TW201442548A - Method and apparatus to enable direct link setup in opportunistic multi-RAT aggregation systems - Google Patents

Method and apparatus to enable direct link setup in opportunistic multi-RAT aggregation systems Download PDF

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Publication number
TW201442548A
TW201442548A TW103109015A TW103109015A TW201442548A TW 201442548 A TW201442548 A TW 201442548A TW 103109015 A TW103109015 A TW 103109015A TW 103109015 A TW103109015 A TW 103109015A TW 201442548 A TW201442548 A TW 201442548A
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Taiwan
Prior art keywords
rat
sta
dl
ap
direct link
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TW103109015A
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Chinese (zh)
Inventor
Amith V Chincholi
Sanjay Goyal
Tan B Le
Alpaslan Demir
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Interdigital Patent Holdings
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Priority to US201361783978P priority Critical
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Publication of TW201442548A publication Critical patent/TW201442548A/en

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/22Processing or transfer of terminal data, e.g. status or physical capabilities
    • H04W8/24Transfer of terminal data
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W76/00Connection management
    • H04W76/10Connection setup
    • H04W76/14Direct-mode setup
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/005Discovery of network devices, e.g. terminals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/02Terminal devices
    • H04W88/06Terminal devices adapted for operation in multiple networks or having at least two operational modes, e.g. multi-mode terminals

Abstract

A method for transmitting direct link capability and RAT capability between a first station (STA) and a second STA by an access point (AP) having multiple radio access technology (RAT) capabilities is disclosed. The method can include the AP receiving a direct link discovery request message from the first STA using the first common grant RAT. The AP may select a second common grant RAT for communicating with the second STA. The AP may forward the direct link discovery request message to the second STA using a second publicly-enabled RAT. The first common enable RAT and the second common enable RAT may be the same. The AP may receive a direct link setup request message from the first STA using the first common-enabled RAT and forward the direct link setup request message to the second STA using the second common-enabled RAT.

Description

Method and device for enabling direct link setting in opportunistic multi-RAT aggregation system

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application claims the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit of the benefit.


A multi-radio access technology (multi-RAT) device is a device capable of supporting data transmission over more than one radio access technology (RAT). The multi-RAT device may be an infrastructure device such as an access point (AP), a home node B (HNB), a home evolved node B (H(e)NB), and the like. The multi-RAT device may also be a client device, such as a station in a Wi-Fi (STA) and a wireless transmit/receive unit (WTRU) in a cellular system, and the like.
Opportunistic Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation (OMMA) allows multi-RAT devices to aggregate multiple RATs operating on separate frequency bands. Aggregation can be done above the empty intermediaries protocol stack but below the IP layer. This layer may be referred to as an OMMA layer, which may be common to all RATs. The OMMA layer is also capable of receiving metadata and link statistics feedback from each RAT.
Direct link (DL) communication enables devices to pass data to each other without using an AP. In the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) 802.11n, STAs with Quality of Service (QoS) facilities can establish a data transfer by using Direct Link Setup (DLS) to transfer frames directly to another STA. In IEEE 802.11z, DLS is called Tunnel Direct Link Setup (TDLS). TDLS features a messaging frame encapsulated in a data frame so that the frame can be transparently transmitted via an access point (AP). It is desirable to enable direct link communication between multi-RAT devices capable of aggregating two or more RATs.

Methods and apparatus are disclosed for communicating direct link capability and RAT capability between a first multi-radio access technology (RAT) capable station (STA) and a second multi-RAT capable STA. The first STA and the second STA may not know each other's RAT capabilities to determine which RAT is common to them. Thus RAT capability discovery is desirable for two multi-RAT devices to communicate directly with each other using a direct link. In one example, a multi-RAT capable access point (AP) may receive a direct link discovery request message from a first STA using a first common enabled RAT. The AP may select a second common enabled RAT for communicating with the second STA and may forward the direct link discovery request message to the second STA using the second common enabled RAT. The second STA may use the at least one common grant RAT associated with the first STA to directly transmit at least one direct link discovery response message to the first STA.
A method and apparatus for establishing a direct link between a first multi-RAT capable STA and a second multi-RAT capable STA is disclosed. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for direct link teardown between a first multi-RAT capable STA and a second multi-RAT capable STA. Methods and apparatus are disclosed for managing RAT availability between a first multi-RAT capable STA and a second multi-RAT capable STA. Methods and apparatus for dynamically switching RATs and methods and apparatus for transmitting Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation (OMMA) mode for multi-RAT capable STAs are also disclosed.

100. . . Communication Systems

102, 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d. . . Wireless transmission/reception unit (WRU)

104. . . Radio access network (RAN)

106. . . Core network

108. . . Public switched telephone network (PSTN)

110. . . Internet

112. . . Other network

114a, 114b. . . Base station

116. . . Empty intermediary

118. . . processor

120. . . transceiver

122. . . Transmission/reception component

124. . . Speaker/microphone

126. . . keyboard

128. . . Display/trackpad

130. . . Non-removable memory

132. . . Removable memory

134. . . power supply

136. . . Global Positioning System (GPS) chipset

138. . . Peripheral device

140a, 140b, 140c. . . eNodeB

142. . . Mobility Management Gateway (MME)

144. . . Service gateway

146. . . Packet Data Network (PDN) gateway

202, 204, 302, 304, 510, 515. . . Station (STA)

206, 306, 505, 601, 1201, 2301. . . Access point (AP)

210a, 210b. . . Request message

220a, 220b. . . Response message

310. . . Set request message

320. . . Set response message

330. . . Confirmation message

400. . . Multi-radio access technology (RAT) device architecture

410a, 410b, 410n, 506, 507, 508, 509, 511, 512. . . RAT module

420a, 420b, 420n. . . Antenna/radio frequency (RF) front-end pair

430. . . OMMA layer module

440. . . IP layer module

605, 1205. . . DL initiator STA

610, 1210. . . DL responder STA

S615, S620, S625, S630, S635, S640a, S640b, S640n. . . Basic example streaming call for DL/RAT capability discovery program

705, 710, 715, 720, 1005, 1010, 1015, 1020, 1305, 1310, 1315, 1320, 1505, 1510, 1515, 1520, 1605, 1610, 1615, 1620, 1805, 1810, 1815, 1820, 1905, 1910, 1915, 1920, 2105, 2110, 2115, 2120, 2405, 2410, 2415, 2420, 2505, 2510, 2515, 2520. . . Address field

800. . . TDLS discovery request frame format

802, 1102, 1402, 1702, 2002, 2602. . . order

804, 1104, 1404, 1704, 2004, 2604. . . Information element

900. . . TDLS link identifier element format

902. . . Element ID field

904. . . Length field

906. . . BSSID field

908. . . DL initiator STA address field

910. . . DL responder STA address field

1100. . . TDLS discovery response frame format

S1215, S1220, S1225, S1230, S1235, S1240, S1245, S1250, S1255, S1260, S1265, S1270. . . Basic example DL setup program for streaming calls

1400. . . TDLS setup request frame format

1700. . . TDLS setting response frame format

2000. . . TDLS setting confirmation frame format

2205, 2305. . . Demolition initiator STA

2210, 2310. . . Demolition responder STA

S2220, S2225, S2230. . . Call flow for an example teardown procedure on a direct path

S2320, S2325, S2330, S2335, S2340, S2345, S2350, S2355, S2360, S2365, S2370, S2375. . . Deleting the program's call flow through the AP's example

2705, 2710, 2805, 2810, 2905, 2910. . . DL peer STA

S2720a, S2720n, S2725a, S2725n, S2730, S2735, S2740, S2745, S2750, S2755, S2760, S2765, S2770. . . Example call flow for RAT availability update management

S2815a, S2815b, S2815c, S2820, S2825, S2830, S2835, S2840, S2845, S2850, S2855, S2860a, S2860b. . . Example call flow for dynamic RAT handover

S2915, S2920, S2925, S2930, S2935, S2940, S2945, S2950, S2955. . . Example OMMA mode transfer program call flow

DL. . . Direct link

ID. . . Identifier

IP. . . Internet protocol

OMMA. . . Opportunistic Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation

RAT. . . Multi-radio access technology

STA. . . station

TCP. . . Transmission control protocol

TDLS. . . Tunnel direct link setup

UDP. . . User data packet protocol

The invention may be understood in more detail from the following description, which is given by way of example, and
1A is a system diagram of an example communication system in which one or more disclosed embodiments may be implemented;
1B is a system diagram of an exemplary wireless transmit/receive unit (WTRU), where the WTRU may be used in a communication system as shown in FIG. 1A;
1C is a system diagram of an example radio access network and an example core network that can be used in a communication system as shown in FIG. 1A;
Figure 2 is a diagram depicting a message flow of an example direct link setup (DLS) procedure between two stations (STAs);
Figure 3 is a diagram depicting the flow of information for an example TDLS procedure between two stations (STAs);
Figure 4 is a diagram of an example multi-RAT device architecture;
Figure 5 is a diagram illustrating a wireless system with multi-RAT capability;
Figure 6 is a streaming call of the basic example DL/RAT capability discovery procedure;
Figure 7 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL discovery request frame sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 8 is an example TDLS discovery request frame format sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 9 is an example TDLS link identifier element format of the TDLS discovery request frame;
Figure 10 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL discovery request frame sent by an AP to a DL responding STA;
Figure 11 is an example TDLS discovery response frame format sent by the AP to the DL responding STA;
Figure 12 is a streaming call of the basic example DL setup program;
Figure 13 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setup request frame sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 14 is an example TDLS setup request frame format sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 15 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setting request frame sent by an AP to a DL responding STA;
Figure 16 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setting response frame sent by the DL responding STA to the AP;
Figure 17 is an example TDLS setup response frame format sent by the DL responding STA to the AP;
Figure 18 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setup response frame sent by the AP to the DL initiator STA;
Figure 19 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setting confirmation frame sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 20 is an example TDLS setup confirmation frame format sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 21 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL setting confirmation frame sent by the AP to the DL responding STA;
Figure 22 is a call flow of an example teardown procedure on a direct path;
Figure 23 is a call flow of the program removal procedure through the AP;
Figure 24 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL teardown frame sent by the teardown initiator STA to the AP;
Figure 25 is an example format of an address field in a MAC layer frame of a DL teardown frame sent by an AP to a DL teardown responding STA;
Figure 26 is an example TDLS removal frame format;
Figure 27 is an example call flow for RAT availability update management;
Figure 28 is an example call flow for dynamic RAT handover; and Figure 29 is a call flow for an exemplary OMMA mode transfer procedure.

