US1006333A - Vapor electric lamp. - Google Patents

Vapor electric lamp. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1006333A
US1006333A US14332903A US1903143329A US1006333A US 1006333 A US1006333 A US 1006333A US 14332903 A US14332903 A US 14332903A US 1903143329 A US1903143329 A US 1903143329A US 1006333 A US1006333 A US 1006333A
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United States
Prior art keywords
electrode
filament
vapor
lamp
mercury
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Expired - Lifetime
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US14332903A
Inventor
Howard I Wood
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General Electric Co
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Aisin Seiki Co Ltd
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Application filed by Aisin Seiki Co Ltd filed Critical Aisin Seiki Co Ltd
Priority to US14332903A priority Critical patent/US1006333A/en
Priority claimed from US190293A external-priority patent/US1006421A/en
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Publication of US1006333A publication Critical patent/US1006333A/en
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Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B31/00Electric arc lamps
    • H05B31/02Details
    • H05B31/18Mountings for electrodes; Electrode feeding devices
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J61/00Gas-discharge or vapour-discharge lamps
    • H01J61/98Lamps with closely spaced electrodes heated to incandescence by light-emitting discharge, e.g. tungsten arc lamp

Description

H. I. WOOD.

VAPOR ELECTRIC LAMP.

APPLICATION FILED $1211.14, 1903.

1 333, Patented Oct. 17,1911.

Fig. 2.

Witnesses. M Inventor.

1 Howard Lvvood.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HOWARD I. WOOD OF SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

VAPOR ELECTRIC LAMP.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 17, 1911.

. To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HOWARD I. \Vooo, a citizen of the United States, residing at Schenectady, county of Schenectady, State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Vapor Electric of which the following is a speclfiout with particularity in the claims appended hereto.

For a detailed description of my invention, reference is to be had to the following specification taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which- Figures 1, 2 and 3 represent by way of illustration some of the various forms which my invention may assume in practice.

As shown in Fig. 1 the envelop of the lamp is a straight glass tube 1, of suitable length, though it is to be understood that the size, shape, length, or other dimensions of the envelop may be Widely varied with out departing from my invention. At the bottom of the tube is contained a body of mercury 2 forming one of the electrodes with which connection is made by the leading-in conductor 3. Theupper terminal of the lamp consists of a cylindrical stick of artificial graphite 4 or if desired this mav be replaced by a cylindrical shell of steelor by other. suitable material. This electrode 4 is supported by a wire 5 ofso'me length, the upper end of which serves as a leading-in conductor, passing through the walls of the tube as indicated at 6, the outer end forming the lamp terminal 7. The con ductor 5 is surrounded by a glass tube 8 depending from the upper wall of the glass at envelop land extending down to the electrode 4. This tube 8 prevents the electric discharge within the envelop 1 from extending-"above the electrode 4, and also serves for preventing latelectrode.

,9 of carbon or other suitable material, which passes very looselythrough a guide or supporting ring or loop 10. Thelower end of this filament 9 dips lightly into the surface of the mercury electrode 2.

hen now, the lamp, after having been very highly exhausted, is connected with a source of electric current, current flows through the lamp by the circuit afforded by the electrodes 2 and 4 which are electrically connected by thefilament- 9. The contact between the lower end of the filament and the mercury 2 however is such that the current, in passing between the filament and the mercury, flows through a comparatively small volume of mercury. By reason of this flow of current ionized mercury vapor is produced, the effect of which is to cause an electric are or discharge to flash into existence between the main electrodes 2 and 4;, completely filling the tube. The firstincipient are or discharge takes place between the'm'ercury and the lower end of the filament 9, and extends instantly upward along the filament until it the action however being too rapid for the eye to follow. The are or electric discharge which then fills the tube affords a path for the current, of much better conductivity than that presented by the filament'thso that current practically ceases to'fiow in the filament, as evidenced by the fact that the filament remainsblack. It is possible that minute arcs are generated between the mercury 2 and the portion of the filament 9 engaged thereby, though according to my present understanding of the action it seems more probable that the initial disengagement of ionized vapor is due to heat developed by the current flowing through the relatively high resistance contact between the lower end of the filament and the mercury.

The localized heating at the end of the filament probably produces enough vapor from the mercury terminal to cause the filfl'r ment and terminal to be separated by a film of mercury vapor, so that conductive vapor is emitted from the mercury terminal and the device is started. 1 j

Instead of arranging the lamp in the vertical position shown in Fig. 1, it may, if desired, be arranged so as to run in a position slightly inclined from the horizontal. as indicated in Fig. 2 in which the lamp is of substantially the same construction as shown in Fig. 1 except that the lower electrode conreaches the electrode 4,,

sists of a body of mercury 11 contained in a slight downward extension 12 of the tnhe 13. The filamentv ll i. orterl by a. guide or guides such asv that its rec end re t ligl'itly on or projects slightly into the surface of the mercury 11 as iinlicated at it The operation of the lamp substantially that described in connection with Fig. 1.

In both the arrang-.n1cnts shown in Figs. it and 2 the filament; inal sort of yielding engagement with the surface of the 1nercury so that slight changes in the level ot the mercury caused by more or less condensed mercury accumulating in portions of thctuhe during operation do not interfere with the operative. starting relation between the filament and the mercury electrode. 111- stead of providing yielding engagement between the filament: and the mercury electrode, a tl'orded by the yielding filament,

indicated in 1 and 2, I niayuse an arcurrent a disintegration of the lower end of the filamenttakcs place, thus blackening the valls of the tube, a hieh action does not take place to the slightest extent with direct current.

thus enabled to produce a lamp is started on thcvoltage and character ct currentv on which it runs, by merely closing the switch.

