US10114581B1 - Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication - Google Patents

Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US10114581B1
US10114581B1 US15/390,999 US201615390999A US10114581B1 US 10114581 B1 US10114581 B1 US 10114581B1 US 201615390999 A US201615390999 A US 201615390999A US 10114581 B1 US10114581 B1 US 10114581B1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
data
objects
set
metadata
respective
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Active, expires
Application number
US15/390,999
Inventor
Assaf Natanzon
Jehuda Shemer
Leehod Baruch
Ron Bigman
Amit Lieberman
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
EMC IP Holding Co LLC
Original Assignee
EMC IP Holding Co LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by EMC IP Holding Co LLC filed Critical EMC IP Holding Co LLC
Priority to US15/390,999 priority Critical patent/US10114581B1/en
Assigned to EMC IP Holding Company LLC reassignment EMC IP Holding Company LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BARUCH, LEEHOD, BIGMAN, RON, LIEBERMAN, AMIT, NATANZON, ASSAF, SHEMER, JEHUDA
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US10114581B1 publication Critical patent/US10114581B1/en
Assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A. reassignment THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A. SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: CREDANT TECHNOLOGIES, INC., DELL INTERNATIONAL L.L.C., DELL MARKETING L.P., DELL PRODUCTS L.P., DELL USA L.P., EMC CORPORATION, EMC IP Holding Company LLC, FORCE10 NETWORKS, INC., WYSE TECHNOLOGY L.L.C.
Application status is Active legal-status Critical
Adjusted expiration legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0646Horizontal data movement in storage systems, i.e. moving data in between storage devices or systems
    • G06F3/065Replication mechanisms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0602Dedicated interfaces to storage systems specifically adapted to achieve a particular effect
    • G06F3/0614Improving the reliability of storage systems
    • G06F3/0619Improving the reliability of storage systems in relation to data integrity, e.g. data losses, bit errors
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0662Virtualisation aspects
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0628Dedicated interfaces to storage systems making use of a particular technique
    • G06F3/0662Virtualisation aspects
    • G06F3/0667Virtualisation aspects at data level, e.g. file, record or object virtualisation
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/06Digital input from or digital output to record carriers, e.g. RAID, emulated record carriers, networked record carriers
    • G06F3/0601Dedicated interfaces to storage systems
    • G06F3/0668Dedicated interfaces to storage systems adopting a particular infrastructure
    • G06F3/067Distributed or networked storage systems, e.g. storage area networks [SAN], network attached storage [NAS]

Abstract

A storage system comprises a production site in operable communication with a replication site, and an object store, comprising a plurality of data objects associated with data stored in at least one data storage entity of the production site, disposed at the replication site. The replication site is configured to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects, by providing a plurality of nodes in operable communication with the storage system, where each respective node is configured to, substantially concurrently, perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects, and to create a respective set of metadata objects. The first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects are merged together into a virtual access PIT from each of the plurality of parallel nodes.

Description

A portion of the disclosure of this patent document may contain command formats and other computer language listings, all of which are subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever.

FIELD

This application relates at least to generally relate to devices, systems, and methods for data storage in computer systems. More particularly, this application relates at least to creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication that makes use of a highly parallel process and a map reduce process.

BACKGROUND

Computer data is vital to today's organizations and a significant part of protection against disasters is focused on data protection. As solid-state memory has advanced to the point where cost of memory has become a relatively insignificant factor, organizations can afford to operate with systems that store and process terabytes of data. Conventional data protection system uses data replication, by creating a copy of the organization's production site data on a secondary backup storage system, and updating the backup with changes. The backup storage system may be situated in the same physical location as the production storage system, or in a physically remote location. Data replication systems generally operate either at the application level, at the file system level, or at the data block level.

One example of a data protection system is a distributed storage system. A distributed storage system may include a plurality of storage devices (e.g., storage arrays) to provide data storage to a plurality of nodes. The plurality of storage devices and the plurality of nodes may be situated in the same physical location, or in one or more physically remote locations. A distributed storage system may include data protection systems that back up production site data by replicating production site data on a secondary backup storage system. The production site data may be replicated on a periodic basis and/or may be replicated as changes are made to the production site data. Some existing data protection systems may provide continuous data protection, meaning that every change made to data is backed up. Current data protection systems try to provide continuous data protection, which enable the organization to roll back to any specified point in time within a recent history. Continuous data protection typically uses a technology referred to as “journaling,” whereby a log is kept of changes made to the backup storage. During a recovery, the journal entries serve as successive “undo” information, enabling rollback of the backup storage to previous points in time.

SUMMARY

This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form, to provide a basic understanding of one or more embodiments that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter.

One aspect provides a storage system, comprising a production site in operable communication with a replication site, and an object store disposed at the replication site, the object store comprising a plurality of data objects associated with data stored in at least one data storage entity of the production site. The replication site is configured to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects. The generation of the virtual access PIT comprises providing a plurality of nodes in operable communication with the storage system, where each respective node is configured to, substantially concurrently, perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects, and to create, based at least in part on the first set of disk objects, a respective set of metadata objects. Each respective metadata object within each respective set describes a location at the replica site of at least one of the plurality of data objects and an offset within that at least one data object that holds corresponding data for the PIT. The first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects are merged together into a virtual access PIT from each of the plurality of parallel nodes.

Details relating to this and other embodiments are described more fully herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

Objects, aspects, features, and advantages of embodiments disclosed herein will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description, the appended claims, and the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals identify similar or identical elements. Reference numerals that are introduced in the specification in association with a drawing figure may be repeated in one or more subsequent figures without additional description in the specification in order to provide context for other features. For clarity, not every element may be labeled in every figure. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating embodiments, principles, and concepts. The drawings are not meant to limit the scope of the claims included herewith.

FIG. 1A is a first block diagram of a data protection system, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 1B is a second block diagram of a data protection system, using a cloud, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 2A is a block diagram of an object store of the data protection system of FIG. 1B, in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 2B is a block diagram showing an illustrative relationship between objects in the object store of FIG. 2A, in accordance with a second illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 2C is a block diagram showing recovery helper virtual machines in relation to the object store of FIG. 2A, in accordance with an illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 2D is a block diagram showing an illustrative relationship between objects in the object store of FIG. 2A to generate points in time, in accordance with an illustrative embodiment

FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a journal history of write transactions for the data protection systems of FIGS. 1A-2D, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 4 is a first flowchart illustrating a first method of updating/rebuilding point in time (PIT) information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 5A is a second flowchart illustrating a second method of updating/rebuilding PIT information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 5B is a simplified diagram illustrating a portion of the map/reduce process of FIG. 5A, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 5C is a simplified table illustrating a portion of the map/reduce process of FIG. 5B, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a third flowchart illustrating a portion of the second method of FIG. 5A in further detail, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 7 is a fourth flowchart illustrating a third method of updating/rebuilding PIT information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3 and set of metadata generated using FIGS. 5, 6, 8, and 9, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 8 is a fifth flowchart illustrating a second alternative portion of the second method of FIG. 5 in further detail, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 9 is a sixth flowchart illustrating a method of generating a new set of metadata objects for the method of FIG. 8, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 10 is an illustration of a portion of a new metadata object generated in accordance with FIG. 9, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 11A is a seventh flowchart illustrating a first method of creating a virtual access point in time that can respond to I/O requests, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 11B is an eighth flowchart illustrating a second method of creating a virtual access point in time, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure;

FIG. 12 is a simplified block diagram of an example of an apparatus that may perform at least a portion of the processes and implement at least a portion of the structures, of FIGS. 1A-11; and

FIG. 13 is a simplified example of an embodiment of a method embodied on a computer readable storage medium that may utilize at least some of the techniques described herein, including at least those described in connection with FIGS. 1A-11 herein, in accordance with at least one embodiment of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

At least some embodiments of the concepts, structures, and techniques sought to be protected herein are described with reference to a data storage system in the form of a storage system configured to store files, but it should be understood that the principles of the concepts, structures, and techniques sought to be protected herein are not limited to this configuration. Rather, they are applicable at least to any system capable of storing and handling various types of objects, in analog, digital, or other form. Although terms such as document, file, object, etc. may be used by way of example, the principles of the described embodiment are not limited to any particular form of representing and storing data or other information; rather, they are equally applicable at least to any object capable of representing information.

Before describing embodiments of the concepts, structures, and techniques sought to be protected herein, some terms are explained. In particular, the following may be helpful in understanding the specification and claims:

In certain embodiments, the term “I/O request” or simply “I/O” may be used to refer to an input or output request, such as a data read or data write request. In certain embodiments, a SAN may be a storage area network of nodes (also called devices) that send and receive I/O and other requests, each node in the network being an initiator or a target, or both an initiator and a target. In certain embodiments, an initiator may be a node in a SAN that issues I/O requests. In certain embodiments, a target may be a node in a SAN that replies to I/O requests. In certain embodiments, a node can provide at least a processor function. In certain embodiments, a node can include both a processor function and a memory function.

In certain embodiments, a host may be at least one computer or networks of computers that runs at least one data processing application that issues I/O requests to one or more storage systems and that can communicate with its corresponding storage system using small computer system interface (SCSI) commands. In some embodiments, a host is an initiator with a SAN, and a host may be a virtual machine. In certain embodiments, a host device may be an internal interface in a host, to a logical storage unit. In certain embodiments, a production site may be a facility where one or more host computers run data processing applications that write data to a storage system and read data from the storage system; may be a virtual or physical site. In certain embodiments, a backup site may be a facility where replicated production site data is stored; the backup site may be located in a remote site or at the same location as the production site; a backup site may be a virtual or physical site. In certain embodiments, a back-up site may be an object store.

In certain embodiments, an object may represent a logical construct containing data. In some embodiments herein, an object containing metadata may be referred to as a metadata object. In certain embodiments, as used herein, a change object may refer to an object with accumulated I/O. In certain embodiments, an object store (also referred to as object storage) may be a storage architecture that manages data as objects, in contrast to file systems which manage data as a file hierarchy and block storage which manages data as blocks within sectors and tracks. Each object includes the data itself, a variable amount of metadata, and a globally unique identifier, where the object store can be implemented at multiple levels, including the device level (object storage device), the system level, and the interface level. An object store generally references physical locations on a disk. In certain embodiments, a cloud may be an object store. For example, in at least some embodiments, a cloud is an off-premise form of computing that stores data on the Internet.

In certain embodiments, a storage device may refer to any non-volatile memory (NVM) device, including hard disk drives (HDDs), solid state drivers (SSDs), flash devices (e.g., NAND flash devices), and similar devices that may be accessed locally and/or remotely (e.g., via a storage attached network (SAN)). In some embodiments, the term “storage device” may also refer to a storage array including multiple storage devices. In certain embodiments, a storage medium may refer to one or more storage mediums such as a hard drive, a combination of hard drives, flash storage, combinations of flash storage, combinations of hard drives, flash, and other storage devices, and other types and combinations of computer readable storage mediums including those yet to be conceived. A storage medium may also refer both physical and logical storage mediums and may include multiple level of virtual to physical mappings and may be or include an image or disk image. A storage medium may be computer-readable, and may also be referred to herein as a computer-readable program medium. In certain embodiments, a data storage entity may be any one or more of a file system, object storage, a virtualized device, a logical unit, a logical unit number, a logical volume, a logical device, a physical device, and/or a storage medium.

In certain embodiments, a storage system may be a SAN entity that provides multiple logical units for access by multiple SAN initiators, and in some embodiments, the term “storage system” may encompass physical computing systems, cloud or virtual computing systems, or a combination thereof. In certain embodiments, a WAN may be a wide area network that connects local networks and enables them to communicate with one another, such as the Internet. In certain embodiments, a virtual volume may be a volume which is exposed to host by a virtualization layer; the virtual volume may be spanned across more than one site and or volumes. In certain embodiments, a volume may be an identifiable unit of data storage, either physical or virtual; that is, a volume can be a removable hard disk, but is not limited as being a unit that can be physically removed from a computer or storage system.

In certain embodiments, a logical unit (LU) may be a logical entity provided by a storage system for accessing data from the storage system, and as used herein a logical unit is used interchangeably with a logical volume. In many embodiments herein, a LU or LUN (logical unit number) may be used interchangeable for each other. In certain embodiments, a LUN may be a logical unit number for identifying a logical unit; may also refer to one or more virtual disks or virtual LUNs, which may correspond to one or more Virtual Machines. In certain embodiments, a physical storage unit may be a physical entity, such as a disk or an array of disks, for storing data in storage locations that can be accessed by address, where physical storage unit is used interchangeably with physical volume.

In certain embodiments, a DPA may be Data Protection Appliance a computer or a cluster of computers, or a set of processes that serve as a data protection appliance, responsible for data protection services including, among other things, data replication of a storage system, and journaling of I/O requests issued by a host computer to the storage system. The DPA may be a physical device, a virtual device running, or may be a combination of a virtual and physical device. In most embodiments, a DPA may accumulate I/O and package it into an object. In many embodiments, a DPA may accumulate I/O until a certain or predetermined size, such as one megabyte, is reached. In most embodiments, a DPA may send a data object representing I/O to a cloud. In certain embodiments, an RPA may be replication protection appliance, which may be used interchangeable with and is another name for DPA. In certain embodiments, a RPA may be a virtual DPA or a physical DPA. In certain embodiments, a DPA may track metadata about changes corresponding to I/O in an object.

In certain embodiments, a splitter (also referred to as a protection agent) may be an agent running either on a production host a switch or a storage array, or in a network, or at a hypervisor level. A splitter, in certain embodiments, can intercept I/O's and split them to a DPA and to the storage array, fail I/O's, redirect I/O's or do any other manipulation to the I/O's. The splitter or protection agent may be used in both physical and virtual systems. The splitter may be in the I/O stack of a system and may be located in the hypervisor for virtual machines. In some embodiments, I/O sent to a LUN or LU on a production site may be intercepted by a splitter. In many embodiments, a splitter may send a copy of I/O sent to LUN or LU to a data protection appliance or data protection application (DPA). In some embodiments, splitters can be array-based, fabric-based, or host based. In certain embodiments, marking on splitter may be a mode in a splitter where intercepted I/O's are not split to an appliance and the storage, but changes (meta data) are tracked in a list and/or a bitmap and I/O is immediately sent to down the 10 stack.

In at least some embodiments, a copy of a LUN or LU may be made, and such copy may include a set of objects, which may represent data on the LUN. In some embodiments, a copy of a LUN may include one or more metadata objects, which may describe how a set of objects representing data of the LUN correspond to or may be used to create the LUN. In at least some embodiments, a copy of a LUN or LU has a set of metadata objects and a set of objects may be sent to a cloud. In certain embodiments, a copy of a LUN or LU as a set of metadata objects and a set of objects may be sent to an object store. In certain embodiments, CRR (continuous remote replication) a may refer to a full replica of a volume or a set of volumes along with a journal which allows any point in time access at a site remote to the production volume and on a separate storage array.

In certain embodiments, a source side may be a transmitter of data within a data replication workflow, during normal operation a production site is the source side; and during data recovery a backup site is the source side; may be a virtual or physical site. In certain embodiments, a target side may be a receiver of data within a data replication workflow. During normal operation a back site is the target side, and during data recovery a production site is the target side. A target site may be a virtual or physical site, and a target site may be referred to herein as a replication site.

