US1008698A - Stove or furnace. - Google Patents

Stove or furnace. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1008698A
US1008698A US41058608A US1908410586A US1008698A US 1008698 A US1008698 A US 1008698A US 41058608 A US41058608 A US 41058608A US 1908410586 A US1908410586 A US 1908410586A US 1008698 A US1008698 A US 1008698A
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Prior art keywords
air
stove
pot
flue
fire
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US41058608A
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Earl V Coulston
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ROCK ISLAND STOVE Co
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ROCK ISLAND STOVE Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24BDOMESTIC STOVES OR RANGES FOR SOLID FUELS; IMPLEMENTS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH STOVES OR RANGES
    • F24B7/00Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for convection heating 
    • F24B7/04Stoves, ranges or flue-gas ducts, with additional provisions for convection heating  with internal air ducts

Description

E. V. GOULSTON. STOVB OR FURNACE. APPLIoATloN FILED JAN.13,1908.
Panted Nov. 14,191.1.
` E. V. COULSTON.
sTovB 0R PURNAGB. APPLICATION FILED JAN.13, 1908.
Patented Nov. 14, 1911.
2 SHEETS-BHEET 2.
. Loosees.
" NUn rrp stares `EARL COMPANY, or Boon isn/inn,
lf lidia.
'reiste erste V. COULSTON, OF ROCK ISLAND, LLINOS, ASSGNOB T0 ROCK lSLANDSTOVE ILINOIS, A CORFOBATION 0F ILLLNOS.
STG VE DB, FURNACE.
spcification of Leners raient.
Patented Nov. jill, i911.
Application filed January 13, 1908. Serial No. 410,586.
Tocll whom in' may concer/rr.:
.Be it known that l, EARL V. CoULs'roN,
a citizen of the United States of America,
invention relates to stoves or furnaces of that character in which an interior air l duel is employed, and in Whichthe fire pot is arrange intermediate the ash pit or base t andthe upper stove body within which the tion is the provision said flue is inclosed.
Generally stated, the'object `of my invenof an improved and highly eflicient stove of this general char- 1 whereby then up through ing. allowed to? escapeA (wel. fuel. vthus 'insuring the highest fectivcly heated which hasvits lower heating. capacity;
' Special objects are the provision of an interior air iiue of improved formation, whereby the hot 'gases and products of combustion are' retained in Contact with the face thereof until the same reach the top 'of the "-stove-,f' and `whereby the heating capacity of the stove `is increased; theprovision of a stove which, although-adapted forv burning the cheaper grades of fuel,.is stilland nev ertheless capable of radiating considerable heatA from its baseor ash pit below' the tire pot, thus still further increasing the heating etliciency of .the tove-i` the provision of an improved construction of the fire pot, the air is caused to pass down. and the side Iwallsof the lire pot, before being allowed to enter the sides of the body of burning fuel, and before oethe top of said combustion at a pointfliinniediately above the' said bed of fuel; to improve the coinbus--' tion in a stove 'in which the air is inore efbefore 'passing to the flue end coupled to a dat or flattened surface rof'the body tovvgive increased width Y and, the provision of, cerH "eatures "of` improvement tending v,to increase the serviceabilityof a stove' of this p: cular character. y
'zlo thejv foregoing and other useful. ends, any invention consists'in matters hereinafti'or set forth and claimed, but it will be tain details' and undv combinations general [ell have invented a certain new- 'degree of tothe said flue.` and increased' understood that if do not wish to be unduly or unnecessarily liinited to the construction disclosed for producing the desired results.
ln the accompanying drawings-Figure 1 is a vertical section of a stove, embodying the principles of my invention. Figs. 2, 3 and i are fragmentary sectional views of the iire pot construction. Fig. 5 is a cross section of the inner air flue,A showing a modified form thereof. Fig. 6 is a cross section on line (3#6 in Fig. l. Fig. 'l' is a cross section on line 7-7 in Fig. l. Fig. 8 is a cross section of the inner `Hue on line 8-8 in Fig. l. Fig. 9 is a detail vertical section of one side of the iire pot on line Sl-9 in Fig. 1. Fig. 10 is an upper e'nd view of the flue. Fig. ll.is a lower end view of said flue.
