RU2588573C2 - Active agent-containing fibrous structure with multiple areas with different densities - Google Patents

Active agent-containing fibrous structure with multiple areas with different densities Download PDF

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Publication number
RU2588573C2
RU2588573C2 RU2014126639/04A RU2014126639A RU2588573C2 RU 2588573 C2 RU2588573 C2 RU 2588573C2 RU 2014126639/04 A RU2014126639/04 A RU 2014126639/04A RU 2014126639 A RU2014126639 A RU 2014126639A RU 2588573 C2 RU2588573 C2 RU 2588573C2
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Russia
Prior art keywords
fibrous structure
characterized
region
example
yarn
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RU2014126639/04A
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Russian (ru)
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RU2014126639A (en
Inventor
Пол Томас ВЕЙСМАН
Андреас Йозеф ДРЕХЕР
Марк Роберт СИВИК
Алыссандреа Хоуп ХАМАД-ЕБРАХИМПОУР
Грегори Чарльз ГОРДОН
Пол Деннис ТРОХАН
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Дзе Проктер Энд Гэмбл Компани
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Priority to US201261583011P priority Critical
Priority to US61/583,011 priority
Application filed by Дзе Проктер Энд Гэмбл Компани filed Critical Дзе Проктер Энд Гэмбл Компани
Priority to PCT/US2013/020006 priority patent/WO2013103626A1/en
Publication of RU2014126639A publication Critical patent/RU2014126639A/en
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Publication of RU2588573C2 publication Critical patent/RU2588573C2/en

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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/70Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres characterised by the method of forming fleeces or layers, e.g. reorientation of fibres
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/16Cloths; Pads; Sponges
    • A47L13/17Cloths; Pads; Sponges containing cleaning agents
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/041Compositions releasably affixed on a substrate or incorporated into a dispensing means
    • C11D17/042Water soluble or water disintegrable containers or substrates containing cleaning compositions or additives for cleaning compositions
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/041Compositions releasably affixed on a substrate or incorporated into a dispensing means
    • C11D17/042Water soluble or water disintegrable containers or substrates containing cleaning compositions or additives for cleaning compositions
    • C11D17/044Solid compositions
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/041Compositions releasably affixed on a substrate or incorporated into a dispensing means
    • C11D17/047Arrangements specially adapted for dry cleaning or laundry dryer related applications
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01FCHEMICAL FEATURES IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF CARBON FILAMENTS
    • D01F1/00General methods for the manufacture of artificial filaments or the like
    • D01F1/02Addition of substances to the spinning solution or to the melt
    • D01F1/10Other agents for modifying properties
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/70Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres characterised by the method of forming fleeces or layers, e.g. reorientation of fibres
    • D04H1/72Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres characterised by the method of forming fleeces or layers, e.g. reorientation of fibres the fibres being randomly arranged
    • D04H1/736Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres characterised by the method of forming fleeces or layers, e.g. reorientation of fibres the fibres being randomly arranged characterised by the apparatus for arranging fibres
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H13/00Other non-woven fabrics
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24479Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness
    • Y10T428/24595Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.] including variation in thickness and varying density
    • Y10T428/24603Fiber containing component

Abstract

FIELD: textile.
SUBSTANCE: invention discloses a fibrous structure (pos. 20) intended for treatment of article made of fabric, which includes threads, where threads comprise one or more threads forming materials, wherein at least one of said one or more forming threads materials contains a hydroxyl polymer, and one or more active fabric care agents, released from threads in conditions of expected application, fibrous structure additionally contains: (a) a continuous mesh area (pos. 22), mesh area is characterised by first mean density; and (b) a plurality of separate zones (pos. 24), characterised by second mean density, where separate zones are distributed over mesh area, and wherein said first mean density and second mean density are different. Also disclosed is a version of fibrous structure, method of producing fibrous structure and method of treating article made of fabric, using fibrous structure.
EFFECT: technical result is obtaining a fibrous structure, which is flexible, non susceptible to breaking with easy handling, with sufficient release of detergent composition in use.
31 cl, 18 dwg, 10 tbl, 8 ex

Description

FIELD OF TECHNOLOGY

[0001] The present disclosure generally relates to fibrous structures containing one or more active agents and characterized by different regions, as well as methods for their manufacture, and in particular, the invention relates to fibrous structures with regions characterized by different densities.

BACKGROUND

[0002] Fibrous structures are known in the art. For example, a polyester non-woven material known from the prior art, impregnated and / or coated with a detergent composition, is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 related to the prior art. As shown in FIG. 1 and 2, the known non-woven backing 10 is made of insoluble fibers 12, and the non-woven backing 10 is coated and / or impregnated with an additive 14, such as an active agent. An example of such a nonwoven fabric is commercially available under the trademark "Purex ® Complete 3-in-1 Laundry Sheets" from The Dial Corporation.

[0003] In addition, a non-fibrous industrial product made from an injection molded detergent composition is also known in the art and commercially available under the trademark "Dizolve ® Laundry Sheets" from Dizolve Group Corporation.

[0004] However, such known non-woven materials and / or products thereof have drawbacks that make them problematic for consumers. For example, known nonwovens and / or articles thereof are relatively rigid and / or inflexible, and thus prone to fracture when handled easily. In addition, non-woven materials and / or products from them usually emit such a small amount of detergent composition and / or detergent active agents that the cleaning properties are lower than those required by consumers. Another disadvantage associated with them is that nonwoven materials and / or products thereof can leave residues of nonwoven material and / or products from them after the washing process; for example, the polyester non-woven base does not dissolve during the washing process. Another disadvantage associated with such known non-woven materials is their tendency to adhere to the surface of the washing machine, or to the window of the washing machine during the washing cycle, and thus, these non-woven materials are impractical from the point of view of the implementation of their intended use, for example, when washing clothes. Most critical is the fact that in some cases known non-woven materials can block the drain mechanism of the washing machine. An additional disadvantage is the removal of insoluble bearing bases of industrial products, for example, in the separation of polyester non-woven bases.

[0005] Accordingly, the present invention provides fibrous structures containing one or more active agents and filaments, the fibrous structures containing two or more regions characterized by different intensive properties to increase strength, while at the same time providing a sufficient level of solubility and degradation during use.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] According to one embodiment, the fibrous structure comprises filaments containing one or more filament-forming materials and one or more active agents released from the filaments under the conditions of the intended use. The fibrous structure also contains a continuous mesh region and many separate zones. A continuous mesh region is characterized by a first average density, and many separate zones are characterized by a second average density. Separate zones are distributed over the mesh region, wherein the first average density and the second average density are different.

[0007] According to another embodiment, the fibrous structure comprises yarns containing one or more yarn-forming materials and one or more active agents released from the yarns under the conditions of the intended use. The fibrous structure further comprises at least a first region and a second region. Each of the first and second areas is characterized by at least one common intense property. At least one common intensive property of the first region is quantitatively different from at least one common intensive property of the second region.

[0008] In accordance with another embodiment, a method of manufacturing a fibrous structure. The specified method includes the step of laying multiple threads on a three-dimensional molding element containing an ordered repeating relief, while providing the formation of a fibrous structure containing one or more forming filament materials and one or more active agents released from the filaments under the conditions of the intended use. The fibrous structure further comprises at least a first region and a second region. Each of the first and second areas is characterized by at least one common intense property. At least one common intensive property of the first region is quantitatively different from at least one common intensive property of the second region.

[0009] Despite the fact that the present description concludes the claims, specifically indicating and clearly stating the subject of the invention, which is considered as forming the present invention, it can be assumed that the invention will be more clear from the following description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0010] FIG. 1 is a known non-woven backing.

[0011] FIG. 2 is another known non-woven backing.

[0012] FIG. 3 is a schematic top view of a portion of a fibrous structure.

[0013] FIG. 4 is a schematic view of a portion of the fibrous structure shown in FIG. 3, in cross section along line 4-4.

[0014] FIG. 5 is a schematic top view of one embodiment of a fibrous structure.

[0015] FIG. 6 is a schematic cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

[0016] FIG. 7 is a schematic illustration of a device used to form fibrous structures.

[0017] FIG. 8 is a schematic illustration of a head used in the device shown in FIG. 7.

[0018] FIG. 9 is an image of a typical molding element.

[0019] FIG. 10 is an illustration of typical molding elements and finished fibrous structures.

[0020] FIG. 11A is a schematic view of equipment for measuring the solubility of a fibrous structure.

[0021] FIG. 11B is a schematic plan view of FIG. 11A.

[0022] FIG. 12 is a schematic view of equipment for measuring the solubility of a fibrous structure.

[0023] FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view of a mesh region and a plurality of individual zones of a fibrous structure, shown using an SEM micrograph.

[0024] FIG. 14 is a processed image of the surface relief of the mesh region and the plurality of individual zones of the fibrous structure shown using an SEM micrograph.

[0025] FIG. 15 is a view of a series of contemplated rectilinear regions formed on a mesh region and individual regions shown in FIG. fourteen.

[0026] FIG. 16 is a graph of a height profile along the considered rectilinear region, built on the basis of the image of the surface topography, to display several values of the height difference.

[0027] FIG. 17 is a graph of the height profile along the considered rectilinear region, based on the image of the surface topography, to display several values of the width of the transition region.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

I. Definitions

[0028] Used in the present description, the following terms should be understood in the meanings defined below:

[0029] The term "thread" or "fiber" or "fiber element" as used in the present description means an elongated particle characterized by a length much greater than its diameter, i.e. with a ratio of length to diameter of at least about 10. The fibrous element may be a thread or fiber. In one example, the fibrous element is a separate fibrous element, and not a bundle containing many fibrous elements. The fibrous elements can be formed from yarn spinning compositions, also called fiber element spinning compositions, by suitable fiber spinning operations such as blow molding technology and / or spunbond technology. Fibrous elements can be single-component and / or multi-component. For example, fibrous elements may contain bicomponent fibers and / or filaments. Bicomponent fibers and / or threads can be presented in any form, for example, with a side-by-side arrangement, in the form of a core with a sheath, in the form of inclusions, etc.

[0030] The term “yarn composition” as used herein means a composition suitable for the manufacture of yarns, for example, by blow molding and / or spunbond technology. Composition for forming threads contains one or more forming a thread of materials, characterized by properties that ensure their suitability for forming in the form of threads. In one example, the yarn forming material comprises a polymer. In addition to one or more yarn forming materials, the yarn forming composition may contain one or more additives, for example, one or more active agents. In addition, the composition for forming the filaments may contain one or more polar solvents, such as water, in which one or more, for example, all of the filament forming materials and / or one or more, for example, all of, are dissolved and / or dispersed active agents.

[0031] The term “yarn forming material” as used herein means a material, such as a polymer or monomers, suitable for forming a polymer having properties suitable for making a yarn. In one example, the yarn forming material comprises one or more substituted polymers such as anionic, cationic, zwitterionic, and / or nonionic polymers. In another example, the polymer may comprise a hydroxyl polymer, such as polyvinyl alcohol ("PVOH") and / or a polysaccharide, such as starch and / or a starch derivative, such as xylated starch and / or acid diluted starch. In another example, the polymer may contain polyethylenes and / or terephthalates. In yet another example, the yarn forming material is a polar solvent soluble material.

[0032] The term “additive” as used herein means any material present in a thread that is not a thread forming material. In one example, the additive contains an active agent. In another example, the additive contains an excipient. In another example, the additive contains a filler. In one example, the additive contains any material present in the thread, the absence of which in the thread will not entail a deterioration in the structure of the thread, in other words, the absence of this material will not entail the loss of solid state by the thread. In another example, an additive, for example an active agent, contains non-polymeric material.

[0033] The term “intended use conditions” as used herein means the temperature, physical, chemical, and / or mechanical conditions that the thread is exposed to when it is used in one or more of the intended applications. For example, if the thread and / or nonwoven fabric containing the thread is intended to be washed in a washing machine, the conditions of intended use will include the temperature, physical, chemical, and / or mechanical conditions present in the washing machine, including any water used in the machine wash . In another example, if the thread and / or non-woven material containing the thread is intended to be used by a person as a shampoo for hair care, the conditions of intended use will include the temperature, physical, chemical and / or mechanical conditions present when applying the shampoo to a person’s hair . Similarly, if the thread and / or non-woven material containing the thread is intended to be used in a dishwashing process manually or in a dishwasher, the conditions of intended use will include the temperature, physical, chemical and / or mechanical conditions present in the dishwashing water and / or in the dishwasher while washing dishes.

[0034] The term "active agent", as used herein, means an additive that provides the desired effect in the environment surrounding the thread and / or non-woven material containing the specified thread, for example, when the thread is subjected to the conditions for the intended use of the thread and / or non-woven material, containing thread. In one example, the active agent contains an additive designed to treat a surface, such as a hard surface (e.g. kitchen worktops, bathtubs, toilets, toilet bowls, sinks, floors, walls, teeth, cars, windows, mirrors, dishes) and / or soft surfaces (e.g., fabric, hair, leather, carpets, crops, plants). In another example, the active agent contains a chemical reaction additive (e.g., foaming, carbonization, dyeing, heating, cooling, soaping, disinfection and / or purification, and / or chlorination, e.g., water purification and / or water disinfection, and / or chlorination of water). In another example, the active agent contains an additive that provides environmental processing (for example, deodorization, purification, aromatization of air). In one example, the active agent is formed in place, for example, during the formation of a yarn containing the active agent, for example, the yarn may contain a water-soluble polymer (e.g., starch) and a surfactant (e.g., an anionic surfactant), which can form a polymer complex or coacervate, which functions as an active agent used to treat tissue surfaces.

[0035] The term “active tissue care agent” as used herein means an active agent which, when applied to a tissue, provides some beneficial effect and / or tissue improvement. Non-limiting examples of beneficial effects on the fabric and / or improvements of the fabric include cleaning (for example, by means of surfactants), removing contaminants, reducing the likelihood of contamination, removing wrinkles, restoring color, adjusting the static charge, resisting wrinkling, creasing resistance, reducing wear, abrasion resistance, removal of spools, resistance to the occurrence of spools, removal of contaminants, resistance to the occurrence of contaminants (including repellent vanie impurities), shape retention, reducing shrinkage, softening, flavoring, antibacterial properties, antiviral properties, resistance to absorb foreign odors, and removal of odors.

[0036] The term “dishwashing active agent” as used herein means an active agent which, when exposed to dishes, glassware, pots, pans, cutlery and / or baking sheets, provides a beneficial effect and / or improvement in relation to dishes, glass products, plastic products, pots, pans and / or baking sheets. A non-limiting example of beneficial effects and / or enhancements for cookware, glassware, plastic products, pots, pans and / or baking trays, includes removing food and / or dirt, cleaning (e.g. with surfactants), removing dirt, reducing the likelihood of contamination, the removal of fat, the removal of stains from dried drops of water and / or the prevention of spots from dried drops of water, the care of glass and metal products, disinfection, giving Shine and polish.