FIG. 1A is a diagram of an example communication system 100 in which one or more disclosed embodiments may be implemented. Communication system 100 may be a multiple access system that provides content such as voice, data, video, messaging, broadcast, etc. to multiple wireless users. Communication system 100 can be shared by system resources (including wireless bandwidth) to enable multiple wireless users to access such content. For example, communication system 100 may use one or more channel access methods, such as code division (CDMA) multiple access, time division multiple access (TDMA), frequency division multiple access (FDMA), orthogonal FDMA (OFDMA). Single carrier FDMA (SC-FDMA) and the like.
As shown in FIG. 1A, communication system 100 can include wireless transmit/receive units (WTRUs) 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d, radio access network (RAN) 104, core network 106, public switched telephone network (PSTN). 108, the Internet 110 and other networks 112, but it will be understood that the disclosed embodiments encompass any number of WTRUs, base stations, networks, and/or network elements. Each of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d may be any type of device configured to operate and/or communicate in wireless communication. By way of example, the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d may be configured to transmit and/or receive wireless signals, and may include user equipment (UE), mobile stations, users, fixed or mobile subscriber units, pagers, mobile phones. Personal digital assistants (PDAs), smart phones, laptops, portable Internet devices, personal computers, wireless sensors, consumer electronics, etc.
Communication system 100 can also include base station 114a and base station 114b. Each of the base stations 114a, 114b can be configured to wirelessly interface with at least one of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d to facilitate access to one or more communication networks (eg, the core network 106) Any type of device of the Internet 110 and/or other network 112). For example, base stations 114a, 114b may be base transceiver stations (BTS), Node Bs, eNodeBs, home Node Bs, home eNodeBs, website controllers, access points (APs), wireless routers, and the like. Although base stations 114a, 114b are each depicted as a single component, it will be understood that base stations 114a, 114b may include any number of interconnected base stations and/or network elements.
The base station 114a may be part of the RAN 104, which may also include other base stations and/or network elements such as a website controller (BSC), a radio network controller (RNC), a relay node (not show). Base station 114a and/or base station 114b may be configured to transmit and/or receive wireless signals within a particular geographic area, which may be referred to as cells (not shown). Cells can also be divided into cell sectors. For example, a cell associated with base station 114a can be divided into three sectors. Thus, in one embodiment, base station 114a may include three transceivers, i.e., one for each sector of the cell. In another embodiment, base station 114a may use multiple input multiple output (MIMO) technology, and thus multiple transceivers for each sector of the cell may be used.
The base stations 114a, 114b may communicate with one or more of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d via an empty intermediation plane 116, which may be any suitable wireless communication link (e.g., radio frequency (RF)) , microwave, infrared (IR), ultraviolet (UV), visible light, etc.). The empty intermediaries 116 can be set using any suitable radio access technology (RAT).
More specifically, as previously discussed, communication system 100 can be a multiple access system and can utilize one or more channel access schemes such as CDMA, TDMA, FDMA, OFDMA, SC-FDMA, and the like. For example, base station 114a and WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c in RAN 104 may implement a radio technology such as Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) Terrestrial Radio Access (UTRA), which may be set using Wideband CDMA (WCDMA) Empty mediation plane 116. WCDMA may include, for example, High Speed Packet Access (HSPA) and/or Evolved HSPA (HSPA+). HSPA may include High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) and/or High Speed Uplink Packet Access (HSUPA).
In another embodiment, base station 114a and WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c may implement a radio technology such as Evolved UMTS Terrestrial Radio Access (E-UTRA), which may use Long Term Evolution (LTE) and/or Advanced LTE (LTE-A) sets up the null mediation plane 116.
In other embodiments, base station 114a and WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c may implement such as IEEE 802.16 (ie, Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX)), CDMA2000, CDMA2000 1x, CDMA2000 EV-DO, Temporary Standard 2000 (IS-2000) Radio technology such as Interim Standard 95 (IS-95), Interim Standard 856 (IS-856), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), Enhanced Data Rate GSM Evolution (EDGE), GSM EDGE (GERAN).
For example, the base station 114b in FIG. 1A can be a wireless router, a home Node B, a home eNodeB, or an access point, and any suitable RAT can be used for facilitating in, for example, a company, a home, a vehicle, a campus. A wireless connection to a local area like that. In one embodiment, base station 114b and WTRUs 102c, 102d may implement a radio technology such as IEEE 802.11 to set up a wireless local area network (WLAN). In another embodiment, base station 114b and WTRUs 102c, 102d may implement a radio technology such as IEEE 802.15 to set up a wireless personal area network (WPAN). In yet another embodiment, base station 114b and WTRUs 102c, 102d may use a cellular based RAT (eg, WCDMA, CDMA2000, GSM, LTE, LTE-A, etc.) to set up picocells or femtocells. (femtocell). As shown in FIG. 1A, the base station 114b can have a direct connection to the Internet 110. Therefore, the base station 114b does not have to access the Internet 110 via the core network 106.
The RAN 104 can be in communication with a core network 106, which can be configured to provide voice, data, application, and/or Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services to the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d. Any type of network of one or more. For example, core network 106 may provide call control, billing services, mobile location based services, prepaid calling, internet connectivity, video distribution, etc., and/or perform high level security functions such as user authentication. Although not shown in FIG. 1A, it should be understood that the RAN 104 and/or the core network 106 can communicate directly or indirectly with other RANs that can use the same RAT as the RAN 104 or a different RAT. For example, in addition to being connected to the RAN 104, which may employ an E-UTRA radio technology, the core network 106 may also be in communication with other RANs (not shown) that employ GSM radio technology.
The core network 106 can also serve as a gateway for the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d to access the PSTN 108, the Internet 110, and/or other networks 112. The PSTN 108 may include a circuit switched telephone network that provides Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS). Internet 110 may include a global system interconnecting computer networks and devices that use public communication protocols such as TCP in the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)/Internet Protocol (IP) Internet Protocol Suite. , User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and IP. Network 112 may include a wireless or wired communication network that is owned and/or operated by other service providers. For example, network 112 may include another core network connected to one or more RANs that may use the same RAT as RAN 104 or a different RAT.
Some or all of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d in the communication system 100 may include multi-mode capabilities, i.e., the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, 102d may be included for communicating with different wireless networks via different communication links. Multiple transceivers for communication. For example, the WTRU 102c shown in FIG. 1A can be configured to communicate with a base station 114a that uses a cellular-based radio technology and with a base station 114b that can use IEEE 802 radio technology.
FIG. 1B is a system diagram of an example WTRU 102. As shown in FIG. 1B, the WTRU 102 may include a processor 118, a transceiver 120, a transmit/receive element 122, a speaker/microphone 124, a keyboard 126, a display/touchpad 128, a non-removable memory 130, and a removable Memory 132, power supply 134, global positioning system chipset 136, and other peripheral devices 138. It should be understood that the WTRU 102 may include any sub-combination of the above-described elements while remaining consistent with the embodiments.
The processor 118 can be a general purpose processor, a special purpose processor, a conventional processor, a digital signal processor (DSP), a plurality of microprocessors, one or more microprocessors associated with the DSP core, a controller, a micro control , dedicated integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gate array (FPGA) circuit, any other type of integrated circuit (IC), state machine, etc. The processor 118 can perform signal coding, data processing, power control, input/output processing, and/or any other functionality that enables the WTRU 102 to operate in a wireless environment. The processor 118 can be coupled to a transceiver 120 that can be coupled to the transmit/receive element 122. Although processor 118 and transceiver 120 are depicted as separate components in FIG. 1B, it should be understood that processor 118 and transceiver 120 can be integrated together into an electronic package or wafer.
The transmit/receive element 122 can be configured to transmit signals to or from a base station (e.g., base station 114a) via the null plane 116. For example, in one embodiment, the transmit/receive element 122 can be an antenna configured to transmit and/or receive RF signals. In another embodiment, the transmit/receive element 122 can be a transmitter/detector configured to transmit and/or receive, for example, IR, UV, or visible light signals. In yet another embodiment, the transmit/receive element 122 can be configured to transmit and receive both RF signals and optical signals. It should be understood that the transmit/receive element 122 can be configured to transmit and/or receive any combination of wireless signals.
Moreover, although the transmit/receive element 122 is depicted as a single element in FIG. 1B, the WTRU 102 may include any number of transmit/receive elements 122. More specifically, the WTRU 102 may use MIMO technology. Thus, in one embodiment, the WTRU 102 may include two or more transmit/receive elements 122 (e.g., multiple antennas) for transmitting and receiving wireless signals via the null intermediate plane 116.
The transceiver 120 can be configured to modulate a signal to be transmitted by the transmit/receive element 122 and configured to demodulate a signal received by the transmit/receive element 122. As described above, the WTRU 102 may have multi-mode capabilities. Thus, the transceiver 120 can include multiple transceivers to enable the WTRU 102 to communicate via multiple RATs such as UTRA and IEEE 802.11.
The processor 118 of the WTRU 102 may be coupled to a speaker/microphone 124, a keyboard 126, and/or a display/touchpad 128 (eg, a liquid crystal display (LCD) display unit or an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display unit), and User input data can be received from the above device. The processor 118 can also output user data to the speaker/microphone 124, the keyboard 126, and/or the display/touchpad 128. In addition, the processor 118 can access information from any type of suitable memory and store the data in any type of suitable memory, such as non-removable memory 130 and/or removable. Memory 132. The non-removable memory 130 may include random access memory (RAM), read only memory (ROM), a hard disk, or any other type of memory storage device. The removable memory 132 may include a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) card, a memory stick, a Secure Digital (SD) memory card, and the like. In other embodiments, processor 118 may access information from memory that is not physically located on WTRU 102 and located on a server or home computer (not shown), and store data in the memory.
The processor 118 may receive power from the power source 134 and may be configured to allocate power to other elements in the WTRU 102 and/or to control power to other elements in the WTRU 102. Power source 134 can be any device suitable for powering WTRU 102. For example, the power source 134 may include one or more dry cells (nickel cadmium (NiCd), nickel zinc (NiZn), nickel hydrogen (NiMH), lithium ion (Li-ion), etc.), solar cells, fuel cells, and the like.
Processor 118 may also be coupled to GPS die set 136, which may be configured to provide location information (eg, longitude and latitude) with respect to the current location of WTRU 102. Additionally or alternatively to the information from the GPS chipset 136, the WTRU 102 may receive location information from a base station (e.g., base station 114a, 114b) via an empty intermediation plane 116, and/or based on two or more neighboring bases. The timing of the signals received by the station determines its position. It should be understood that the WTRU 102 may obtain location information using any suitable location determination method while remaining consistent with the implementation.
The processor 118 can also be coupled to other peripheral devices 138, which can include one or more software and/or hardware modules that provide additional features, functionality, and/or wireless or wired connections. For example, peripheral device 138 may include an accelerometer, an electronic compass (e-compass), a satellite transceiver, a digital camera (for photo or video), a universal serial bus (USB) port, a vibrating device, a television transceiver, and a hands-free Headphones, Bluetooth R modules, FM radio units, digital music players, media players, video game player modules, Internet browsers, and more.
1C is a system diagram of RAN 104 and core network 106, in accordance with an embodiment. As described above, the RAN 104 can use E-UTRA radio technology to communicate with the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c via the null plane 116. The RAN 104 can also communicate with the core network 106.
The RAN 104 may include e base stations 140a, 140b, 140c, although it should be understood that the RAN 104 may include any number of eNodeBs while still being consistent with the embodiments. The eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c may each include one or more transceivers to communicate with the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c via the null plane 116. In an embodiment, the eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c may use MIMO technology. Thus, for example, eNodeB 140a may use multiple antennas to transmit wireless signals to, and receive wireless signals from, WTRU 102a.
Each of the eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c may be associated with a particular cell (not shown) and may be configured to handle radio resource management decisions, handover decisions, users in the uplink and/or downlink schedule. As shown in FIG. 1C, the eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c can communicate with each other via the X2 interface.
The core network 106 shown in FIG. 1C may include a mobility management gateway (MME) 142, a service gateway 144, and a packet data network (PDN) gateway 146. While each of the above elements is described as being part of the core network 106, it should be understood that any of these elements may be owned and/or operated by entities other than the core network operator.
The MME 142 may be connected to each of the eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c in the RAN 104 via the S1 interface and may act as a control node. For example, the MME 142 may be responsible for authenticating the users of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, bearer activation/deactivation, selecting a particular service gateway during the initial connection of the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, and the like. The MME 142 may also provide control plane functionality for handover between the RAN 104 and a RAN (not shown) that uses other radio technologies (e.g., GSM or WCDMA).
Service gateway 144 may be connected to each of eNodeBs 140a, 140b, 140c in RAN 104 via an S1 interface. The service gateway 144 can typically route and forward user data packets to the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, or route and forward user data packets from the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c. The service gateway 144 may also perform other functions, such as anchoring the user plane during inter-eNode B handover, triggering paging when the downlink data is available to the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c, managing and storing context for the WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c and many more.
Service gateway 144 may also be coupled to PDN gateway 146, which may provide WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c with access to a packet switched network (e.g., Internet 110) to facilitate WTRUs 102a, 102b. Communication between 102c and the IP-enabled device.
The core network 106 can facilitate communication with other networks. For example, core network 106 can provide WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c with access to a circuit-switched network (e.g., PSTN 108) to facilitate communication between WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c and conventional landline communication devices. For example, core network 106 may include, or may communicate with, an IP gateway (eg, an IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) server) that interfaces between core network 106 and PSTN 108. In addition, core network 106 can provide WTRUs 102a, 102b, 102c with access to network 112, which can include other wired or wireless networks that are owned and/or operated by other service providers.
The term station (STA) herein includes, but is not limited to, a WTRU, a User Equipment (UE), a mobile station, a fixed or mobile user unit, an AP, a pager, a mobile phone, a personal digital assistant (PDA). ), computer, mobile internet device (MID) or any other type of user device that can operate in a wireless environment. As referred to herein, the term access point (AP) includes, but is not limited to, a base station, a Node B, a website controller, or any other type of peripheral device capable of operating in a wireless environment.
Direct link (DL) communication enables devices to pass data to each other without using an AP. In IEEE 802.11n, a station (STA) with a Quality of Service (QoS) facility can enable DL communication by establishing a data transfer using Direct Link Setup (DLS), ie, transmitting the frame directly to another One STA. Figure 2 is a diagram depicting the flow of information for an example DLS program between two stations (STAs). Referring to FIG. 2, the first STA 202 that wants to establish a direct link with the second STA 204 transmits a request message 210a for the second STA 204 to the access point (AP) 206. The request message 210a may be a DLS request message. The AP 206 transmits a request message 210b to the second STA 204. The second STA 204 transmits a response message 220a to the AP 206 in response to the received request message 210b. The response message 220a may be a DLS response message. The AP 206 transmits a DLS response message 220b to the first STA 202. In this procedure, both the request and response messages pass through the AP non-transparently, i.e., the AP directly participates in and exchanges the DLS request and the response message between the first STA and the second STA, thereby completing the DLS procedure. After successful DLS, the two STAs can use a direct link for data transfer using any of the access mechanisms defined in the IEEE 802.11n standard. In addition, secure communication in the DLS can be secured by performing a PeerKey Handshake procedure.
The STA initiated or AP initiated DLS teardown procedure can be used to tear down the direct link established between the first STA and the second STA. In the STA-initiated teardown, the first STA may send the DLS teardown frame to the second STA via the AP. The DLS teardown frame passes through the AP non-transparently, that is, the AP directly participates in it and relays the DLS to remove the frame to the second STA. The STA can also maintain an inactive timer for each negotiated DL. If any STA does not receive a DLS response message to the DLS request message before the timeout event, the STA may initiate a DLS removal procedure.
In some instances, the STA cannot initiate a DLS teardown procedure, for example, the AP detects that either end of the DLS link (ie, one of the peer STAs) has reserved the Basic Service Set (BSS) without tearing down the DLS link. Thus, the AP can initiate a teardown procedure. In the AP initiated teardown procedure, the AP may remove one or more STAs from the BSS list and send a DLS teardown message to all peers of the removed STA.
The DLS in IEEE 802.11z is called Tunnel Direct Link Setup (TDLS). The TDLS is characterized by the use of a message frame encapsulated in the data frame so that the frame can be transparently transmitted via the AP, ie the AP is not directly involved. In TDLS, unlike DLS, the AP does not need DL awareness, and the AP does not have to support the same set of capabilities that will be used on the DL.
In TDLS, the discovery procedure is used to discover TDLS capable STAs in the same BSS. The TDLS Initiator STA, that is, the STA that initiates the direct link setup procedure, can send a TDLS Discovery Request frame to the Unicast Destination Address (DA) via the AP. The TDLS capable STA that receives the TDLS discovery request frame may send the TDLS discovery response frame to the requesting STA via the direct path.
Figure 3 is a diagram depicting the flow of information for an example TDLS procedure between two stations (STAs). Referring to FIG. 3, the first STA 302 intending to establish a direct link with the second STA 304 transmits a setup request message 310 for requesting the DLS to the second STA 304. The setup request message can be a TDLS setup request frame. The message can be transparently transmitted via the AP 306, ie the AP 306 simply relays the request message received from the first STA 302 to the second STA 304. The second STA 304 that has received the setup request message 310 transmits a setup response message 320 to the first STA 302 in response to the setup request message 310. The setup response message can be a TDLS setup response frame. Again, the message can be transmitted transparently via the AP 306, ie the AP 306 simply relays the setup response message 320 received from the second STA 304 to the first STA 302. The first STA 302 that has received the setup response message 320 can transmit an acknowledgement message 330 to the second STA 304 to indicate that the setup response frame was successfully received. The confirmation message 330 can be a TDLS setup confirmation frame. Note that if the STA is already securely enabled on the link with the AP, the TDLS Peer-to-Peer (TPK) handshake procedure can be performed during the TDLS setup procedure. After completing the TDLS, the first STA 302 and the second STA 304, which may also be referred to as peer STAs, may directly transmit data frames to each other.
In the TDLS teardown procedure, the TDLS peer STAs can send TDLS teardown frames to their respective TDLS peer STAs. In most instances, the TDLS teardown frame can be sent on the direct link. However, when the TDLS peer STA cannot reach via the TDLS direct link, the TDLS teardown frame can be sent via the AP.
The tunnel DL can operate on different channels from the AP. The channel on which the AP is operating may be referred to as the base channel. If the DL switches to a channel other than the base channel, this channel is called an off-channel. The TDLS peer STA can perform a channel switching procedure to switch from the base channel to the off-channel and vice versa.
TDLS also includes power saving mechanisms such as peer to peer power save mode (PSM) and peer unscheduled automatic power receive delivery (U-ASPD). The peer-to-peer PSM is based on a periodic scheduled service period and the peer-to-peer U-APSD is based on an unscheduled service period, which can be used between two STAs that have established a TDLS direct link.
A method for enabling direct link communication between multi-RAT devices that can aggregate two or more RATs by IP traffic between dynamically scheduled multi-RAT devices based on instant link quality from the RAT is described And equipment. The multi-RAT device may be an infrastructure device such as an access point (AP), a home node B (HNB), a home evolved node B (H(e)NB), and the like. The multi-RAT device may also be a client device, such as a station in a Wi-Fi (STA) and a wireless transmit/receive unit (WTRU) in a cellular system, and the like.
FIG. 4 is a diagram of an example multi-RAT device architecture 400. The example architecture of the multi-RAT device shown in FIG. 4 enables multi-RAT aggregation using an opportunistic multi-MAC aggregation (OMMA) layer. Referring to FIG. 4, an example apparatus can include a plurality of RAT modules 410a-n. Each RAT module 410a-n can be configured to operate on a particular band. For example, RAT module 410a may be an 802.11n PHY/MAC RAT operating on the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and RAT module 410b may be an 802.11af PHY/MAC operating on a 512 MHz-698 MHz TV white space (TVWS) band. The RAT, RAT module 410c may be a Long Term Evolution (LTE) RAT operating on a licensed 700 MHz band, and the RAT 410d may be a Bluetooth RAT operating on the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and the like. The apparatus can include a plurality of antenna/radio frequency (RF) front end pairs 420a-n corresponding to each of the RAT modules 410a-n. Each antenna/RF front end pair 420a-n can operate on a particular band, for example, the antenna/RF front end pair 420a can operate on a 2.4 GHz ISM band radio, and the antenna/RF front end pair 420b can operate in a low band radio and On the 512 MHz-698 MHz TVWS band for high-band radios, the antenna/RF front-end pair 420c can operate on LTE 700 MHz radios and more. The device can include an OMMA layer module 430 and an IP layer module 440. The OMMA layer module 430 is a common module between the IP layer module 440 and the plurality of RAT modules 410a-n. The OMMA layer module 430 is responsible for allocating IP packets to individual RATs.
Figure 5 is a diagram illustrating a wireless system 500 with multi-RAT capabilities. Referring to Figure 5, the wireless system can be comprised of a network terminal (NT) (e.g., AP 505), and a plurality of user terminals (UTs) (e.g., STAs 510, 515). Both NT (ie, AP 505) and UT (ie, STA 510, 515) have the capability to support one or more RATs (eg, K RATs), where all RATs can operate on different frequency bands. Some UT pairs (ie, STAs 510, 515) that are able to communicate with each other via a direct link may use one or more RATs that are common to them. The bands can be orthogonal and the signals on different bands can not interfere with each other. As shown in FIG. 5, the AP 505 is capable of operating on RAT 1 (506), RAT 2 (507), RAT 3 (508), and RAT 4 (509). STA 510 is also capable of operating on RAT 1 (506), RAT 2 (507) and thus can communicate with AP 505 via those RATs, as shown. The STA 515 is capable of operating on RAT 3 (508) and RAT 4 (509), and thus can communicate with the AP 505 via those RATs, as shown. If STA 510 and STA 515 are able to establish a direct link between them, the flow of packets arriving at STA 510 and assigned to STA 515 may be sent via one or more public RATs between them. STAs 510 and 515 have a common RAT 5 (511) and RAT 6 (512) between them, and thus can communicate via these RATs, as shown. However, STA 510 and STA 515 may not know each other's RAT capabilities to determine which RATs are common between them. Thus, in order for two multi-RAT devices to communicate directly with each other, RAT capability discovery is desirable.
RAT capability discovery can be done in different ways, for example, by autonomous discovery, infrastructure based discovery, or the like. In autonomous discovery, multi-RAT devices can autonomously discover each other and can share their device capabilities and operational parameters with each other before starting communication. In infrastructure-based discovery, multi-RAT devices can use their neighboring infrastructure devices (eg, APs) to assist in the initial handshake mechanism between multi-RAT devices and also use management messaging to support their periodicity and/or non- Periodic updates to help maintain direct links.
Multi-RAT devices may use a Common Multimedia Access Control (MAC) address for all RATs. Alternatively, the multi-RAT device may use a separate MAC address for each RAT. In either case, the AP can maintain a repository of RAT capabilities for all STAs associated with its MAC address. Table 1 is an example RAT capability database at the AP. Similarly, a STA may store the same information for its associated AP.