What I claim new and desii ejo secure by Letters Patent of the U .ited States, is,

1. The combination of an envelop, electrodes ther for. one at least of which ct hie inc." 1 and normally conduct i connect ng said elecand operating when "0 to disengage ionized or "lPOl from said vaporizalole envelop, elecan electric conductor U. lhc coinhina'icn of an exl'iausted envelop, aporizahle electrode, a. non-vaporizalole electrode. and an. ecctric cone-i i mally extending lietvveen the electrodi.v

t relatively high resistance con with the vapcrizahle electrode.

4. The colnoination of an exhausted nvelop, a vapori'lzahle electrode therefor, a. c

I operating electrode, and means for initiating a discharge betweensaid elcctrodes consisting or a? filament lightly touching the vaporize-able electrode and extending into electrical connection with the cooperating electrode. i

5. In a vapor electric lamp, the coinbination of a ligjht-transniitting envelop, two cooperating electrodes one at least of which is of vaporizahle material, means for impressing upon said electrodes an electro-niotive force, and means for initiating a discharge between said electrodes by first causing cur rent of normal voltage to pass, between. said electrodes, through a constructed area the exposed surface of said vaporizahle electrode. i

6. In a vapor electric apparatus, the com bination of an envelop of approximately uniform cross section, an electrode iii'one end of the envelop. and a cooperating electrode located in the envelop far enoughfroin the other end to form a condensing chamber of considerable length. p

In a vapor electric device, then mhination of an envelop or cbntaiiicn'c ectrodes therefor, and astarting device in nor: mal contact with one of said electrodes, sai contact being of poor conductivity \vhereh'y, on the passage of current. a center of emis sion of conductive vapor is formed; 5

8. in a vapor electric zipparatusflhe hinaticn of a positive electrode. liquid negative electrode, an are starting device in poor contact with the liquid electrodd'j'a'rid means for supplying current throng said starting device whereby the poorv Contact between said device and said liquid elec trode results in the production 01" an'zirc from the liquid electrode.

9. In a vapor electric device, a pos t electrocle, a. liqiiid negative electrode, .I'id an are starting device normally in poor gentact with said liquid electrode,v i'vliereliy upon the passage ofcurr'ent through said. device, a local vaporization takes place .at said liquid. electrode. 7 i

The combination of an enve op, elsetrodes therefor. and rting evice consisting of an electric conductornormally making a light. contact- With one of said electrodes.

The oomhination oi an exhaustedfenvelop, vapofizalne elect-rode therefor cctiperating .trifitle, and filament will;

l' i es the vaporiza l electrode. s

. :"ion'cf en nausted en lectrodes therefor, a intent 1 said clear-ode nd ith he surface onl lj I A vapor electric apparatu container, electrod "s liqnid. a terminal-nor- .of contact and thereby start an mally in poor contact with the liquid electrode, and means for supplying current through said terminal, whereby the said current will vaporize the liquid at the point are. 14. The combination of anexhausted envelop, a vaporizable electrode therein, and

' means for starting an are at said electrode,

said means including a filament making llght surface contact with said electrode.

15. The combination of an exhausted envelop, a vaporizable electrode therein, and

means for starting an are at said electrode, said means including a slender conductor in circuit'with saidw electrode but making poor contact therewith at the surface thereof.

16. In a vapor-tube, the combination with separated terminals between which a conducting vapor exists when the tube is in operation, but a non-conducting and highly resistant interval exists when the lamp has not been started, a stationary auxiliary terof an auxiliary electrode in contact with one of the electrodes of the lamp before starting, and means whereby the current conducted before starting automatically separates or renders defective the contact of said auxiliary electrode and lamp-electrode, while both remainystationary, whereby the lamp is started.

18. In a vapor-tube, the combination with the positive and negative terminals, of a stationary auxiliary terminal normally in contact with a lamp-terminal, one of said terminals being liquid, means for supplying a current through said auxiliary terminal, and means whereby the passage of said current will vaporize the liquid terminal and thereby break said contact.

19, In a vapor-tube, the combination with a positive and a liquid negative terminal,

of a stationary solid auxiliary terminal normally in contact with the liquid terminal, means for supplying a current throu h said auxiliary terminal, means whereby t e passage of said current will yaporize the liquid terminal and thereby break said contact.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 12thday of February, 1903. I l-IOIVARD I. WOOD. Witnesses: v

BENJAMIN B. HULL, HELEN Onion).

US14332903A 1903-02-14 1903-02-14 Vapor electric lamp. Expired - Lifetime US1006333A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14332903A US1006333A (en) 1903-02-14 1903-02-14 Vapor electric lamp.

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14332903A US1006333A (en) 1903-02-14 1903-02-14 Vapor electric lamp.
US190293A US1006421A (en) 1903-02-14 1904-01-23 Vapor electric lamp.

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4939417A (en) * 1988-12-20 1990-07-03 Gte Products Corporation High pressure discharge lamp with incandescent filament for starting

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4939417A (en) * 1988-12-20 1990-07-03 Gte Products Corporation High pressure discharge lamp with incandescent filament for starting

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