[0037] The term “hard surface active agent” as used herein means an active agent which, when applied to floors, countertops, sinks, windows, mirrors, in showers, bathtubs and / or toilets, provides a beneficial effect and / or improvement for floors, countertops, sinks, windows, mirrors, showers, bathtubs and / or toilets. Non-limiting examples of beneficial effects and / or enhancements for floors, countertops, sinks, windows, mirrors, showers, bathtubs and / or toilets include the removal of food and / or dirt, cleaning (e.g. by means of surfactants), the removal of dirt, reducing the likelihood of contamination, removing grease, removing stains from dried up water droplets and / or preventing the appearance of stains from dried up water droplets, descaling, disinfecting, glossing and polishing.

[0038] The term "weight ratio", as used herein, means the ratio of the dry weight of the material forming the thread and / or the dry weight of the material forming the detergent (g or%) to the dry weight of the thread to the weight of the additive, such as an active agent (agents) (g or%) on the dry weight of the thread.

[0039] The term "hydroxyl polymer", as used herein, includes any hydroxyl-containing polymer that may be included in a thread, for example, as a thread-forming material. In one example, the hydroxyl polymer contains more than 10% and / or more than 20%, and / or more than 25% by weight of the hydroxyl moieties.

[0040] The term “biodegradable”, as used herein, means, with reference to a material, such as a yarn as a whole and / or a polymer contained in a yarn, such as a yarn-forming material, that the yarn and / or polymer is capable of undergoing and / or are physically, chemically, thermally and / or biodegradable in municipal solid waste treatment facilities such that at least 5% and / or at least 7% and / or at least 10% of the original filament and / or polymer turned into carbon dioxide After 30 days, as measured by the source "OECD (1992) Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals 301B; Ready Biodegradability - Convolution (Modified Sturm Test) Test", incorporated herein by reference.

[0041] The term “biodegradable” as used herein means, with respect to a material, such as a yarn as a whole and / or a polymer contained in a yarn, such as a yarn-forming material, that the yarn and / or polymer are not subject to physical, chemical , thermal and / or biodegradation in municipal solid waste processing facilities, such that at least 5% of the initial filament and / or polymer is converted to carbon dioxide after 30 days, as measured by the OECD (1992) Guide line for the Testing of Chemicals 301B; Ready Biodegradability - CO 2 Evolution (Modified Sturm Test) Test ", incorporated herein by reference.

[0042] The term “non-thermoplastic” as used herein means, with respect to a material, such as a yarn as a whole and / or a polymer contained in a yarn, such as a yarn-forming material, that the yarn and / or polymer does not have a melting point and / or softening temperature, allowing the material to flow under the influence of pressure in the absence of a plasticizer, such as water, glycerin, sorbitol, urea, etc.

[0043] The term "non-thermoplastic biodegradable yarn" as used herein means a yarn characterized by biodegradable and non-thermoplastic properties, as described above.

[0044] The term "non-thermoplastic biodegradable thread", as used herein, means a thread characterized by biodegradable and non-thermoplastic properties, as described above.

[0045] The term "thermoplastic", as used herein, means, with respect to a material, such as a yarn as a whole and / or a polymer contained in a yarn, such as a yarn forming material, that the yarn and / or polymer have a melting point and / or a softening point at a certain temperature, allowing the material to flow under the influence of pressure in the absence of plasticizer.

[0046] The term "thermoplastic biodegradable thread", as used herein, means a thread characterized by biodegradable and thermoplastic properties, as described above.

[0047] The term "thermoplastic biodegradable thread", as used in the present description, means a thread characterized by biodegradable and thermoplastic properties, as described above.

[0048] The term "polar solvent soluble material" as used herein means a material that can be mixed with a polar solvent. In one example, a polar solvent soluble material is miscible with alcohol and / or water. In other words, a material soluble in a polar solvent is a material capable of forming a stable homogeneous solution (i.e., such a homogeneous solution that does not separate into separate phases after more than 5 minutes after its formation) with a polar solvent such as alcohol and / or water under ambient conditions.

[0049] The term "alcohol-soluble material" as used in the present description means a material that can be mixed with alcohol. In other words, a material capable of forming a stable homogeneous solution (i.e., a homogeneous solution that does not separate into separate phases after more than 5 minutes after its formation) with alcohol under ambient conditions.

[0050] The term "water soluble material" as used in the present description means a material that can be mixed with water. In other words, a material capable of forming a stable homogeneous solution (i.e., such a homogeneous solution that does not separate after more than 5 minutes after its formation) with water under ambient conditions.

[0051] The term "non-polar solvent soluble material", as used herein, means a material that can be mixed with a non-polar solvent. In other words, a soluble in a non-polar solvent material is a material capable of forming a stable homogeneous solution (i.e., such a homogeneous solution that does not separate into separate phases after more than 5 minutes after its formation) with a non-polar solvent.

[0052] The term "environmental conditions" as used herein means a temperature of 73 ° F ± 4 ° F (approximately 23 ° C ± 2.2 ° C) and a relative humidity of 50% ± 10%.

[0053] The term “weight average molecular weight” as used herein means weight average molecular weight as determined by gel permeation chromatography according to the protocol found in the following source: “Colloids and Surfaces A. Physico Chemical & Engineering Aspects, Vol. 162, 2000, pg. 107-121. "

[0054] The term "length" as used herein with reference to a thread means a length along the longest axis of the thread from one end to the other end. If the thread contains bends, curls or tortuous sections, then the length is the length along the entire path of the thread.

[0055] The "diameter" used in the present description with reference to the yarn is measured in accordance with the method for determining the diameter described in the present description. In one example, the thread may have a diameter of less than 100 microns, and / or less than 75 microns, and / or less than 50 microns, and / or less than 25 microns, and / or less than 20 microns, and / or less than 15 microns, and / or less 10 μm and / or less than 6 μm and / or more than 1 μm and / or more than 3 μm.

[0056] The term “trigger condition”, as used herein, in one example means any action or event that acts as a stimulus and initiates or stimulates changes in the thread, for example, the loss or change in the thread of its physical structure and / or release of the additive such as an active agent. In another example, a trigger condition may be present in an environment, such as water, when a filament and / or nonwoven material and / or film are introduced into the water. In other words, no changes occur in the water, except that the thread and / or non-woven material and / or film are introduced into the water.

[0057] The term "morphological changes", as used herein, with respect to a change in the morphology of a thread, means a change in the physical structure of the thread. Non-limiting examples of morphological changes in the yarn include: dissolution, melting, swelling, shrinkage, separation into parts, tearing, elongation, shortening, and combinations thereof. The strands may completely or substantially lose their physical structure, or they may undergo a change in morphology, or they may retain or substantially retain their physical structure under the conditions of the intended use.

[0058] The term “general level” as used herein, for example, with reference to the general level of one or more active agents present in a thread and / or detergent, means the sum of the weights or weight percent of all materials in question, for example, active agents. In other words, the thread and / or detergent may contain 25% by weight of the anionic surfactant per dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent, 15% by weight of a nonionic surfactant per dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight detergent, 10% by weight of a chelating agent, and 5% flavor, while the total level of active agents present in the thread is more than 50%, for example, 55% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent.

[0059] The term “detergent” as used herein means a solid form, for example a rectangular body, sometimes referred to as a sheet, containing one or more active agents, for example, an active tissue care agent, an active agent for a dishwasher, an active agent for hard surfaces and mixtures thereof. In one example, the detergent may contain one or more surfactants, one or more enzymes, one or more flavorings, and / or one or more antifoam agents. In another example, the detergent may contain a detergent component and / or a chelating agent. In another example, the detergent may contain a whitening agent.

[0060] The term "material" as used herein means a collection of formed fibers and / or threads, such as a fibrous structure, and / or a detergent formed from fibers and / or threads, such as continuous threads of any nature and origin, related to each other. In one example, the material is a rectangular body containing fibers and / or filaments formed during molding rather than molding.

[0061] The term "nonwoven fabric" as used herein, and as defined generally by the European Association of Nonwoven Fabrics and Disposable Products (EDANA), means a sheet of fibers and / or threads, such as continuous filaments of any nature and origin, formed into the material by any means and which can be joined together by any means, with the exception of textile or knitting. Felts made by wet felting are not non-woven materials. In one example, "nonwoven fabric" means an ordered arrangement of threads within the structure, in order to perform some function. In one example, a nonwoven fabric is a structure comprising a plurality of two or more and / or three or more threads that are mutually woven or otherwise connected to each other to form a nonwoven fabric. In one example, in addition to yarns, the nonwoven material may contain one or more solid additives, such as particles and / or fibers.

[0062] The term "particles", as used herein, means granular substances and / or powders. In one example, filaments and / or fibers can be converted to powders.

[0063] The term "equivalent diameter" is used in the present description to determine the cross-sectional area and surface area of an individual starch filament, without regard to the cross-sectional shape. Equivalent diameter is a parameter that satisfies the equation S = ¼πD 2 , where S is the cross-sectional area of the thread (excluding its geometric shape), π = 3.14159, and D is the equivalent diameter. For example, a cross-section having a rectangular shape formed by two mutually opposite sides "A" and two mutually opposite sides "B" can be expressed as: S = A × B. At the same time, this cross-sectional area can be expressed as the area of a circle having an equivalent diameter D. Then the equivalent diameter D can be calculated by the formula: S = ¼πD 2 , where S is the known area of the rectangle. (Of course, the equivalent diameter of a circle is equal to the actual diameter of the circle.) The equivalent radius is ½ of the equivalent diameter.

[0064] The term "pseudo-thermoplastic" as applied to "materials" or "compositions" is intended to mean materials and compositions that, when exposed to elevated temperatures, dissolving in an appropriate solvent, or otherwise can be softened to such an extent that they can be given in a fluid state in which they can be shaped as necessary, in particular, processed to form starch filaments suitable for forming a fibrous structure. Pseudo-thermoplastic materials can be molded under the combined action of heat and pressure. Pseudo-thermoplastic materials differ from thermoplastic materials in that the softening or liquefaction of pseudo-thermoplastics is caused by the present softeners and solvents, without which it would be impossible to bring them by any temperature or pressure into the soft or fluid state necessary for molding, since pseudo-thermoplastics as such are not “melted”. The effect of moisture content on the glass transition temperature and melting point of starch can be measured by differential scanning calorimetry described by Zeleznak and Hoseny in the source: "Cereal Chemistry", Vol. 64, No. 2, pp. 121-124, 1987. A pseudo-thermoplastic melt is a pseudo-thermoplastic material in a fluid state.

[0065] The term "microgeometry" and its derivatives refer to relatively small (ie, "microscopic") details of the fibrous structure, such as, for example, the surface texture regardless of the general configuration of the structure as opposed to its general (ie, " macroscopic ") geometry. Terms containing “macroscopic” or “macroscopically” refer to the general geometry of a structure or part thereof when considered in a two-dimensional configuration, for example, in the X-Y plane. For example, at the macroscopic level, the fibrous structure, when it is located on a flat surface, is a relatively thin and flat sheet. However, at the microscopic level, the structure may contain many of the first regions forming the first plane having a first height, and many bulges or "pads" distributed over the frame region and extending outward from it to form a second height.

[0066] "Intensive properties" are properties that do not have a value that depends on the totality of values within the plane of the fibrous structure. A common intensive property is an intensive property that more than one area possesses. Such intense properties of the fibrous structure include, among others: density, bulk, height and opacity. For example, if density is a common intense property of two different regions, then the density in one region may differ from the density in another. Regions (such as, for example, the first region and the second region) are recognizable zones, distinguished from one another by individual intense properties.

[0067] "Glass transition temperature" T g , is the temperature at which a material changes from a viscous or elastic state to a solid or relatively brittle state.

[0068] A “longitudinal direction” (or MD) is a direction parallel to the process route of a fabricated fibrous structure through production equipment. A “transverse direction" (or CD) is a direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction and parallel to the general plane of the fibrous structure being manufactured.

[0069] “X”, “Y” and “Z” denote a conventional Cartesian coordinate system in which the mutually perpendicular coordinates “X” and “Y” define the X-Y reference plane, and “Z” defines the perpendicular to the X-Y plane . "Z-direction" means any direction perpendicular to the X-Y plane. Similarly, the term “Z-dimension” means a dimension, distance, or parameter measured parallel to the Z-direction. When an element, such as a molding element, bends or otherwise ceases to be flat, the X-Y plane follows the configuration of the element.

[0070] A “substantially continuous” region is a section within which any two points can be connected by a continuous line running completely within that section along its entire length. Namely, in essence, a continuous region has substantial “continuity” in all directions parallel to the first plane, and ends only at the edges of this region. The term "in essence" in combination with the term "solid" is intended to indicate that although absolute continuity is preferred, slight deviations from absolute continuity may be allowed, as long as these deviations do not have a noticeable effect on both the intended and intended characteristics of the fibrous structure (or molding element).

[0071] A “substantially semi-continuous” region is a region that has “continuity” in all directions parallel to the first plane except at least one, and in which it is impossible to connect any two points by a continuous line running completely within that region on all along. A half-solid frame can have continuity in only one direction parallel to the first plane. By analogy with the solid region described above, although absolute continuity is preferred in all but at least one direction, slight deviations from such continuity may be allowed until these deviations have a noticeable effect on the characteristics of the fibrous structure.

[0072] "Intermittent" areas are separate or separated from each other areas that are intermittent in all directions parallel to the first plane.

[0073] "Flexibility" is the ability of a material or structure to not deform without deformation under a given load, regardless of the ability or inability of the material or structure to return to its shape before deformation.

[0074] A “forming element” is a structural element that can be used as a support for threads that can be laid on it during the manufacturing process of the fibrous structure, and as a molding device for forming (or “molding”) the desired microscopic geometry fibrous structure. The molding element can be any element that has the ability to give a three-dimensional relief to the structure made on it, and contains, inter alia, a fixed plate, belt, cylinder / roller, woven fabric and strip.

[0075] "Melt forming" is a process in which a thermoplastic or pseudoplastic material is converted into a fibrous material by a pulling force. Melt forming may include mechanical drawing, blow molding, spunbond technology, and electrospinning.

[0076] "Mechanical drawing" is a method of applying force to a fibrous filament by bringing it into contact with a moving surface, such as a roller, to apply force to the melt, and thereby manufacture the fibers.

[0077] "Blow molding" is a method of manufacturing fibrous non-woven materials or products directly from polymers or resins using high-speed air flow or other suitable force to draw threads. With the Meltblown technology, the pulling force is applied in the form of a high-speed air stream when the material leaves the head or die.

[0078] “Spunbond technology” is a method in which a fiber is allowed to fall a predetermined distance under the influence of flow forces and gravity and then subjected to the force exerted by a high speed air stream or other appropriate source.