Table 1: RAT Capability Database at the AP
In order for a multi-RAT device to discover the DL capabilities and RAT capabilities of a peer to peer multi-RAT device, the multi-RAT device may initiate DL/RAT capability discovery. The basic procedure is shown in Figure 6.
Figure 6 is a streaming call of an example DL/RAT capability discovery procedure. Referring to FIG. 6, a DL Initiator STA 605, a DL Responder STA 610, and an AP 601 are shown. The AP 601 is common to the DL Initiator STA 605 and the DL Responder STA 610. The DL Initiator STA 605, that is, the STA that initiated the DLS procedure, wants to send a request message to a peer STA (ie, DL Responder STA 610) in the same BSS set to discover the DL capabilities and RAT capabilities of the Peer STA. The request message can be a DL discovery request frame. The TDLS (ie, using the TDLS Discovery Request frame) can be used to transmit this request message via the AP 601. The DL Initiator STA 605 may select a publicly-enabled RAT that is common to both the DL Initiator STA 605 and the AP 601, such as RAT 3 (S615). The DL Initiator STA 605 may transmit the request message to the AP using the selected Common Empowerment RAT (S620). If the public MAC address is used for all RATs, all of the address fields of the MAC layer frame in the request message (ie, the address field for the single RAT device) can be mapped to the public MAC address. If a separate MAC address is used for each RAT, the address field in the MAC layer frame can be formatted as shown in Figure 7.
Figure 7 is an example format of an address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL Discovery Request frame sent by the DL Initiator STA to the AP. Referring to FIG. 7, the address field in the MAC layer frame may be formatted to include an address field 705, which may be the MAC address of the AP of the selected public RAT between the AP and the DL initiator STA; Address field 710, which may be the MAC address of the DL Initiator STA of the selected public RAT between the AP and the DL Initiator STA; the address field 715, which may be the DL Initiator STA wants to make The MAC address of the DL responder STA for which the request of the specific DL responder is directed, or the broadcast address of the RAT; and the address field 720, which may be the MAC address of the DL initiator STA of the RAT, at the RAT It wants to make a request to the DL responding STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Figure 8 is an example TDLS discovery request frame format 800 sent by the DL Initiator STA to the AP. The TDLS discovery request frame format 800 can include various information elements 804 that can be ordered as indicated at 802. The example TDLS discovery request frame format 800 depicted in FIG. 8 may include the following information element fields: category, action, dialog beacon, and link identifier. Other information elements can also be used.
Figure 9 is an example TDLS link identifier element format 900 for a TDLS discovery request frame. The TDLS link identifier element format 900 can include an element ID field 902, a length field 904, a BSSID field 906, a DL initiator STA address field 908, and a DL responder STA address field 910. Other fields can also be used.
In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the BSSID field 906 and the DL initiator STA address field 908 may be modified. If the public MAC address is used for all RATs, the BSSID field 906 can be modified to include a single BSSID of the AP, and the DL Initiator STA address field 908 can be modified to include a single public MAC for the DL Initiator STA Address. If a separate MAC address is used for each RAT, the BSSID field 906 can be modified to include all BSSIDs for all RATs at the AP, and the DL Initiator STA address field 908 can be modified to be included in the DL All MAC addresses of all RATs at the initiator STA. Using the modifications described above for the TDLS Link Identifier Element Format 900, the DL Initiator STA can transmit information for the RAT in which it can communicate. The DL Initiator STA may transmit this information using a MAC address (ie, DL Initiator STA Address Field 908 in the Link Identifier Element) or by adding a new information element in the DL Discovery Request Frame Format 800. The DL Initiator STA can send this information in the format shown in Table 2.