As thus illustrated, my invention comprises stove body A, which is 'preferably' square or rectangular in cross section, as shown more clearly in Fig. 6. This stove body has top L provided with the usual opening a1 for a stove pipe or'srnoke flue. rEhe said top is also provided centrally with a round 'opening a2, for the upward discharge of heated air, as will hereinafter more fully appear. .it its iront the said stove body has a door o3, whereby fuel can be fed to the combustion chamber. The said stove body is supported upon the fire pot B, and an upper casting` C is supported upon the top of said fire pot and inclosed or engaged all around. by the sides of the stove body. A hollow "base D is provi supporting the said fire pot, said 'base being .provided with suitable legs d, if such lare desired. it the front of the stove a damper or air inlet E is provided. whereby air may enter and circulate' between the outer sur'- face of the casting C and the inner surface of the stove body, as indicated.` The dat back of the stove has an air inlet o r opening at, and this opening is connected by an ini terior flue F with the upper opening a?, in lthe manner illustrated. In this Away the said'fiue F is disposed over-'the fire pot, `and is adapted to discharge highly heated air from the top of the stove. the stove is (lat, the Vopening o* can be con l siderablv wider, than it is high, and in this ,'way the flue Fran be as widc'as desired, its llower end being coupled flatwise over the ded for- Asthe back of Y l opening a4, so that no diHiculty is encoun tered in making the connection, regardless of the width of the said opening and Hue.
If desired, the opening a? in the top of the stove can be round, as shown in F ig. l0,
- face or under surface, so that its elbow f is given a higher degree of heat than was illustrated. In this way the floor is permitted to risc throfugh the broad.
does .not extend too far over the fire pot and is not likely to` be burned out or become destroyed more quickly than the other parts of the stove. The broadening of the Hue 4in this manner "providesit with allat or' substantially flat' face f2., and this face can be provided with corrugations f3, as shown more clearly in Fig. 8. lf desired, the face of said flue can be provided with one broad channel f4, as shown in Fi 5; but in either case the face of the'tlue is so formed that the heat and products of combustion are held in contact with the flue until they reach the top of the store, thus increasing the heating capacity of the stove. words, with a flue with a perfectly fla or round front surface` the heat and prodiucts of combustion would strike it. and immediately pass around and behind the flue, and then escape upwardly through the stove pipe. l-Vith my improved formation of the flue, however, the hot. gases and products of combustion are retained in contact with the face of the flue until they reach the top of the store, and thus the air within the flue heretofore possible in stoves of Athis character.
At the back of the stove, the concave shell G is bolted or otherwise scented thereto, its lower end'being open, and its upper end'being coupled tlatwise over the opening o4, as air' near the ilue provided by the shell (l, and is therein heated by coming in contact wiith the lire pot B. After this the air passes through the opening of and then upwardl'y through the flue lll-and finally passes out tlnough the opening a2, where it can either be allowed to escape into the room, or conducted to another room above, as by the flue X indicated in dotted lines. Any suitable means can be provided for regulating the discharge of heated air from the top of the stove--that-is to say, from the upper end of the said in-` terior flue. The said fire pot is provided with outer vertical air passages; 'which are open at top and bottom, the upper ends air then passes upwardly through the bot-- tom of the tire pot and into the fuel. The said fire pot also has its side wall provided the ash pit within the I' with vertical air passages bl, which are open at their lower ends and closed at their upper ends. Each air passage 111 is, however, provided at its inner side with a vertical slot b2.
i whereby the air entering at the lower ends of these passages can pass upwardly and into the sides of the body of fuel, and also to a polnt where the a1r can escape across the top of the burning bed of fuel. The air passages 7) can be formed by walls cast integral with the fire pot, or they can be formed by concave shells b3 suitably fitted closely to the outside of the tire pot as shown more clearly in Figs. 3 anfll.. lith either construction, however, it will be seen .that cold air enters throughfthe damper or opening E, and then passes down throu h the passages b, therebybecoming heated efore entering the ash pit or heating'chamber Il This..