[0079] "Electroforming" is a method in which an electric potential is used as a force for drawing fibers.

[0080] "Dry spinning", also commonly known as "spin-molding", includes removing the solvent by drying to stabilize the spinning of the fiber. The material is dissolved in an appropriate solvent and stretched by mechanical stretching, blow molding, spunbond technology and / or electrospinning. As the solvent evaporates, the fiber becomes stable.

[0081] "Wet forming" includes dissolving a material in an appropriate solvent and spinning small fibers by mechanical drawing, blow molding, spunbond technology and / or electrospinning. After forming the fiber, it is introduced into a coagulation system, usually containing a bath filled with an appropriate solution that cures the target material, whereby stable fibers are produced.

[0082] "Melting point" means the temperature or temperature range at which or above which the starch composition melts or softens sufficiently to be capable of being processed into starch filaments. It should be understood that some starch compositions are pseudo-thermoplastic compositions, and as such may not manifest themselves as truly “melting” compositions.

[0083] “Processing temperature” means the temperature of a starch composition at which starch filaments can be formed, for example, by drawing.

[0084] The term "bulk" as used herein is the mass per unit area of a sample indicated in g / m 2 and measured in accordance with the method for measuring the bulk described in the present description.

[0085] The term "fibrous structure" as used in the present description, means a structure containing one or more fibrous filaments and / or fibers. In one example, a “fibrous structure” means an ordered arrangement of filaments and / or fibers within a structure in order to perform some function. Non-limiting examples of fibrous structures may include detergents, fabrics (including woven, knitted, and non-woven) and absorbent bags (for example, for diapers or feminine hygiene products). The fibrous structures of the present invention may be homogeneous or layered. If the fibrous structures are layered, they may contain at least two and / or at least three, and / or at least four, and / or at least five layers, for example, one or more layers of the fibrous element, one or more layers of particles, and / or one or more mixed layers containing a fibrous element and particles.

[0086] Used in the present description of the singular, for example, "anionic surfactant" or "fiber", it should be understood as implying "one or more" of the claimed or described materials.

[0087] All percentages and ratios are calculated by weight, unless otherwise indicated. All percentages and ratios are calculated based on the entire composition, unless otherwise indicated.

[0088] Unless otherwise specified, the levels of all components or compositions are indicated relative to the level of the active agent of these components or compositions and are given without impurities, for example, residual solvents or by-products that may be present in commercially available sources.

II. Fiber Structures

[0089] As shown in FIG. 3, 4, the fibrous structure 20 can be formed from filaments and have at least a first region (e.g., mesh region 22) and a second region (e.g., separate zones 24). Each of the first and second regions is characterized by at least one common intense property, such as, for example, bulk or average density. The general intensive property of the first region may be quantitatively different from the general intensive property of the second region. For example, the average density of the first region may be higher than the average density of the second region. In FIG. 3 is a plan view of a portion of the fibrous structure 20 showing a mesh region 22 delimiting hexagons, although it should be understood that other predetermined patterns may be used.

[0090] FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the fibrous structure 20 taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3. As can be seen from the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the mesh region 22 is essentially monoplanar. In one example, the mesh region is a macroscopically monoplanar, embossed, continuous mesh region. The second region of the fibrous structure 20 may comprise a plurality of individual zones 24 distributed throughout the mesh region 22, with virtually each zone being surrounded by a mesh region 22. The shape of the individual zones 24 may be determined by the mesh region 22. As shown in FIG. 4, separate zones 24, (protrude relative to the plane formed by the mesh region 22, in the direction of an imaginary observer looking in the direction indicated by arrow T. When viewed by an imaginary observer looking in the direction indicated by arrow B in Fig. 4, the second region contains curved cavities that appear to be dimples or depressions.

[0091] As shown in another embodiment of FIG. 5, 6, the first and second regions 122 and 124 of the fibrous structure 120 may also differ in terms of their respective microgeometry. In FIG. 5, 6, for example, the first region 122 contains essentially a continuous mesh region forming a first plane at a first height when the fibrous structure 120 is located on a flat surface; wherein the second region 124 may comprise a plurality of distinct zones distributed throughout an essentially continuous mesh region. These individual zones in some embodiments may comprise separate elevations, or “pads”, extending outward from the mesh region to form a second height greater than the first height relative to the first plane. It should be understood that the pads can form, in essence, a continuous relief, as well as, in essence, a semi-continuous relief.

[0092] In one embodiment, in essence, the continuous mesh region can be characterized by a relatively high density, wherein the pads are characterized by a relatively low density. In yet another embodiment, in essence, the continuous mesh region can be characterized by a relatively low density, while the pads can be characterized by a relatively high density. In certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 3000 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 1,500 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 1000 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 700 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 500 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 300 g / m 2 or less; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may have a bulk of approximately 200 g / m 2 or less; and in certain embodiments, the fibrous structure may be characterized by a bulk of approximately 150 g / m 2 or less, as measured in accordance with the bulk measurement method disclosed herein.

[0093] In other embodiments, the second region may comprise a semi-continuous mesh region. The second region may comprise separate portions similar to those shown in FIG. 5, 6, and half-solid portions extended in at least one direction, as seen in the X-Y plane (i.e., in the plane formed by the first region 122 of the fibrous structure 120 located on a flat surface).

[0093] In the embodiments shown in FIG. 5 and 6, the fibrous structure 120 comprises a third region 130, characterized by at least one intense property that is common with the intensive properties of the first region 122 and the second region 124 and quantitatively different from them. For example, the first region 122 may have a general intensive property characterized by a first value, the second region 124 may have a general intensive property characterized by a second value, and the third region 130 may have a general intensive property characterized by a third value, the first value may differ from the second value , and the third value may differ from the second value and the first value. In one embodiment, such a third region may comprise a transition region 135 (see FIG. 4) located between the first region 122 and the second region 124. The transition region 135 is a portion or transition region between the mesh region and the individual zones.

[0094] If the fibrous structure 120, containing at least three different regions 122, 124, 130, as described herein, is located on a horizontal reference plane (ie, the XY plane), the first region 122 forms a plane characterized by the first height, and the second region 124 extends from it to form a second height. An embodiment is contemplated in which the third region 130 has a third height, wherein at least one of the first, second, and third heights is different from at least one of the other heights. For example, a third height may be located between the first and second heights.

[0095] Suitable fibrous structures having a mesh region and a plurality of distinct zones may have predetermined elevations. For example, in certain embodiments, one region from among the mesh region or individual zones may have a height of from about 50 microns to about 5000 microns; in certain embodiments, one region from among the mesh region or individual zones may have a height of from about 100 microns to about 2000 microns; and in certain embodiments, one region from among the mesh region or individual zones may have a height of from about 150 microns to about 1500 microns.

[0096] The following table, without limitation, shows some possible combinations of embodiments of the fibrous structure 120 containing at least three regions characterized by different (ie, high, medium, or low) intense properties. All these embodiments are included in the scope of the present disclosure.

Figure 00000001

Figure 00000002

[0097] Suitable fibrous structures described herein may have mesh regions and separate zones characterized by different (ie, not the same) average densities. The average density for both the mesh region and individual zones can be from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 , in certain embodiments, from about 0.10 g / cm 3 to about 0 , 50 g / cm 3 and in certain embodiments, from about 0.15 g / cm 3 to about 0.40 g / cm 3 . In other embodiments, the average density of the mesh region may be from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.15 g / cm 3 , and the average density of the individual zones can be from about 0.15 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 ; or the average density of the mesh region can be from about 0.07 g / cm 3 to about 0.13 g / cm 3 and the average density of the individual zones can be from about 0.25 g / cm 3 to about 0.70 g / cm 3 ; or the average density of the mesh region can be from about 0.08 g / cm 3 to about 0.12 g / cm 3 and the average density of the individual zones can be from about 0.40 g / cm 3 to about 0.60 g / cm 3 . In other specific embodiments, the average density values for the mesh regions and individual zones may be reversed. Given the number of fibers per unit area, with respect to the fibrous structure under consideration, the ratio of the average density of the net area to the average density of the individual zones may be more than 1. In another embodiment, the ratio of the average density of the net area to the average density of the individual zones may be less than 1.

[0098] In certain embodiments, the ratio of the bulk of the net region to the bulk of the individual zones is from about 0.5 to about 1.5; and in certain embodiments, the ratio of the bulk of the net region to the bulk of the individual zones is from about 0.8 to about 1.2.

[0099] In certain embodiments, the network region may comprise from about 5% to about 95% of the total area of the fibrous structure, and in certain embodiments from about 20% to about 40% of the total area of the fibrous structure. In certain embodiments, a plurality of individual regions may comprise from about 5% to about 95% of the total area of the fibrous structure, and in certain embodiments from about 60% to about 80% of the total area of the fibrous structure.

[00100] In certain embodiments, suitable fibrous structures may have a moisture content (% moisture) of 0% to about 20%; in certain embodiments, the fibrous structures may have a moisture content of from about 1% to about 15%; and in certain embodiments, the fibrous structures may have a moisture content of from about 5% to about 10%.

[00101] In certain embodiments, a suitable fibrous structure may have a geometric mean total energy (PE) of about 100 g * inch / inch 2 or more, and / or about 150 g * inch / inch 2 or more, and / or about 200 g * inch / inch 2 or more, and / or approximately 300 g * inch / inch 2 or more, according to the tensile test method described in the present description.

[00102] In certain embodiments, a suitable fibrous structure may have a geometric mean modulus of elasticity of approximately 5000 g / cm or less and / or 4000 g / cm or less and / or approximately 3500 g / cm or less and / or approximately 3000 g / cm or less, and / or approximately 2700 g / cm or less, according to the tensile test method described herein.

[00103] In certain embodiments, suitable fibrous structures described herein may have an average geometric maximum elongation of about 10% or more and / or about 20% or more and / or about 30% or more and / or about 50% or more, and / or about 60% or more, and / or about 65% or more, and / or about 70% or more, as measured according to the tensile test method described herein.

[00104] In certain embodiments, suitable fibrous structures described herein may have a geometric mean tensile strength of about 200 g / inch or more and / or about 300 g / inch or more and / or about 400 g / inch or more, and / or about 500 g / inch or more, and / or about 600 g / inch or more, as measured according to the tensile test method described herein.

[00105] Other suitable configurations of fibrous structures are described in US Pat. No. 4,637,859 and in US Patent Application Publication No. 2003/0203196.

[00106] Further non-limiting examples of other suitable fibrous structures are disclosed in provisional patent application US No. 61/583018 (P&G, patent attorney case number 12330P), filed in conjunction with the present application and incorporated herein by reference.

[00107] The use of the fibrous structure described herein as detergents provides additional advantages over prior art products. Due to the presence of at least two regions characterized by different intense properties, the fibrous structure may have sufficient integrity before use, however, when used (for example, in a washing machine), the fibrous structure can sufficiently dissolve and release the active agent. In addition, such fibrous structures do not adhere to any products during the washing process (for example, clothes) or the surfaces of the washing machine, while such fibrous structures do not block the drain mechanism of the washing machines.

A. Threads

[00108] The yarns may contain one or more yarn-forming materials. In addition to the yarn-forming materials, the yarn may further comprise one or more active agents released from the yarn when the yarn is in the intended use, with the total level of one or more yarn-forming materials present in the yarn being less than 80% by weight dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the total level of one or more active agents present in the thread is more than 20% by weight of the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent.

[00109] In another example, the yarn may contain one or more yarn-forming materials and one or more active agents, and the total level of yarn-forming materials present in the yarn can be from about 5% to less than 80% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the total level of active agents present in the thread can be more than 20% and up to about 95% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent.

[00110] In one example, the yarn may contain yarn-forming materials in an amount of at least 10% and / or at least 15% and / or at least 20% and / or less than 80% and / or less than 75% and / or less than 65% and / or less than 60% and / or less than 55% and / or less than 50% and / or less than 45% and / or less than 40% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight detergent and active agents in an amount of more than 20% and / or at least 35%, and / or at least 40%, and / or at least 45%, and / or at least 50%, and / or at least 60%, and / or less than 95%, and / or less than 90%, and / or less than 85%, and / or less than 80%, and / or less 75% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent.

[00111] In one example, the yarn may comprise yarn-forming materials in an amount of at least 5% and / or at least 10% and / or at least 15% and / or at least 20% and / or less 50%, and / or less than 45%, and / or less than 40%, and / or less than 35%, and / or less than 30%, and / or less than 25% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent and active agents in an amount of more than 50%, and / or at least 55%, and / or at least 60%, and / or at least 65%, and / or at least 70%, and / or less 95% and / or less than 90% and / or less than 85% and / or less than 80% and / or less than 75% by weight on the dry weight of the thread / Or dry weight of detergent. In one example, the thread may contain active agents in an amount of more than 80% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent.

[00112] In another example, one or more yarn-forming materials and active agents are present in the yarn with a weight ratio of the total level of the yarn-forming materials to active agents of 4 or less and / or 3.5 or less and / or 3 or less and / or 2.5 or less, and / or 2 or less, and / or 1.85 or less, and / or less than 1.7, and / or less than 1.6, and / or less than 1.5, and / or less than 1.3, and / or less than 1.2, and / or less than 1, and / or less than 0.7, and / or less than 0.5, and / or less than 0.4, and / or less 0.3, and / or more than 0.1, and / or more than 0.15, and / or more than 0.2.

[00113] In yet another example, the yarn may comprise a yarn-forming material, such as a polyvinyl alcohol polymer and / or starch polymer, in an amount of from about 10% and / or from about 15% to less than 80% by weight on a dry weight basis and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the active agent in an amount of from more than 20% to about 90% and / or up to about 85% by weight of the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent. The strand may further comprise a plasticizer, such as glycerin, and / or pH adjusters, such as citric acid.

[00114] In yet another example, the yarn may comprise a yarn forming material, such as a polyvinyl alcohol polymer and / or starch polymer, in an amount of from about 10% and / or from about 15% to less than 80% by weight on a dry weight basis and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the active agent in an amount of more than 20% to about 90% and / or up to about 85% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the weight ratio of the material forming the thread to the active agent is 4 or less. The strand may further comprise a plasticizer, such as glycerin, and / or pH adjusters, such as citric acid.

[00115] In another example, the thread may contain one or more yarn forming materials and one or more active agents selected from the group consisting of: enzymes, bleaching agents, detergent component, chelating components, sensory components, dispersing agents, and mixtures thereof that may be released and / or released when the thread is in the intended use. In one example, the yarn is characterized by a total level of yarn-forming materials of less than 95% and / or less than 90%, and / or less than 80%, and / or less than 50%, and / or less than 35%, and / or up to about 5% and / or up to about 10% and / or up to about 20% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the detergent and the total level of active agents selected from the group including: enzymes, bleaching agents, detergent, chelating components and mixtures thereof, comprising more than 5% and / or more than 10%, and / or more than 20%, and / or more than 35%, and / or more than 50%, and / or more than 65%, and / or up to about 95%, and / or up to about 90%, and / or up to about 80% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the detergent. In one example, the active agent contains one or more enzymes. In another example, the active agent contains one or more whitening agents. In another example, the active agent contains one or more detergent components. In yet another example, the active agent contains one or more chelating components.