In certain embodiments, an image may be a copy of a logical storage unit at a specific point in time. In certain embodiments, a clone may be a copy or clone of the image or images, and/or drive or drives of a first location at a second location. In some embodiments, a clone may be made up of a set of objects. In certain embodiments, a snapshot may refer to differential representations of an image, i.e. the snapshot may have pointers to the original volume, and may point to log volumes for changed locations. Snapshots may be combined into a snapshot array, which may represent different images over a time period. In some embodiments, a snapshot can include a full volume copy, also known as a mirror, clone, or business continuance volume as well as a partial copy, where only changed data, or pointers to changed data, is kept. In certain embodiments, a point in time (PIT) image may be a point-in-time snapshot, such as a copy of a storage volume, file or database as it appeared at a given point in time. In some embodiments, PIT images can be used as method of data protection. A description of certain methods associated with creating PIT snapshots of a volume may be described in U.S. Pat. No. 8,996,460, entitled “Accessing an Image in a Continuous Data Projection Using Deduplication-Based Storage,” which is hereby incorporated by reference; however it will be understood that many different method of creating PIT images are applicable.

At least some disclosed embodiments may enable replication to a cloud. At least some embodiments may enable to replication to an object store. At least some embodiments may enable replication to a cloud with an object store. In some embodiments, replication to an object store may include sending objects representing changes to one or more LUNS on a production site to an object store. In many embodiments, an object store may have a copy of a LUN as a set of objects and a set of metadata objects. In these embodiments, as I/O occurs to the LUN, the object store may receive a set of change objects corresponding to the changes written to the LUN. In these embodiments, the object store may receive a set of metadata objects describing the changes to the LUN in the objects. In most of these embodiments, the set of change objects and the set metadata objects may be used as a journal. In most of these embodiments, using the set of metadata objects, one or more portions of the or more of the change objects may be applied to the create new objects to replace the set of objects and the set of metadata objects corresponding to the copy of the LUN. In most of these embodiments, by replacing objects and metadata objects corresponding to the LUN, it may move the copy of the LUN to a future point in time. In some of these embodiments, by keeping the original set of metadata objects and objects, it may be possible to access the original LUN as well as any point in time. In most of these embodiments, by reading the metadata objects describing the set of change objects, multiple points of time may be created on the cloud site. In further embodiments, metadata objects may be created that correspond to information about how to move a new point in time back to a previous point in time.

In certain embodiments, a journal may be a record of write transactions (e.g., I/O data) issued to a storage system, which may be used to maintain a duplicate storage system, and to rollback the duplicate storage system to a previous point in time. In some embodiments, the journal includes a redo log that includes changes that occurred to a production volume and not yet applied to the replica/duplicate, and an undo log having a list of changes that undo the latest changes in the replica/duplicate volume. In some embodiments, each entry in a journal contains, apart from the I/O data itself, I/O metadata that can include information such as a volume identifier (ID), the I/O block offset within the volume, the I/O length, and a time stamp of the I/O.

In certain embodiments, logged access (also known as physical access) may be an access method provided by the appliance and the splitter, in which the appliance rolls the volumes of a consistency group to the point in time the user requested and let the host access the volumes in a copy on first write base. For example, logged access can permit rolling backwards or forwards to a given snapshot (e.g., point in time) for which access is desired. There can be a delay depending on how far the selected point in time is from the snapshot currently being distributed to storage. In some embodiments, when logged access is enabled, hosts in a given SAN can have direct access to replica volumes, and, generally, an RPA does not have access—that is, the copying of snapshots from the journal to storage is paused during physical access.

In certain embodiments, virtual access may be an access method provided by the appliance and the splitter, in which the appliance exposes a virtual volume from a specific point in time to the host, where the data for the virtual volume is partially stored on the remote copy and partially stored on the journal. In certain embodiments, virtual access is able to create a desired image of a volume, at a specific point in time, in a separate virtual LUN, in memory, in the cloud. Because the system does not have to roll to the image that is stored in in storage, access can be very fast. Virtual access can be used by entities using or accessing the data in a substantially similar way to physical access. In certain embodiments, in virtual access, the system may create the image selected in a separate virtual LUN within the data protection appliance. While performance may be constrained by the appliance, access to the point-in-time image may be nearly instantaneous. The image may be used for I/O (e.g., reads and writes) in the same way as logged access (physical), noting that data changes (e.g., writes) are temporary and stored in the local journal or local log. In some embodiments, virtual image access may be chosen because the user may not be sure which image, or point in time is needed. The user may access several images to conduct forensics and determine which replica is required.

There may be a number of image access modes. Image access may be used to restore production from a disaster recovery site, and to roll back to a previous state of the data. Image access also may be used to operate a system, temporarily, from a replicated copy while maintenance work is carried out on the production site and to fail over to the replica. When image access is enabled, host applications at the copy site may be able to access the replica.

In certain embodiments, synthesize may mean creating a new file using pointers from existing files, without actually copying the referenced data. For example, a new file representing a volume at a point-in-time may be created using pointers to a file representing a previous point-in-time, as well as pointers to journal representing changes to the volume.

In many embodiments, a set of virtual machines may be used in the cloud or in the object store. In certain embodiments, a set of virtual machines in a cloud may process metadata objects describing the set of change objects to create a new point in time for a LUN. In many of these certain embodiments, the set of virtual machines may read a set of metadata objects corresponding to the set of change objects to create new objects to replace a set of original objects corresponding to a LUN. In further embodiments, a set of virtual machines may run periodically to create new points in time for an object store or cloud containing changes to a copy of a LUN. In certain embodiments, a virtual machine is created that, for example, accesses a volume at a specific point in time, but is able to access the volume very fast without need for a lot of data movement, thus minimizing consumption of system and network resources.

In at least some embodiments, MapReduce refers at least to two separate and distinct tasks: a map task, which takes a set of data and converts it into another set of data, where individual elements are broken down into tuples (key/value pairs), and a reduce task, which takes the output from a map as input and combines those data tuples into a smaller set of tuples. In an exemplary MapReduce process, the reduce job is always performed after the map job. It will be appreciated that known MapReduce processes, are only one illustration of a type of process for processing and generating large data sets with a parallel, distributed algorithm on a cluster that is usable with at least some embodiments described herein. Those of skill in the art will appreciate that other types of parallel and/or distributed processes, especially those implemented in accordance with a programming model and an associated implementation for processing and generating large data sets with a parallel, distributed algorithm on a cluster, which splits input data set into independent chunks that are processed in a completely parallel manner, are implementable as an alternative to (or in addition to) MapReduce, to improve the efficiency of generating the PIT information, including but not limited to Apache products like Pig, Spark, Flink, and Hive.

Referring to the illustrative embodiment shown in FIG. 1A, data protection system 100 may include two sites, production site 102 (which in some embodiments can correspond to a source site) and replication site 122 (which in some embodiments can correspond to a target site). Production site 102 may generally be a facility where one or more hosts run data processing applications that write data to a storage system and read data from the storage system. Replication site 122 may generally be a facility where replicated production site data is stored. In such embodiments, production site 102 may back up (e.g., replicate) production data at replication site 122. Production site 102 has splitter 106, which splits I/O sent to LUN 112, such as I/O 175, by making a copy of the I/O and sending it to DPA 108. DPA 108 sends the I/O, such as I/O 175, to DPA 126 on replication site 122. DPA 126 on replication site 122 sends I/O 175 to LUN 132 on Replication site 122. In some embodiments, the DPA 126 manages a journal 184 of the data the replica site 122, as well as a full copy of the data.

Some embodiments of data protection system 100 may be provided as physical systems for the replication of physical LUs, or as virtual systems for the replication of virtual LUs. In certain embodiments, production site 102 and replication site 122 may be remote from one another. For example, as shown in FIG. 1B, replication site 122′ may be implemented as one or more “virtual” or “cloud” replication sites located remotely from production site 102′ and in communication via a WAN or other network link (e.g., the Internet, etc.) (not shown). As will be appreciated, local data protection may have the advantage of minimizing data lag between target and source, and remote data protection may have the advantage of being robust in the event that a disaster occurs at the source site.

Referring again to FIG. 1A, replication site 122 may replicate production site data and enable rollback of data of production site 102 to an earlier point in time (PIT). Rollback may be used in the event of data corruption of a disaster, or alternatively in order to view or to access data from an earlier point in time. In some embodiments, replication may be triggered manually (e.g., by a user) or automatically. In certain embodiments, the data protection system 100 may include a failover mode of operation, wherein the direction of replicated data flow is reversed (e.g., where production site 102 may behave as a target site and replication site 122 may behave as a source site.

As shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, production site 102 may include a host (FIG. 1A) or virtual machine (VM) (FIG. 1B) 104, splitter 106, storage (or storage array) 110, and a data protection appliance (DPA) 108. A host computer may be one computer, or a plurality of computers, or a multiprocessor system, or a network of distributed computers. Each computer may include, among other things, a conventional CPU, volatile and non-volatile memory, a data bus, an I/O interface, a display interface and a network interface. In some embodiments, a host computer runs at least one data processing application, such as a database application and an e-mail server. In some embodiments, host 104 may write to a logical unit in storage 110. In embodiments such as shown in FIG. 1B, VM 104′ may write to virtual disk(s) 112′ in a virtual machine file system (VMFS) 110′. Replication site 122 may include DPA 126 and storage 130. In some embodiments, host 104 may include one or more devices (or “nodes”) that may be designated an “initiator,” a “target”, or both, coupled by communication links appropriate for data transfer, such as an InfiniBand (IB) link or Fibre Channel (FC) link, and/or a network, such as an Ethernet or Internet (e.g., TCP/IP) network that may employ, for example, the iSCSI protocol. In addition, in at least some embodiments (as further described herein), additional hosts or virtual machines 104″ maybe operably coupled to the system 110 (or generated, in the case of virtual machines), as necessary or “on demand”, as shown via the dotted lines in FIG. 1A. This may be advantageous, for example, in the embodiments described further herein that can, in certain instances, utilize multi-parallel processing (also known as massively parallel processing) to perform MapReduce and other related processes, to more efficiently create or rebuild point in time (PIT) information “on demand,” as will be understood. As further explained herein, in some embodiments, as shown in FIG. 1B, data from the production site 102′ (i.e., “on premises) is sent directly to the object store 130′ in the cloud, and this data can be operated on in a multi-parallel way bringing up virtual machines 104′ to the work on the objects periodically in the cloud (e.g., as needed, such as during the multi-parallel map reduce process described further herein).

Referring again to FIG. 1A, storage 110 and storage 130 may include storage devices for storing data, such as disks or arrays of disks. Storage 110 may provide (e.g., expose) one or more logical units (LUs) 112 to which production commands are issued, while storage 130 may provide (e.g., expose) one or more logical units (LUs) 132 to which replication commands are issued.

Storage system 110 may expose a journal LU 176 for maintaining a history of write transactions made to LU 112, referred to herein as a “journal.” In some embodiments, a journal may be used to provide access to storage at specified points-in-time (PITs), as discussed in greater detail in regard to FIG. 3. In some embodiments, the journal may be stored across multiple LUs (e.g., using striping, etc.). In some embodiments, DPA 108 may include a journal processor 180 for managing the journal within journal LU 176. In some embodiments, journal processor 180 may manage the journal entries of LU 112. Specifically, in some embodiments, journal processor 180 may enter write transactions received by DPA 108 from the replication site DPA 126 into the journal by writing them into journal LU 176, read the undo information for the transaction from LU 112, update the journal entries in journal LU 176 with undo information, apply the journal transactions to LU 112, and remove already-applied transactions from the journal.

In some embodiments, a snapshot replica may be a differential representation of a volume. For example, the snapshot may include pointers to the original volume, and may point to log volumes for locations of the original volume that store data changed by one or more I/O requests. In some embodiments, snapshots may be combined into a snapshot array, which may represent different images over a time period (e.g., for multiple PITs).

In some embodiments, DPA 108 and DPA 126 may perform various data protection services, such as data replication of storage system 100, and journaling of I/O requests issued by device 104. DPA 108 and DPA 126 may also enable rollback of production data in storage 110 to an earlier point-in-time (PIT) from replica data stored in storage 130, and enable processing of rolled back data at the target site. In some embodiments, rollback may be used in the event of data corruption of a disaster, or alternatively in order to view or to access data from an earlier point in time. In some embodiments, each DPA 108 and DPA 126 may be a physical device, a virtual device, or may be a combination of a virtual and physical device.

In the architecture illustrated in FIG. 1A, DPA 108 and DPA 126 are standalone devices integrated within a SAN. Alternatively, each of DPA 108 and DPA 126 may be integrated into storage system 110 and storage system 130, respectively, or integrated into host computer 104 (as well as any other component or computer at replication site 122). Both DPAs communicate with their respective host computers through communication lines such as fiber channels using, for example, SCSI commands, or any other protocol. In at least some embodiments, the replica site only has object storage.

In some embodiments, DPA 108 may receive commands (e.g., SCSI commands) issued by device 104 to LUs 112. For example, splitter 106 may intercept commands from device 104, and provide the commands to storage 110 and also to DPA 108. In some embodiments, the splitter 106 may intercept data operations at several logical levels. In some embodiments, the splitter helps in replication of block level devices and intercepts I/O at the SCSI layer. In some embodiments, splitter 106 may act on intercepted SCSI commands issued to a logical unit in one of the following ways: send the SCSI commands to its intended LU; redirect the SCSI command to another LU; split the SCSI command by sending it first to DPA 108 and, after DPA 108 returns an acknowledgement, send the SCSI command to its intended LU; fail a SCSI command by returning an error return code; and delay a SCSI command by not returning an acknowledgement to the respective host. In some embodiments, splitter 106 may handle different SCSI commands, differently, according to the type of the command. For example, in some embodiments, a SCSI command inquiring about the size of a certain LU may be sent directly to that LU, whereas a SCSI write command may be split and sent to DPA 108.

In certain embodiments, splitter 106 and DPA 126 may be drivers located in respective host devices of production site 102 and replication site 122. Alternatively, in some embodiments, a protection agent may be located in a fiber channel switch, or in any other device situated in a data path between host/VM 104 and storage 110. In a virtualized environment, the protection agent may run at the hypervisor layer or in a virtual machine providing a virtualization layer. For example, in such embodiments, a hypervisor may consume LUs and may generate a distributed file system on the logical units such as Virtual Machine File System (VMFS) that may generate files in the file system and expose the files as LUs to the virtual machines (each virtual machine disk is seen as a SCSI device by virtual hosts). In another embodiment, a hypervisor may consume a network based file system and exposes files in the Network File System (NFS) as SCSI devices to virtual hosts. It will be appreciated that use of SCSI format is not mandatory, and a hypervisor may consume files as disks with other protocols, such as SATA or proprietary protocols.

In some embodiments, production DPA 108 may send its write transactions to replication DPA 126 using a variety of modes of transmission, such as continuous replication or snapshot replication. For example, in continuous replication, production DPA 108 may send each write transaction to storage 110 and also send each write transaction to replication DPA 126 to be replicated on storage 130. In snapshot replication, production DPA 108 may receive several I/O requests and combine them into an aggregate “snapshot” or “batch” of write activity performed to storage 110 in the multiple I/O requests, and may send the snapshot to replication DPA 126 for journaling and incorporation in target storage system 120. In such embodiments, a snapshot replica may be a differential representation of a volume. For example, the snapshot may include pointers to the original volume, and may point to log volumes for locations of the original volume that store data changed by one or more I/O requests. In some embodiments, snapshots may be combined into a snapshot array, which may represent different images over a time period (e.g., for multiple PITs).