Table 2 Example format for elements that send RAT information
Referring again to FIG. 6, in the case of a separate MAC address for all RATs, the AP 601 can store the address field 715 of the MAC layer frame of the DL discovery request frame as shown in FIG. The database of all RAT RAT capabilities (with MAC address) is matched to learn the DL responder STA 610. Note that the AP's database is populated with the MAC address of each device connected to it during each associated program of each device. After learning the DL responder STA 610, the AP 601 may select a publicly-enabled RAT with the DL responder STA 610, such as RAT 2, to forward the DL Discovery Request frame to the DL Responder STA 610 (S625). The AP 601 then forwards the DL Discovery Request frame to the DL Responder STA 610 using the selected RAT (S630). The address field of the MAC layer frame of the DL discovery request frame transmitted from the AP 601 to the DL responding STA 610 can be formatted as shown in FIG.
Figure 10 is an example format of an address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL Discovery Request frame sent by the AP to the DL Responder STA. Referring to FIG. 10, the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL discovery request frame sent from the AP to the DL responding STA may be formatted to include the address field 1005, which may be selected for the AP. The MAC address of the DL responder STA of the selected public RAT; the address field 1010, which may be the MAC address of the AP of the selected public RAT between the AP and the DL responder STA; the address field 1015, It may be the MAC address of the DL Responder STA for which the DL Initiator STA wants to make a request for a particular DL Responder, or may be the broadcast address of the RAT; and the Address Field 1020, which may be a RAT The MAC address of the DL Initiator STA on which it wants to make a request to the DL Responder STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
A DL-capable STA that receives a DL Discovery Request frame having a matching BSSID (at least one matching BSSID in the case of multiple BSSIDs) in the Link Identifier Element may directly send a DL Discovery Response frame to the requesting STA. Referring again to FIG. 6, the DL responder STA 610 can learn the RAT capabilities of the DL Initiator STA 605 via the DL Discovery Request frame. Thus, the DL responder STA 610 can select all public RATs, such as RAT 1, RAT 5, RAT 6 (S635), and on all common RATs (eg, RAT 1, RAT 5, RAT 6 (S640a-n)) The DL discovery response frame is sent directly to the DL initiator STA 605. TDLS can be used to send DL discovery response messages. Due to link quality or mobility, etc., some public RATs are not activated at that time, thereby transmitting on all public RATs can avoid loss of DL discovery response frames. On the other hand, the DL Initiator STA 605 may only consider the first DL discovery response frame and may discard all DL discovery response frames (if any) received from the DL Responder STA 610 on other RATs. The DL Responder STA 610 may use the MAC address of the RAT (Public MAC Address or Separate MAC Address), which sends the frame on the RAT, by the DL Initiator STA 605 and its own MAC address in the frame Used in. If there is no RAT common to the DL responder STA 610 and the DL initiator STA 605, the DL discovery response frame is not transmitted.
Figure 11 is an example TDLS discovery response frame format 1100. The TDLS discovery response frame format 1100 can include various information elements 1104 that can be ordered as indicated at 1102. The example TDLS discovery response frame format 1100 can include the following information element fields: category, action, dialog beacon, capability, supported rate, extended supported rate, supported channel, robust secure network information element (RSNIE) Extended capabilities, fast BSS conversion information elements (FTIE), timeout intervals, supported regulation levels, high throughput (HT) capabilities, 20/40 BSS coexistence, and link identifiers. Other information elements can also be used.
In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the following fields can be modified. These fields can be designed for all RATs (ie, the maximum RAT capability of the DL Responder STA), rather than just for a single RAT as in the case of TDLS.
Supported Rates: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to indicate the rate supported by the STAs on each RAT.
Extended Extended Supported Rate: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element is present for the RAT whenever there are more than eight supported rates on the RAT, and it may be additionally optional.
Supported Channels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include a list of channel sub-bands, where multi-RAT STAs can operate for each RAT.
• Supported adjustment levels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include information for each RAT.
Security parameters (ie RSNIE, FTIE, time-out interval in TDLS case): in the case of multi-RAT STAs, each element related to security parameters (eg RSNIE, FTIE, timeout interval in IEEE 802.11 case) It can be modified to include the corresponding parameters for each RAT.
• Capabilities (such as HT capabilities in TDLS cases, extended capabilities, etc.): In the case of multi-RAT STAs, each capability element can be modified to include corresponding parameters for each RAT.
Link Identifier: In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the following fields of the link identifier element can be modified.
○ BSSID: This field can be modified to include a single BSSID of the AP in the case of a public MAC address, or all BSSIDs of all RATs at the AP in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT.
○ DL Initiator STA Address: This field can be modified to include a single public MAC address of the DL Initiator in the case of a public MAC address, or a DL Responder in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT. All MAC addresses of all RATs at the location.
Table 3, described below, is an exemplary view of the format that the DL Initiator STA can use to transmit all of the above modified elements to the DL Responder STA.