[00116] In another example, the strands may contain active agents that can provide health care and / or safety concerns when released into the air. For example, the yarn can be used to inhibit the release of airborne enzymes within the yarn.

[00117] In one example, the filaments may be filaments obtained by blow molding technology. In another example, the strands may be spunbond yarns. In another example, the threads can be hollow threads before and / or after the release of one or more of the active agents contained in them.

[00118] Suitable threads can be hydrophilic or hydrophobic. The yarns may be surface treated and / or internally treated to alter the characteristic hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties of the yarn.

[00119] In one example, a thread is characterized by a diameter of less than 100 μm and / or less than 75 μm, and / or less than 50 μm, and / or less than 30 μm, and / or less than 10 μm, and / or less than 5 μm, and / or less than 1 μm, as measured in accordance with the method for determining the diameter described in the present description. In another example, the thread may have a diameter of more than 1 μm, as measured in accordance with the method for determining the diameter described in the present description. The diameter of the thread can be used to control the release rate of one or more active agents present in the thread and / or the rate of loss and / or change in the physical structure of the thread.

[00120] A strand may contain two or more different active agents. In one example, the thread contains two or more different active agents, wherein two or more different active agents are compatible with each other. In another example, the thread may contain two or more different active agents, wherein two or more different active agents are incompatible with each other.

[00121] In one example, the yarn may contain an active agent within the yarn and an active agent on the outer surface of the yarn, for example, a coating on the yarn. The active agent on the outer surface of the yarn may be the same or different from the active agent present in the yarn. If different, the active agents may be compatible or incompatible with each other.

[00122] In one example, one or more active agents may be uniformly distributed or substantially uniformly distributed across the strand. In another example, one or more active agents may be distributed as separate regions in the strand. In yet another example, at least one active agent is distributed evenly or substantially uniformly across the yarn, and at least another active agent is distributed as one or more separate regions within the yarn. In yet another example, at least one active agent is distributed within the yarn in the form of one or more separate regions, and at least another active agent is distributed within the yarn in the form of one or more separate regions that are different from the first separate regions.

[00123] Threads can be used as separate items. In one example, the threads can be applied and / or laid on a carrier base, for example, a sponge, paper towel, toilet paper, cosmetic towel, sanitary towel, tampon, diaper, incontinence adult product, washcloth, antistatic cloth, cloth for cleaning clothes, washing soap, dry cloth, mesh, filter paper, cloth, clothes, underwear, etc.

[00124] In addition, a plurality of filaments can be assembled and compressed into a film, resulting in a film containing one or more filament-forming materials and one or more active agents released from the film, for example, when the film is under the conditions of the intended use.

[00125] In one example, a fibrous structure containing such filaments may have an average decay time of about 60 seconds (s) or less, and / or about 30 s or less, and / or about 10 s or less, and / or about 5 s or less, and / or about 2 s or less, and / or 1.5 s or less, as measured according to the dissolution test method described herein.

[00126] In one example, a fibrous structure containing such filaments may have an average dissolution time of about 600 seconds (s) or less, and / or about 400 s or less, and / or about 300 s or less, and / or approximately 200 s or less, and / or 175 s or less, as measured according to the dissolution test method described herein.

[00127] In one example, a fibrous structure containing such filaments may have an average decay time per g / m 2 of sample of approximately 1 second / (g / m 2 ) (s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 0.5 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 0.2 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 0.1 s / (g / m 2 ) or less and / or about 0.05 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 0.03 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, as measured according to the dissolution test method described in this description.

[00128] In one example, a fibrous structure containing such filaments may have an average dissolution time per g / m 2 of sample of approximately 10 seconds / (g / m 2 ) (s / (g / m 2 )) or less, and / or about 5.0 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 3.0 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 2.0 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 1.8 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, and / or about 1.5 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, as measured according to the dissolution test method described in the present description.

B. Thread-forming material

[00129] The yarn forming material may include any suitable material, such as a polymer or monomers, suitable for forming a polymer characterized by properties suitable for making the yarn, for example, by means of a drawing process.

[00130] In one example, the yarn forming material may comprise a polar solvent soluble material, such as an alcohol soluble material and / or a water soluble material.

[00131] In another example, the yarn forming material may comprise a non-polar solvent soluble material.

[00132] In yet another example, the yarn forming material may contain a polar solvent soluble material and is free of (containing less than 5% and / or less than 3%, and / or less than 1%, and / or 0% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of detergent) soluble in a non-polar solvent.

[00133] In yet another example, the yarn forming material may be a film forming material. In yet another example, the yarn-forming material may be of synthetic or natural origin, and it may be chemically modified by enzymes and / or physically.

[00134] In yet another example, the yarn forming material may comprise a polymer selected from the group consisting of: polymers derived from acrylic monomers such as ethylenically unsaturated carboxyl monomers and ethylenically unsaturated monomers, polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylates, polymethacrylates, acrylic acid copolymers and methyl acrylates, polymers , polyalkylene oxides, starch and starch derivatives, pullulan, gelatin, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, methyl cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose.

[00135] In yet another example, the yarn forming material may comprise a polymer selected from the group consisting of: polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl alcohol derivatives, carboxylated polyvinyl alcohol, sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol, starch, starch derivatives, cellulose derivatives, hemicellulose, hemicellulose derivatives, hemicellulose derivatives, sodium alginate, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, polyethylene glycol, tetramethylene glycol ether, polyvinylpyrrolidone, hydroxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose y and mixtures thereof.

[00136] In another example, the yarn forming material comprises a polymer selected from the group consisting of pullulan, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, carboxymethyl cellulose, sodium alginate, gum, gum, gum, gum, gum, gum methyl methacrylate copolymer, carboxyvinyl polymer, dextrin, pectin, chitin, levan, elsinan, collagen, gelatin, zein, gluten, soy protein, casein, polyvinyl alcohol, starch , Starch derivatives, hemicellulose derivatives, hemicelluloses, proteins, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, polyethylene glycol, tetrametilenglikolevy ether, hydroxymethylcellulose, and mixtures thereof.

i. Polar Soluble Materials

[00137] Non-limiting examples of polar solvent soluble materials include polar solvent soluble polymers. Soluble in a polar solvent polymers can be of artificial or natural origin, while they can be modified chemically and / or physically. In one example, polar solvent soluble polymers have a weight average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g / mol and / or at least 20,000 g / mol and / or at least 40,000 g / mol and / or at least 80,000 g / mol and / or at least 100,000 g / mol and / or at least 1,000,000 g / mol and / or at least 3,000,000 g / mol and / or at least 10,000,000 g / mol and / or at least 20,000,000 g / mol, and / or up to about 40,000,000 g / mol, and / or up to about 30,000,000 g / mol.

[00138] In one example, polar-soluble polymers are selected from the group consisting of: alcohol-soluble polymers, water-soluble polymers and mixtures thereof. Non-limiting examples of water soluble polymers include water soluble hydroxyl polymers, water soluble thermoplastic polymers, water soluble biodegradable polymers, water soluble biodegradable polymers and mixtures thereof. In one example, a water soluble polymer contains polyvinyl alcohol. In another example, a water-soluble polymer contains starch. In yet another example, a water soluble polymer comprises polyvinyl alcohol and starch.

but. Water Soluble Hydroxyl Polymers

[00139] Non-limiting examples of water-soluble hydroxyl polymers may include polyols such as polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinyl alcohol derivatives, polyvinyl alcohol copolymers, starch, starch derivatives, starch copolymers, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, chitosan derivatives, such as celluloses, cellulose esters, cellulose copolymers, hemicellulose, hemicellulose derivatives, hemicellulose copolymers, gums, arabinans, galactans, proteins and various other polysaccharides and mixtures thereof.

[00140] In one example, a water soluble hydroxyl polymer may include a polysaccharide.

[00141] The term "polysaccharides", as used herein, means natural polysaccharides, derivatives of polysaccharides and / or modified polysaccharides. Suitable water soluble polysaccharides include, but are not limited to, starches, starch derivatives, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, cellulose derivatives, hemicellulose, hemicellulose derivatives, gums, arabinans, galactans and mixtures thereof. A water-soluble polysaccharide may have a weight average molecular weight of from about 10,000 to about 40,000,000 g / mol and / or more than 100,000 g / mol and / or more than 1,000,000 g / mol and / or more than 3,000,000 g / mol and / or more 3,000,000 to about 40,000,000 g / mol.

[00142] Water-soluble polysaccharides can be water-soluble polysaccharides that do not contain cellulose and / or do not contain cellulose derivatives and / or do not contain cellulose copolymers. Such cellulose-free water-soluble polysaccharides may be selected from the group consisting of starches, starch derivatives, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, hemicellulose, hemicellulose derivatives, gums, arabinans, galactans and mixtures thereof.

[00143] In another example, a water soluble hydroxyl polymer may comprise a non-thermoplastic polymer.

[00144] The water soluble hydroxyl polymer may have a weight average molecular weight of from about 10,000 g / mol to about 40,000,000 g / mol and / or more than 100,000 g / mol and / or more than 1,000,000 g / mol and / or more than 3,000,000 g / mol, and / or more than 3,000,000 to about 40,000,000 g / mol. High and low molecular weight water soluble hydroxyl polymers can be used in combination with hydroxyl polymers characterized by a certain required weight average molecular weight.

[00145] Well-known modifications of water-soluble hydroxyl polymers, such as natural starches, include chemical modifications and / or enzyme modifications. For example, natural starch may be dilute acid, hydroxyethylated, hydroxypropylated and / or oxidized. In addition, a water-soluble hydroxyl polymer may contain starch of dentiform maize.

[00146] Natural starch is typically a mixture of linear amylose and branched polymer amylopectin from D-glucose units. Amylose is essentially a linear polymer of D-glucose units linked by (1,4) -α-D bonds. Amylopectin is a widely branched polymer of D-glucose units connected by (1,4) -α-D bonds and (1,6) -α-D bonds at the branch nodes. Natural starch usually contains relatively high levels of amylopectin, for example, corn starch (64-80% amylopectin), waxy corn starch (93-100% amylopectin), rice (83-84% amylopectin), potato (approximately 78% amylopectin), and wheat (73-83% amylopectin). Although all starches can potentially be used in the present invention, natural starches with a high content of amylopectin obtained from agricultural sources, which are characterized by large volumes of supplies, easy renewability and low cost, are most often used in practice.

[00147] As used herein, the term “starch” includes any unmodified naturally occurring starches, modified starches, artificial starches and mixtures thereof, as well as mixtures of amylose or amylopectin fractions; however, starch can be modified by physical, chemical or biological methods, or their combinations. The choice of unmodified or modified starch may depend on the final destination of the product. In one embodiment, the starch or starch mixture used is characterized by an amylopectin content of from about 20% to about 100%, more typically from about 40% to about 90%, even more typically from about 60% to about 85% by weight of starch or its mixtures.

[00148] Suitable naturally occurring starches may include, but are not limited to, corn starch, potato starch, sweet potato starch, wheat starch, sago palm starch, tapioca starch, rice starch, soy starch, morant starch, starch starch, starch starch, starch starch, starch starch, starch starch, corn and high amylose corn starch. Natural starches, in particular corn starch and wheat starch, are preferred starch polymers due to their availability as well as the economic benefits provided by their use.

[00149] Other polymers may be grafted onto the polyvinyl alcohols described herein to change their properties. A wide range of monomers were successfully grafted onto polyvinyl alcohol. Non-limiting examples of such monomers include vinyl acetate, styrene, acrylamide, acrylic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, methyl methacrylate, methacrylic acid, maleic acid, itaconic acid, sodium vinyl sulfonate, sodium phenyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonyl sulfonate, sodium, 2-acrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid (AMP), vinylidene chloride, vinyl chloride, vinylamine and many acrylate esters.

[00150] In one example, a water soluble hydroxyl polymer is selected from the group consisting of: polyvinyl alcohols, hydroxymethyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, and mixtures thereof. A non-limiting example of a suitable polyvinyl alcohol includes polyvinyl alcohols commercially available from Sekisui Specialty Chemicals America, LLC (Dallas, Texas) under the trademark CELVOL ® . A non-limiting example of a suitable hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose includes hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose commercially available from the Dow Chemical Company (Midland, MI) under the brand name METHOCEL ® , including combinations with the aforementioned polyvinyl alcohols.

b. Water Soluble Thermoplastic Polymers

[00151] Non-limiting examples of suitable water soluble thermoplastic polymers include thermoplastic starch and / or starch derivatives, polylactic acid, polyhydroxyalkanoate, polycaprolactone, polyetheramides and certain polyesters and mixtures thereof.

[00152] Water-soluble thermoplastic polymers can be hydrophilic or hydrophobic. Water-soluble thermoplastic polymers can be surface-treated and / or processed internally to alter the characteristic hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties of water-soluble thermoplastic polymers.

[00153] Water-soluble thermoplastic polymers may contain biodegradable polymers.

[00154] For thermoplastic polymers, any suitable weight average molecular weight can be selected. For example, the weight average molecular weight for the thermoplastic polymer may be more than about 10,000 g / mol and / or more than 40,000 g / mol and / or more than 50,000 g / mol and / or less than 500,000 g / mol and / or less than 400,000 g / mol, and / or approximately less than 200,000 g / mol.

ii. Non-Polar Soluble Materials

[00155] Non-limiting examples of non-polar solvent-soluble materials include non-polar solvent-soluble polymers. Non-limiting examples of suitable non-polar solvent soluble materials include cellulose, chitin, chitin derivatives, polyolefins, polyesters, their copolymers, and mixtures thereof. Non-limiting examples of polyolefins include polypropylene, polyethylene, and mixtures thereof. A non-limiting example of a polyester includes polyethylene terephthalate.

[00156] Soluble in a non-polar solvent, the materials may contain a biodegradable polymer such as polypropylene, polyethylene and certain polyesters.

[00157] For thermoplastic polymers, any suitable weight average molecular weight can be selected. For example, the weight average molecular weight for the thermoplastic polymer may be more than about 10,000 g / mol and / or more than 40,000 g / mol and / or more than 50,000 g / mol and / or less than 500,000 g / mol and / or less than 400,000 g / mol, and / or approximately less than 200,000 g / mol.