As shown in FIG. 1B, in some embodiments, a copy of a LUN or LU may be stored in an object store (e.g., object store 130′ of FIG. 1B) of replication site 122′. Object store 130′ may be implemented similar to the object store 200 as shown in FIG. 2A, and may include a set of objects 202, 204, 206, that may represent data of the LUN. For example, in some embodiments, object store 200 may include one or more disk objects 202, one or more change objects 204 and one or more metadata objects 206. Disk objects 202 may include data stored in the LUN and can be associated with data stored in a copy of an LU or virtual disk at a point in time of the production site. As will be described, change objects may represent changes to data of the LUN over time. For example, in some embodiments, change objects can be associated with one or more input/output (I/O) operations on the production site. Metadata objects 206 may describe how a set of objects representing data of the LUN correspond to or may be used to create the LUN. In some embodiments, metadata objects are associated with the change object. In some embodiments, metadata objects 206 themselves include content such as a volume identifier (ID), an I/O block offset within a volume, an I/O length, and a time stamp of the I/O. In some embodiments, object store 200 may be in a cloud replication site. Replication may include sending objects representing changes to one or more LUNs on production site 102 to the replication site.

Referring again to FIGS. 1A and 1B, input/output (I/O) requests sent to a LUN or LU (e.g., 112) on a production site (e.g., 102) may be intercepted by a splitter (e.g., 106, 106′). The splitter may send a copy of the I/O to a DPA (e.g., DPA 108, VDPA 108′). The DPA may accumulate multiple I/O's into an object (e.g., disk objects 202). A change object (e.g., change objects 204) may refer to an object with accumulated I/O where each I/O may change data in the disk objects. The DPA may accumulate I/O until a certain size is reached, and may then send disk object(s) and change objects representing the accumulated I/O to a cloud replication site (e.g., 122′) that may include an object store (e.g., 130′). In some embodiments, DPA 108 may track metadata about changes corresponding to accumulated I/O in an object as metadata objects 206. DPA 108 may send metadata objects to a cloud or an object store when the metadata object reaches a certain size. In some embodiments, DPA 108 may package the disk objects, change objects and metadata objects into an object to send to a cloud replication site.

In at least some described embodiments, as I/O occurs to the production site LUN, object store 200 may receive a set of change objects corresponding to the changes written to the LUN. In these embodiments, the object store may receive a set of metadata objects describing the changes to the LUN in the objects. Thus, the set of change objects and the set of metadata objects may be used as a journal. In such embodiments, the metadata objects and one or more portions of the change objects may be used to create new disk objects to move the copy of the LUN to a different point in time. For example, by keeping the original set of metadata objects and objects, it may be possible to access the original LUN and any point in time (PIT). By reading the metadata objects describing the set of change objects, multiple PITs may be created on the cloud replication site. In some embodiments, objects and metadata may be maintained to provide a protection window of storage system 100. For example, a protection window may correspond to a time period during which changes to a LUN are tracked. Objects and metadata objects that correspond to a PIT outside of a protection window may be deleted.

In some embodiments, especially as further described herein it is possible to access an image (e.g., a point in time image) without rolling the journal objects into the replica copy objects, by using virtual image access, which allows exposing replica LU's at a requested point in time almost immediately, without having to apply the data from the journal to the volumes.

For example, referring to FIG. 2B, the relationship between the data objects of object store 200′ and the LUNs of storage 110″ is shown. As shown in FIG. 2B, at a first time, t1, image 1 of storage 110″ may be generated. Image 1 includes a plurality of disk objects, shown as disk objects 1-N, each disk object corresponding to an associated LUN of storage 110″, shown as LUNs 1-N. One or more metadata objects 206′ may include information about each of the disk objects 1-N of image 1. As changes are made to the data stored in LUNs 1-N of storage 110″ (e.g., in response to write requests), one or more change objects 204′ may be stored in object store 200′. The change objects may include data or pointers to data that was modified from the data stored in disk objects 1-N of image 1. One or more metadata objects 206′ may also include information about associations between change objects 204′ and the disk objects 1-N of image 1 (e.g., if a given change object represents a change to a given disk object). As used in FIG. 2B, N represents a given number of objects, and may be an integer greater than or equal to 1.

Referring to FIG. 2C, an illustrative block diagram is shown of cloud replication site 122″ having one or more recovery helper virtual machines (VMs), shown as recovery helper VMs 1-N. As described, one or more VMs may be generated to serve as a plurality of nodes that help to generate, concurrently, one or more PITs from the data stored in object store 200″, wherein, advantageously, in at last some embodiments, a MapReduce process can be employed to improve the speed at which the PIT is created and/or can be used to help to create a replica copy with journal based replication to the object store. Although shown in FIG. 2B as only including a single image (image 1), in general, object store 200′ of FIG. 2C may include a plurality of images, with each image including full disk data (e.g., disk objects) of storage 110″.

For example, as shown in FIG. 2D, the images may be taken at specific time intervals, and between the image time intervals, one or more change objects 204′ may allow recovery to various points in time between the image time intervals. For example, image 1 may be generated at time t0, and include full data (e.g., disk objects) of storage 110″. Each change object 204′ may correspond to changes that occurred at a specific time, shown as change objects 1-M, occurring at times t1-tM. By modifying an earlier image (e.g., image 1) with changes indicated in the one or more change objects, recovery can be made to a point in time between image intervals, shown as PIT for time tM. Metadata objects 206″ may indicate the relationship between disk objects 1-N and change objects 1-M, which allow a new full disk image (e.g., new disk objects 1-N) to be generated to a given PIT. The PIT may then be copied to an associated volume, shown as volume 1, to be operated upon by an associated virtual machine, shown as recovery helper VM 1.

In some embodiments, one or more virtual machines may be used in the cloud or in the object store to process disk objects, change objects, and metadata objects describing the change objects to create and/or rebuild a new PIT for a LUN. For example, the virtual machines may create new metadata objects to describe the LUN at a future point in time, where the new metadata objects may reference some of the original disk objects corresponding to the LUN and new objects that replace one or more of the original objects corresponding to the LUN.

In some embodiments, the virtual machines may be created (e.g., brought up) and run periodically to process change objects and metadata objects and/or to create new PITs for an object store or cloud containing changes to a copy of a LUN. In some embodiments, if virtual machines operate periodically, there may not be a need to use compute power in the cloud (e.g., at the replication site) other than when the virtual machines are running. The virtual machines may process a set of change objects and a set of metadata objects to create a journal to enable a PIT to be rolled forward or backward in time. In some embodiments, the journal may be represented by a set of objects.

As described herein, a set of change objects that contain change data, and a set of metadata objects describing the change data may enable recovering or recreating the production site LUN from the replica data if a failure occurs on the production site.

Described embodiments may perform cloud recovery to multiple points in time (PITs). As described herein, storage system 100 may generate multiple snapshots of the replica copy of the LUN, each snapshot corresponding to a different PIT. Each snapshot may include one or more objects (e.g., as shown in FIG. 2) associated with LUNs of the snapshot. The objects may be used by replication site 122 to create a journal. By applying a portion of the journal (e.g., change objects) to disk data objects, multiple PITs may be recovered.

In some embodiments, storage system 100 may perform a recovery operation by initiating one or more virtual machines in the cloud (e.g., at the replication site) in parallel, as needed, to apply journal data (e.g., change objects) to the volume data (e.g., disk objects). Thus, described embodiments may rebuild a PIT “on demand”, using a multi-parallel process if necessary, with map reduce, with multiple nodes (if necessary) able to independently and simultaneously generate and/or rebuild a PIT, providing a process that is faster than known processes for generating/rebuilding a PIT, and also which, in some embodiments, can be configured to bring in or generate additional nodes only when needed, helping to reduce resource needs required to create the PIT. Thus, it is possible, in some embodiments, to create multiple points in time independently but also to create a single point in time in a multi-parallel manner.

In addition, in at least some embodiments, the rebuilding of the PIT is done using the object store instead of just a computer.

FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a journal history of write transactions for the data protection systems of FIGS. 1A-2D, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. Referring to FIG. 3, in some described embodiments, a write transaction 200 may be included within a journal and stored within a journal LU. In some embodiments, write transaction 200 may include one or more identifiers and a time stamp indicating the date and time at which the transaction was received by the source DPA. In some embodiments, write transaction 200 also includes a write size indicating the size of the data block; a location in the journal LU where the data is entered; a location in the target LU where the data is to be written; and the data itself.

Referring to FIGS. 1A-2D and 3, in some embodiments, transaction 200 may correspond to a transaction transmitted from production DPA 108 to replication DPA 126. In some embodiments, production DPA 108 may record write transaction 200 in the journal that includes four streams. In some embodiments, a first stream, referred to as a “DO” stream, includes a copy of the new data for writing to LU 112. In some embodiments, a second stream, referred to as a “DO METADATA” stream, includes metadata for the write transaction, such as an identifier, a date and time, a write size, the offset within LU 112 where the new data is written, and a pointer to the offset in the DO stream where the corresponding data is located. In some embodiments, a third stream, referred to as an “UNDO” stream, includes a copy of the data being overwritten within LU 112 (referred to herein as the “old” data). In some embodiments, a fourth stream, referred to as an “UNDO METADATA” stream, includes an identifier, a date and time, a write size, a beginning address in LU 112 where data was (or will be) overwritten, and a pointer to the offset in the UNDO stream where the corresponding old data is located.

In some embodiments, since the journal contains the “undo” information necessary to rollback storage system 100, data that was stored in specific memory locations at a specified point in time may be obtained by undoing write transactions that occurred subsequent to such point in time (PIT). In some embodiments, each of the four streams may hold a plurality of write transaction data. In some embodiments, as write transactions are received dynamically by the target DPA, the write transactions may be recorded at the end of the DO stream and the end of the DO METADATA stream, prior to committing the transaction. In some embodiments, a metadata stream (e.g., UNDO METADATA stream or the DO METADATA stream) and the corresponding data stream (e.g., UNDO stream or DO stream) may be kept in a single stream by interleaving metadata and data.

Having described a data protection system and journal history configuration in which at least some embodiments may be embodied, further details of at least some embodiments related to journal based replication and rebuilds of point-in-time copies using a multi-parallel process and map reduce will now be described. Although the following disclosure and certain example embodiments are described in connection with their use with data centers, DPAs, RPAs, hosts, SANs, LUNs, etc., it will be appreciated that the disclosures and embodiments herein are not limited to these applications, but can find applicability in virtually any type of computer system. In at least some aspects, embodiments are described herein create journal based replications to an object store target, including methods for doing a rebuild of point in time copies using a multi-parallel process with map reduce. It should be understood that FIG. 3 above generally describes the journal structure in a conventional replication configuration. In at least some embodiments described herein, however, the journal is divided into objects, and there is no undo log. Rather, there is a “do stream” of objects (i.e., the change objects 204) and a stream of metadata objects 206′ that are ordered by time. Regarding the “do metadata stream” of FIG. 3, in some embodiments, to get to an older point in time, an older snapshot of the volume is used and system herein rolls forward from that older snapshot.

Referring again briefly to FIGS. 1A-1B, accessing an image at the replication site 122, 122′ is generally performed using physical access or virtual access. In physical access (or logged access), a journal is rolled to the requested point in time by transferring data between the journal and the replica volume. In virtual access, a data structure is generated that designates whether a certain block is in the replicated volume or in the journal (and where in the journal it is). The data structure for a given point in time can be generated relatively quickly. However, in some embodiments, all data access (reads & writes) need to be routed through the data protection appliance in order to lookup the location in the data structure. This can provide fast access to the image but there can be slow performance in accessing the actual data. As described further herein, in at least some embodiments this access to the image can be made more efficient and quick by using a MapReduce process to help build the metadata for the virtual image access in a highly parallel manner. In addition, in at least some embodiments, as shown in the cloud replica site 122′ of FIG. 1B, there are no DPA's 126 on the replica; rather, the volume (e.g., LUN 112′ is rebuilt to the point in time using the map reduce technique described herein.

Generally, in accordance with at least some embodiments described herein, access to a PIT journal can be done by building a virtual image of the block device by using pointers to either the journal or the copy of the volume. Building the PIT can be done in a more efficient way, on demand, in at least some embodiments described herein, by doing rebuilds (e.g., updates) of a point in time journal using a multi-parallel process and also using map reduce.

For example, in accordance with at least some embodiments, the following technique can be used to rebuild/update a point in time journal: A list of meta data objects (e.g., metadata objects 206) is provided, along with the data that is needed to be applied to the disk data objects (e.g., disk object(s) 202)). For each offset that changes, write the latest update to the data (i.e., the disk object 202). Sort the meta data by address (and not by time like it is typically stored). For each address, get the latest meta data entries. Using multiple nodes (e.g., multiple processor or computers or virtual machines), each node reads some meta data objects and then maps them by address and reduces them by time (map/reduce procedure, as described further below. Determine which data needs to be applied to which locations in the disk. In parallel, read the disk portions (e.g. objects that need update). For each such object (that needs update) read the data from the journal entries and apply it to the object. Because each disk chunk can be updated from a separate location, this process also can be highly parallel.

FIG. 4 is a first flowchart 300 illustrating, at a high level, a first method of updating/rebuilding point in time (PIT) information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. Referring to FIG. 4, the illustrative process for generating or rebuilding a PIT may be performed multiple times concurrently (e.g., in parallel) to rebuild multiple PITs, or can be performed using multiple nodes (e.g., multiple helper VM's), each mapper node receiving a portion of the metadata objects from the metadata stream (which is ordered by time). As further described herein, each mapper node/VM gets a portion of the meta data objects (portion size does not matter; may be predetermined to be a size smaller than that of the LUN itself) where the metadata object that are in the portion are ordered by date. The mapper node/VM then re-maps these metadata objects by offset (recall that each I/O metadata object can include information such as a volume identifier (ID), the I/O block offset within the volume, the I/O length, and a time stamp of the I/O).

The mapper node/VM then provides the metadata objects to a reducing node, where each reducer node is predetermined to be in charge of some portion of the offsets of the disk (e.g., the LU). The reducer node then reduces the metadata objects to keep only the latest metadata prior to the requested point in time, and this metadata is then used in a later step to read changes from a corresponding change object and then to apply the changes to a disk object and save a new copy of the disk object—where the new copy of the disk object describes the data of the respective portion of the disk (LUN) at the new time stamp. This is explained further herein.

The above-summarized process is able, to create a single PIT faster and more efficiently (as described more fully in connection with FIGS. 5A-11 herein) than in at least some conventional systems, because the mapping and reducing processes as described herein can all take place in parallel, at multiple nodes or virtual machines.

Referring now to FIG. 4, at block 402 of FIG. 4, the process of rebuilding a PIT begins. At block 404, the associated virtual machine (VM) (which, as described further herein, can be, in some embodiments, one of a plurality of parallel VMs/nodes) identifies one or more disk objects (e.g., disk objects 202 of FIG. 2A) that are associated with the respective PIT. For example, the VM may identify associated disk objects based upon a LUN or other data storage entity associated with the PIT and the required restored PIT. At block 406, the associated VM identifies one or more metadata objects (e.g., metadata objects 206 of FIG. 2A) that are associated with the PIT. For example, the VM may identify associated metadata objects based upon the LUN associated with the PIT and the desired time associated with the PIT. At block 408, the associated VM identifies one or more change objects that are associated with the PIT. For example, the VM may identify associated change objects based upon the metadata objects identified at block 406 since the identified metadata objects may identify or otherwise reference any change objects associated with the PIT. In some embodiments, such as described in regard to FIG. 2D, change objects may be identified that include changes between a most recent full image of the LUN and a time associated with the PIT. In some embodiments, such as described in regard to FIG. 2D, change objects may be identified that include changes between a most recent full image of the LUN and a time associated with the PIT.

At block 410, the VM generates one or more new disk objects and, at block 412, it applies data changes (if applicable) to generate data for the PIT, which is stored in the new disk objects. In other words, at block 412, the VM modifies data of the disk objects identified at block 404 with data from the change objects identified at block 408, and stores the modified data in the new disk objects generated at block 410. At block 414, the new disk objects are copied to a volume that is associated with the VM. At block 416, process of creating/rebuilding the PIT completes.