Table 3 format for transmitting information for multi-RAT devices
In Table 3, RAT 1, RAT 2, ... RAT N may be a list of IDs of all RATs supported by the DL Initiator STA. With the above modification, the DL initiator STA can also send information of the RAT, and the DL initiator STA can communicate at the RAT. It can send this information in the same way as discussed for the DL Discovery Request frame. Thus, after completing the DL discovery process, the DL Initiator STA and the DL Responder STA can know each other's RAT capabilities (with MAC address). As described above, each STA that knows the RAT capabilities of any other STA can store this information in its RAT capability database in a manner similar to that shown in Table 1.
A method for establishing a DL between two multi-RAT OMMA devices will now be described. Figure 12 is a streaming call of the basic example DL program. Referring to FIG. 12, a DL Initiator STA 1205, a DL Responder STA 1210, and an AP 1201 are shown. The AP 1201 is common to the DL Initiator STA 1205 and the DL Responder STA 1210. In order to establish the DL, the initiating multi-RAT device (i.e., DL Initiator STA 1205) may send a setup request message to the intended peer multi-RAT OMMA device, DL Responder STA 1210. The setup request message may be a DL setup request frame. This setup request message can also be transmitted via the AP 1201 using TDLS (ie, using the TDLS Setup Request frame). If the DL discovery procedure has been completed between the DL Initiator STA 1205 and the DL Responder STA 1210 (ie, the DL Initiator STA 1205 has received the DL Discovery Response frame), the DL Initiator STA 1205 may select the DL Responder STA One of the public RATs of 1210, and uses the MAC address of the public RAT in the request frame of the DL as shown in FIG. If the DL discovery procedure is not performed or completed between the DL Initiator STA 1205 and the DL Responder STA, the DL Initiator STA may still send a DL Setup Request to the DL Responder STA. The MAC addressing can be done in a similar manner to the DL discovery request described in FIG.
Referring to FIG. 12, the DL Initiator STA 1205 may select a publicly enabled RAT with the AP 1201, such as RAT 3 (S1215). The DL Initiator STA 1205 transmits a DL Setup Request frame to the AP 1201 on the selected RAT (S1220). The DL Initiator STA 1205 and AP 1201 may dynamically update the Common Empowered RAT between them. In the case of a public MAC address for all RATs, all address fields in the MAC layer frame of the DL Setup Request frame can be mapped to a public MAC address. In the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT, the address field in the MAC layer frame can be formatted as shown in FIG.
Figure 13 is an exemplary format of an address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL Setup Request frame sent by the DL Initiator STA to the AP. Referring to Figure 13, the address field in the MAC layer frame may be formatted to include an address field 1305, which may be the MAC address of the AP for the selected public RAT selected by the DL Initiator STA; Address field 1310, which may be the MAC address of the DL Initiator STA of the selected public RAT between the AP and the DL Initiator STA; the address field 1315, which may be for the selection selected by the DL Initiator STA The MAC address of the DL Responder STA of the public RAT; and the Address Field 1320, which may be the MAC address of the DL Initiator STA of the selected public RAT with the DL Responder STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Figure 14 is an example TDLS setup request frame format 1400 that is sent by the DL Initiator STA to the AP. The TDLS setup request frame format 1400 can include various information elements 1404 that can be ordered as indicated at 1402. The example TDLS setup request frame format 1400 depicted in FIG. 14 includes the following information element fields: category, action, dialog message, capability, supported rate, country, extended supported rate, supported channel, RSNIE, Extended capabilities, Quality of Service (QoS) capabilities, FTIE, timeout interval, supported adjustment levels, HT capabilities, 20/40 BSS coexistence, and link identifiers. Other information elements can also be used.
In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the following fields can be modified.
Supported Rates: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to indicate the rate supported by the STAs on each RAT.
Extended Extended Supported Rate: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element is present for the RAT whenever there are more than eight supported rates on the RAT, and it may be additionally optional.
Supported Channels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include a list of channel sub-bands, where multi-RAT STAs can operate for each RAT.
QoS capability: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, QoS capability information should be sent for each RAT.
• Supported adjustment levels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include information for each RAT.
Security parameters (ie RSNIE, FTIE, time-out interval in TDLS case): in the case of multi-RAT STAs, each element related to security parameters (eg RSNIE, FTIE, timeout interval in IEEE 802.11 case) It can be modified to include the corresponding parameters for each RAT.
• Capabilities (such as HT capabilities in TDLS cases, extended capabilities, etc.): In the case of multi-RAT STAs, each capability element can be modified to include corresponding parameters for each RAT.
Link Identifier: In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the following fields of the link identifier element can be modified.
○ BSSID: This field can be modified to include a single BSSID of the AP in the case of a public MAC address, or all BSSIDs of all RATs at the AP in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT.
○ DL Initiator STA Address: This field can be modified to include a single public MAC address of the DL Initiator in the case of a public MAC address, or a DL Responder in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT. All MAC addresses of all RATs at the location.
The DL Initiator STA may also send information for the RAT that the DL Initiator STA is capable of communicating on. It can send this information in the same manner as described above for the DL Discovery Request frame.
Referring again to FIG. 12, in the case of a separate MAC address for all RATs, the AP 1201 can address the address field 1315 of the MAC layer frame of the DL setting request frame as shown in FIG. The DL Initiator STA 1205 receives the DL Responder STA 1210 as it matches the database that stores the RAT capabilities (with MAC address) for all RATs. After learning the DL responder STA 1210, the AP 1201 may select a publicly-enabled RAT with the DL responder STA 1210, such as RAT 2 (S1225). The AP 1201 may forward the DL setting request frame to the DL responding STA 1210 using the publicly-enabled RAT (S1230). The address field of the MAC layer frame of the DL setting request frame (sent from the AP 1201 to the DL responding STA 1210) can be formatted as shown in FIG.
Figure 15 is an exemplary format of an address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL Setup Request frame sent by the AP to the DL Responder STA. Referring to Figure 15, the address field in the MAC layer frame may be formatted to include an address field 1505, which may be the MAC address of the DL responder STA for the selected public RAT selected by the AP; Address field 1510, which is the MAC address of the AP of the selected public RAT between the AP and the DL responder STA; the address field 1515, which may be the "address 3" of the request received from the DL initiator STA A field; and an address field 1520, which may be the "Address 4" field of the request received from the DL Initiator STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Referring again to FIG. 12, in response to receiving the DL setup request message by the DL responder STA 1210, the setup response message can be sent from the DL responder STA 1210 to the DL initiator STA 1205. The setup message can be a DL setup response frame that can be transmitted via the AP 1201 using TDLS. The DL responder STA 1210 may select a publicly enabled RAT with the AP 1201, such as RAT 2, to transmit a DL setup response frame on the RAT (S1235). The DL responder STA 1210 may transmit a DL setup response frame to the AP 1201 using the publicly-enabled RAT (S1240). The address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting response frame can be formatted as shown in Figure 16.
Figure 16 is an example format of the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setup response frame sent by the DL responding STA to the AP. Referring to Figure 16, the address field in the MAC layer frame may be formatted to include an address field 1605, which may be the MAC address of the AP for the selected public RAT selected by the DL responder STA; Address field 1610, which may be the MAC address of the DL Responder STA for the public RAT selected with the AP; the address field 1615, which may be the "Address 4" field of the DL Setup Request; and the address Field 1620, which may be the "Address 3" field of the DL Setup Request. As described, in the MAC layer frame, the "Address 3" and "Address 4" fields can be copied from the "Address 4" and "Address 3" fields of the received DL setup request, respectively. . It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Figure 17 is an example TDLS setup response frame format 1700 sent by the DL Responder STA to the AP. The TDLS setup response frame format 1700 can include various information elements 1704 that can be ordered as indicated at 1702. The example TDLS setup response frame format 1700 depicted in FIG. 17 may include the following information element fields: category, action, status code, dialog beacon, capability, supported rate, country, extended supported rate, supported Channel, RSNIE, extended capability, QoS capability, FTIE, time-out interval IE, supported adjustment level, HT capability, 20/40 BSS coexistence, link identifier. Other information elements can also be used.
In the case of multi-RAT STAs, the following fields can be modified.
• Status Code: In TDLS, five options (ie status codes '0', '37', etc.) are listed for the TDLS Responder STA to make a response. In the case of a multi-RAT STA, all of those options can be utilized for the DL responder to remain the same with the following modifications in option 2 (section 11.21.4 in IEEE 802.11z).
o The DL Responder STA may reject the DL Setup Request frame, in which case the DL Responder STA may respond with a DL Setup Responsive Frame with status code 37 ("Request has been rejected"). When any of the received link identifier elements does not match any of the BSSIDs of the DL responder STA, the DL responder STA does not find any public RAT with the DL initiator, then the DL setup request may be rejected.
Supported Rates: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to indicate the rate supported by the STAs on each RAT.
Extended Extended Supported Rate: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element is present for the RAT whenever there are more than eight supported rates on the RAT, and it may be additionally optional.
Supported Channels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include a list of channel sub-bands, where multi-RAT STAs can operate for each RAT.
QoS capability: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, QoS capability information should be sent for each RAT.
• Supported adjustment levels: In the case of multi-RAT STAs, this element can be modified to include information for each RAT.
Security parameters (ie RSNIE, FTIE, time-out interval in TDLS case): in the case of multi-RAT STAs, each element related to security parameters (eg RSNIE, FTIE, timeout interval in IEEE 802.11 case) It can be modified to include the corresponding parameters for each RAT.
• Capabilities (such as HT capabilities in TDLS cases, extended capabilities, etc.): In the case of multi-RAT STAs, each capability element can be modified to include corresponding parameters for each RAT.
Link Identifier: In the case of a multi-RAT STA, the following fields of the link identifier element can be modified.
○ BSSID: This field can be modified to include a single BSSID of the AP in the case of a public MAC address, or all BSSIDs of all RATs at the AP in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT.
o DL Initiator STA Address: This field can be modified to include a single public MAC address of the DL Initiator in the case of a public MAC address or a DL Responder in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT All MAC addresses of all RATs.
The DL Responder STA can also send information about the RAT in which it can communicate. It can send this information in the same manner as described above for the DL Discovery Request frame.
Referring again to FIG. 12, in the case of a separate MAC address for all RATs, the AP 1201 may receive the address field 1615 of the MAC layer frame as shown in FIG. 16 (received from the DL responder STA 1210) The DL Initiator STA 1205 is known with a database match that can store RAT capabilities (with MAC addresses) for all RATs. After learning the DL Initiator STA 1205, the AP 1201 may select a publicly-enabled RAT with the DL Initiator STA 1205, such as RAT3 (S1245). The AP 1201 may forward the DL setup response frame to the DL Initiator STA 1205 using the Common Empowered RAT (S1250). The address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setup response frame (from the AP to the DL initiator) can be formatted as shown in Figure 18.
Figure 18 is an example format of the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setup response frame sent by the AP to the DL Initiator STA. Referring to FIG. 18, the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting response frame sent by the AP to the DL initiator STA may be formatted to include the address field 1805, which may be for the AP selected. MAC address of the DL Initiator STA of the selected public RAT; address field 1810, which may be the MAC address of the AP for the selected public RAT with the DL Initiator STA; address field 1815, which may be The "Address 3" field of the response received from the DL Responder STA; and the Address Field 1820, which may be the "Address 4" field of the response received from the DL Responder STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