C. Active agents

[00158] Active agents are a class of additives designed to provide a beneficial effect on something other than the thread itself, for example, to have a beneficial effect on the environment surrounding the thread. Active agents may be any suitable additive that provides the desired effect under the conditions of the intended use of the thread. For example, the active agent may be selected from the group consisting of: washing and / or conditioning agents for personal care, such as hair care agents, such as shampoo agents and / or hair dye agents, hair conditioning agents, hair care agents skin care, sunscreen and skin conditioning agents; washing and / or conditioning agents, such as fabric care agents, fabric conditioning agents, fabric softening agents, anti-creasing agents, anti-static agents, fabric stain removing agents, fabric removal of contaminants, dispersing agents, foaming suppressing agents, foaming enhancing agents, antifoaming agents and fabric refreshing agents; liquid and / or powdered dishwashing agents (for manual dishwashing and / or for use in automatic dishwashing machines), hard surface care agents and / or conditioning agents, and / or polishing agents; other cleaning and / or conditioning agents, such as antimicrobial agents, flavorings, whitening agents (such as oxygen-containing bleaching agents, hydrogen peroxide, percarbonate-containing bleaching agents, perborate-containing bleaching agents, chlorine-containing bleaching agents), bleaching activating agents, x lotions, brightening agents, air care agents, carpet care agents, dye transfer inhibiting agents, water softening agents, enhancing water hardness agents, pH regulators, enzymes, flocculating agents, effervescent agents, antiseptics, cosmetic agents, makeup remover agents, soap deposition agents, coacervate formation agents, clays, thickening agents, latexes, silicas, drying agents, deodorizing agents, antiperspirants, cooling agents, warming agents, absorbent gel agents, anti-inflammatory agents, colorants, pigments, acids and bases; active agents for liquid processing; agricultural active agents; industrial active agents; active agents for internal use, for example, medicinal agents, tooth whitening agents, dental care agents, mouthwashes, gum care agents, edible agents, food agents, vitamins, minerals; water treatment agents, such as water treatment and / or disinfecting agents, and mixtures thereof.

[00159] Non-limiting examples of suitable cosmetic agents, skin care agents, skin conditioning agents, hair care agents, and hair conditioning agents are described in CTFA Cosmetic Ingredient Handbook, Second Edition, The Cosmetic, Toiletries, and Fragrance Association , Inc. 1988, 1992.

[00160] One or more classes of chemicals may be suitable for use as one or more of the active agents listed above. For example, surfactants can be used as any number of active agents described above. Similarly, whitening agents can be used to care for tissue, clean hard surfaces, wash dishes, and also to whiten teeth. Thus, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that the active agents will be selected based on the intended use of the yarn and / or non-woven material made from it.

[00161] For example, if a thread and / or a nonwoven fabric made therefrom are used for hair care and / or conditioning, then one or more suitable surfactants, such as foaming surfactants, may be selected to provide the desired benefits for consumer under the conditions of the intended use of the thread and / or non-woven material containing this thread.

[00162] For example, if a thread and / or a nonwoven fabric made therefrom are provided or intended for washing clothes during the washing process, then one or more suitable surfactants and / or enzymes and / or detergent components and / or fragrances, and / or defoamers and / or bleaching agents can be selected to provide the desired benefits for the consumer under the conditions of the intended use of the yarn and / or non-woven material containing the yarn. In another example, if the thread and / or the nonwoven fabric made from it are intended for use in washing clothes and / or for cleaning dishes during the washing of dishes, then the thread may contain a detergent composition for washing or a detergent composition for washing dishes.

[00163] In one example, the active agent is an active agent that is not a flavoring agent. In another example, the active agent is an active agent that is not a surfactant. In yet another example, the active agent is an active agent not intended for oral administration, in other words, an active agent that is not an oral active agent.

i. Surfactants

[00164] Non-limiting examples of suitable surfactants include anionic surfactants, cationic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, zwitterionic surfactants, amphoteric surfactants, and mixtures thereof. Auxiliary surfactants may also be included in the yarns. In the case of filaments intended for use as detergents for washing and / or detergents for washing dishes, the total level of surfactants should be sufficient to ensure cleaning, including the removal of contaminants and / or odors, and usually ranges from approximately 0.5% to about 95%. In addition, surfactant systems containing two or more surfactants intended for use in laundry detergent and / or dishwashing detergent threads may include fully anionic surfactant systems, mixed surfactant systems - active substances containing mixtures of anionic and nonionic surfactants, or mixtures of nonionic and cationic surfactants, or low foaming surfactants.

[00165] Surfactants according to the present description may be linear or branched. In one example, suitable linear surfactants include surfactants derived from agrochemical oils such as coconut oil, palm kernel oil, soybean oil, or other vegetable oils.

but. Anionic Surfactants

[00166] Nonlimiting examples of suitable anionic surfactants include alkyl sulfates, alkyl ether sulfates, branched alkyl, branched alkyl alkoxylates, branched alkilalkoksilatsulfaty, medium branched alkyl aryl sulfonates, sulfated monoglycerides, sulfonated olefins, alkyl aryl sulfonates, primary or secondary alkane sulfonates, alkyl sulfosuccinates, acyl taurates, acyl isethionates, alkilglitserilefirsulfonat, sulfonated methyl ethers, sulfonated fatty acids, alkyl phosphates, acylglutamates, acyl sarcosinates, alkyl sulfoacetates, acylated peptides, alkyl ether carboxylates, acyl lactylates, anionic fluorine-containing surfactants, sodium lauryl glutamate, and combinations thereof.

[00167] Alkyl sulfates and alkyl ether sulfates suitable for use in the present invention include materials of the corresponding formula ROSO 3 M and RO (C 2 H 4 O) x SO 3 M, where R is alkyl or alkenyl containing from about 8 to about 8 24 carbon atoms, x is from 1 to 10, and M is a water-soluble cation, such as ammonium, sodium, potassium and triethanolamine. Other suitable anionic surfactants are described in the source: "McCutcheon's Detergents and Emulsifiers, North American Edition (1986), Allured Publishing Corp. and McCutcheon's, Functional Materials, North American Edition (1992), Allured Publishing Corp."

[00168] In one example, the anionic surfactants used in the yarn may include C 9 -C 15 alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS), C 8 -C 20 alkyl ether sulfates, for example, alkyl poly (ethoxy) sulfates, C 8 -C 20 alkyl sulfates, and mixtures thereof. Other anionic surfactants include methyl ether sulfonates (MES), secondary alkanesulfonates, methyl ether ethoxylates (MEU), sulfonated estolides, and mixtures thereof.

[00169] In another example, the anionic surfactant is selected from the group consisting of: C 11 -C 18 alkylbenzenesulfonates ("LAS") and primary C 10 -C 20 alkyl sulfates ("AS") with branched and disordered chains, C 10 - C 18 secondary (2,3) alkyl sulfates of the formula C H 3 ( C H 2 ) x ( C H O S O 3 - M + ) C H 3

Figure 00000003
and C H 3 ( C H 2 ) y ( C H O S O 3 - M + ) C H 2 C H 3
Figure 00000004
where x and (y + 1) are integers of at least about 7, preferably at least about 9, and M is a cation that dissolves in water, in particular sodium, unsaturated sulfates such as oleyl sulfate , C 10 -C 18 alpha-sulfonated fatty acid esters, C 10 -C 18 sulfated alkyl polyglycosides, C 10 -C 18 alkyl alkoxysulfates ("AE x S"), where x is in the range of 1-30, and C 10 -C 18 alkylalkoxycarboxylates, for example, containing 1-5 ethoxy units, medium chain branched alkyl sulfates, such as friction in US 6020303 and US 6060443; medium chain branched alkyl alkoxysulfates, such as those disclosed in US Pat. No. 6,008,181 and US Pat. No. 6,020,303; modified alkylbenzenesulfonate (MLAS), such as those described in documents WO 99/05243, WO 99/05242 and WO 99/05244; methyl ether sulfonate (MES); and alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS).

[00170] Other suitable anionic surfactants that may be used are alkyl ether sulfonate surfactants, including sulfonated linear esters of C 8 -C 20 carboxylic acids (ie, fatty acids). Other suitable anionic surfactants that may be used include soap salts, C 8 -C 22 primary or secondary alkanesulfonates, C 8 -C 24 olefin sulfonates, sulfonated polycarboxylic acids, C 8 -C 24 alkyl polyglycol ether sulfates (containing up to 10 moles of ethylene oxide) ; alkilglitserolsulfonaty fatty atsilglitserolsulfonaty fatty oleilglitserolsulfaty, alkilfenoletilenoksidefirsulfaty, paraffin sulfonates, alkyl phosphates, isethionates such as the acyl isethionates, N-acyl taurates, alkyl succinamates and sulfosuccinates, monoesters of sulfosuccinates (e.g. saturated and unsaturated C 12 -C 18 monoesters) and diesters of sulfosuccinates (e.g. saturated and unsaturated C 6 -C 12 diesters), alkyl polysaccharide sulfates, such as alkyl polyglucoside sulfates, and alkyl polyethoxycarboxylates, such as alkyl polyethoxycarbonate boxylates of the formula RO (CH 2 CH 2 O) k -CH 2 COO-M +, where R is C 8 -C 22 alkyl, k is an integer from 0 to 10, and M is a soluble salt-forming cation.

[00171] Other examples of anionic surfactants are alkali metal salts of C 10 -C 16 alkylbenzenesulfonic acids, preferably C 11 -C 14 alkylbenzenesulfonic acids. In one example, the alkyl group is linear. Such linear alkylbenzenesulfonates are known as “LAS”. Such surfactants and their preparation are described, for example, in US patent No. 2220099 and No. 2477383. In another example, linear linear alkylbenzenesulfonates include straight and straight chain sodium and / or potassium alkylbenzenesulfonates in which the average number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group is from about 11 to 14. C 11 -C 14 LAS sodium, for example C 12 LAS is a specific example such surfactants.

[00172] Another example of an anionic surfactant is a linear or branched ethoxylated alkyl sulfate surfactant. Such materials, also known as alkyl ether sulfates or alkyl polyethoxylate sulfates, are materials corresponding to the formula: R'-O- (C 2 H 4 O) n -SO 3 M, where R 'is a C 8 -C 20 alkyl group, n is from about 1 to 20, and M is a salt-forming cation. In a specific embodiment, R 'is C 10 -C 18 alkyl, n is from about 1 to 15, and M is sodium, potassium, ammonium, alkylammonium, or alkanolammonium. In more specific embodiments, R 'is C 12 -C 16 , n is from about 1 to 6, and M is sodium. Alkyl ether sulfates are usually used as mixtures with different R 'chain lengths and varying degrees of ethoxylation. Often, such mixtures will also inevitably contain some non-ethoxylated alkyl sulfate materials, i.e. surfactants based on the ethoxylated alkyl sulfate of the above formula, where n = 0. Non-ethoxylated alkyl sulfates can also be added to the composition separately, and also used as a component, or as part of any component of the anionic surfactant that may be present in the composition. Specific examples of non-alkoxylated, for example, non-ethoxylated alkyl ether sulfate surfactants are surfactants obtained by sulfating higher C 8 -C 20 fatty alcohols. Standard surfactants based on primary alkyl sulfates have the general formula: R " O S O 3 - M +

Figure 00000005
where R ″ is usually a C 8 -C 20 alkyl group, which may be a straight chain or branched chain, and M is a cation that promotes dissolution in water. In specific embodiments, R ″ is a C 10 -C 15 alkyl group and M is an alkali metal, in particular R ″ is C 12 -C 14 alkyl, and M is sodium. Specific non-limiting examples of anionic surfactants used in the present invention include: a) C 11 -C 18 alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS); b) C 10 -C 20 branched and disordered primary alkyl sulfates (AS); c) C 10 -C 18 secondary (2,3) -alkyl sulfates having the following formula:

Figure 00000006

where M is hydrogen or a cation providing neutrality of charges, while all M units associated with either a surfactant or an auxiliary ingredient can be either a hydrogen atom or a cation, depending on the form chosen by the specialist, or relative pH a system in which the compound is used, but non-limiting examples of suitable cations include sodium, potassium, ammonium and mixtures thereof, and x is an integer of at least 7 and / or at least about 9, and y is tse a single number of at least 8 and / or at least 9; d) C 10 -C 18 alkyl alkoxysulfates (AE z S), where z, for example, is from 1-30; e) C 10 -C 18 alkyl alkoxycarboxylates, preferably containing 1-5 ethoxy units; f) medium chain branched alkyl sulfates, as described in US patent No. 6020303 and 6060443; g) medium chain branched alkyl alkoxysulfates, as described in US patent No. 6008181 and 6020303; h) modified alkylbenzenesulfonate (MLAS) as described in WO 99/05243, WO 99/05242, WO 99/05244, WO 99/05082, WO 99/05084, WO 99/05241, WO 99/07656, WO 00 / 23549 and WO 00/23548; i) methyl ether sulfonate (MES); and j) alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS).

b. Cationic Surfactants

[00173] Non-limiting examples of suitable cationic surfactants include, but are not limited to, cationic surfactants having the formula (I):

Figure 00000007

[00174] where each of R 1 , R 2 , R 3 and R 4 is independently selected from (a) an aliphatic group containing from 1 to 26 carbon atoms, or (b) an aromatic, alkoxy, polyoxyalkylene, alkylamide, hydroxyalkyl, an aryl or alkylaryl group containing up to 22 carbon atoms; and X is a salt-forming anion, such as anions selected from halogens (e.g., chlorides, bromides) and radicals of acetate, citrate, lactate, glycolate, phosphate, nitrate, sulfate and alkyl sulfates. In one example, the alkyl sulfate radical is methosulfate and / or ethosulfate.

[00175] Suitable cationic surfactants of general formula (I) quaternary ammonium may include cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, behenyltrimethylammonium chloride (BTAC), stearyltrimethylammonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, octadecyl trimethylammonium chloride, hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, oktildimetilbenzilammoniya chloride detsildimetilbenzilammoniya chloride, stearyl chloride , didodecyldimethylammonium chloride, didecyldimethylammonium chloride, dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride distearyldime chloride tilammonium, thallotrimethylammonium chloride, cocotrimethylammonium chloride, 2-ethylhexylstearyldimethylammonium chloride, dipalmitoylethyldimethylammonium chloride, PEG-2 oleylammonium chloride and their salts, in which the chloride is replaced by a halogen, for example, sulfate, nitrate, bromide, nitrate, bromide or alkyl sulfate.

[00176] Nonlimiting examples of suitable cationic surfactants are commercially available under the tradenames ARQUAD ® from the company Akzo Nobel Surfactants (Chicago, Illinois).

[00177] In one example, suitable cationic surfactants include quaternary ammonium surfactants, for example, surfactants containing up to 26 carbon atoms, for example: quaternary alkoxylate ammonium surfactants (AQA) such as described in US Pat. No. 6,136,769; quaternary dimethylhydroxyethylammonium, such as described in US 6004922; dimethylhydroxyethyl laurylammonium chloride; polyamine-based cationic surfactants, such as those described in WO 98/35002, WO 98/35003, WO 98/35004, WO 98/35005 and WO 98/35006; cationic ester-based surfactants, such as those described in US Pat. .