More details about the process of FIG. 4 are provided in FIGS. 5A-5C and 6, in accordance with at least some embodiments. FIG. 5A is a second flowchart 400 illustrating a second method of updating/rebuilding PIT information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. FIG. 5B is a simplified diagram illustrating a portion of the map/reduce process of FIG. 5A, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment. FIG. 5C is a simplified table illustrating a portion of the map/reduce process of FIG. 5B, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment. FIG. 6 is a third flowchart 500 illustrating the actions of block 320 of the second method of FIG. 5A in further detail, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. Each of these is discussed further below.

Referring to FIGS. 5A-5C and 6, at block 305, the data recovery/rebuild PIT process 300 begins. For example, data recovery process 300 may be started manually by a user of data protection system 100. Alternatively, data protection system 100 may automatically perform data recovery process 300, for example when production site 102 has experienced a data loss or disaster, or to periodically identify image data for a given PIT. Advantageously, in at least some embodiments, the data recovery/rebuild PIT process 300 can be performed “on demand” from a user, a process, or in response to a one-time or periodic request from any type of entity, to help rebuild or recreate a desired PIT from one or more objects stored at replication site 122 (such as those in the object store 200 of FIG. 2A).

Referring again to FIG. 5A-5C and FIG. 6, as noted in block 310, in at least some embodiments, one or more additional nodes (e.g., “recovery helper VM's 104” as shown in FIG. 1A, 1B, 2C) can be provided or generated to assist with the multi-parallel generation of the PIT, such as by operably coupling one or more nodes 104″ (FIG. 1A) to the data protection system 100 and/or by generating one or more recovery helper virtual machines (VMs) 104″(for example at replication site 122) or other processes capable of executing the blocks described herein. As described herein, replication site 122 may, in at least some embodiments be a cloud site 122′, as shown in FIG. 1B. In particular, any one or more of the processes described for FIGS. 5A-5C and FIG. 6 (and also FIG. 4) can be performed, in at least some embodiments, substantially concurrently (i.e., at substantially the same time, in parallel), by a set of interconnected nodes (which can, for example, be processors, virtual machines, etc.) interconnected by one or more computer networks. In at least some embodiments, at least a portion of the set of interconnected nodes can be replaced by one or more distributed computer systems, and/or a single, large-scale multiprocessor configured to perform at least a portion of the processes described herein.

In some embodiments, the system of FIGS. 1A-2D generally does not have the multiple VM's 104″ connected in parallel at times when it is not rebuilding a PIT; rather, at those times when there is no rebuilding, the system 100 has only object storage 200. When a PIT is to be rebuilt, multiple helper VM's 104″ are assigned and operably coupled to the object storage 200 to help perform the work.

It will be appreciated that by using terms like “substantially concurrently” and “substantially at the same time” herein, it is not necessary or intended that each interconnected node begin or end its respective tasks exactly at the same time, as various network bandwidth factors, hardware differences, relative distances or proximity of the virtual machines and/or nodes, differences in associated objects at each offset or address, amount of I/O associated with each offset or address, etc., may mean that there may be slight lags or differences in the times that each interconnected node is able to complete its tasks (e.g., its MapReduce related tasks, as described further below). However, it is intended, when reference is made to terms like “substantially concurrently” or “in parallel” or “multi-parallel,” that the interconnected virtual machines and/or nodes are all attempting to work in at approximately the same time and to receive their respective portions of information at approximately the same time.

A list of objects (e.g., metadata objects) associated with the LU or other device for which a PIT is being rebuilt, is retrieved or received (block 313), such as by accessing a stream of metadata objects. In at least some embodiments, the data objects can include a set of disk objects associated with data stored in a copy of a logical unit or virtual disk at a point in time of the production site, a set of change objects associated with one or more input/output (I/O) operations on the production site; and a set of metadata objects associated with the set of change objects. In some embodiments, the map/reduce processes described herein work only on the metadata, to create a list of the pieces of data that need to be copied from change objects 201 to data/disk objects 202 to help create a new point in time (PIT). In block 315 of FIG. 5A, this list of metadata objects (which will correspond to the inputs to the MapReduce Block 320) are divided into N portions that will each be provided to one or more of the helper VMs/nodes 104″, in accordance with the MapReduce process (described more fully herein) (e.g., as illustrated in FIG. 2B-2D and FIGS. 5B-5C). The portions are divided into any size desired, generally a size that is small (e.g., a few MB or GB) compared to the size of the LUN. This is shown, for example, in the simplified diagram 450 of FIG. 5B, where the illustrative metadata stream 462 of metadata A through E, which is ordered by time (e.g., corresponding to metadata along time period 454) is broken up into three portions 458, each portion 458 assigned to a respective mapping node/VM 460. This simplified diagram is, of course, illustrative and not limiting.

Thus, in this example embodiment, a first portion 458 of the metadata stream 462, consisting of metadata A and B, is assigned to mapping node1/VM1 460; the second portion, consisting of metadata C and D, is assigned to mapping node2/VM2 460; and the third portion, consisting of metadata E and F, is assigned to mapping node node3/VM3 460. Note also, per FIG. 5B, that each metadata A through E is associated with corresponding disk objects 456 during that time period, where the disk objects D1 through D4 correspond to simplified representations of the I/O associated with a given combination of volume identifier and I/O block offset within the volume, at a given time stamp. For example, the metadata A in the time period T0 through T1 is associated with disk objects D1, D2, D3, and D4, where, for example, the disk object D1 is associated with a particular volume ID and block offset, where, as shown in FIG. 5B, it has timestamps at the time period T0-T1, T1-T2, and T2-T3 (indicating that this disk object may have associated changes to it at those times, as pointed to by the metadata object). As noted elsewhere, the metadata object stream 462 can include other information, but in this simplified view the information that is particularly relevant to FIGS. 5A-6 is discussed.

Referring again to FIGS. 5A-5C and 6, each helper VM 104″ (which in this part of the process serves as a mapping node/VM 460) gets the respective portion of the metadata stream 462 (block 315 of FIG. 5 and block 325 of FIG. 6), where the metadata stream 462 is ordered by time. Referring to FIG. 6, as described further below, the helper VM 104″ (i.e., mapping node/VM 352) will take the chunk of time-ordered metadata 462 that it receives (block 325) and create a map to map this information based on offset (block 335 of FIG. 6), where the mapping node/VM 452 sends its map of its portion of received metadata 452 based on offset to a reducing node/VM that is assigned to that offset or range of offsets (block 335 of FIG. 6 and blocks 333A-333C of FIG. 5A).

For example, referring to FIGS. 5B and 5C, in this example, the map of FIG. 5C (e.g., the map referred to in 337A-337C of FIG. 5A) is created by each of the mapping nodes/VMs 452 of FIG. 5B. It can be seen that, in the metadata stream 462, disk object D1 is associated with metadata at several times along the timelines 454, and also is associated with the offset range of 0-500. For 0-500, D1 has metadata entries in three different time periods, disk object D3 has metadata entries in two different time periods, and so on In the table 470 of FIG. 5C, it can be seen that the first offset range 0-500, for D1, is assigned to a reducing node/VM named RVM_1. Similarly, the other offset ranges are each associated with a respective disk object and corresponding reducing VM, and have corresponding metadata entries, at different time stamps/time periods for that disk object. That is further illustrated in the arrows pointing to the blocks 345A-345C of FIG. 5A: in FIG. 5A it depicts, e.g., via the arrows going from block 337A to both blocks 345A and 345B, how a given I/O map (e.g., FIG. 5C) can provide metadata from its map associated with a first offset to a first reducing node/VM, metadata associated with a second offset to a second reducing node/VM, etc. It also should be understood that not all writes to a given offset or range of offsets are required to be overlapping. For example, there can be a write to an offset of size 50, and two writes to offset 200 size 10, where only the second two writes are overlapping. Similarly, for the portions of the disk reducing VM handles, these, too, may contain writes which are not overlapping or partially overlapping.

Referring still to FIGS. 5A-5C and 6, each reducer node/VM receiving the mapped information then reads the data that the metadata describes (block 340 of FIG. 6) and reduces the data, where for each offset or address, only the latest metadata prior to the requested PIT is kept (block 343 of FIG. 6). Thus, the reducing node/VM receiving the metadata after the mapping then reduces the metadata so that for each offset there is only one entry. For example, referring to the example map of FIG. 5C, for disk object D2 (offset range 501-1000), there are three metadata entries by time: D2(T0-T1); D2(T1-T2); D2 (T2-T3). Referring to the timeline 454 of FIG. 5B, if the requested PIT was for time T3, then the reducing node/VM chooses to retain the latest data prior to that time T3, which in this example is the entry of D2 (T2-T3). If, for example, the desired PIT was for T2, then the data retained would be D2(T1-T2).

Each reducing VM 104″ is in charge of a respective portion of the offsets of the volume/LUN 112 (see FIG. 2B). Once the reducer node/VM has completed block 343, the reducer node/VM 104″ then reads the data relevant from to changes from the change objects and reads the relevant disk data objects and applies the changes to them. (blocks 345 and 347 of FIG. 6; blocks 345A-345C of FIG. 5A)

Thus, as described above, the blocks in block 320 of FIG. 5A and of FIG. 6 effectively implement a highly parallel process, using, in one embodiment, a map reduce process, such as Google MapReduce, to allow the one or more VMs or nodes of block 310 to more quickly and efficiently build on demand PIT information. In particular, the MapReduce Block 320 of FIG. 5A includes actions taken in blocks 325-350 of FIG. 6, as described above, where block 320 lists all the actions that can be taken, in parallel, in each respective one of the one or more mapper and reducer VMs/nodes of block 310. Thus, each of the respective other ones of the one or more mapper and reducer VMs/nodes also executes its own set of actions of blocks 325-350, at substantially the same time as all the other VMs/nodes, such that the respective mapper and reducer VMs/nodes are all performing blocks 325-355 in parallel, to effect a multi-parallel process. As noted above, these mapper and reducer VMs are spun or generated only as needed, such as to implement this map reduce process. As noted above, FIG. 6 lists the actions (blocks 325-345) taken by a single mapper and/or reducer VM/node, whereas FIG. 5A shows these same actions at a high level, also taking place in parallel at multiple VMs/nodes.

Referring to FIGS. 5A and 6, in at least some embodiments, it can be seen a first set of VMs/nodes (of a plurality of interconnected VMs/nodes), e.g., those nodes in block 320A, perform, in parallel, certain blocks of the process of block 320 (e.g., the mapper nodes/VMs), and a second, set of VMs/Nodes (e.g., those nodes in block 320C) (e.g., the reducer nodes/VMs) perform other blocks of the process of block 320, where in the illustration of FIG. 5A these are different nodes, but this is not limiting. In some embodiments, the VMs/Nodes performing the mapping function in block 320A are the same as the VMs/Nodes performing the reducing functions in block 320C. In some embodiments, the VMs/Nodes performing the mapping function in block 320A entirely different than the VMs/Nodes performing the reducing functions in block 320C. In addition, the number of VMs/nodes performing the mapping function need not be the same as the number of VMs/nodes performing the reducing function. Further, as FIG. 5A shows, one of the nodes (VM1Node1) performs actions in both block 320A and block 320C, but this is merely exemplary and not limiting.

Referring to block 320 of FIGS. 5 and 6, a respective VM/node 333A-333C thus receives a respective portion of metadata objects from a stream of metadata objects (block 325), such as a redo log metadata stream (where, in at least some embodiments, the redo log is the set of data and meta data objects), where the stream of metadata object is ordered by time. and the respective VM/node then maps each received portion of metadata based on offset, as described above, to a reducing node/VM that is assigned to that offset or range of offsets (block 335). Thus, each mapping VM gets a portion of the meta data objects (block 325), and the mapping VM then maps the metadata pieces in each object based on the offset to a reducing VM which is in charge of the offset (block 225). For example, if there are two reduce VM's, one can be in charge of offset 1-1000 and the other for offsets 1001-2000. The reducer node/VM reads the data that the metadata describes, which resides in change objects (block 340). The reducer node/VM then, for each offset/address, keeps only the latest metadata entry (latest by time) (block 343).

For each reducer node/VM that corresponds to a location where data has changed, the reducer VM/node then reads the data change object(s) that the metadata describes, which data resides in the change objects (block 345). For example, a given metadata can indicate, in some embodiments, that a change to volume Y happened at offset X at time t, and the data of the change is stored in some change object O. The next phase will read the changes from object O and read the disk object corresponding to offset X and apply the change to the disk object (block 347) and save a new copy of the disk object which describes the data of the portion of the disk at the new time stamp (block 350).

This can be done, in at least some embodiments, if it is known that certain VMs/nodes are designated to be responsible for certain types of data and if there is repetition or commonality or some other predetermined condition or relationship (which can be distinct or different predetermined conditions, for example) in some of the intermediate data that makes it appropriate to be routed to a particular VM/node, before being reduced. These I/O's can be combined into a second portion of data that is provided to certain VMs/nodes that are predetermined to be handling that type of I/0.

Referring again to FIGS. 5A-5C and 6, during the Reduce portion of the process (block 320 c), for each offset/address, only the most recent I/O which is prior to the point in time being built is kept (block 345), and only the metadata associated with the most recent I/O before the point in time being built is kept. So, in some embodiments, each VM/Node that “handles” the I/O for those properties (e.g., in block 320C), only builds that portion of the PIT using the most recent I/O (which are before the requested point in time) relating to a given address/offset. Once it is known which data needs to be applied to given locations in the disk, the appropriate change objects associated with those dates can be received and applied in parallel (block 347) and a copy of the data object is saved (block 350). As noted above, all of this (blocks 320-350) is done substantially simultaneously, in parallel, at each VM/node.

When the MapReduce block 320 is completed, the results from all the VMs/Nodes are merged (block 355) and provided to help rebuild the PIT (block 365). At block 360, the VMs generated and/or nodes operably coupled at block 310 may be shut down and/or disconnected, for example, to reduce processor and memory consumption at replication site 122. At block 365, the process 300 completes, finishing in accordance with either block 414 of FIG. 4 (in some embodiments) or block 1415 of FIG. 7 (in some embodiments, described further herein). In some embodiments, FIG. 5A is usable with the methods of FIGS. 6-9, FIG. 11A, and the illustration of FIG. 10, as described further herein.

In a further aspect, in certain embodiments herein, the methods of FIGS. 4-6 are further adapted, as shown in FIGS. 5A-5C, 6, and 7-11, to create a virtual access point in time (PIT) on an object based journal replication to an object store. In some of these embodiments, the data of the replica copy at a specific PIT is spread over the data objects of the volume and the objects of the journal. For example, in some embodiments, the data objects of the volume include information relating to the last full copy of the production site, and the objects of the journal include information relating to the DO metadata. Using the metadata objects and the order objects it is possible to point out what is the data object, and the offset within that data object that holds the correct data of a specific point in time. Thus, it is possible to access an image without rolling the journal objects into the replica copy objects. This process is referred to as virtual image access. In some embodiments, the MapReduce process of FIGS. 5A-5C and 6 is adapted, as shown in FIGS. 5A and 7-11, to implement, more efficiently and quickly, virtual image access using the object store.

In particular, in accordance with some embodiments, if an application (e.g., a user or any other entity, device, program, etc.) needs to access a specific offset in an image, a service is generated that can build the meta data for the virtual image access in a highly parallel manner (e.g., via the methods of FIGS. 5A-11), using the above-described MapReduce technique implemented over multiple in parallel nodes, as described for FIGS. 4-6. This can result in a VM that can expose the volume as a SCSI device, and which can acquire and make use of the offset to the objects relevant from the metadata built in the processes of FIGS. 5A-11. It is then possible to run a VM in the cloud against this iSCSI storage device.

