slidable piston in each chamber operated by fluid pressure and disposed radially outwardly from their axes of rotation, and means disposed at one side of the axes of rotation of said pistons for controlling the movement of said pistons with respect to each other to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to effect fluid propulsion of the other, substantially as described.
9. A fluid operating mechanism comprising in combination, a casing having circular intersecting chambers, a sliding piston in each chamber operated by fluid pressure and provided with tapering ends, and means controlling the movement of said pistons to cause one to act as a fluid abutment to trolling said pistons to cause one to act as 10 eflect fluid propulsion of the other, substana fluid abutment to effect fluid propulsion tially as described. of the other, substantially as described.
10. A fluid operating mechanism com- In testimony whereof I aifiX my signaprising in combination, a casing having inture in presence of two Witnesses. tersecting circular chambers disposed ra- ARTHUR AUGUSTUS BROOKS. dially outwardly with respect to their cen- WVitnesses: ters, a bodily slidable piston in each cham- RIDLEY JAMES URQUHART, ber driven by fluid pressure, and means con- MALCOLM SMETHURsT.
Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. C.
US61464011A 1911-03-15 1911-03-15 Fluid-operating mechanism. Expired - Lifetime US1013121A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3809022A (en) * 1972-11-15 1974-05-07 J Dean Rotary power translation machine
US4391574A (en) * 1980-03-13 1983-07-05 Helen H. Noga Rotary positive displacement mechanism
WO1985000405A1 (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-01-31 Noga, Helen, H. Rotary positive displacement mechanism
US20090255507A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Craig Louis Althen Piston Valve Internal Combustion Engine

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3809022A (en) * 1972-11-15 1974-05-07 J Dean Rotary power translation machine
US4391574A (en) * 1980-03-13 1983-07-05 Helen H. Noga Rotary positive displacement mechanism
WO1985000405A1 (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-01-31 Noga, Helen, H. Rotary positive displacement mechanism
JPS60501716A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-10-11
US20090255507A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Craig Louis Althen Piston Valve Internal Combustion Engine
US8136503B2 (en) * 2008-04-10 2012-03-20 Craig Louis Althen Piston valve internal combustion engine

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