heated air then passes upwardly through the body of lmrning fuel and also across the top of the same, thus materially }uomoting cour bustion and increasing the heating efficiency of ,thestove With a fire pot of this 'corr struction, the cheaper grades of ffuel can bek used, without; danger of clogging in any of the passages or flues, and without. resorting to constant cleaning of said tlues sages. lI `urt.hermore, and notwithstanding that the stove is adapted for lburning the cheaper grades of fuel, the hase l) vis utilized for radiating heat, as the air before entering theash pit is highly heated, and in this way the heating ctliciency of the store is still further increased. A-greater part of the air passes from the ash pit upwardly `through the passages 1, and across the top of the fuel, so that the-solid fuel burns slowly, thus generating gases, and the principal lire is due to the combustion of gases and volatile matter above the coal. In this way, the intense hea-t. or highest degree of combustion is brought close to the Hue F, with the result that the air passing upwardly through this flue is super-heated to a degree heretofore never accomplished. It will be seen that-thesupply of oxygen for promoting combustion is'twice conducted through the highly heated walls of the fire pot., lirst and that as a result the air which finally enters'the bed. of fuel. and which tinally passes above the'bed of burning fuel, is of a character to best promote combustion.
The casting C can be made inzone piece, ,or in any suitable manner, according-to requirements. There can be as manypassages ly as may be found -requisite or desirable,
down and then up,
or pasincassa there being fou-r of these ues shown inthe drawings, one at each side of the lire pot.
The stove body A, as stated, is preferably square or rectangular, as such shape gives greater breadth'to the iiue F. It will be seen, however, that the feature of corrugatl ing-machanneling the face or front of the flue, so as to cause the hotJ gases and product-s of combustion vto stay longer in contact therewith, can be employed in stoves of other shapes, without departing vfrom the spirit of my invention. The novel fire pot construction heroin disclosed `can also be employed in stoves of other shapes without departing from the spirit of vny invention. As stated, the pass-ages in the Ere pot, '.ar e, by reason `of the 'construction employed,
' 'adaptedA for the downward passage of air therein, and the lire pot thus constructed is -'combined vwith draft producing means for accomplishing this desired result. It will be understood, of course, that such draftpro- .duding means may consist of the ordinare combustion chamber and stove pipe, whereby the upward rmovement of gases and prod- 'ucts of combustion from the top ofthe stove serves to draw the air upwardly from the ash pit and through the fuel, thereby draw ing -the air downwardly through the outer passages in the fire, pot-that is to say, the
draft up the chimney allows atmospheric pressure to force air int-o .the bottomv of the stove. In other words, the said passages b are not only adapted for the downward pas- In this way ample heat is radiated from the sides of the fire pot, and at the same time air is taken downwardly through the csides of the fire pot, which air is thus heated before being discharged into the chamber below the fuel in the fire pot. For stoves and (furnaces, the fire pot must be able to radiate heat from the sides thereof. With my improved oonst'ructionthe yfire-pot is capable of doing this, and at the same time heating a quantity of air for supporting combustion.
Preferably, therefore,` as illustrated, the heatl radiating surfaces of the 'tire pot are` ar-' ranged intermediate the ducts or passages 'through which the air is conducted downwardly to the chamber below the fuel. With my improved construction, the walls of the ucs t, and-Z)a are imp eforate, so that these yV open st top-and .beiten, whereby@ l can pass directly therefrom to the interior of the fire pot. The entire volume of air must pass downward to the ash pit, before any air can enter the fire. In other words, no' portion of the draft air is allowedto contact with the lire until after it has passed through the ash pit, or through the chamber below the tire pot. For the purpose of heating the air by the passage of the same downwardly at the sides of the ire pot, or of keeping the products of combustion in contact with the flue, and the combination thereof with the flattening of the body at the point where the lower end of the flue joins the back of said body, l do not limit myself to the exact construction shown and described.