Referring now to FIG. 7, FIG. 7 is a high level fourth flowchart illustrating a third method of updating/rebuilding PIT information, using the data protection system of FIGS. 1A-3 and set of metadata generated using FIGS. 5, 6, 8, and 9, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. FIG. 7 is substantially similar to FIG. 4, except that blocks 412 and 414 of FIG. 4 are replaced by blocks 1413 1415 of FIG. 7. However, Blocks 1402, 1404, 1406, 1408, and 1410 of FIG. 7 have substantially the same functions as corresponding blocks 402, 404, 406, 408, and 410 of FIG. 4, and the description of the functions of these blocks is not repeated here.

Thus, in comparing the embodiment of FIG. 4 to the embodiment of FIG. 7, a difference between the two processes occurs at the end of the process, in comparing blocks 412 and 414 of FIG. 4 to blocks 1413 and 1415 of FIG. 7. Instead of applying identified change objects and copying the new disk objects to a volume associated with the VM (as described in blocks 412 and 414 of FIG. 4), which can involve a lot of data movement and which can require rolling journal objects into replica copy objects, in FIG. 7, the metadata is analyzed (block 1411) and a mapping is created for each offset where the data exists, where the data can be in a change object or in a data object (block 1413), A virtual access PIT is created (block 1415) that instead will point to the locations of the appropriate data associated with the change objects. The virtual access PIT is created after the identified change object(s) are mapped in the new sit of metadata, so that the metadata identifies where the data is (including change objects in the journal). The virtual access PIT uses a new set of metadata created in block 1353 of FIG. 8, described further herein. In particular, the new set of metadata referenced in block 1415 includes a set of objects that describes where the data is, including indicating what is the data object and the offset within that data object that holds the corresponding correct data of a specific point in time, without actually reading the data and moving the data into another volume.

The new set of metadata referenced at block 1415 of FIG. 7 comes from block 1353 of FIG. 8. The process blocks to get to that point and block are now described.

First, the aforementioned FIG. 5A process blocks 305 through 315 are implemented, as described previously in connection with FIG. 5A. However, at block 320, in some embodiments, the process is replaced, as shown in FIG. 5A, with alternate block 1320, the actions for which are listed in FIG. 8, which is a fifth flowchart 1300 illustrating a second alternative portion of the second method of FIG. 5 in further detail, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure.

Referring now to FIG. 8, blocks, 1325, 1330, 1335, 1340, 1343, and 1345 are implemented in substantially the same way as similarly numbered blocks 325, 330, 1335, 1340, 1343, and 1345, as described above in connection with FIG. 6, and a description of their functions is not repeated here. It also should be noted that these aforementioned blocks in FIG. 8 are all being implemented at a given node, and that multiple other nodes also are implementing these same blocks in parallel, similar to FIG. 6 as previously described. That is, as described above in connection with FIG. 5, one or more additional nodes are used to assist with an on-demand multi-parallel generation of the PIT using a MapReduce process, using the most recent I/O relating to a given address/offset.

At block 1350, based on metadata known for each offset, where the data relating to the offset at the requested PIT exists, the data exists either in a disk object or a change object, so full metadata can be created describing the disk at the PIT. After block 1350, instead of proceeding to directly to block 355 of FIG. 4, the process includes a block 1353 relating to creating a new set of metadata objects describing locations of data objects and the offset within each data object that holds correct data for the PIT being generated (block 1353 of FIG. 8). This process also is done in parallel, at one or more nodes at substantially the same time. That is, the new set of metadata objects is a set of objects that describe in which objects the data for the desired PIT exists: these are not standard metadata objects, but rather provide a description of how the disk looks at the requested PIT, i.e. a mapping from offset in the disk, to disk object or change object. To get to this set, processing moves to block 1510 of FIG. 9, which is a sixth flowchart 1500 illustrating a method of generating a new set of metadata objects for the method of FIG. 5, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure.

Referring to FIG. 9, the process starts in flowchart 1500 (which also, in some embodiments, is done in a multi-parallel manner) with receiving the metadata objects built from the MapReduce process of FIGS. 5A-5C, 7, and 8. The offset to these objects is obtained (block 1530). For each object, a determination is made to identify where data is stored (block 1540). Based at least in part on the MapReduce processes of FIG. 5A-5C, 7 and 8, a new set of metadata objects is created, the new set of metadata objects describing locations of data objects and the offset within the data object that holds correct data for the PIT (block 1550). The MapReduce process of FIG. 6 helps to find this mapping, which helps to show what needs to be applied, and in some embodiments, the mapping is kept in a format that can be accessed quickly.

In some embodiments, the new set of metadata objects of block 1550 effectively serves as a description of the volume where the PIT information is stored. This description can be used to provide PIT data on demand without having to generate the full volume to provide for the PIT. For example, a description of a given volume, in a new metadata object, can indicate that data for a given object is located in the volume at a first location. In one embodiment, for example, the description in the metadata can indicate, for a first given offset in the volume, the object where the data of the object is stored. For example offset 0-10 may be stored in a disk object y at offsets xxx:yyy in the disk objects, and offsets 11-27 may be stored in a change object x at offsets zzz:www of the change object.

FIG. 10 is an exemplary illustration of a portion of a new metadata object 1600 generated in accordance with FIG. 9, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. As the object 1600 illustrates, data for ObjectA is accessible at Offset 0 on the volume, the data for ObjectB is stored from offset 1 through offset 4; the data for ObjectC is stored from offset 5 to offset 6; the data of ObjectD) is stored at offset 7, etc. (FIG. 10 is, of course, illustrative and not limiting.). FIG. 10 expresses, in one way, the concepts of having a metadata object able to convey, within the metadata itself, enough information to enable an entity to make a request for a given PIT and to be able to return to that entity the desired information found within the PIT, on an as needed or on demand basis, without having to completely rebuild the entire volume all at once. It will be appreciated that the particular structure of FIG. 10 is not the only way metadata could be arranged, or the only way to convey the same information.

One example of how this is advantageous is to consider an example, in some embodiments, of a system responding to an entity's request for a PIT. With the configuration described herein in connection with FIGS. 5A-5C and 7-10, responding to the entity's request may only require operating on the metadata (e.g., a user request). It is not necessary to move data from the object to a disk (whether virtual or actual), to replicate a volume or LU at a PIT. This means that system responding to an entity request, in some embodiments, operates on a significantly smaller amount of data, so the entire process can be significantly faster as compared to a situation where an entire volume had to be created for a PIT. For example, in some instances, the new metadata objects can be, as but one example, about one percent of the size of the data to which the metadata object is referring. Accordingly, instead of requiring a terabyte of data to be in transit to create a PIT, it may be possible to have as little as 1-10 GB of data. Thus, in some embodiments, because of both the multi-parallel creation of the PIT, with MapReduce (as described previously) and also because the amount of data being operated on to create the new metadata objects is significantly smaller, operations to generate a PIT in response to a request can be completed in only a few seconds, This process helps to build metadata for virtual image access in a highly parallel manner.

Referring again to FIGS. 5A-5C and 7-10, the set of new metadata objects created in block 1550 of FIG. 9 is returned to block 1353 of FIG. 8, which returns to block 355 of FIG. 5A. At block 355 of FIG. 5A, as noted previously, the results from the multiple nodes operating in parallel are merged, and the PIT is finished as described previously.

In some embodiments, one example of a way in which the set of new metadata objects is used to provide the PIT to a user or other entity, is found in FIG. 11A, which is a block diagram showing creation of a virtual machine configured to emulate a disk at a point in time. In some embodiments based on FIG. 11A, a virtual machine (VM) is provided that exposes the volume as a SCSI device, then offsets to objects relevant from the metadata (e.g., as discusses above) can be obtained. Then, a VM can be run in the cloud against this SCSI storage device that was created.

Referring to FIG. 11A, FIG. 11A shows two processes happening at different sides of the system, including at the user or other entity, in blocks 605-625 and the responding system at blocks 705-755, which interact with each other several times. If a user or other entity wants to spin a VM at a specific time (block 605), the user logs into the cloud portal (block 610), and asks for a recovery VM for that time (block 615). The system, which has started its process or service (block 705), then receives the request for recovery VM (block 715). In response, the system launches the entire multi-parallel MapReduce process of FIGS. 5A-5C and 7-8 to rebuild the PIT at the requested time (block 720). In the background, the system launches the MapReduce process of FIGS. 5A-5C and 7 and commences the above-described actions of FIGS. 5A-5C and 7-9, culminating in creating the virtual image metadata (e.g., as described above in connection with FIGS. 5 and 7-11)(block 725).

The system then generates a single VM for exposing an iSCSI device (block 730) (e.g., a storage VM for exposing the recovered PITs over iSCSI) and then establishes the recovery VM and attaches the iSCSI to the recovery VM (block 735) (which sees its devices over iSCSI), where the user is then provided with information needed to access the recovery VM (block 620). In effect, the recovery VM exposes an iSCSI target on its front end, but on its back end, it will emulate (e.g., for purposes of I/O reads and writes) the disk at the point in time the user or other entity is seeking. The recovery VM, in some embodiments, redirects all reads to the correct objects and handles writes by providing them to a local device. As will be appreciated, this iSCSI device, in some embodiments, can host multiple volumes.

In some embodiments, if an I/O request arrives at the VM (block 625), the action may differ depending on whether the I/O was for a read vs for a write. If the I/O request is for a read (the answer at block 740 is NO), then the iSCSI device parses the I/O request to determine the location(s) of PIT data to be read (block 750), then checks the new set of metadata objects to determine the location of the data object. The data can then be returned to the requesting entity in accordance with an iSCSI protocol (block 755). From the requesting entity's perspective, the requesting entity (e.g., a user, application, or other requester) just sees what appears to be an iSCSI volume, for that point in time that it is responding to the read request. However, “underneath,” the iSCSI volume actually is accessing an object structure, as described above. It is important to note that, in some embodiments, the metadata is stored in a format or a database which will allow fast access to the I/O.

In some embodiments, if the I/O request that arrives is for a write (the answer at block 740 is YES), then the iSCSI device does need to keep the write, so that it can be written to the actual permanent data storage at some point. In some embodiments, when a write request is received, the VM is configured to write to a local device, a local log service, or any other place where write data can be stored until the data can be written to the actual disk where data is stored. In some embodiments, an I/O write request is treated in a manner similar to a snapshot, wherein, every time there is a write (or even a read) where the SCSI device is configured to use a technology such as VMware, where data actually is written into a new log device.

Thus, in accordance with at least some embodiments described above, a virtual machine is provided that exposes a volume to a requesting entity as an iSCSI device, where new writes are written to a log device, but where there is a read request received, where the read is not to some data already written to the log device, the read request is responded to by going to the object store based on the new set of metadata that was created as discussed herein. Thus, within a very short time (e.g., in some embodiments a few seconds to a minute) of receiving a request, it is possible, in some embodiments, to bring a requester to any point in time.

In some described embodiments, hosts 104 and 116 of FIG. 1A may each correspond to one computer, a plurality of computers, or a network of distributed computers. For example, in some embodiments, host 104 and/or host 116 may be implemented as one or more computers such as shown in FIG. 11A. As shown in FIG. 11A, computer 800 may include processor 802, volatile memory 804 (e.g., RAM), non-volatile memory 806 (e.g., one or more hard disk drives (HDDs), one or more solid state drives (SSDs) such as a flash drive, one or more hybrid magnetic and solid state drives, and/or one or more virtual storage volumes, such as a cloud storage, or a combination of physical storage volumes and virtual storage volumes), graphical user interface (GUI) 808 (e.g., a touchscreen, a display, and so forth) and input/output (I/O) device 820 (e.g., a mouse, a keyboard, etc.). Non-volatile memory 806 stores computer instructions 812, an operating system 816 and data 818 such that, for example, the computer instructions 812 are executed by the processor 802 out of volatile memory 804 to perform at least a portion of the processes shown in FIGS. 4-6. Program code may be applied to data entered using an input device of GUI 808 or received from I/O device 820.

FIG. 11B is an eighth flowchart 1600 illustrating a second method of creating a virtual access point in time, in accordance with at least one illustrative embodiment of the instant disclosure. In some embodiments, the blocks of FIG. 11B are implemented as part of a computer-implemented method. In block 1610, an object store is generated at a replication site of a storage system. The replication site is configured to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects (block 1615). As part of the generation of the virtual access PIT, a plurality of nodes are provided in operable communication with the storage system (block 1620). Each respective node is configured to perform the actions in block 1620 (i.e., the actions in blocks 1630, 1635, and block 1650), substantially concurrently.

Each respective node is configured to perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects (block 1630). A respective set of metadata object is created based at least in part on the first set of disk objects (block 1635). Each respective metadata object within each respective set describes a location at the replica site of at least one of the plurality of data objects and an offset within that at least one data object that holds corresponding data for the PIT (block 1640). Then, the first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects are merged together, from each respective parallel node, into a virtual access PIT (block 1645).

The processes of FIGS. 4-11B are not limited to use with the hardware and software of FIGS. 1A-3 and/or FIG. 12 and may find applicability in any computing or processing environment and with any type of machine or set of machines that may be capable of running a computer program. The processes described herein may be implemented in hardware, software, or a combination of the two. The logic for carrying out the method may be embodied as part of the system described in FIG. 11A, which is useful for carrying out a method described with reference to embodiments shown in, for example, FIGS. 4-11B. The processes described herein are not limited to the specific embodiments described. For example, the processes of FIGS. 4-11B are not limited to the specific processing order shown in FIGS. 4-11B. Rather, any of the blocks of the processes may be re-ordered, combined or removed, performed in parallel or in serial, as necessary, to achieve the results set forth herein.

Processor 802 may be implemented by one or more programmable processors executing one or more computer programs to perform the functions of the system. As used herein, the term “processor” describes an electronic circuit that performs a function, an operation, or a sequence of operations. The function, operation, or sequence of operations may be hard coded into the electronic circuit or soft coded by way of instructions held in a memory device. A “processor” may perform the function, operation, or sequence of operations using digital values or using analog signals. In some embodiments, the “processor” can be embodied in one or more application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). In some embodiments, the “processor” may be embodied in one or more microprocessors with associated program memory. In some embodiments, the “processor” may be embodied in one or more discrete electronic circuits. The “processor” may be analog, digital, or mixed-signal. In some embodiments, the “processor” may be one or more physical processors or one or more “virtual” (e.g., remotely located or “cloud”) processors.

Various functions of circuit elements may also be implemented as processing blocks in a software program. Such software may be employed in, for example, one or more digital signal processors, microcontrollers, or general-purpose computers. Described embodiments may be implemented in hardware, a combination of hardware and software, software, or software in execution by one or more physical or virtual processors.

Some embodiments may be implemented in the form of methods and apparatuses for practicing those methods. Described embodiments may also be implemented in the form of program code, for example, stored in a storage medium, loaded into and/or executed by a machine, or transmitted over some transmission medium or carrier, such as over electrical wiring or cabling, through fiber optics, or via electromagnetic radiation. A non-transitory machine-readable medium may include but is not limited to tangible media, such as magnetic recording media including hard drives, floppy diskettes, and magnetic tape media, optical recording media including compact discs (CDs) and digital versatile discs (DVDs), solid state memory such as flash memory, hybrid magnetic and solid state memory, non-volatile memory, volatile memory, and so forth, but does not include a transitory signal per se. When embodied in a non-transitory machine-readable medium and the program code is loaded into and executed by a machine, such as a computer, the machine becomes an apparatus for practicing the method.