[00178] Other cationic surfactants include salts of primary, secondary and tertiary fatty amines. In one embodiment, the alkyl groups of such amines have from about 12 to about 22 carbon atoms and may be substituted or unsubstituted. Such amines are commonly used in combination with acid to produce cationic samples.

[00179] Cationic surfactants may include cationic ester surfactants having the formula:

Figure 00000008

where R 1 is a C 5 -C 31 linear or branched alkyl, alkenyl or alkylaryl chain or M is .N + (R 6 R 7 R 8 ) (CH 2 ) S ; X and Y are independently selected from the group consisting of COO, CCA, O, CO, CCC, CONH, NHCO, OCONH and NHCOO, wherein at least one of X or Y is a COO, CCC, CCC, OCONH or NHCOO group; R 2 , R 3 , R 4 , R 6 , R 7 and R 8 are independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkenyl, hydroxyalkyl, hydroxyalkenyl and alkylaryl groups having from 1 to 4 carbon atoms; and R 5 independently represents H or a C 1 -C 3 alkyl group; the values of m, n, s and t are independently in the range from 0 to 8, the values of b are in the range from 0 to 20, and the values of a, u and v independently represent either 0 or 1, given that at least at least one of u or v must be equal to 1; and M is a counter anion. In one example, R 2 , R 3 and R 4 are independently selected from CH 3 and —CH 2 CH 2 OH. In another example, M is selected from the group consisting of halide, methyl sulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, bromide or iodide.

[00180] Cationic surfactants can be selected for use in personal care. In one example, such cationic surfactants may be enclosed in a filament and / or fiber with a total weight level of from about 0.1% to about 10% and / or from about 0.5% to about 8%, and / or from about 1% to about 5%, and / or from about 1.4% to about 4%, taking into account the balance between the feeling of lightness when rinsing, rheological properties, as well as beneficial effects when wet applied. A variety of cationic surfactants can be used in the compositions, including cationic surfactants with one and two alkyl chains. In one example, cationic surfactants include single alkyl chain cationic surfactants to provide the necessary gel matrix as well as beneficial effects in wet applications. Single chain cationic surfactants are surfactants having a long alkyl chain containing from 12 to 22 carbon atoms and / or from 16 to 22 carbon atoms and / or from 18 to 22 atoms in their alkyl group carbon, to ensure balanced properties in wet applications. The remaining groups attached to nitrogen are independently selected from an alkyl group containing from 1 to about 4 atoms, carbon or alkoxy, polyoxyalkylene, alkylamide, hydroxyalkyl, aryl or alkylaryl groups containing up to about 4 carbon atoms. Such single-chain cationic surfactants include, for example, quaternary mono-alkyl ammonium salts and mono-alkyl amines. Quaternary monoalkylammonium salts include, for example, salts having long alkyl chains without functional groups. Mono-alkylamines include, for example, mono-alkylamidoamines and their salts. Other cationic surfactants, such as cationic surfactants with two alkyl chains, can be used alone, or in combination with cationic surfactants with one alkyl chain. Such cationic surfactants with two alkyl chains include, for example, dialkyl- (14-18) dimethylammonium chloride, dithiuloalkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride, dihydrogenated tallow alkyldimethyl ammonium chloride, distearyldimethylammonium chloride and dicetyldimethylammonium chloride.

[00181] In one example, cationic ester surfactants are hydrolysable under machine wash conditions.

from. Nonionic Surfactants

[00182] Non-limiting examples of suitable nonionic surfactants include alkoxylated alcohols (AE) and alkyl phenols, polyhydroxy fatty acid amides (PFAA), alkyl polyglycosides (APG), C 10 -C 18 glycerol esters, and the like.

[00183] In one example, non-limiting examples of nonionic surfactants used include: C 12 -C 18 alkyl ethoxylates, such as non-ionic surfactants NEODOL ® from Shell; C 6 -C 12 alkyl phenol alkoxylates, wherein the alkoxylate units are a mixture of ethyleneoxy and propyleneoxy units; condensation products of C 12 -C 18 alcohol and C 6 -C 12 alkylphenol with block ethylene oxide / propylene oxide alkilpoliaminetoksilatami such as PLURONIC ® by the company BASF; C 14 -C 22 mid chain branched alcohols, VA, such as those described in US Pat. No. 6,150,322; C 14 -C 22 medium chain branched alkyl alkoxylates, BAEx, where x is from 1-30, as discussed in US 6153577, US 6020303 and US 6093856; alkyl polysaccharides, such as those discussed in US Pat. No. 4,565,647 to Llenado, issued January 26, 1986; in particular alkyl polyglycosides, such as those described in US Pat. Nos. 4,483,780 and 4,483,779; polyhydroxy acid amide detergents, such as those described in US Pat. No. 5,332,528; and surfactants based on an esterified poly (oxyalkylated) alcohol, such as those described in US 6482994 and WO 01/42408.

[00184] Examples of suitable commercially available nonionic surfactants include: Tergitol® 15-S-9 (condensation product of a C 10 -C 15 linear alcohol with 9 moles of ethylene oxide) and Tergitol® 24-L-6 NMW (condensation product of C 12 -C 14 primary alcohol with 6 moles of ethylene oxide with a narrow molecular weight distribution), both available from Dow Chemical Company; Neodol ® 45-9 (condensation product of C 14 -C 15 linear alcohol with 9 moles of ethylene oxide), Neodol ® 23-3 (condensation product of C 12 -C 15 linear alcohol with 9 moles of ethylene oxide), Neodol ® 45-7 (condensation product C 14 -C 15 linear alcohol with 7 moles of ethylene oxide) and Neodol ® 45-5 (condensation product of C 14 -C 15 linear alcohol with 5 moles of ethylene oxide), available from Shell Chemical Company; Kyro ® EOB (condensation product of C 13 -C 15 alcohol with 9 moles of ethylene oxide), available from The Procter & Gamble Company; and Genapol LA O3O or O5O (condensation product of C 12 -C 14 alcohol with 3 or 5 moles of ethylene oxide), available from Hoechst. Non-ionic surfactants can have a hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) in the range of from about 8 to about 17 and / or from about 8 to about 14. Condensates with propylene oxides and / or butylene oxides can also be used.

[00185] Non-limiting examples of used semipolar nonionic surfactants include: water-soluble amine oxides containing one alkyl moiety comprising from about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms, and 2 moieties selected from the group consisting of alkyl moieties and hydroxyalkyl moieties, including about 1 to about 3 carbon atoms; water-soluble phosphine oxides containing one alkyl moiety comprising from about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms and 2 moieties selected from the group consisting of alkyl moieties and hydroxyalkyl moieties comprising from about 1 to about 3 carbon atoms; and water-soluble sulfoxides containing one alkyl moiety comprising from about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms, and a moiety selected from the group consisting of alkyl moieties and hydroxyalkyl moieties comprising from about 1 to about 3 carbon atoms. See documents WO 01/32816, US 4,681,704, and US 4,133,779.

[00186] Another class of nonionic surfactants that may be used includes polyhydroxy fatty acid amide surfactants of the following formula:

Figure 00000009

where R 1 is H, or C 1-4 hydrocarbyl, 2-hydroxyethyl, 2-hydroxypropyl or a mixture thereof, R 2 is C 5-31 hydrocarbyl, and Z is a polyhydroxyhydrocarbyl having a linear hydrocarbyl chain with at least 3 hydroxyls directly connected to the chain, or its alkoxylated derivative. In one example, it is methyl, R 2 is an unbranched C 11-15 alkyl or C 15-17 alkyl or alkenyl chain, such as coconut alkyl chain or mixtures thereof, and Z is a derivative of a reducing sugar such as glucose, fructose, maltose, lactose obtained by the reductive amination reaction. Typical examples include C 12 -C 18 and C 12 -C 14 N-methylglucamides.

[00187] Alkyl polysaccharide-based surfactants can also be used as non-ionic surfactants.

[00188] Condensates of polyethylene, polypropylene and polybutylene oxide with alkyl phenols are also suitable for use as nonionic surfactants. These compounds include condensation products with alkylene oxide alkylphenols having an alkyl group comprising from about 6 to about 14 carbon atoms, either as a straight chain or branched chain configuration. Commercially available nonionic surfactants of this type include Igepal ® CO-630, available from the company GAF Corporation; and Triton ® X-45, X-114, X-100 and X-102, available from Dow Chemical Company Company.

[00189] Low foaming non-ionic surfactants can be used for machine wash. Suitable low foaming non-ionic surfactants are disclosed in US 7,271,138 column 7, from line 10 to line 60.

[00190] Examples of other suitable nonionic surfactants are commercially available Pluronic ® surfactants supplied by BASF, commercially available Tetronic ® compounds supplied by BASF and commercially available Plurafac ® surfactants supplied by BASF.

d. Zwitterionic Surfactants

[00191] Non-limiting examples of zwitterionic or ampholytic surfactants include: derivatives of secondary and tertiary amines, derivatives of heterocyclic secondary and tertiary amines or derivatives of compounds based on quaternary ammonium, quaternary phosphonium or tertiary sulfonium. See US patent No. 3929678 from column 19, line 38 to column 22, line 48, for examples of zwitterionic surfactants; betaines, including alkyldimethyl betaine and cocodimethylamidopropyl betaine, C 8 -C 18 (e.g. C 12 -C 18 ) amine oxides and sulfo and hydroxybetaines such as N-alkyl-N, N-dimethylamino-1-propanesulfonate, where the alkyl group may be C 8 -C 18 , and in certain embodiments, C 10 -C 14 .

e. Amphoteric surfactants

[00192] Non-limiting examples of amphoteric surfactants include: aliphatic derivatives of secondary or tertiary amines, or aliphatic derivatives of heterocyclic secondary or tertiary amines, in which the aliphatic radical may be in the form of a straight or branched chain, as well as mixtures thereof. One of the aliphatic substituents may contain at least about 8 carbon atoms, for example, from about 8 to about 18 carbon atoms, and at least one of the aliphatic substituents contains an anionic water-soluble group, for example, a carboxy, sulfonate or sulfate group. See US patent No. 3929678 column 19, lines 18-35, which discloses the corresponding amphoteric surfactants.

f. Excipients Surfactants

[00193] In addition to the surfactants described above, the filaments may also contain auxiliary surfactants. In the case of detergents for washing and / or detergents for washing dishes, they usually contain a mixture of surfactants of various types to provide a wide range of cleaning characteristics to combat various dirt and stains under different operating conditions. A wide range of such auxiliary surfactants can be used in the yarn. A typical listing of anionic, nonionic, ampholytic, and zwitterionic classes and samples of such auxiliary surfactants is provided herein, and can also be found in US Pat. No. 3,664,961. In other words, the surfactant systems disclosed herein may also include one or more auxiliary surfactants selected from nonionic, cationic, anionic, zwitterionic, as well as mixtures thereof. The choice of adjuvant surfactant may depend on the desired beneficial effect. The surfactant system may contain from 0% to about 10%, or from about 0.1% to about 5%, or from about 1% to about 4% by weight of the composition, one or more other auxiliary surfactants.

g. Amine Neutralized Anionic Surfactants

[00194] Anionic surfactants and / or anionic auxiliary surfactants may exist in the form of an acid, which can be neutralized to form a surfactant salt. In one example, the filaments may contain a surfactant in salt form. Typical neutralizing agents include bases from metals with counterions, such as NaOH or KOH. Other agents for neutralizing anionic surfactants and anionic auxiliary surfactants in their acid forms include ammonia, amines or alkanolamines. In one example, the neutralizing agent contains alkanolamine, for example, alkanolamine selected from the group consisting of: monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine and other linear or branched alkanolamines known in the art; for example, 2-amino-1-propanol, 1-aminopropanol, monoisopropanolamine or 1-amino-3-propanol. Amine neutralization can be performed in full or in part, i.e. part of the mixture of anionic surfactants can be neutralized with sodium or potassium, and part of the mixture of anionic surfactants can be neutralized with amines or alkanolamines.

ii. Flavors

[00195] One or more flavorings and / or flavoring starting materials, such as combinations of odors and / or individual odor notes, may be included in one or more threads. The flavoring agent may contain a flavoring ingredient selected from the group consisting of: aldehyde flavoring ingredients, ketone flavoring ingredients, and mixtures thereof.

[00196] One or more flavorings and / or flavoring ingredients may be wrapped in yarns. A wide range of natural and artificial chemical ingredients that can be used as flavorings and / or flavoring ingredients include, among others, aldehydes, ketones, esters, and mixtures thereof. Various natural extracts and essences are also included, which may contain complex mixtures of ingredients, such as orange oil, lemon oil, pink extract, lavender, musky, patchouli, balsamic essence, sandalwood oil, pine oil, cedar oil, etc. Final prepared flavors may contain extremely complex mixtures of such ingredients. In one example, the finished flavor is typically contained in an amount of from about 0.01% to about 2% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material.

iii. Fragrance Delivery Systems

[00197] Certain flavor delivery systems, methods for manufacturing specific flavor delivery systems, and the use of such flavor delivery systems are disclosed in US Patent Application Publication No. 2007/0275866. Non-limiting examples of flavor delivery systems include the following systems:

[00198] Polymer Delivery (PAD): This flavor delivery technology uses polymer materials to deliver flavor materials. Examples of such materials include classic donor-acceptor polymer complexes, polymers from water-soluble or partially soluble to insoluble, charge-bearing or neutral, liquid crystals, melts, hydrogels, flavored plastics, microcapsules, nano and microlatexes, materials for the formation of polymer films, as well as polymer absorbents, polymer adsorbents, and the like. PAD systems include, among others:

[00199] a.) Matrix systems: The flavoring substance is dissolved or dispersed in a polymer matrix or particle. Flavors, for example, can be 1) dispersed in the polymer before being added to the product, or 2) can be added separately from the polymer during or after the formation of the product. Diffusion of a flavoring agent from a polymer is a standard stimulant that allows increasing or increasing the rate of release of a flavoring agent from a polymer matrix system located or deposited on a desired surface (site), although many other stimulants are known by which the release of flavorings can be controlled. Absorption and / or adsorption in or on polymer particles, films, solutions, and the like. are aspects of this technology. Examples of such particles are nano or microparticles consisting of organic materials (e.g., latexes). Suitable particles include a wide range of materials, including, but not limited to: polyacetal, polyacrylate, polyacrylic materials, polyacrylonitrile, polyamide, polyaryl ether ketone, polybutadiene, polybutylene, polybutylene terephthalate, polychloroprene, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthylene, polyethylene polyethylene terephthylene, polyethylene terethylene, polyethylene terethylene, polyethylene terethylene, polyethylene polyetherimide, polyethersulfone, polyethylene chlorinates, polyimide, polyisoprene, polylactic acid, polymethylpentene, polyphenylene oxide, olifenilensulfid, polyphthalamide, polypropylene, polystyrene, polysulfone, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloride, and polymers or copolymers based on butadiene-acrylonitrile, cellulose acetate, ethylene-vinyl acetate, ethylene-vinyl alcohol, styrene-butadiene, ethylene-vinyl acetate, and mixtures thereof.