If the DL Initiator STA receives a DL setup response with a status code of zero, and before the timeout (if a response is defined for the DL setup) occurs, the DL Initiator STA may send a DL Setup Confirmation Frame to the DL Responder STA. This message can be transmitted via the AP. Referring again to FIG. 12, the DL Initiator STA 1205 may select a publicly enabled RAT with the AP 1201, such as RAT 3 (S1255). The DL Initiator STA 1205 may transmit the DL Setup Confirmation frame to the AP 1201 using the selected Common Empowerment RAT (S1260). The address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting confirmation frame can be formatted as shown in Fig. 19.
Figure 19 is an exemplary format of an address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setup confirmation frame sent by the DL Initiator STA to the AP. Referring to FIG. 19, the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting confirmation frame sent by the DL initiator STA to the AP may be formatted to include the address field 1905, which may be for the DL initiator. The MAC address of the AP of the selected public RAT selected by the STA; the address field 1910, which may be the MAC address of the DL Initiator STA for the selected public RAT with the AP; the address field 1915, which may be The DL sets the "Address 4" field of the MAC layer frame of the response frame; and the address field 1920, which may be the "Address 3" field of the MAC layer frame of the DL setting response. As described, in the MAC layer frame, the "Address 3" and "Address 4" fields can be copied from the "Address 4" and "Address 3" fields of the received DL setup response, respectively. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Figure 20 is an example TDLS setup confirmation frame format 2000. The TDLS Setup Confirmation Frame Format 2000 can include various information elements 2004 that can be ordered as indicated at 2002. The example TDLS setup confirmation frame format 2000 depicted in FIG. 20 may include the following information element fields: category, action, status code, dialog beacon, RSNIE, EDCA parameter set, FTIE, time interval interval IE, HT operation, and chain Road identifier. Other information elements can also be used.
For multi-RAT devices, modifications in a subset of information elements can be made, similar to those made for DL setup requests. In the case of multi-RAT, the security parameters of the DL setup acknowledgement frame (ie, RSNIE, FTIE, and time-out interval IE), EDCA parameter set, and HT operation field may be included between the DL Initiator STA and the DL Responder STA Information of all public RATs (after obtaining a successful DL setup response frame from the DL Responder STA, the DL Initiator STA can know its public RAT capability with the DL Responder STA). In the link identifier, the following fields can be modified.
BSSID: This field may contain a single BSSID of the AP in the case of a public MAC address, or all BSSIDs of all RATs at the AP in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT.
DL Initiator STA Address: This field may contain a single public MAC address of the DL Initiator in the case of a public MAC address, or a DL Initiator and Responder in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT. All MAC addresses between the public RATs.
Referring again to FIG. 12, in the case of a separate MAC address for all RATs, the AP 1201 can set the address field 1915 of the MAC layer frame of the acknowledgment frame as shown in FIG. The DL Initiator STA 1205 receives the DL Responder STA 1210 as it can store a database match for the RAT capabilities (with MAC address) for all RATs. After learning the DL responder STA 1210, the AP 1201 may select a publicly-enabled RAT with the DL responder STA 1210, such as RAT 2 (S1265). The AP 1201 may forward the DL setting confirmation frame to the DL responder STA 1270 using the selected common enabled RAT (S1270). The address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting confirmation frame (from the AP to the DL responding STA) can be formatted as shown in FIG.
Figure 21 is an example format of the address field of the MAC layer frame of the DL setting confirmation frame sent by the AP to the DL responding STA. Referring to FIG. 21, the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL setting confirmation frame sent by the AP to the DL responding STA may be formatted to include the address field 2105, which may be selected for the AP. MAC address of the selected DL responsive party STA; address field 2110, which may be the MAC address of the AP for the public RAT of the selection with the DL responder STA; address field 2115, which may be The "Address 3" field of the confirmation frame received from the DL Initiator; and the Address Field 2120, which may be the "Address 4" field of the confirmation frame received from the DL Initiator. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
A method for tearing down a direct link between two multi-RAT OMMA devices will now be described. The DL peer STA (ie, the DL Initiator STA or the DL Responder STA) may send a DL teardown frame to the intended DL peer STA to tear down the direct link. The DL removal frame can be a TDLS removal frame. There may be multiple ways to send this frame, for example via a direct path or via an AP.
Figure 22 is a call flow of an example teardown procedure on a direct path. When the intended DL peer STA is reachable via the DL link, the DL teardown frame can be sent via the direct path. Referring to Fig. 22, the teardown initiator STA 2205 and the teardown responder STA 2210 are shown. The teardown initiator STA 2205 may select a public RAT, such as RAT 4 (S2220), with the intended DL peer STA (ie, tear down the responder STA 2210). The teardown initiator STA 2205 may send a DL teardown request frame to the teardown responder STA 2210 on the selected public RAT (S2225). In response to receiving the DL teardown request frame, the teardown responder 2210 will send a DL teardown response frame to the teardown initiator STA 2205 (S2230).
Figure 23 is a call flow of an example teardown procedure via the AP. Referring to FIG. 23, the teardown initiator STA 2305, the teardown responder STA 2310, and the AP 2301 common to the teardown initiator STA 2305 and the teardown responder STA 2310 are shown. The teardown initiator STA 2305 may select a public RAT, such as RAT 4 (S2320), with the intended DL peer STA (ie, tear down the responder STA 2310). The teardown initiator STA 2305 may send a DL teardown request frame to the teardown responder STA 2310 on the selected public RAT (S2325). In response to receiving the DL teardown request frame, the teardown responder STA 2310 may send a DL teardown response frame to the teardown initiator STA 2305 (S2330). If the DL teardown response frame is not received within the timeout period (S2335), the DL teardown frame may be sent via the AP 2301. The teardown initiator STA 2305 can select a public RAT with the AP, such as RAT 1 (S2340). The teardown initiator STA 2305 may send the DL teardown request frame to the AP 2301 using the selected public RAT (S2345). The teardown initiator STA may use the MAC address of the public RAT in the DL teardown frame as shown in Fig. 24, which will be described in more detail below. The AP 2301 can select and tear down the public RAT of the responding STA 2310, such as RAT 3 (S2350). The AP 2301 may transmit the DL teardown request frame to the teardown responder STA 2310 using the selected RAT (S2355). In response, the teardown responder STA 2310 can use the same public RAT to send a DL teardown response frame to the AP 2301 (S2360). The AP 2301 may forward the DL teardown response frame to the teardown initiator STA 2305 on the RAT common to the AP 2301 and the teardown initiator STA 2305 (S2365). In response, the teardown initiator STA 2305 can use the same public RAT to send a DL teardown confirmation frame to the AP 2301 (S2370). The AP 2301 may forward the DL teardown confirmation frame to the teardown responder STA 2310 using the RAT common to the AP 2301 and the teardown responder STA 2310 (S2375). In the case of a common MAC address for all RATs, all address fields in the MAC layer frame of the message can be mapped to the device's public MAC address. In the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT, the address field in the MAC layer frame can be formatted as shown in FIG.
Figure 24 is an example format of the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL teardown frame sent by the teardown initiator STA to the AP. Referring to Figure 24, the address field in the MAC layer frame can be formatted to include an address field 2405, which can be the MAC address of the AP for the selected public RAT selected by the teardown initiator STA; Address field 2410, which may be the MAC address of the teardown initiator STA for the public RAT with the selection of the AP; the address field 2415, which may be the expected for the selected public RAT selected by the teardown initiator STA The MAC address of the DL peer STA; and the address field 2420, which may be the MAC address of the teardown initiator STA for the public RAT with the selection of the intended DL peer STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
In the case of a separate MAC address for all RATs, the AP may pass the address field 2415 (received from the teardown initiator STA) of the MAC layer frame of the DL teardown frame as shown in FIG. A database match for RAT capabilities (with MAC address) for all RATs is stored to learn the expected DL peer STAs. After learning the expected DL peer STA, it can select the publicly-enabled RAT with the intended DL peer STA to forward the DL teardown frame to the intended DL peer STA. The address field in the MAC layer frame (from the AP to the DL responding STA) can be formatted as shown in Figure 25.
Figure 25 is an example format of the address field in the MAC layer frame of the DL teardown frame sent by the AP to the DL teardown responder STA. Referring to Figure 25, the address field in the MAC layer frame can be formatted to include an address field 2505, which can be the MAC address of the intended DL peer STA for the selected public RAT selected by the AP. Address field 2510, which may be the MAC address of the AP for the public RAT selected with the intended DL peer STA; the address field 2515, which may be the acknowledgement frame received from the teardown initiator STA The "Address 3"field; and the Address field 2520, which may be the "Address 4" field of the confirmation frame received from the Demolition Initiator STA. It should be noted that alternative address fields can be used, and those described are only examples.
Figure 26 is an example TDLS removal frame format 2600. The TDLS teardown frame format 2600 includes various information elements 2604 that can be ordered as indicated at 2602. The example TDLS teardown frame format 2600 depicted in FIG. 26 may include the following information element fields: category, action, reason code, FTIE, and link identifier. Other information elements can also be used.
For multi-RAT devices, the following modifications can be made in a subset of the above fields:
Security related parameters (ie FTIE in TDLS): Information related to any security parameters can be sent for each RAT.
● Link identifier: In the link identifier, the following fields can be modified:
○ BSSID: This field may contain a single BSSID of the AP in the case of a public MAC address, or all BSSIDs of all RATs at the AP in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT.
○ DL Initiator STA Address: This field may contain the removal of the initiator's single public MAC address in the case of a public MAC address, or the removal of the initiator and the expected in the case of a separate MAC address for each RAT. All MAC addresses of the public RAT between the DL peer STAs.
A method for RAT availability management will be described below. Each DL STA pair can establish a DL by signaling its maximum matching RAT capability at this time. Thus the DL STA pair can know the public maximum RAT capability between them when the DL is set. However, the list of RAT availability for DL STA pairs varies over time based on several factors (eg, mobility, link quality fluctuations, etc.). Thus, there may be a need for dynamic management of RAT availability for DL STA pairs, where both DL peer STAs know each other's RAT availability.
Figure 27 is an example call flow for RAT availability update management. Referring to Figure 27, a first DL peer STA 2705 and a second DL peer STA 2710 are shown. In the example provided in FIG. 27, the DL peer STA 2710 is a DL initiator STA, and the DL peer STA 2705 is a DL responder STA. Each DL peer STA includes an OMMA controller (ie, a RAT update management module), an OMMA scheduler (ie, a RAT update sender), a STA RAT capability database, and a RAT 1-N. It should be noted that the OMMA scheduler for the DL peer STA 2710 is not shown in Figure 27 for simplicity of illustration. The DL Peer STA 2710 periodically or aperiodically transmits the probe/training signals on all common RATs (ie, the public maximum RAT capabilities) to the DL Peer STA 2705 (S2720a-n). At the DL Peer STA 2710, each RAT listening for the probe/training signal may inform or update the OMMA controller (ie, the RAT Update Management Module) (S2725a-n) regarding the RAT availability. This update or notification can be implemented via the signal RAT_Capablities_A3 (RAT_Capability_A3) on the A3 interface. The OMMA controller of the DL peer STA 2705 updates this information of the RAT capability in the STA RAT capability database of the DL peer STA 2705 (S2730). This update can be implemented via the STA_RAT_Capability_Update_A1 (STA_RAT_Capability_Update_A1) signal on the A1 interface. The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2705 (ie, the RAT update sender) may query the STA RAT capability database for the DL peer STA 2705 for the RAT availability list of the DL peer STA 2710 (S2735). This query may be a STA_RAT_Capability_Query_A4 (STA_RAT_Capability_Query_A4) signal via the A4 interface. The STA RAT capability database of the DL peer STA 2405 may send a response to the query indicating the RAT availability of the DL peer STA 2710 (S2740). The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2705 selects a publicly available RAT, such as RAT2 (S2745). The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2705 generates a STA_RAT_Availability (STA_RAT_Availability) message that may include the following parameters:

● Source STA_Addr: self address;
● Destination STA_Addr: the address of the DL initiator to which this information needs to be sent;
RAT_Ids: List of Ids of all RATs available [RAT_1, RAT_2 .....].
The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2705 transmits the STA_RAT_Availability message to the DL peer STA 2710 (S2755) using the selected public available RAT (S2750). At DL Peer STA 2710, a STA_RAT_Availability message is received at the selected available RAT. The selected public RAT notifies the RAT capability of the DL peer STA 2705 to the OMMA controller of the DL peer STA 2710 (S2760). This can be done via the RAT_Capablities_A3 signal on the A3 interface. The OMMA controller of the DL peer STA 2710 may update the RAT availability information in the STA RAT capability database for the DL peer STA 2705 (S2765). This can be achieved via STA_RAT_Capability_Update_A1 on the A1 interface. In this method, the RAT availability information for any DL STA pair can be updated. The above procedure can be executed periodically (S2770).
Sometimes in multi-RAT devices, the packet error rate on some RATs becomes too high for various reasons. In this case, the receiver that obtains a high error packet on the RAT set can inform the transmitter not to select a particular set of RATs to transmit to the receiver. Thus, dynamic RAT switching for DL STAs is required.
Figure 28 is an example call flow for dynamic RAT handover. Referring to Figure 28, a first DL peer STA 2805 and a second DL peer STA 2810 are shown. In the example provided in FIG. 28, the DL peer STA 2805 is a transmitting DL STA and the DL peer STA 2810 is a receiving DL STA. Each DL peer STA includes an OMMA controller (ie, a RAT update management module), an OMMA scheduler (ie, a RAT update sender), a STA RAT capability database, and RATs 1-3. The number of RATs shown in Figure 28 is for illustrative purposes only and is not intended to be limiting. A DL peer STA can include any number of RATs. Moreover, for simplicity purposes, the OMMA scheduler for the DL peer STA 2810 is not shown in FIG. As shown in Fig. 28, the DL peer STA 2810 receives the material communication on the RAT 1-3 (S2815a-c). The DL peer STA 2810 continuously receives the high packet error rate on the RAT 2 (S2820). It should be noted that the DL peer STA 2810 may continuously receive a high packet error rate on another RAT or RAT set. The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2810 queries the STA RAT availability database (the erroneous packet transmitter) for the DL peer 2810 of the RAT availability list for the DL peer STA 2805 (S2825). This can be achieved via the STA_RAT_Capability_Query_A4 (STA_RAT_Capability_Query_A4) signal on the A4 interface. The STA RAT availability database of the DL peer STA 2810 sends a response to the request, providing a list of RAT availability for the DL peer STA 2805 (S2830). This can be achieved via the STA_RAT_Capability_Response_A4 (STA_RAT_Capability_Response_A4) signal on the A4 interface. The DL Peer STA 2810 may remove these RATs from the list where it becomes a high packet error rate (e.g., a packet error rate above a predetermined value) on the RAT. The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2810 selects a publicly available RAT, such as RAT 1 (S2835). The selected publicly available RAT (e.g., RAT 1) will not be the RAT that the DL peer STA continuously receives the high packet error rate. The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2810 generates a STA_RAT_Availability message that is sent to the DL peer STA 2805. The STA_RAT_Availability message may include the following parameters:
Source STA_Addr: the address of the DL peer STA that sent this message;
Destination STA_Addr: the address of the DL peer STA to which it needs to be sent;
RAT_Ids: Id list [RAT_1, RAT_2 ...] of all RATs available and not receiving high packet error rate.
The OMMA scheduler of the DL peer STA 2810 transmits the STA_RAT_Availability message to the DL peer STA 2805 (S2845) using the selected publicly available RAT (S2840). At the DL Peer STA 2805 side, the RAT receiving the STA_RAT_Availability message may notify the OMMA controller of the DL Peer STA 2805 (S2850). This can be done via the RAT_Capablities_A3 signal on the A3 interface. The OMMA controller of the DL peer STA 2805 may update the RAT availability information in the STA RAT capability database for the DL peer STA 2805 of the STA (S2855). This can be achieved via the STA_RAT_Capability_Update_A1 signal on the A1 interface. Thus, the DL Peer STA 2805 is unable to transmit to the DL Peer STA 2810 using these high packet error RATs before any new updates are obtained in the STA RAT Capability Library for the DL STA Receiver. The DL Peer STA 2805 can then send the material communication to the DL Peer STA 2810 (S2860a-b) on the available RATs (ie, RAT1 and RAT3).
The DL peer STAs may know each other's OMMA mode (eg, transparent or non-transparent), for example, the DL receiver may know that a DL transmitter is being used to send IP flows to it using multiple RATs, whereby it may aggregate during reception All of these packets. Thus, a DL peer STA can transmit its OMMA mode of operation to another DL peer STA if needed. In the case of a newly associated DL peer STA, the DL Initiator STA may send its OMMA mode to the DL Responder STA during the DL setup procedure in the DL Setup Confirmation frame. Alternatively, the DL Initiator STA may send its OMMA mode using a new signal containing the mode. The DL Initiator STA can send its OMMA mode before any data communication begins.
Figure 29 is a diagram showing the call flow of the OMMA mode transfer program. Referring to Figure 29, a first DL peer STA 2905 and a second DL peer STA 2910 are shown. In the example provided in FIG. 29, DL Peer STA 2905 is a DL Responder STA and DL Peer STA 2910 is a DL Initiator STA. Each DL peer STA includes an OMMA controller, an OMMA scheduler, a STA RAT capability database, and a RAT 1-N. For illustrative purposes, the STA 2905 STA's DL Responder RAT Capability Library is not shown. Furthermore, only the selected RAT is described for each DL peer STA. As indicated above, each DL peer STA has one or more available RATs. Referring to Fig. 29, the OMMA controller of the DL initiator STA 2910 selects the OMMA mode in which it operates (S2915). The OMMA controller of the DL Initiator STA 2910 passes its mode decision to the OMMA Scheduler of the DL Initiator STA 2910 (S2920). This can be done via the OMMA_Mode_Decision_A9 (OMMA_Mode_Decision_A9) signal on the A9 interface. The OMMA controller of the DL Initiator STA 2910 may query the STA RAT Capability Library of the DL Initiator STA 2910 to obtain the available RAT for the DL Responder STA 2905 (S2925). This can be done using the A1 interface via the STA_RAT_Capability_Query_A1 signal. The STA RAT availability database of the DL Initiator STA 2910 may send a response to the request to provide a list of RAT availability for the DL Responder STA 2905 (S2930). The OMMA controller of the DL Initiator STA 2910 may select any of the available RATs on the RAT availability list (S2935). The OMMA controller of the DL Initiator STA 2910 sends the OMMA mode to the selected RAT (S2940). This can be done using the A3 interface via the Mode_to_RAT_A3 (mode_to__RAT_A3) signal. The selected RAT transmits a new signal including the OMMA mode decision to the DL responder STA 2905 (S2945). New signals containing this mode can be sent over the air. It can have the following parameters:
Source STA address: the address of the DL peer STA that generated the message;
• destination STA address: the address of the DL peer STA to which it needs to be sent;
● Mode: Mode information.
At the DL responder STA 2905, the mode information received in the signal containing the mode from the DL initiator STA 2910 may be transmitted to the OMMA controller of the DL responder STA 2905 (S2950). This can be done via Mode_to_Controller_A3 (Mode_to_Controller_A3) using the A3 interface. The OMMA controller of the DL responder STA 2905 may send a signal to the OMMA scheduler of the DL responder STA 2605 operating for this mode (S2955). Furthermore, whenever any peer STA (DL Initiator STA or DL Responder STA) needs to change its current mode of operation (eg, from multiple RATs to only a single RAT communication), it can be in the same procedure as discussed above Notify other peer STAs.
Example
1. A method for use in a station (STA), the method comprising:
A message is sent to an access point (AP), wherein the message includes a message for at least one of a plurality of radio access technologies (RATs) available to the STA.
2. The method of embodiment 1 wherein the message is a direct link (DL) discovery request message.
3. The method of embodiment 1, wherein the message is a direct link (DL) setup request message.
4. The method of embodiment 2, further comprising:
A DL discovery response message is received at the STA, wherein the discovery response message includes information for at least one of a plurality of RATs available to the STA.
5. The method of embodiment 3, further comprising:
A DL setup response message is received at the STA, wherein the DL response message includes information for at least one of a plurality of Radio Access Technologies (RATs) available to the STA.
6. The method of embodiment 5, further comprising:
Send a DL setup confirmation message.
7. The method of embodiment 1, wherein the message is a direct link (DL) teardown message.
8. The method of embodiment 6, wherein the DL setup confirmation message comprises an Opportunistic Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation (OMMA) mode of the STA.
9. A method for use in a station (STA), the method comprising:
A direct link (DL) teardown message is sent to the intended DL peer STA, wherein the message includes information for at least one of a plurality of radio access technologies (RATs) available to the STA.
10. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-9, wherein the information comprises a Media Access Control (MAC) address of a STA for a RAT that is common to the STA and the AP.
11. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-10, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an AP for a RAT that is common to the STA and the AP.
12. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-11, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of a STA for a RAT common to the STA and the intended DL peer STA.
13. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-12, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an intended peer STA of the RAT common to the STA and the intended DL peer STA.
14. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-13, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an AP for a RAT that is common to the AP and the intended peer STA.
15. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-14, wherein the information further comprises an expected peer MAC address of the RAT for the AP and the intended peer STA common RAT.
16. The method as in any one of embodiments 1-15, wherein the information further comprises a list of RATs available to the STA.
17. The method of any of embodiments 1-16, further comprising:
Maintain a database of multiple RAT capabilities of at least one AP.
18. A method for use in a station (STA), the method comprising:
Transmitting a sounding signal to an intended peer STA via at least one of a plurality of radio access technologies (RATs) common to the STA and the intended peer STA;
The RAT availability message is received via a RAT that is common to the STA and the intended peer STA, where the RAT availability message includes a list of available RATs.
19. A method for use in a station (STA), the method comprising:
Querying a database for a Radio Access Technology (RAT) availability list if the packet error rate on at least one of the plurality of RATs used by the STA is above a predetermined value;
Receive a list of RAT availability;
Removing the RAT from which the packet error rate is above a predetermined threshold from the availability list;
The updated availability list is sent to the intended peer STA via at least one of a plurality of RATs that are common to the STA and the intended peer STA.
20. A method for use in a station (STA), the method comprising:
Querying a database of radio access technology (RAT) availability lists for prospective peer STAs;
Select an available RAT;
A signal containing an Opportunistic Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation (OMMA) mode of the selected RAT is sent to the intended peer STA.
21. A method for use in an access point (AP), the method comprising:
A message is received from a station (STA), wherein the message includes information for at least one of a plurality of radio access technologies (RATs) available to the STA.
22. The method of embodiment 21 wherein the message is a direct link (DL) discovery request message.
23. The method of embodiment 21 wherein the message is a direct link (DL) setup request message.
24. The method of embodiment 22, further comprising:
Send a DL discovery response message to the intended peer STA.
25. The method of embodiment 23, further comprising:
A DL setup request message is sent to the intended peer STA.
26. The method of embodiment 25, further comprising:
Receiving a DL setting confirmation message from the STA, and
Send a DL setup confirmation message to the intended peer STA.
27. The method of embodiment 21 wherein the message is a direct link (DL) teardown message.
28. The method of embodiment 26 wherein the received DL setup confirmation message comprises an Opportunistic Multimedia Access Control (MAC) aggregation (OMMA) mode of the STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-28, wherein the information comprises a Media Access Control (MAC) address of a STA for a RAT that is common to the STA and the AP.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-29, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an AP for a RAT common to the STA and the AP.
The method of any one of embodiments 22-30, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of a STA for a RAT common to the STA and the intended DL peer STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-31, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an intended peer STA of the RAT common to the STA and the intended DL peer STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-32, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an AP for a RAT that is common to the AP and the intended peer STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-33, wherein the information further comprises a MAC address of an intended peer STA of the RAT that is common to the AP and the intended peer STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-34, wherein the information further comprises a list of RATs available to the STA.
The method of any one of embodiments 21-35, wherein the method further comprises maintaining a database of a plurality of RAT capabilities of the at least one STA.
37. A station (STA) configured to perform at least a portion of the method of any of embodiments 1-20.
38. An access point (AP) configured to perform at least a portion of the method of any of embodiments 21-36.
39. A wireless communication system configured to perform at least a portion of the method of any of embodiments 1-36.
Although the features and elements of the present invention have been described above in terms of specific combinations, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that each feature or element can be used alone or in any other feature or element of the present invention. Used in combination with various situations. Moreover, the processes described above can be implemented in a computer program, software and/or firmware executed by a computer or processor, where the computer program, software or/or firmware is embodied in a computer readable medium. Examples of computer readable media include, but are not limited to, electronic signals (transmitted via wired and/or wireless connections) and computer readable storage media. Examples of computer readable storage media include, but are not limited to, read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), scratchpad, cache memory, semiconductor storage device, magnetic media (eg, internal hard drive) Or removable disk), magneto-optical media, and optical media such as CD-ROMs and digital versatile discs (DVDs). The software related processor can be used to implement a radio frequency transceiver for use in a WTRU, UE, terminal, base station, RNC, or any host computer.