When implemented on one or more processing devices, the program code segments combine with the processor to provide a unique device that operates analogously to specific logic circuits. Such processing devices may include, for example, a general purpose microprocessor, a digital signal processor (DSP), a reduced instruction set computer (RISC), a complex instruction set computer (CISC), an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field programmable gate array (FPGA), a programmable logic array (PLA), a microcontroller, an embedded controller, a multi-core processor, and/or others, including combinations of one or more of the above. Described embodiments may also be implemented in the form of a bitstream or other sequence of signal values electrically or optically transmitted through a medium, stored magnetic-field variations in a magnetic recording medium, etc., generated using a method and/or an apparatus as recited in the claims.

For example, when the program code is loaded into and executed by a machine, such as the computer of FIG. 11A, the machine becomes an apparatus for practicing the invention. When implemented on one or more general-purpose processors, the program code combines with such a processor to provide a unique apparatus that operates analogously to specific logic circuits. As such a general-purpose digital machine can be transformed into a special purpose digital machine. FIG. 12 shows Program Logic 910 embodied on a computer-readable medium 930 as shown, and wherein the Logic is encoded in computer-executable code configured for carrying out the reservation service process of this invention and thereby forming a Computer Program Product 900. The logic may be the same logic on memory loaded on processor. The program logic may also be embodied in software modules, as modules, or as hardware modules. A processor may be a virtual processor or a physical processor. Logic may be distributed across several processors or virtual processors to execute the logic.

In some embodiments, a storage medium may be a physical or logical device. In some embodiments, a storage medium may consist of physical or logical devices. In some embodiments, a storage medium may be mapped across multiple physical and/or logical devices. In some embodiments, storage medium may exist in a virtualized environment. In some embodiments, a processor may be a virtual or physical embodiment. In some embodiments, a logic may be executed across one or more physical or virtual processors.

For purposes of illustrating the present embodiment, the disclosed embodiments are described as embodied in a specific configuration and using special logical arrangements, but one skilled in the art will appreciate that the device is not limited to the specific configuration but rather only by the claims included with this specification.

Various elements, which are described in the context of a single embodiment, may also be provided separately or in any suitable subcombination. It will be further understood that various changes in the details, materials, and arrangements of the parts that have been described and illustrated herein may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope of the following claims.

Claims (20)

We claim:
1. A storage system, comprising:
a production site in operable communication with a replication site; and
an object store disposed at the replication site, the object store comprising a plurality of data objects associated with data stored in at least one data storage entity of the production site;
the replication site configured to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects, the generation of the virtual access PIT comprising:
providing a plurality of nodes in operable communication with the storage system, each respective node configured to, substantially concurrently:
perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects; and
create, based at least in part on the first set of disk objects, a respective set of metadata objects, each respective metadata object within each respective set describing a location at the replica site of at least one of the plurality of data objects and an offset within that at least one data object that holds corresponding data for the PIT; and
merging together into a virtual access PIT, from each of the plurality of parallel nodes, the first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the set of metadata objects comprises one or more objects describing in which objects data for the virtual access PIT exists.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein performing a MapReduce operation further comprises:
at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, mapping each respective data object from the plurality of data objects to a corresponding respective address in the data storage entity; and
at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, reducing, at each respective address in the data storage entity, a set of input/output (I/O) metadata associated with the respective address, the reducing configured to keep only the most recent I/O metadata to the respective address.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the plurality of data objects comprises:
a set of second disk objects associated with data stored in a copy of a data storage entity at a point in time of the production site;
a set of change objects associated with one or more I/O operations on the production site; and
a set of metadata objects associated with the set of change objects.
5. The system of claim 1, wherein generation of the virtual PIT further comprises:
at each respective node, sorting the received portion of metadata objects based on time and at least one of offset and address; and
mapping the sorted metadata objects based on a corresponding range of I/O to the data storage entity to the at least one of offset and address described by the metadata.
6. The system of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving, from a requesting entity, a request for a recovery virtual machine (recovery VM) at a first PIT;
configuring the merged first set of disk objects and first set of metadata objects to create the virtual access PIT;
generating a single storage VM for exposing an Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) device to the requesting entity; and
attaching the recovery VM to the iSCSI.
7. The system of claim 6, further comprising:
receiving a write request; and
writing data associated with the write request to a log device.
8. The system of claim 6, further comprising:
receiving a read request from a requesting entity;
determining, from the set of metadata objects, a location of a data object responsive to the read request; and
returning the data object to the requesting entity.
9. A computer-implemented method, comprising
generating an object store disposed at a replication site, the object store comprising a plurality of data objects associated with data stored in at least one data storage entity of a production site;
configuring the replication site to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects, the generation of the virtual access PIT comprising:
providing a plurality of nodes in operable communication with the storage system, each respective node configured to, substantially concurrently:
perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects; and
create, based at least in part on the first set of disk objects, a respective set of metadata objects, each respective metadata object within each respective set describing a location at the replica site of at least one of the plurality of data objects and an offset within that at least one data object that holds corresponding data for the PIT; and
merging together into a virtual access PIT, from each of the plurality of parallel nodes, the first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects.
10. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, wherein the set of metadata objects comprises one or more objects describing in which objects data for the virtual access PIT exists.
11. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, further comprising:
at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, mapping each respective data object from the plurality of data objects to a corresponding respective address in the data storage entity; and
at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, reducing, at each respective address in the data storage entity, a set of input/output (I/O) data associated with the respective address, the reducing configured to keep only the most recent I/O data to the respective address.
12. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, wherein the plurality of data objects comprises:
a set of second disk objects associated with data stored in a copy of a data storage entity at a point in time of the production site;
a set of change objects associated with one or more I/O operations on the production site; and
a set of metadata objects associated with the set of change objects.
13. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, further comprising:
at each respective node, sorting the received portion of metadata objects based on time and at least one of offset and address; and
mapping the sorted metadata objects based on a corresponding range of I/O to the data storage entity to the at least one of offset and address described by the metadata.
14. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, further comprising:
receiving, from a requesting entity, a request for a recovery virtual machine (recovery VM) at a first PIT;
configuring the merged first set of disk objects and first set of metadata objects to create the virtual access PIT;
generating a single storage VM for exposing an Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) device to the requesting entity; and
attaching the recovery VM to the iSCSI.
15. The computer-implemented method of claim 9, further comprising:
receiving an I/O request;
writing, if the I/O request is a write request, data associated with the write request to a log device;
determining, if the I/O request is a read request, from the set of metadata objects, a location of a data object responsive to the read request; and returning the data object to the requesting entity.
16. A computer program product including a non-transitory computer readable storage medium having computer program code encoded thereon that when executed on a processor of a computer causes the computer to operate a storage system, the computer program product comprising:
computer program code for generating an object store disposed at a replication site, the object store comprising a plurality of data objects associated with data stored in at least one data storage entity of a production site;
computer program code for configuring the replication site to generate a virtual access point in time (PIT) based at least in part on the plurality of data objects, the generation of the PIT comprising:
providing computer program code for providing a plurality of nodes in operable communication with the storage system, each respective node configured to, substantially concurrently:
perform a MapReduce operation to generate a respective first set of disk objects based on the plurality of data objects; and
create, based at least in part on the first set of disk objects, a respective set of metadata objects, each respective metadata object within each respective set describing a location at the replica site of at least one of the plurality of data objects and an offset within that at least one data object that holds corresponding data for the PIT; and
providing computer program code for merging together into a virtual access PIT, from each of the plurality of parallel nodes, the first set of disk objects and the first set of metadata objects.
17. The computer program product of claim 16, further comprising:
computer program code for, at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, mapping each respective data object from the plurality of data objects to a corresponding respective address in the data storage entity; and
computer program code for, at each corresponding respective one of the plurality of nodes, reducing, at each respective address in the data storage entity, a set of input/output (I/O) data associated with the respective address, the reducing configured to keep only the most recent I/O data to the respective address.
18. The computer program product of claim 16, further comprising:
computer program code for providing a set of second disk objects associated with data stored in a copy of a data storage entity at a point in time of the production site;
computer program code for providing a set of change objects associated with one or more I/O operations on the production site; and
computer program code for providing a set of metadata objects associated with the set of change objects.
19. The computer program product of claim 16, further comprising:
computer program code for receiving, from a requesting entity, a request for a recovery virtual machine (recovery VM) at a first PIT;
computer program code for configuring the merged first set of disk objects and first set of metadata objects to create the virtual access PIT;
computer program code for generating a single storage VM for exposing an Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) device to the requesting entity; and
computer program code for attaching the recovery VM to the iSCSI.
20. The computer program product of claim 16, further comprising:
computer program code for receiving an I/O request;
computer program code for writing, if the I/O request is a write request, data associated with the write request to a log device;
computer program code for determining, if the I/O request is a read request, from the set of metadata objects, a location of a data object responsive to the read request; and returning the data object to the requesting entity.
US15/390,999 2016-12-27 2016-12-27 Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication Active 2037-05-18 US10114581B1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15/390,999 US10114581B1 (en) 2016-12-27 2016-12-27 Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15/390,999 US10114581B1 (en) 2016-12-27 2016-12-27 Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US10114581B1 true US10114581B1 (en) 2018-10-30

Family

ID=63894948

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/390,999 Active 2037-05-18 US10114581B1 (en) 2016-12-27 2016-12-27 Creating a virtual access point in time on an object based journal replication

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US10114581B1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10303562B2 (en) * 2017-03-30 2019-05-28 Entit Software Llc Using metadata extracted from proxy files to access data stored in secondary storage
US10324798B1 (en) 2014-09-25 2019-06-18 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Restoring active areas of a logical unit