[00200] The term "standard" systems refers to those systems that are "preloaded" to store the pre-loaded flavor associated with the polymer until or when the flavor is released. Such polymers can suppress the odor of the main product and provide a slight odor and / or long-lasting flavor effect, depending on the rate of release of the flavor. One objective of such systems is to achieve the perfect balance between 1) stability within the product (keeping the flavor inside the carrier until it is needed) and 2) timely release (when used or in a dry state). Achieving such stability is especially important during storage of the product, as well as during aging of the product. This task is especially relevant for water-based products containing surfactants, such as highly effective liquid detergents for washing. Many of the available “standard” matrix systems effectively become “equilibrium” systems when incorporated into water-based products. An “equilibrium” system or reservoir system can be selected that has acceptable diffusion stability within the product and also has available stimulants to provide release (eg, by friction). "Equilibrium" systems are systems in which the flavor and polymer can be added to the product separately, while the equilibrium interaction between the flavor and the polymer leads to beneficial effects at one or more contacts of the consumer with the product (in contrast to the free release of the flavor, in which no polymer delivery technology). The polymer may also be preloaded with a flavor; however, part or all of the flavor may be distributed during storage within the product, thereby achieving an equilibrium state, which includes the binding of the necessary flavoring starting materials (PRM) to the polymer. The polymer then carries the flavor to the surface and releases it, usually through diffusion. The use of such equilibrium polymer systems has the potential to reduce the odor intensity of the main product (usually this is more typical in the case of preloaded standard systems). The use of such polymers can serve to “equalize” the release profile and provide extended release times. As shown above, such a release time can be achieved by suppressing the initial intensity and may allow the formulation designer to use flavoring starting materials (PRMs) that are more powerful, or have a lower odor detection threshold level (ODT), or a low Kovach retention index (KI) , to achieve a positive impression in the first 3-7 seconds of consumer contact with the product, which are the most important in the purchase decision, while the initial intensity of aha is not too strong or distorted. It is important that the release of the flavor occurs during the period of contact of the consumer with the product, in order to have the necessary impact on the decision of the consumer to purchase when the consumer contacts or contacts the product. Suitable microparticles and microlatexes, as well as methods for their manufacture, can be found in USPA 2005/0003980 A1. Matrix systems also include hot melt adhesives and flavored plastics. In addition, hydrophobically modified polysaccharides can be included in the composition of the flavored product to improve the uptake of the flavor and / or control the release of flavor. All such matrix systems, including, for example, polysaccharides and nanolatexes, can be combined with other PDTs, including other PAD systems, such as reservoir PAD systems in the form of microcapsules with flavoring (PMC). Matrix polymer delivery systems (PADs) may include systems described in the following sources: US Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0110648 A1; 2004/0092414 A1; 2004/0091445 A1 and 2004/0087476 A1, and U.S. Patent Nos. 6,553,444; 6,024,943; 6,042,792; 6051540; 4540721 and 4973422.

[00201] Silicones are also examples of polymers that can be used as PDT, while they can also provide a flavoring effect similar to that provided by the "matrix systems" of delivery using polymers. Such a PDT is known as silicone delivery (SAD). Silicones can be preloaded with flavoring, or they can be used as an equilibrium system, as described in relation to PAD. Suitable silicones, as well as methods for their manufacture, can be found in WO 2005/102261; US Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0124530 A1; US Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0143282 A1; and WO 2003/015736. Functionalized silicones can also be used as described in US Patent Application Publication No. 2006/003913 A1. Examples of silicones include polydimethylsiloxanes and polyalkyldimethylsiloxanes. Other examples include amine-functional silicones that can be used to provide beneficial effects associated with amine delivery (AAD) and / or polymer delivery (PAD) and / or the benefits associated with the use of amine reaction products (ARP) . Other similar examples can be found in US patent No. 4911852; and U.S. Patent Applications No. 2004/0058845 A1; 2004/0092425 A1 and 2005/0003980 A1.

[00202] b.) Tank systems: Tank systems are also known as core-shell technology, or a technology in which a flavoring substance is surrounded by a membrane that controls the release of flavoring and can also serve as a protective shell. The material inside the microcapsule is called the core, internal phase, or aggregate, while the wall is sometimes called the shell, coating, or membrane. Microparticles or pressure-sensitive capsules or microcapsules are examples of this technology. The microcapsules according to the present invention are formed by a variety of methods, which include, but are not limited to, coating, extrusion, spray curing, interfacial, local, as well as matrix polymerization. Possible materials for the shell vary widely in terms of resistance to water. Among the most stable, we can distinguish materials based on polyoxymethylene urea (PMU), which can hold certain PRM for extended periods of time in an aqueous solution (or product). Such systems include, inter alia, urea formaldehyde and / or melamine formaldehyde. Sustainable shell materials include polyacrylate-based materials obtained as the reaction product of an oil-soluble or dispersible amine with a multifunctional acrylate or methacrylate monomer or oligomer, an oil-soluble acid and a catalyst in the presence of an anionic emulsifier containing a water-soluble or dispersible copolymer of acrylic copolymer alkyl acid, alkali or alkali metal salt. Gelatin-based microcapsules can be prepared in such a way that they can be quickly or slowly dissolved in water, depending, for example, on the degree of crosslinking. Many other materials for the capsule wall are available, and they vary in terms of the observed degree of diffusion resistance of the flavor. If not limited to theory, the rate of release of a flavor from a capsule, for example, immediately after it is applied to a surface, is usually inversely related to the stability of diffusion of the flavor within the product. As such, for example, urea-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules for release usually require a release mechanism different from diffusion, or present in addition to it, for example, mechanical force (e.g., friction, pressure, shear stress), which serves to break the capsule and increase speed release of flavoring (flavoring substance). Other stimulants include melting, dissolution, hydrolysis or other chemical reactions, electromagnetic radiation and the like. The use of pre-loaded microcapsules requires the proper balance of stability within the product and release when used and / or on the surface (in place), as well as the correct selection of PRM. Microcapsules based on urea-formaldehyde and / or melamine-formaldehyde are relatively stable, especially in near neutral aqueous solutions. These materials may require a stimulator in the form of friction, which may not be acceptable for all product applications. Other microcapsule materials (e.g. gelatin) may be unstable in water-based products, and may even have a lesser beneficial effect (as compared to free release of flavor) after being inside the product for a long time. The rub and smell technologies are another example of PAD. Flavoring microcapsules (PMCs) may include microcapsules described in the following sources: US Patent Publications No. 2003/0125222 A1; 2003/215417 A1; 2003/216488 A1; 2003/158344 A1; 2003/165692 A1; 2004/071742 A1; 2004/071746 A1; 2004/072719 A1; 2004/072720 A1; 2006/0039934 A1; 2003/203829 A1; 2003/195133 A1; 2004/087477 A1; 2004/0106536 A1; and U.S. Patent Nos. 6,645,479 B1; 6,200,949 B1; 4,882,220; 4,917,920; 4,514,461; 6106875 and 4234627, 3594328, and US RE 32713, in PCT applications: WO 2009/134234 Al, WO 2006/127454 A2, WO 2010/079466 A2, WO 2010/079467 A2, WO 2010/079468 A2, WO 2010/084480 A2 .

Molecular Delivery (MAD): Non-polymeric materials or molecules can also serve to improve flavor delivery. If not limited to theory, the flavor may interact non-covalently with organic materials, resulting in altered rates of uptake and / or release of the flavor. Non-limiting examples of such organic materials include, among others, hydrophobic materials such as organic oils, waxes, mineral oils, paraffin, fatty acids or esters, sugars, surfactants, liposomes, and even flavoring starting materials (aromatic oils), as well as natural oils including body fats and / or other fats. Flavor fixers are another example. In one aspect, the non-polymer materials of the molecule are characterized by a CLogP of greater than about 2. Delivery by molecules (MAD) may also include those described in US Pat. Nos. 7119060 and 5506201.

[00204] Fiber Delivery (FAD): The selection or use of the fiber itself can serve to improve flavor delivery. In fact, the fiber itself may be a flavor delivery technology. For example, fabrics of various types, such as cotton or polyester, will have different properties with respect to their ability to capture and / or hold and / or release flavor. The amount of flavor applied to or enclosed in the fibers can be controlled by selecting the fibers, as well as the origin or processing of the fibers, along with any coatings or processing methods. The fibers may be woven or non-woven, as well as natural or artificial. Natural fibers include fibers obtained from plants, animals, as well as those resulting from geological processes, and include, among others, cellulosic materials such as cotton, linen, hemp fibers, flax, Chinese nettle and agave fiber, as well as fibers used for production of paper and fabric. Fiber delivery may include the use of wood fiber, such as thermomechanical cellulose and bleached or unbleached kraft cellulose, or sulphite pulps. Fibers of animal origin usually consist of specific proteins, such as proteins of silk, tendons, intestines and hair (including wool). Synthetic chemical-based polymer fibers include, but are not limited to, polyamide dylon, PET or PBT polyester, phenol formaldehyde (PF), polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) fibers, polyvinyl chloride fiber (PVC), polyolefins (PP and PE) and acrylic polymers. All such fibers can be pre-loaded with flavoring, and then added to the product, which may or may not contain free flavoring and / or one or more flavoring delivery technologies. In one aspect, the fibers can be added to the product before being loaded with flavoring, and then loaded with flavoring by adding flavoring to the product that can diffuse into the fiber. If not limited to the theory, the flavor can be adsorbed to the surface or inside the fiber, for example, during storage of the product, and then released during one or more contacts of the consumer with the product.

[00205] Amine Delivery (AAD): Amine delivery technologies include the use of materials containing an amino group to improve the uptake of the flavor or control the release of the flavor when using the product. With this approach, there is no need for a preliminary complexation reaction or for a preliminary reaction of the starting material (s) of the flavor with the amine before being added to the product. In one aspect, amine-containing materials for AAD suitable for use in the present invention may be non-aromatic compounds; for example, polyalkylimine, such as polyethyleneimine (PEI) or polyvinylamine (PVAm), or aromatic compounds, for example, anthranilates. Such materials may also be polymeric or non-polymeric. In one aspect, such materials comprise at least one primary amine. This technology provides extended release times as well as controlled release odor components with low ODTs (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, enones) due to amine functional groups, and, if not limited to theory, it also delivers other PRMs via polymer delivery for polymer amines. Without the use of this technology, volatile top notes of a smell can disappear too quickly, and a high ratio of middle and main notes to top notes remains. The use of polymer amines makes it possible to use higher levels of the upper notes of odor, as well as other PRMs, to achieve the duration of the fresh odor without increasing the intensity of the smell of the main product to a level higher than the acceptable level, or provides more efficient use of the upper notes of smell or other PRM. In one aspect, AAD systems are effective in delivering PRMs with a pH greater than or approximately equal to neutral. If not limited to theory, the conditions under which most amines of the AAD system are deprotonated can result in increased affinity of deprotonated amines with respect to PRMs such as aldehydes and ketones, including unsaturated ketones and enones such as damaskones. In another aspect, polymeric amines are effective in delivering PRMs with a pH level lower than the approximately neutral pH level. If not limited to the theory, the conditions under which most amines of the AAD system are protonated can result in a reduced affinity of protonated amines for PRM, such as aldehydes and ketones, and a high affinity of the polymer framework for a wide range of different PRMs. In this aspect, polymer delivery can provide the effect of delivering more flavor; such systems are subtypes of AAD and may be referred to as delivery using polymers and amines, or - APAD. In some cases, when using APAD in a composition with a pH of less than 7, such APAD systems may be considered as polymer delivery systems (PADs). In yet another aspect, AAD and PAD systems can interact with other materials, such as anionic surfactants or polymers to form coacervates and / or systems similar to coacervates. In another aspect, a material containing a heteroatom other than nitrogen, for example sulfur, phosphorus or selenium, can be used as an alternative to amino compounds. In yet another aspect, the aforementioned alternative compounds may be used in combination with amino compounds. In yet another aspect, a single molecule may comprise an amine moiety and one or more alternative heteroatomic moieties, for example, thiols, phosphines and selenols. Suitable AAD systems, as well as methods for their manufacture, can be found in US Patent Publications No. 2005/0003980 A1; 2003/0199422 A1; 2003/0036489 A1; 2004/0220074 A1, and also in US patent No. 6103678.

[00206] Cyclodextrin Delivery System (CD): This technology uses oligosaccharides or cyclodextrin to improve flavor delivery. Typically, a complex of flavor and cyclodextrin (CD) is formed. Such complexes may be pre-formed, formed in place, or they may be formed on or in the fiber itself. If not limited to theory, water loss can provide a shift in equilibrium towards the CD-flavor complex, especially if other auxiliary ingredients (e.g., surfactants) are not present in high concentration to compete with the flavor for a place in the cyclodextrin cavity. The effect of a slight odor can be achieved by exposure to water or in the case of an increase in moisture content at later times. In addition, cyclodextrin provides the flavor designer with more flexibility in choosing PRM. Cyclodextrin may be pre-loaded with flavoring, or it may be added separately from the flavoring to achieve the desired stability of the flavoring, its grip, and also release. Suitable CDs, as well as methods for their manufacture, can be found in US Patent Application Publications Nos. 2005/0003980 A1 and 2006/0263313 A1, and US Patents Nos. 5552378; 3,812,011; 4,317,881; 4,418,144 and 4,378,923.

[00207] Odor Combination Starch (SEA) Encapsulation Technology: The use of Odor Combination Starch (SEA) encapsulation technology allows modifying the properties of a flavor, for example, by converting a liquid flavor to a solid when adding ingredients such as starch. An advantage of this technology includes improved flavor retention during product storage, especially under anhydrous conditions. Exposure to moisture can cause odor. Useful effects can also be achieved with other consumer contacts with the product, since starch allows the product formulation designer to select PRM or PRM concentrations that normally cannot be applied without using SEA technology. Another technology example involves the use of other organic and inorganic materials, such as silicon dioxide, to convert a flavor from liquid to solid. Suitable SEAs as well as methods for their implementation can be found in US Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0003980 A1 and US Patent No. 6,458,754 B1.