What l claim as my invention is:
l. A stove or furnace having openings in i the back and top thereof, a fire pot, an interior heating flue or air circulating chamber leading upwardly from the opening in the back of the stoveto the opening at the top thereof, the face or front of said flue Abeing inclined forwardly above the center of the fire-pot and channeled or corrugated longitudinally thereof to retain the hot gases or products of combustion in contact therewith until the same reach the top of the stove, as set forth.
2. A. stove or furnace having openings in the back and top thereof, an interior heating flue or air circulating` chamber leading upwardly from the opening in the back of the stove to the opening in the top thereof. said liuc being round at its upper end and tap- .ered downwardly when viewed from thc side,
but the face or front surface of Asaid flue being broader than the sides thereof, and
channeled longitudinally, as set forth.
3. ln a stove or furnace` the combination of a fire-pot having its side-walls provided with vertical air passages which arc open at top and bottom and disposed at opposite sides of the fire-pot, an air circulating chamber at the top of the fire-pot communicating withthe upper ends of said passages, said chamber being formed by a captitted on to the top of the'ire-poanieans for admitting air to said circulating chamber', an ash pit below the fire-pot, and means for creating a draft to draw the air downwardly through said .passages and into the ash pit, said air being then free to pass upwardly to the fuel in the fire-pot.
4. A. stovevor furnace comprisinga fire-.pot having the walls thereof provided with vertical passages which are open at top and bottom, and having other vert1ca1 passages which 'are chred at then-upper ends and open'at their lower ends, said additional passages h aving inner vertical slots communicating with the interior of the fire-pot, a chamber below said lire-plot pommunieating with the lower ends of all said passages, an air circulating chamber above the ducting the air u Y wardly through the wallsI {ire-pot communicating with the upper'en'ds of the said first-mentioned passages, and means for creating a draft upwardly above the tire-pot to cause air to' pass downwardly 'through said first-mentioned passages, as
and means for conducting air upwardly tov the said openingv and into said flue, the said fiue having its face inclined forwardly above the center of the firefand corrugated or channeled longitudinally thereof to retain the hot.; gases and p1' oducts of combustion in contacty therewith until the same reach the top of the stove, as set forth.
6. In a stove, the combination of a body having an opening in the top and another in the back thereof, an interior ilue or air heating chamber leading upwardly from the opening in the back of the stove to the opening in the top thereof, and a fire-pot below said flue or air circulating chamber, said fire-pot having vertical passages in the walls thereof for conducting air upwardly and discharging the same across the top of the bed of fuel therein, whereby the principal point of combustion is above-the 'fuel and immediately below said flue. y y
7. In a stove, the combination of a body having a flat back rovided with an o )enino therein, an interior flue having its lower end coupled atwise over the said opening, an exterior shellapplied to the stove to conduct the air upwardly to the said opening and into said flue, a lire-pot below said fiue, an
ash pit orchamber below the said lire-pot,
means for admitting air att-he top of the fire-pot, said' stove having passages for conducting air downwardly in contactwith the fire-pot and into said ash pit or chamber and passages in said lire pot for then conof the vfire-pot an across the top off the fuel,
` whereby the principal point of combustion is immediately below said flue.
8. In a stove, a lire pot, an interior air flue having its face or surface exposed to the lire formed with a channel or channels thereof.
` 10. In a stove, an inclined interior air iiue therefor, ,with space all around the same,
longitudinally channeled on the' under sur- I face thereof to keep the heat and products of combustion in contact therewith, as set forth.
11; In a stove, an inclined interior air flue therefor, means for delivering heated air to the lower end of said flue, a combustion chamber below the Hue, and means in the sides of the combustion chamber for heat-ing the air before the same asses upward from below and through 'the re, said means hav-v ing imperforatesi'des toprevent direct admission of air therefrom to the combustion chamber, and a square stove body inclosing said flue and to the flat back of which the lower end of the latter is attached, giving increased width for the lower end of the flue, substantially as and lfor the purpose set forth. I
12. In a stove, an inclined interior air flue therefor, provided with a curved lower end, a combustlon chamber below said flue, means for delivering heated air u wardly through said flue said air being or heating purposes, means for passin air downwardly immediatelyvoutside of t e fire, but not in contact therewith, to heat the air, and then` upwardly through the fire, whereby the lower-end of said iue is intensely heated, and a square stove body inclosing said fiue and to the flat back of which the lower end of thel latter is attached giving increased width for the lower e`nd of the iue, substantially as4 and for the purpose set forth.