Citations (169)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7203741B2 (en) 2000-10-12 2007-04-10 Peerapp Ltd. Method and system for accelerating receipt of data in a client-to-client network
US20080059541A1 (en) * 2006-08-18 2008-03-06 Fachan Neal T Systems and methods for a snapshot of data
US7516287B2 (en) 2006-09-28 2009-04-07 Emc Israel Development Center, Ltd. Methods and apparatus for optimal journaling for continuous data replication
US7650331B1 (en) 2004-06-18 2010-01-19 Google Inc. System and method for efficient large-scale data processing
US7719443B1 (en) 2008-06-27 2010-05-18 Emc Corporation Compressing data in a continuous data protection environment
US7840662B1 (en) 2008-03-28 2010-11-23 EMC(Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Dynamically managing a network cluster
US7840536B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-11-23 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for dynamic journal expansion
US7844856B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-11-30 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for bottleneck processing in a continuous data protection system having journaling
US7860836B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-12-28 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus to recover data in a continuous data protection environment using a journal
US7882286B1 (en) 2008-09-26 2011-02-01 EMC (Benelux)B.V., S.A.R.L. Synchronizing volumes for replication
US7934262B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-04-26 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for virus detection using journal data
US7958372B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-06-07 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus to convert a logical unit from a first encryption state to a second encryption state using a journal in a continuous data protection environment
US8041940B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-10-18 Emc Corporation Offloading encryption processing in a storage area network
US8060714B1 (en) 2008-09-26 2011-11-15 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Initializing volumes in a replication system
US8060713B1 (en) 2005-12-21 2011-11-15 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Consolidating snapshots in a continuous data protection system using journaling
US20110313973A1 (en) * 2010-06-19 2011-12-22 Srivas Mandayam C Map-Reduce Ready Distributed File System
US8103937B1 (en) 2010-03-31 2012-01-24 Emc Corporation Cas command network replication
US8108634B1 (en) 2008-06-27 2012-01-31 Emc B.V., S.A.R.L. Replicating a thin logical unit
US8214612B1 (en) 2009-09-28 2012-07-03 Emc Corporation Ensuring consistency of replicated volumes
US8232687B2 (en) 2006-04-26 2012-07-31 Raydiance, Inc. Intelligent laser interlock system
US8271441B1 (en) 2009-12-26 2012-09-18 Emc Corporation Virtualized CG
US8271447B1 (en) 2010-06-18 2012-09-18 Emc International Company Mirroring metadata in a continuous data protection environment
US8332687B1 (en) 2010-06-23 2012-12-11 Emc Corporation Splitter used in a continuous data protection environment
US8335771B1 (en) 2010-09-29 2012-12-18 Emc Corporation Storage array snapshots for logged access replication in a continuous data protection system
US8335761B1 (en) 2010-12-02 2012-12-18 Emc International Company Replicating in a multi-copy environment
US8341115B1 (en) 2009-12-26 2012-12-25 Emc Corporation Dynamically switching between synchronous and asynchronous replication
US8370648B1 (en) 2010-03-15 2013-02-05 Emc International Company Writing and reading encrypted data using time-based encryption keys
US8380885B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2013-02-19 Emc Corporation Handling abort commands in replication
US8392680B1 (en) 2010-03-30 2013-03-05 Emc International Company Accessing a volume in a distributed environment
US8429362B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2013-04-23 Emc Corporation Journal based replication with a virtual service layer
US8433869B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2013-04-30 Emc International Company Virtualized consistency group using an enhanced splitter
US8478955B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2013-07-02 Emc International Company Virtualized consistency group using more than one data protection appliance
US8495304B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2013-07-23 Emc Corporation Multi source wire deduplication
US8510279B1 (en) 2012-03-15 2013-08-13 Emc International Company Using read signature command in file system to backup data
US20130218840A1 (en) * 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Charles Smith System and method for building a point-in-time snapshot of an eventually-consistent data store
US8521691B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2013-08-27 Emc Corporation Seamless migration between replication technologies
US8521694B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2013-08-27 Emc Corporation Leveraging array snapshots for immediate continuous data protection
US8543609B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2013-09-24 Emc Corporation Snapshots in deduplication
US8583885B1 (en) 2009-12-01 2013-11-12 Emc Corporation Energy efficient sync and async replication
US8601085B1 (en) 2011-03-28 2013-12-03 Emc Corporation Techniques for preferred path determination
US8600945B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2013-12-03 Emc Corporation Continuous data replication
US8627012B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2014-01-07 Emc Corporation System and method for improving cache performance
US8683592B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2014-03-25 Emc Corporation Associating network and storage activities for forensic analysis
US8694700B1 (en) 2010-09-29 2014-04-08 Emc Corporation Using I/O track information for continuous push with splitter for storage device
US8706700B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-04-22 Emc Corporation Creating consistent snapshots across several storage arrays or file systems
US8712962B1 (en) 2011-12-01 2014-04-29 Emc Corporation Snapshots in de-duplication
US8719497B1 (en) 2011-09-21 2014-05-06 Emc Corporation Using device spoofing to improve recovery time in a continuous data protection environment
US8725692B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Replication of xcopy command
US8725691B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Dynamic LUN resizing in a replication environment
US8726066B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Journal based replication with enhance failover
US8738813B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2014-05-27 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for round trip synchronous replication using SCSI reads
US8745004B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2014-06-03 Emc Corporation Reverting an old snapshot on a production volume without a full sweep
US8751828B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-06-10 Emc Corporation Sharing encryption-related metadata between multiple layers in a storage I/O stack
US8769336B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2014-07-01 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for preventing journal loss on failover in symmetric continuous data protection replication
US8805786B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2014-08-12 Emc Corporation Replicating selected snapshots from one storage array to another, with minimal data transmission
US8806161B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2014-08-12 Emc Corporation Mirroring splitter meta data
US8825848B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2014-09-02 Emc Corporation Ordering of event records in an electronic system for forensic analysis
US8850144B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2014-09-30 Emc Corporation Active replication switch
US8850143B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-09-30 Emc Corporation Point in time access in a replication environment with LUN resizing
US8862546B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2014-10-14 Emc Corporation Virtual access roll
US8892835B1 (en) 2012-06-07 2014-11-18 Emc Corporation Insertion of a virtualization layer into a replication environment
US8898515B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2014-11-25 Emc International Company Synchronous replication using multiple data protection appliances across multiple storage arrays
US8898409B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2014-11-25 Emc International Company Journal-based replication without journal loss
US8898112B1 (en) 2011-09-07 2014-11-25 Emc Corporation Write signature command
US8898519B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-11-25 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for an asynchronous splitter
US8914595B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2014-12-16 Emc Corporation Snapshots in deduplication
US8924668B1 (en) 2011-12-23 2014-12-30 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for an application- and object-level I/O splitter
US8930947B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-01-06 Emc Corporation System and method for live migration of a virtual machine with dedicated cache
US8935498B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2015-01-13 Emc Corporation Splitter based hot migration
US8949180B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2015-02-03 Emc International Company Replicating key-value pairs in a continuous data protection system
US8954673B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2015-02-10 Emc International Company Using a conditional read request and a hash to determine synchronization of data in a cache at a host with data in storage array
US8954796B1 (en) 2012-06-26 2015-02-10 Emc International Company Recovery of a logical unit in a consistency group while replicating other logical units in the consistency group
US8959054B1 (en) 2010-03-25 2015-02-17 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for optimal journaling for continuous data replication
US8977826B1 (en) 2011-12-28 2015-03-10 Emc Corporation Extent commands in replication
US8996461B1 (en) 2011-03-28 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for replicating the punch command
US8995460B1 (en) 2012-05-14 2015-03-31 Arris Enterprises, Inc. Embedded control data in communications systems
US8996460B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Accessing an image in a continuous data protection using deduplication-based storage
US8996827B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Creating and maintaining clones in continuous data protection
US9003138B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-04-07 Emc Corporation Read signature command
US9032160B1 (en) 2011-12-29 2015-05-12 Emc Corporation Continuous data replication
US9031913B1 (en) 2011-12-28 2015-05-12 Emc Corporation File replication
US9037818B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2015-05-19 Emc Corporation Active replication switch
US9063994B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2015-06-23 Emc Corporation Networked based replication of distributed volumes
US9069709B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-06-30 Emc International Company Dynamic granularity in data replication
US9081842B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-07-14 Emc Corporation Synchronous and asymmetric asynchronous active-active-active data access
US9081754B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-07-14 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for cascaded replication using a multi splitter
US9087112B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-07-21 Emc International Company Consistency across snapshot shipping and continuous replication
US9087008B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-07-21 Emc International Company Replicating a volume using snapshots
US9104529B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-08-11 Emc Corporation System and method for copying a cache system
US9110914B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-08-18 Emc Corporation Continuous data protection using deduplication-based storage
US9116811B1 (en) 2012-06-30 2015-08-25 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9128855B1 (en) 2013-06-26 2015-09-08 Emc Corporation Flash cache partitioning
US9128628B1 (en) 2013-03-13 2015-09-08 Emc Corporation Dynamic replication mode switching
US9135120B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation Consistency group moving
US9135119B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation System and method for data management
US9134914B1 (en) 2012-12-27 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation Deduplication
US9146878B1 (en) 2013-06-25 2015-09-29 Emc Corporation Storage recovery from total cache loss using journal-based replication
US9152578B1 (en) 2013-03-12 2015-10-06 Emc Corporation Securing data replication, backup and mobility in cloud storage
US9152339B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-10-06 Emc Corporation Synchronization of asymmetric active-active, asynchronously-protected storage
US9158578B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-10-13 Emc Corporation System and method for migrating virtual machines
US9158630B1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-10-13 Emc Corporation Testing integrity of replicated storage
US9177670B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2015-11-03 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for flash cache management
US9189339B1 (en) 2014-03-28 2015-11-17 Emc Corporation Replication of a virtual distributed volume with virtual machine granualarity
US9189341B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-11-17 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for multi-copy replication using a multi-splitter
US9201736B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2015-12-01 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for recovery of complex assets in distributed information processing systems
US9225529B1 (en) 2013-12-10 2015-12-29 Emc Corporation Encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US9223659B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2015-12-29 Emc International Company Generating and accessing a virtual volume snapshot in a continuous data protection system
US9235632B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-01-12 Emc Corporation Synchronization of replication
US9235524B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2016-01-12 Emc Corporation System and method for improving cache performance
US9244997B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Emc Corporation Asymmetric active-active access of asynchronously-protected data storage
US9256605B1 (en) 2011-08-03 2016-02-09 Emc Corporation Reading and writing to an unexposed device
US9274718B1 (en) 2014-06-20 2016-03-01 Emc Corporation Migration in replication system
US9275063B1 (en) 2011-09-30 2016-03-01 Emc Corporation Replication optimizated IO
US9286052B1 (en) 2011-09-15 2016-03-15 Emc Corporation Upgrading software on a pair of nodes in a clustered environment
US9305009B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-04-05 Emc Corporation Synchronous replication of virtualized storage processors
US9330155B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-05-03 Emc Corporation Unified management of sync and async replication for block and file objects
US9336094B1 (en) 2012-09-13 2016-05-10 Emc International Company Scaleout replication of an application
US9367260B1 (en) 2013-12-13 2016-06-14 Emc Corporation Dynamic replication system
US9378219B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation Metro-cluster based on synchronous replication of virtualized storage processors
US9378096B1 (en) 2012-06-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9378261B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation Unified synchronous replication for block and file objects
US9383937B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-07-05 Emc Corporation Journal tiering in a continuous data protection system using deduplication-based storage
US9389800B1 (en) 2014-03-27 2016-07-12 Emc Corporation Synthesizing virtual machine disk backups
US9405481B1 (en) 2014-12-17 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation Replicating using volume multiplexing with consistency group file
US9405684B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9405765B1 (en) 2013-12-17 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation Replication of virtual machines
US9411535B1 (en) 2015-03-27 2016-08-09 Emc Corporation Accessing multiple virtual devices
US9460028B1 (en) 2012-12-27 2016-10-04 Emc Corporation Non-disruptive and minimally disruptive data migration in active-active clusters
US9477407B1 (en) 2013-06-28 2016-10-25 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Intelligent migration of a virtual storage unit to another data storage system
US9501542B1 (en) 2008-03-11 2016-11-22 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for volume synchronization
US9507732B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2016-11-29 EMC IP Holding Company LLC System and method for cache management
US9507845B1 (en) 2014-03-27 2016-11-29 EMC IP Holding Company, LLC Virtual splitter
US9514138B1 (en) 2012-03-15 2016-12-06 Emc Corporation Using read signature command in file system to backup data
US9524218B1 (en) 2013-09-09 2016-12-20 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Leverage fast VP extent-level statistics within CDP environments
US9529885B1 (en) 2014-09-29 2016-12-27 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Maintaining consistent point-in-time in asynchronous replication during virtual machine relocation
US9535801B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2017-01-03 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Xcopy in journal based replication
US9535800B1 (en) 2014-09-30 2017-01-03 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Concurrent data recovery and input/output processing
US9547591B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2017-01-17 EMC IP Holding Company LLC System and method for cache management
US9547459B1 (en) 2013-06-27 2017-01-17 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Techniques for data relocation based on access patterns
US9552405B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2017-01-24 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Methods and apparatus for recovery of complex assets in distributed information processing systems
US9557925B1 (en) 2014-12-29 2017-01-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Thin replication
US9557921B1 (en) 2015-03-26 2017-01-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Virtual volume converter
US9563684B1 (en) 2013-12-31 2017-02-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication cookie
US9563517B1 (en) 2013-12-30 2017-02-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Cloud snapshots
US9575857B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Active/active replication
US9575851B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Volume hot migration
US9575894B1 (en) 2015-03-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Application aware cache coherency
US9582382B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2017-02-28 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Snapshot hardening
US9588847B1 (en) 2014-03-25 2017-03-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Recovering corrupt virtual machine disks
US9594822B1 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-03-14 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and apparatus for bandwidth management in a metro cluster environment
US9600377B1 (en) 2014-12-03 2017-03-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Providing data protection using point-in-time images from multiple types of storage devices
US9619543B1 (en) 2014-06-23 2017-04-11 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replicating in virtual desktop infrastructure
US9632881B1 (en) 2015-03-24 2017-04-25 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication of a virtual distributed volume
US9665305B1 (en) 2015-06-26 2017-05-30 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Tiering data between two deduplication devices
US9722788B1 (en) 2015-06-29 2017-08-01 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Rekeying encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US9720618B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2017-08-01 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Maintaining backup snapshots using continuous replication from multiple sources
US9727429B1 (en) 2015-03-31 2017-08-08 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for immediate recovery of replicated virtual machines
US9733969B2 (en) 2015-06-30 2017-08-15 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for malware detection in virtual machines
US9737111B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Cara Lustik Removable shoe insert for corrective sizing
US9749300B1 (en) 2015-03-30 2017-08-29 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for immediate recovery of virtual machines encrypted in the cloud
US9772789B1 (en) 2014-03-25 2017-09-26 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Alignment fixing on a data protection system during continuous data replication to deduplicated storage
US9798472B1 (en) 2015-09-29 2017-10-24 Emc Corporation Extent level cache destaging
US9804934B1 (en) 2014-12-30 2017-10-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Production recovery using a point in time snapshot
US9823973B1 (en) 2014-12-22 2017-11-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Creating consistent snapshots in a virtualized environment
US9823865B1 (en) 2015-06-30 2017-11-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication based security
US9832261B2 (en) 2014-09-30 2017-11-28 Emc Corporation Cloud consistency technology
US9846698B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2017-12-19 Emc Corporation Maintaining point-in-time granularity for backup snapshots
US9875042B1 (en) 2015-03-31 2018-01-23 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Asynchronous replication
US9875162B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2018-01-23 Emc Corporation Recovering corrupt storage systems