1201. . . Access point (AP)

1205. . . DL initiator STA

1210. . . DL responder STA

S1215, S1220, S1225, S1230, S1235, S1240, S1245, S1250, S1255, S1260, S1265, S1270. . . Basic example DL program streaming call

DL. . . Direct link

MT. . . Multi-radio access technology

STA. . . station

Claims (1)


1. An access point (AP) having a multi-radio access technology (RAT) capability for transmitting a direct link capability and a RAT capability between a first station (STA) and a second STA Method, the method includes:

Receiving, by using a first common-enabled RAT, a direct link discovery request message from the first STA;

Selecting a second common enable RAT for communicating with a second STA;

The direct link discovery request message is forwarded to the second STA using the second publicly-enabled RAT.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the first common enabling RAT and the second common enabling RAT are the same.

3. The method described in claim 1 of the patent scope further includes:

The RAT capability of the second STA is determined.

4. The method of claim 3, wherein determining the RAT capability of the second STA comprises comparing a Media Access Control (MAC) address associated with the second STA to a database Where the database includes the RAT capabilities of all associated STAs.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the first STA and the second STA are in the same basic service set (BSS).

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the received direct link discovery request message comprises a media access control (MAC) address of the publicly enabled RAT associated with the AP, and a MAC address of the publicly-enabled RAT associated with the first STA, and a MAC address associated with the second STA.

7. The method of claim 6, wherein the received direct link discovery request message further includes a MAC address of the RAT, and the MAC address of the RAT is expected to be used by the first STA. A request is made for the second STA.

8. The method of claim 7, wherein the received direct link discovery request message further comprises a BSS identification code of all RATs associated with the AP and all RATs associated with the first STA. MAC address.

9. The method described in claim 1 of the patent scope further includes:

Receiving, by the first publicly-enabled RAT, a direct link setup request message from the first STA;

Transmitting the direct link setup request message to the second STA by using the second publicly-enabled RAT;

Receiving, by the first common enabling RAT, a direct link setup response message from the second STA;

The direct link setup response message is forwarded to the first STA using the second common enable RAT.

10. The method of claim 9, wherein the method further comprises:

Receiving, by the first publicly-enabled RAT, a direct link setup confirmation message from the first STA;

The direct link setup confirmation message is forwarded to the second STA using the second common enable RAT.

11. The method of claim 1, wherein the method further comprises:

Dynamically updating the first common enable RAT;

The second common enable RAT is dynamically updated.

12. A multi-radio access technology (RAT) capable access point (AP) for communicating a direct link capability and a RAT capability between a first station (STA) and a second STA, APs with multi-RAT capabilities include:

a receiver configured to receive a direct link discovery request message from the first STA using a first common enabled RAT;

a processor configured to select a second common enable RAT for communicating with a second STA;

A transmitter configured to forward the direct link discovery request message to the second STA using the second common enabled RAT.

13. The multi-RAT capable AP as described in claim 12, wherein the first common enabling RAT and the second common enabling RAT are the same.

14. The multi-RAT capable AP as described in claim 12, wherein the processor is further configured to determine the RAT capability of the second STA.

15. The multi-RAT capable AP according to claim 14, wherein determining the RAT capability of the second STA comprises comparing a MAC address associated with the second STA with a database, Where the database includes the RAT capabilities of all associated STAs.

16. The multi-RAT capable AP according to claim 12, wherein the first STA and the second STA are in the same basic service set (BSS).

17. The multi-RAT capable AP according to claim 12, wherein the received direct link discovery request message includes a media access control (MAC) of the publicly enabled RAT associated with the AP. An address, a MAC address of the publicly-enabled RAT associated with the first STA, and a MAC address associated with the second STA.

18. The multi-RAT capable AP according to claim 17, wherein the received direct link discovery request message further includes a MAC address of the RAT, and the MAC address of the RAT is the first A STA desires to use to make a request for the second STA.

19. The multi-RAT capable AP according to claim 12, wherein the received direct link discovery request message further includes a BSS identification code of all RATs associated with the AP and the first STA. The MAC address of all associated RATs.

20. A multi-RAT capable AP as described in claim 12, wherein:

The receiver is further configured to:

Receiving, by the first common enabling RAT, a direct link setup request message from the first STA;

Receiving, by the second common-enabled RAT, a direct link setup response message from the second STA;

The transmitter is configured to:

Forwarding the direct link setup request message to the second STA using the second common enable RAT;

The direct link setup response message is forwarded to the first STA using the first common enable RAT.

21. A multi-RAT capable AP as described in claim 20, wherein:

The receiver is further configured to receive a direct link setup confirmation message from the first STA using the first common enable RAT;

The transmitter is further configured to forward the direct link setup confirmation message to the second STA using the second common enable RAT.

22. A multi-RAT capable AP as described in claim 12, wherein:

The processor is further configured to:

Dynamically updating the first common enable RAT;

The second common enable RAT is dynamically updated.

23. A method for determining a direct link capability and a RAT capability of a second STA by a multi-radio access technology (RAT) capable station (STA), the method comprising:

Selecting a first common enabling RAT associated with a multi-RAT capable access point (AP);

Transmitting, by the first publicly-enabled RAT associated with the multi-RAT capable AP, a direct link discovery request message to the AP to be used for a second STA;

At least one direct link discovery response message from the second RAT is received using at least one common enabled RAT associated with the second STA.

24. The method of claim 23, wherein the multi-RAT capable AP is common to the first STA and the second STA.

25. The method of claim 23, wherein the first STA and the second STA are in the same basic service set (BSS).

The method of claim 23, wherein the direct link discovery request message includes a media access control (MAC) address of the publicly-enabled RAT associated with the AP, and the first A MAC address of the publicly-enabled RAT associated with the STA, and a MAC address associated with the second STA.

The method of claim 26, wherein the direct link discovery request message further includes a MAC address of the RAT, the MAC address of the RAT is expected to be used by the first STA to make a pair The request of the second STA.

28. The method of claim 27, wherein the direct link discovery request message further comprises a MAC address of all RATs associated with the first STA.

29. The method of claim 23, further comprising:

The RAT capability information of the second STA is stored in a database.

30. The method of claim 23, further comprising:

Transmitting, by the first publicly-enabled RAT associated with the multi-RAT capable AP, a direct link setup request message to the multi-RAT capable AP;

Receiving, by the first publicly-enabled RAT associated with the multi-RAT capable AP, a direct link setup response message from the multi-RAT capable AP;

The first publicly-enabled RAT associated with the multi-RAT capable AP is used to send a direct link setup acknowledgment to the multi-RAT capable AP.
TW103109015A 2013-03-14 2014-03-13 Method and apparatus to enable direct link setup in opportunistic multi-RAT aggregation systems TW201442548A (en)

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KR20170022826A (en) * 2015-08-21 2017-03-02 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for performing hybrid automatic repeat request in a wireless communication system
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