13. In a stove, an inclined interior air flue therefor, provided with a curved lower end, a fire-pot below the same, means for admit ting `air upwardly through said flue, said air being for heating purposes, means for admitting air into'l the stove, said fire pot having means for taking the air downwardly through the opposite sides of the fire-pot to heat the air, adapted .to prevent any air from reaching the fire until after passing below the fire-pot, and then upwardly through the lire, and a square stove body -inclosing said flue and to the flat back of which the lower end of the latter is attached, giving increased width for. the lower end of the liuc, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.
14. In a stove, a fire-pot having its side .walls provided with exposed radiating sur-,..4 p.
faces and with. air ducts or passages inter' i mediate said surfaces, means for admitting air to the upper erfls of said tir'lducts or iso imperforate sides and open only at top and bottom, a chamber below the {ire-pot conimunicating With the interior thereof, means for admitting air to the upperends of said air duets or passages, and draft producing means for drawingI `the air downwardly through said duets or passages and into said chamber, whereby the air is heated before passin upwardly through the fuel.v
16. n a stove, a fire-pot made of one integral piece of metal, provided with exposed and depressed radiating surfaces alternating with vertically disposed air duets or pas-l sages spaced a part inthe sides thereof, each duct orpassage having impert'orate sides and open only at top and bottom, means for admitting air to the upper ends of said ducts orpassages, and draft producing means for thenv drawingthe air upwardly through the fuel in the fire-pot.
17. In a stove, a firepot cast in one in' tegral piece, having Vertical passages in the sides thereof which are only Open at top and bottom, land having other vertical passages vwhich are closed at their tops and open at their lower ends, said last-mentioned passages being provided with 'vertical slot-s opening into the' fire-pot, and means for feeding air to the passages which are open at their upper ends.
18. In a stove, a fire-pot provided'with a vertically ribbed radiating surface, said ribs being hollow, means for feeding air downwardly through one or more of said ribs, means for then causing the airlto ascend to the fire through one or more of said ribs, an air chamber one side thereof formed by a portion of said ribbed radiating surface, to preliminarily heat the air thereirna .stove body with a vilat or flattened bark on said lire pot, an airtlue in the stove body, above the fire pot, the lower end ofsaid air flue being coupled by thc (lat back to the upper end of said air chamber, to give increased breadth to the lower end of said air flue, and means for supporting the upper end of the flue in the top of the stove.
Signed'by Iine at Rock island, ll., this 21st day of Dee. 1907.
EARL v. ooULsToN.
Vitnesses A. D. Srnnnr,
MARY DIXON.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2417138A (en) * 1943-09-10 1947-03-11 August F P Stenzy Stove with internal air chamber
US2457614A (en) * 1946-03-20 1948-12-28 Globe American Corp Burner for brooder stoves
US4117826A (en) * 1977-03-07 1978-10-03 Bette Joseph A Wood burning stove
US10926925B2 (en) 2015-08-14 2021-02-23 Yeti Coolers, Llc Container with magnetic cap
US10959552B2 (en) 2016-10-17 2021-03-30 Yeti Coolers, Llc Container and method of forming a container

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2417138A (en) * 1943-09-10 1947-03-11 August F P Stenzy Stove with internal air chamber
US2457614A (en) * 1946-03-20 1948-12-28 Globe American Corp Burner for brooder stoves
US4117826A (en) * 1977-03-07 1978-10-03 Bette Joseph A Wood burning stove
US10926925B2 (en) 2015-08-14 2021-02-23 Yeti Coolers, Llc Container with magnetic cap
US10959552B2 (en) 2016-10-17 2021-03-30 Yeti Coolers, Llc Container and method of forming a container

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