Patent Citations (192)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7203741B2 (en) 2000-10-12 2007-04-10 Peerapp Ltd. Method and system for accelerating receipt of data in a client-to-client network
US8930500B2 (en) 2000-10-12 2015-01-06 Peerapp Ltd. Method and system for accelerating receipt of data in a client to client network
US8250149B2 (en) 2000-10-12 2012-08-21 Peerapp Ltd. Method and system for accelerating receipt of data in a client to client network
US8037162B2 (en) 2000-10-12 2011-10-11 PeeApp Ltd. Method and system for accelerating receipt of data in a client to client network
US7650331B1 (en) 2004-06-18 2010-01-19 Google Inc. System and method for efficient large-scale data processing
US8060713B1 (en) 2005-12-21 2011-11-15 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Consolidating snapshots in a continuous data protection system using journaling
US8232687B2 (en) 2006-04-26 2012-07-31 Raydiance, Inc. Intelligent laser interlock system
US20080059541A1 (en) * 2006-08-18 2008-03-06 Fachan Neal T Systems and methods for a snapshot of data
US7516287B2 (en) 2006-09-28 2009-04-07 Emc Israel Development Center, Ltd. Methods and apparatus for optimal journaling for continuous data replication
US7844856B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-11-30 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for bottleneck processing in a continuous data protection system having journaling
US7934262B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-04-26 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for virus detection using journal data
US7860836B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-12-28 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus to recover data in a continuous data protection environment using a journal
US7840536B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2010-11-23 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Methods and apparatus for dynamic journal expansion
US8041940B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-10-18 Emc Corporation Offloading encryption processing in a storage area network
US7958372B1 (en) 2007-12-26 2011-06-07 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Method and apparatus to convert a logical unit from a first encryption state to a second encryption state using a journal in a continuous data protection environment
US9501542B1 (en) 2008-03-11 2016-11-22 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for volume synchronization
US7840662B1 (en) 2008-03-28 2010-11-23 EMC(Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Dynamically managing a network cluster
US7719443B1 (en) 2008-06-27 2010-05-18 Emc Corporation Compressing data in a continuous data protection environment
US8108634B1 (en) 2008-06-27 2012-01-31 Emc B.V., S.A.R.L. Replicating a thin logical unit
US8060714B1 (en) 2008-09-26 2011-11-15 Emc (Benelux) B.V., S.A.R.L. Initializing volumes in a replication system
US7882286B1 (en) 2008-09-26 2011-02-01 EMC (Benelux)B.V., S.A.R.L. Synchronizing volumes for replication
US8214612B1 (en) 2009-09-28 2012-07-03 Emc Corporation Ensuring consistency of replicated volumes
US8583885B1 (en) 2009-12-01 2013-11-12 Emc Corporation Energy efficient sync and async replication
US8341115B1 (en) 2009-12-26 2012-12-25 Emc Corporation Dynamically switching between synchronous and asynchronous replication
US8977593B1 (en) 2009-12-26 2015-03-10 Emc Corporation Virtualized CG
US8271441B1 (en) 2009-12-26 2012-09-18 Emc Corporation Virtualized CG
US9152814B1 (en) 2010-03-15 2015-10-06 Emc International Company Writing and reading encrypted data using time-based encryption keys
US8370648B1 (en) 2010-03-15 2013-02-05 Emc International Company Writing and reading encrypted data using time-based encryption keys
US8959054B1 (en) 2010-03-25 2015-02-17 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for optimal journaling for continuous data replication
US8392680B1 (en) 2010-03-30 2013-03-05 Emc International Company Accessing a volume in a distributed environment
US8103937B1 (en) 2010-03-31 2012-01-24 Emc Corporation Cas command network replication
US8464101B1 (en) 2010-03-31 2013-06-11 Emc Corporation CAS command network replication
US8271447B1 (en) 2010-06-18 2012-09-18 Emc International Company Mirroring metadata in a continuous data protection environment
US8438135B1 (en) 2010-06-18 2013-05-07 Emc International Company Mirroring metadata in a continuous data protection environment
US20110313973A1 (en) * 2010-06-19 2011-12-22 Srivas Mandayam C Map-Reduce Ready Distributed File System
US8332687B1 (en) 2010-06-23 2012-12-11 Emc Corporation Splitter used in a continuous data protection environment
US8478955B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2013-07-02 Emc International Company Virtualized consistency group using more than one data protection appliance
US8832399B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2014-09-09 Emc International Company Virtualized consistency group using an enhanced splitter
US8433869B1 (en) 2010-09-27 2013-04-30 Emc International Company Virtualized consistency group using an enhanced splitter
US9323750B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2016-04-26 Emc Corporation Storage array snapshots for logged access replication in a continuous data protection system
US8694700B1 (en) 2010-09-29 2014-04-08 Emc Corporation Using I/O track information for continuous push with splitter for storage device
US8335771B1 (en) 2010-09-29 2012-12-18 Emc Corporation Storage array snapshots for logged access replication in a continuous data protection system
US9026696B1 (en) 2010-09-29 2015-05-05 Emc Corporation Using I/O track information for continuous push with splitter for storage device
US8335761B1 (en) 2010-12-02 2012-12-18 Emc International Company Replicating in a multi-copy environment
US8850143B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-09-30 Emc Corporation Point in time access in a replication environment with LUN resizing
US9740572B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2017-08-22 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication of xcopy command
US9740573B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2017-08-22 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Dynamic LUN resizing in a replication environment
US9582382B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2017-02-28 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Snapshot hardening
US8725692B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Replication of xcopy command
US8725691B1 (en) 2010-12-16 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Dynamic LUN resizing in a replication environment
US8751828B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-06-10 Emc Corporation Sharing encryption-related metadata between multiple layers in a storage I/O stack
US8495304B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2013-07-23 Emc Corporation Multi source wire deduplication
US9160526B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2015-10-13 Emc Corporation Sharing encryption-related metadata between a host and an external intermediate device
US8706700B1 (en) 2010-12-23 2014-04-22 Emc Corporation Creating consistent snapshots across several storage arrays or file systems
US8996461B1 (en) 2011-03-28 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for replicating the punch command
US8601085B1 (en) 2011-03-28 2013-12-03 Emc Corporation Techniques for preferred path determination
US9588703B1 (en) 2011-03-28 2017-03-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and apparatus for replicating the punch command
US8726066B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2014-05-13 Emc Corporation Journal based replication with enhance failover
US9063994B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2015-06-23 Emc Corporation Networked based replication of distributed volumes
US9811431B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2017-11-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Networked based replication of distributed volumes
US8429362B1 (en) 2011-03-31 2013-04-23 Emc Corporation Journal based replication with a virtual service layer
US8805786B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2014-08-12 Emc Corporation Replicating selected snapshots from one storage array to another, with minimal data transmission
US8521691B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2013-08-27 Emc Corporation Seamless migration between replication technologies
US8745004B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2014-06-03 Emc Corporation Reverting an old snapshot on a production volume without a full sweep
US9471579B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2016-10-18 Emc Corporation Replicating selected snapshots from one storage array to another, with minimal data transmission
US8521694B1 (en) 2011-06-24 2013-08-27 Emc Corporation Leveraging array snapshots for immediate continuous data protection
US8862546B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2014-10-14 Emc Corporation Virtual access roll
US9003138B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-04-07 Emc Corporation Read signature command
US8380885B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2013-02-19 Emc Corporation Handling abort commands in replication
US9535801B1 (en) 2011-06-30 2017-01-03 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Xcopy in journal based replication
US9256605B1 (en) 2011-08-03 2016-02-09 Emc Corporation Reading and writing to an unexposed device
US8898112B1 (en) 2011-09-07 2014-11-25 Emc Corporation Write signature command
US9286052B1 (en) 2011-09-15 2016-03-15 Emc Corporation Upgrading software on a pair of nodes in a clustered environment
US8719497B1 (en) 2011-09-21 2014-05-06 Emc Corporation Using device spoofing to improve recovery time in a continuous data protection environment
US9069479B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2015-06-30 Emc Corporation Snapshots in deduplication
US8543609B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2013-09-24 Emc Corporation Snapshots in deduplication
US8935498B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2015-01-13 Emc Corporation Splitter based hot migration
US8914595B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2014-12-16 Emc Corporation Snapshots in deduplication
US8806161B1 (en) 2011-09-29 2014-08-12 Emc Corporation Mirroring splitter meta data
US9798490B1 (en) 2011-09-30 2017-10-24 Emc Corporation Replication optimizated IO
US9275063B1 (en) 2011-09-30 2016-03-01 Emc Corporation Replication optimizated IO
US8712962B1 (en) 2011-12-01 2014-04-29 Emc Corporation Snapshots in de-duplication
US8924668B1 (en) 2011-12-23 2014-12-30 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for an application- and object-level I/O splitter
US8738813B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2014-05-27 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for round trip synchronous replication using SCSI reads
US9710177B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2017-07-18 EMC IP Holdings Company LLC Creating and maintaining clones in continuous data protection
US8996827B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Creating and maintaining clones in continuous data protection
US8769336B1 (en) 2011-12-27 2014-07-01 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for preventing journal loss on failover in symmetric continuous data protection replication
US8977826B1 (en) 2011-12-28 2015-03-10 Emc Corporation Extent commands in replication
US9031913B1 (en) 2011-12-28 2015-05-12 Emc Corporation File replication
US9336230B1 (en) 2011-12-28 2016-05-10 Emc Corporation File replication
US9235481B1 (en) 2011-12-29 2016-01-12 Emc Corporation Continuous data replication
US9032160B1 (en) 2011-12-29 2015-05-12 Emc Corporation Continuous data replication
US8683592B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2014-03-25 Emc Corporation Associating network and storage activities for forensic analysis
US8627012B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2014-01-07 Emc Corporation System and method for improving cache performance
US9158578B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-10-13 Emc Corporation System and method for migrating virtual machines
US9104529B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-08-11 Emc Corporation System and method for copying a cache system
US8930947B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2015-01-06 Emc Corporation System and method for live migration of a virtual machine with dedicated cache
US9235524B1 (en) 2011-12-30 2016-01-12 Emc Corporation System and method for improving cache performance
US20130218840A1 (en) * 2012-02-17 2013-08-22 Charles Smith System and method for building a point-in-time snapshot of an eventually-consistent data store
US8510279B1 (en) 2012-03-15 2013-08-13 Emc International Company Using read signature command in file system to backup data
US9514138B1 (en) 2012-03-15 2016-12-06 Emc Corporation Using read signature command in file system to backup data
US8954673B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2015-02-10 Emc International Company Using a conditional read request and a hash to determine synchronization of data in a cache at a host with data in storage array
US8825848B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2014-09-02 Emc Corporation Ordering of event records in an electronic system for forensic analysis
US9459804B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2016-10-04 Emc Corporation Active replication switch
US8600945B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2013-12-03 Emc Corporation Continuous data replication
US8850144B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2014-09-30 Emc Corporation Active replication switch
US9037818B1 (en) 2012-03-29 2015-05-19 Emc Corporation Active replication switch
US9081754B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-07-14 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for cascaded replication using a multi splitter
US9189341B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-11-17 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for multi-copy replication using a multi-splitter
US8898519B1 (en) 2012-03-30 2014-11-25 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for an asynchronous splitter
US8995460B1 (en) 2012-05-14 2015-03-31 Arris Enterprises, Inc. Embedded control data in communications systems
US8892835B1 (en) 2012-06-07 2014-11-18 Emc Corporation Insertion of a virtualization layer into a replication environment
US8954796B1 (en) 2012-06-26 2015-02-10 Emc International Company Recovery of a logical unit in a consistency group while replicating other logical units in the consistency group
US9135120B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation Consistency group moving
US9575851B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Volume hot migration
US9575857B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Active/active replication
US8898409B1 (en) 2012-06-27 2014-11-25 Emc International Company Journal-based replication without journal loss
US8898515B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2014-11-25 Emc International Company Synchronous replication using multiple data protection appliances across multiple storage arrays
US9223659B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2015-12-29 Emc International Company Generating and accessing a virtual volume snapshot in a continuous data protection system
US8949180B1 (en) 2012-06-28 2015-02-03 Emc International Company Replicating key-value pairs in a continuous data protection system
US9116811B1 (en) 2012-06-30 2015-08-25 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9378096B1 (en) 2012-06-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9336094B1 (en) 2012-09-13 2016-05-10 Emc International Company Scaleout replication of an application
US9405684B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation System and method for cache management
US9547591B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2017-01-17 EMC IP Holding Company LLC System and method for cache management
US9507732B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2016-11-29 EMC IP Holding Company LLC System and method for cache management
US9135119B1 (en) 2012-09-28 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation System and method for data management
US9134914B1 (en) 2012-12-27 2015-09-15 Emc Corporation Deduplication
US9460028B1 (en) 2012-12-27 2016-10-04 Emc Corporation Non-disruptive and minimally disruptive data migration in active-active clusters
US9152578B1 (en) 2013-03-12 2015-10-06 Emc Corporation Securing data replication, backup and mobility in cloud storage
US9594822B1 (en) 2013-03-13 2017-03-14 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and apparatus for bandwidth management in a metro cluster environment
US9128628B1 (en) 2013-03-13 2015-09-08 Emc Corporation Dynamic replication mode switching
US8996460B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-03-31 Emc Corporation Accessing an image in a continuous data protection using deduplication-based storage
US9383937B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-07-05 Emc Corporation Journal tiering in a continuous data protection system using deduplication-based storage
US9110914B1 (en) 2013-03-14 2015-08-18 Emc Corporation Continuous data protection using deduplication-based storage
US9244997B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-01-26 Emc Corporation Asymmetric active-active access of asynchronously-protected data storage
US9152339B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-10-06 Emc Corporation Synchronization of asymmetric active-active, asynchronously-protected storage
US9737111B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Cara Lustik Removable shoe insert for corrective sizing
US9081842B1 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-07-14 Emc Corporation Synchronous and asymmetric asynchronous active-active-active data access
US9087008B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-07-21 Emc International Company Replicating a volume using snapshots
US9087112B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-07-21 Emc International Company Consistency across snapshot shipping and continuous replication
US9069709B1 (en) 2013-06-24 2015-06-30 Emc International Company Dynamic granularity in data replication
US9146878B1 (en) 2013-06-25 2015-09-29 Emc Corporation Storage recovery from total cache loss using journal-based replication
US9128855B1 (en) 2013-06-26 2015-09-08 Emc Corporation Flash cache partitioning
US9547459B1 (en) 2013-06-27 2017-01-17 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Techniques for data relocation based on access patterns
US9477407B1 (en) 2013-06-28 2016-10-25 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Intelligent migration of a virtual storage unit to another data storage system
US9524218B1 (en) 2013-09-09 2016-12-20 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Leverage fast VP extent-level statistics within CDP environments
US9305009B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-04-05 Emc Corporation Synchronous replication of virtualized storage processors
US9235632B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-01-12 Emc Corporation Synchronization of replication
US9177670B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2015-11-03 Emc Corporation Method and apparatus for flash cache management
US9378219B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation Metro-cluster based on synchronous replication of virtualized storage processors
US9330155B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-05-03 Emc Corporation Unified management of sync and async replication for block and file objects
US9552405B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2017-01-24 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Methods and apparatus for recovery of complex assets in distributed information processing systems
US9201736B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2015-12-01 Emc Corporation Methods and apparatus for recovery of complex assets in distributed information processing systems
US9378261B1 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-06-28 Emc Corporation Unified synchronous replication for block and file objects
US9740880B1 (en) 2013-12-10 2017-08-22 Emc Corporation Encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US9225529B1 (en) 2013-12-10 2015-12-29 Emc Corporation Encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US9367260B1 (en) 2013-12-13 2016-06-14 Emc Corporation Dynamic replication system
US9846698B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2017-12-19 Emc Corporation Maintaining point-in-time granularity for backup snapshots
US9875162B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2018-01-23 Emc Corporation Recovering corrupt storage systems
US9720618B1 (en) 2013-12-16 2017-08-01 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Maintaining backup snapshots using continuous replication from multiple sources
US9405765B1 (en) 2013-12-17 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation Replication of virtual machines
US9158630B1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-10-13 Emc Corporation Testing integrity of replicated storage
US9563517B1 (en) 2013-12-30 2017-02-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Cloud snapshots
US9563684B1 (en) 2013-12-31 2017-02-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication cookie
US9588847B1 (en) 2014-03-25 2017-03-07 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Recovering corrupt virtual machine disks
US9772789B1 (en) 2014-03-25 2017-09-26 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Alignment fixing on a data protection system during continuous data replication to deduplicated storage
US9507845B1 (en) 2014-03-27 2016-11-29 EMC IP Holding Company, LLC Virtual splitter
US9389800B1 (en) 2014-03-27 2016-07-12 Emc Corporation Synthesizing virtual machine disk backups
US9189339B1 (en) 2014-03-28 2015-11-17 Emc Corporation Replication of a virtual distributed volume with virtual machine granualarity
US9274718B1 (en) 2014-06-20 2016-03-01 Emc Corporation Migration in replication system
US9619543B1 (en) 2014-06-23 2017-04-11 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replicating in virtual desktop infrastructure
US9529885B1 (en) 2014-09-29 2016-12-27 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Maintaining consistent point-in-time in asynchronous replication during virtual machine relocation
US9832261B2 (en) 2014-09-30 2017-11-28 Emc Corporation Cloud consistency technology
US9535800B1 (en) 2014-09-30 2017-01-03 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Concurrent data recovery and input/output processing
US9600377B1 (en) 2014-12-03 2017-03-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Providing data protection using point-in-time images from multiple types of storage devices
US9405481B1 (en) 2014-12-17 2016-08-02 Emc Corporation Replicating using volume multiplexing with consistency group file
US9823973B1 (en) 2014-12-22 2017-11-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Creating consistent snapshots in a virtualized environment
US9557925B1 (en) 2014-12-29 2017-01-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Thin replication
US9804934B1 (en) 2014-12-30 2017-10-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Production recovery using a point in time snapshot
US9632881B1 (en) 2015-03-24 2017-04-25 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication of a virtual distributed volume
US9557921B1 (en) 2015-03-26 2017-01-31 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Virtual volume converter
US9575894B1 (en) 2015-03-27 2017-02-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Application aware cache coherency
US9411535B1 (en) 2015-03-27 2016-08-09 Emc Corporation Accessing multiple virtual devices
US9749300B1 (en) 2015-03-30 2017-08-29 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for immediate recovery of virtual machines encrypted in the cloud
US9727429B1 (en) 2015-03-31 2017-08-08 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for immediate recovery of replicated virtual machines
US9875042B1 (en) 2015-03-31 2018-01-23 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Asynchronous replication
US9665305B1 (en) 2015-06-26 2017-05-30 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Tiering data between two deduplication devices
US9722788B1 (en) 2015-06-29 2017-08-01 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Rekeying encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US9733969B2 (en) 2015-06-30 2017-08-15 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Method and system for malware detection in virtual machines
US9823865B1 (en) 2015-06-30 2017-11-21 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Replication based security
US9798472B1 (en) 2015-09-29 2017-10-24 Emc Corporation Extent level cache destaging

Non-Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
"TechTarget's SearchServerVisualization.com Announces Call for Nominations of Best of VMworld 2015 Awards;" Jul. 2, 2015; 2 Pages.
Natanzon et al., "Virtual Point in Time Access;" Proceedings of the 6th International Systems and Storage Conference; Jun. 30-Jul. 2, 2013; 8 Pages.
Rubens, "What Are Containers and Why Do You Need Them?;" CIO from IDG; May 20, 2015; 6 Pages.
U.S. Appl. No. 15/390,996, filed Dec. 27, 2016, Natanzon et al.
Vaidya, "Survey of Parallel Data Processing in Context with MapReduce;" Department of Computer Science, Vivekanand College, Cehmbur, Mumbai; 2011; 12 Pages.

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10324798B1 (en) 2014-09-25 2019-06-18 EMC IP Holding Company LLC Restoring active areas of a logical unit
US10303562B2 (en) * 2017-03-30 2019-05-28 Entit Software Llc Using metadata extracted from proxy files to access data stored in secondary storage

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9244967B2 (en) Incremental copy performance between data stores
US8904126B2 (en) System and method for performing a plurality of prescribed data management functions in a manner that reduces redundant access operations to primary storage
US8788769B2 (en) System and method for performing backup or restore operations utilizing difference information and timeline state information
US8738813B1 (en) Method and apparatus for round trip synchronous replication using SCSI reads
US9501546B2 (en) System and method for quick-linking user interface jobs across services based on system implementation information
US9087008B1 (en) Replicating a volume using snapshots
US8706700B1 (en) Creating consistent snapshots across several storage arrays or file systems
US8898519B1 (en) Method and apparatus for an asynchronous splitter
US8832399B1 (en) Virtualized consistency group using an enhanced splitter
US9031913B1 (en) File replication
US9459804B1 (en) Active replication switch
US8769336B1 (en) Method and apparatus for preventing journal loss on failover in symmetric continuous data protection replication
US9225529B1 (en) Encrypted virtual machines in a cloud
US8850144B1 (en) Active replication switch
US9495251B2 (en) Snapshot readiness checking and reporting
US8392680B1 (en) Accessing a volume in a distributed environment
US10048889B2 (en) Efficient live-mount of a backed up virtual machine in a storage management system
US9110604B2 (en) System and method for full virtual machine backup using storage system functionality
US9383937B1 (en) Journal tiering in a continuous data protection system using deduplication-based storage
US9158630B1 (en) Testing integrity of replicated storage
US9557925B1 (en) Thin replication
US9632881B1 (en) Replication of a virtual distributed volume
US9032160B1 (en) Continuous data replication
US9003138B1 (en) Read signature command
US8949180B1 (en) Replicating key-value pairs in a continuous data protection system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCF Information on status: patent grant

Free format text: PATENTED CASE