[00208] Inorganic Carrier Delivery System (ZIC): This technology involves the use of porous zeolites or other inorganic materials for the delivery of flavors. The zeolite loaded with flavoring can be used together with auxiliary ingredients used to coat the zeolite loaded with flavoring (PLZ) in order to change its flavor release properties during product storage, either during use or in a dry state, or without auxiliary ingredients. Suitable zeolites and inorganic carriers, as well as methods for their manufacture can be found in the publication of US patent application No. 2005/0003980 A1, as well as in US patent No. 5885959; 6245732 B1; 6048830 and 4539135. Silicon dioxide is another form of ZIC. Another example of a suitable inorganic carrier includes inorganic tubes in which flavoring or other active materials are held within the nano- or microtubes cavity. In one aspect, the flavor-loaded inorganic tube (or flavor-loaded tube — PLT) is a nano- or microtube of a mineral such as halloysite or a mixture of halloysite with other inorganic materials, including other clays. PLT technology may also include the use of additional ingredients inside and / or outside the tube to increase diffusion stability within the product, improve application at the right place, or to control the rate of release of the charged flavor. Monomeric and / or polymeric materials, including encapsulation in starch, can be used for coating, capping, sealing or other encapsulation of PLT. Suitable PLT systems, as well as methods for their implementation, can be found in US Pat. No. 5,651,976.

[00209] Pro-flavoring agent (PP): This technology relates to flavoring technologies due to the reaction of flavoring materials with other substances or chemicals to form materials having covalent bonds between one or more PRMs and one or more carriers. PRM is transformed into a new material called pro-PRM (i.e., a pro-aromatizer), which can then release the original PRM under the influence of a stimulant such as water or light. Pro-flavors may provide improved flavor delivery characteristics, such as improved flavor uptake, release duration, stability, retention, and the like. Pro-aromatizers include monomeric (non-polymeric) or polymeric aromatizers, and can be preformed or can be formed in place under equilibrium conditions that may be present during storage inside the product, or in a wet or dry place. Non-limiting examples of proaromatizers include Michael adducts (e.g., beta-aminoketones), aromatic or non-aromatic imines (Schiff bases), oxazolidines, beta-ketoesters, and orthoesters. Another aspect includes compounds containing one or more beta-hydroxy or beta-thiocarbonyl moieties capable of releasing PRM, for example, alpha, beta unsaturated ketone, aldehyde or carboxyl ether. A typical stimulant for flavor release is exposure to water; although other stimulants may include enzymes, heat, light, a change in pH, auto-oxidation, an equilibrium shift, a change in concentration or ionic strength, and others. Light-stimulated pro-flavors are particularly suitable for water-based products. Such photo-aromatizers (PPPs) include, among others, photo-aromatizers, which upon stimulation release coumarin derivatives and flavors and / or pro-aromatizers. The released pro-aromatizer can release one or more PRM using any of the aforementioned stimulants. In one aspect, the photo-aromatizer releases a nitrogen-based pro-aromatizer when exposed to a stimulant in the form of light and / or moisture. In another aspect, a nitrogen-based pro-aromatizer released from a photo-aromatizer releases one or more PRMs selected, for example, from aldehydes, ketones (including enones), and alcohols. In yet another aspect, PPP releases a dihydroxycoumarin derivative. A light-stimulated proaromatizer may also be an ether that releases a coumarin derivative and aromatic alcohol. In one aspect, the proaromatizer is a dimethoxybenzoin derivative, such as described in US Patent Application Publication No. 2006/0020459 A1. In another aspect, the proaromatizer is a derivative of 3 ′, 5′-dimethoxybenzoin (DMB), which releases alcohol under the influence of electromagnetic radiation. In yet another aspect, the pro-aromatizer releases one or more low ODT PRMs, including tertiary alcohols, such as linalool, tetrahydrolinal lanol, or dihydromyrzenol. Suitable pro-flavoring agents and methods for their manufacture can be found in US Pat. Nos. 7,018,978 B2; 6987084 B2; 6956013 B2; 6,861,402 B1; 6,544,945 B1; 6093691; 6,277,796 B1; 6,165,953; 6,316,397 B1; 6,437,150 B1; 6,479,682 B1; 6,069,918; 6,218,355 B1; 6133228; 6147037; 7,109,153 B2; 7071151 B2; 6987084 B2; 6610646 B2 and 5958870, as well as in publications of patent applications No. 2005/0003980 A1 and 2006/0223726 A1.

[00210] Amine Reaction Products (ARPs): In the context of the present application, ARPs are a subclass or samples of PP. Can also be used "reactive" polymeric amines in which the amine functional group pre-reacts with one or more PRMs with the formation of the reaction product with amines (ARP). Typically, reactive amines are primary and / or secondary amines and may be part of a polymer or monomer (non-polymer). Such ARPs may also be blended with additional PRMs to provide the beneficial effects of polymer delivery and / or amine delivery. Non-limiting examples of polymeric amines include polyalkylimine-based polymers such as polyethyleneimine (PEI) or polyvinylamine (PVAm). Non-limiting examples of monomeric (non-polymeric) amines include hydroxylamines, such as 2-aminoethanol and its alkyl substituted derivatives, as well as aromatic amines, such as anthranilates. ARPs may be premixed with a flavor, or they may be added separately for storage or rinsing applications. In another aspect, a material containing a heteroatom other than nitrogen, for example, oxygen, sulfur, phosphorus or selenium, may be used as an alternative to amino compounds. In yet another aspect, the aforementioned alternative compounds may be used in combination with amino compounds. In yet another aspect, a single molecule may comprise an amine moiety and one or more alternative heteroatomic moieties, for example, thiols, phosphines and selenols. Useful effects may include improved flavor delivery as well as controlled release of flavor. Suitable ARPs, as well as methods for their preparation, can be found in US Patent Application Publication No. 2005/0003980 A1 and US Patent No. 6413920 B1.

iv. Bleaching agents

[00211] Filaments may contain one or more bleaching agents. Non-limiting examples of suitable bleaching agents include peroxyacids, perborate, percarbonate, chlorine bleaches, oxygen bleaches, hypohalite-based bleaches, bleach precursors, bleach activators, bleach catalysts, hydrogen peroxide, bleach enhancers, bleach, polymerization agents, bleach, and bleach mixtures thereof.

[00212] One or more bleaching agents may be included in the yarn in an amount of from about 1% to about 30% and / or from about 5% to about 20% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material. If present, bleach activators may be included in the yarns in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 60% and / or from about 0.5% to about 40% by weight based on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the nonwoven.

[00213] Non-limiting examples of bleaching agents include oxygen bleach, perborate bleach, percarboxylic acid and its salts bleach, peroxide bleach, persulfate bleach, percarbonate bleach, and mixtures thereof. In addition, non-limiting examples of whitening agents are disclosed in US patent No. 4483781, US patent application No. 740446, European patent application No. 0133354, US patent No. 4412934 and US patent No. 4334551.

[00214] Non-limiting examples of whitening activators (eg, acylactam activators) are disclosed in US Pat. Nos. 4,915,854; 4,412,934; 4,634,551; and 4966723.

[00215] In one example, the whitening component comprises a transition metal based bleaching catalyst, which catalyst may be encapsulated. The transition metal-based bleaching catalyst typically contains a transition metal ion, for example, a transition metal ion selected from the group consisting of: Mn (II), Mn (III), Mn (IV), Mn (V), Fe (II), Fe (III), Fe (IV), Co (I), Co (II), Co (III), Ni (I), Ni (II), Ni (III), Cu (I), Cu (II), Cu (III), Cr (II), Cr (III), Cr (IV), Cr (V), Cr (VI), V (III), V (IV), V (V), Mo (IV), Mo (V), Mo (VI), W (IV), W (V), W (VI), Pd (II), Ru (II), Ru (III), and Ru (IV). In one example, the transition metal is selected from the group consisting of: Mn (II), Mn (III), Mn (IV), Fe (II), Fe (III), Cr (II), Cr (III), Cr (IV) , Cr (V), and Cr (VI). The transition metal based bleaching catalyst typically contains a ligand, for example, a macropolycyclic ligand, such as a bridged crosslinked macropolycyclic ligand. The transition metal ion can be coordinated to the ligand. In addition, the ligand may contain at least four donor atoms, at least two of which are donor atoms at the beginning of the bridge. Non-limiting examples of suitable transition metal-based bleaching catalysts are described in US Pat. Nos. 5,580,485 and 4,430,243; US 4,728,455; US 5246621; US 5244594; US 5284944; US 5194416; US 5246612; US 5,256,779; US 5280117; US 5,274,147; US 5153161; US 5227084; US 5,114,606; US 5114611, EP 549271 A1; EP 544,490 A1; EP 549272 A1; and EP 544440 A2. In one example, a suitable transition metal based bleaching catalyst is a manganese based catalyst, for example, disclosed in US 5576282. In another example, suitable cobalt based bleaching catalysts are described in US 5597936 and US 5595967. Such cobalt based catalysts may be easily prepared according to known methods, for example, such as those described in US 5597936 and US 5595967. In yet another example, a suitable transition metal based bleaching catalyst contains a base-based ligand complex a transition metal such as bispidones described in WO 05/042532 A1.

[00216] Bleaching agents other than oxygen-containing bleaching agents are also known in the art and may be used in the present invention (for example, photoactivated whitening agents such as sulfonated zinc and / or aluminum phthalocyanines (US Pat. No. 4,033,718, incorporated herein by reference) )), and / or preformed organic peracids, such as peroxycarboxylic acid and its salts and / or peroxysulfonic acids and their salts, can also be used. In one example, a suitable organic peracid is phthaloyl imidoperoxicaproic acid or a salt thereof. Photoactivated whitening agents, such as sulfonated zinc phthalocyanine, if present, may be present in the yarn in an amount of about 0.025% to about 1.25% by weight on a dry weight basis and / or dry weight non-woven material.

v. Clarifiers

[00217] Any optical brighteners or other brightening or whitening agents known in the art may be included in the yarns in amounts of from about 0.01% to about 1.2% by weight of the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material . Commercial optical brighteners that can be used can be classified into subgroups, which include, but are not limited to, derivatives of stilbene, pyrazoline, coumarin, carboxylic acids, methincyanines, dibenzothiophene-5,5-dioxide, azoles, five and six-membered ring heterocycles and other various agents . Examples of such brighteners are disclosed in The Production and Application of Fluorescent Brightening Agents, M. Zahradnik, published by John Wiley & Sons, New York (1982). Specific non-limiting examples of optical brighteners that can be used in the present compositions are those disclosed in US Pat. No. 4,790,856 and US Pat. No. 3,646,015.

vi. Fabric Dyeing Agents

[00218] The yarns may contain tissue staining agents. Non-limiting examples of suitable tissue staining agents include low molecular weight dyes and polymeric dyes. Suitable low molecular weight dyes include low molecular weight dyes selected from the group consisting of dyes belonging to the classes Direct Blue, Direct Red, Direct Violet, Acid Blue, Acid Red, Acid Violet, Basic Blue, Basic Violet, and Basic Red according to the color classification index (C.I.). In another example, suitable polymeric dyes include polymeric dyes selected from the group consisting of direct dyes for the fabric sold under the trademark Liquitint ® (Milliken, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA), conjugates of dyes with polymers formed from at least one reactive dye and a polymer selected from the group comprising polymers containing a functional group selected from a hydroxyl group, a primary amino group, a secondary amino group, a thiol group, and combinations thereof. In another aspect, suitable polymeric dyes include polymeric dyes selected from the group consisting of Liquitint ® (Milliken, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA) Violet CT, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) conjugated with a reactive blue, reactive violet or reactive red dye, e.g., CMC conjugated to Reactive Blue 19 (in accordance with C.I. classification) sold by Megazyme, Wicklow, Ireland under the trade name AZO-CM-CELLULOSE, product code: S-ACMC, alkoxylated triphenylmethane polymer dyes, polymer nye dyes based on alkoxylated thiophene and mixtures thereof.

[00219] Non-limiting examples of useful colorants include colorants that can be found in US Pat. No. 7,052,269; US 7208459; and US 7674757 B2. For example, fabric dyes can be selected from the group consisting of: blue and violet triarylmethane main dyes, blue and violet methane main dyes, dyes, blue and violet anthrachionic basic dyes, azo dyes basic blue 16, basic blue 65, basic blue 66 basic blue 67, basic blue 71, basic blue 159, basic violet 19, basic violet 35, basic violet 38, basic violet 48, oxazine dyes basic blue 3, basic blue 75, basic blue 95, basic blue 122, basic blue 124, basic blue 141, Nile blue A and xanthan dye basic violet 10, a polymeric dye based on alkoxylated triphenylmethane; alkoxylated thiophene polymer dye; thiazolium dye; and mixtures thereof.

[00220] In one example, fabric dyeing dyes include whitening agents, which can be found in WO 08/87497 A1. These whitening agents can be characterized by the following structure (I):

Figure 00000010

where R 1 and R 2 can be independently selected from:

a) [(CH 2 CR′HO) x (CH 2 CR ″ HO) y H]

where R ′ is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 3 , CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein R "is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein x + y≤5; wherein y≥1; and wherein z = from 0 to 5 ;

b) R 1 = alkyl, aryl or arylalkyl and R 2 = [(CH 2 CR′HO) x (CH 2 CR ″ HO) y H]

where R ′ is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 3 , CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein R ″ is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein x + y≤10; wherein y≥1; and wherein z = from 0 to 5;

c) R 1 = [CH 2 CH 2 (OR 3 ) CH 2 OR 4 ] and R 2 = [CH 2 CH 2 (OR 3 ) CH 2 OR 4 ]

where R 3 selected from the group comprising H, (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; and wherein z = from 0 to 10;

wherein R 4 is selected from the group consisting of (C 1 -C 16 ) alkyl, aryl groups and mixtures thereof; and

d) where R1 and R2 can be independently selected from the product of addition of amine to styrene, glycidyl methyl ether, isobutyl glycidyl ether, isopropyl glycidyl ether, t-butyl glycidyl ether, 2-ethylhexyl glycidyl ether and glycidyl hexadecyl ether from 1 to 10.

[00221] In another example, suitable whitening agents may be characterized by the following structure (II):

Figure 00000011

[00222] where R ′ is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 3 , CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein R ″ is selected from the group consisting of H, CH 2 O (CH 2 CH 2 O) z H and mixtures thereof; wherein x + y≤5; wherein y≥1; and z = from 0 to 5.

[00223] In yet another example, suitable whitening agents may be characterized by the following structure (III):

Figure 00000012

This whitening agent is commonly referred to as "Violet DD". Agent Violet DD is usually a mixture containing a total of 5 ethylene oxide groups. This structure is usually obtained by the following selection in Structure I from the "part a" above, the following side groups, shown below in Table I:

Figure 00000013

[00224] Useful additional whitening agents include whitening agents described in US 2008/34511 A1 (Unilever). In one example, the whitening agent contains "Violet 13".

vii. Dye Transfer Inhibiting Agents

[00225] The filaments may contain one or more dye transfer inhibiting agents that inhibit dye transfer from one tissue to another during the cleaning process. Typically, such dye transfer inhibiting agents include polyvinylpyrrolidone-based polymers, polyamine-N-oxide polymers, copolymers of N-vinylpyrrolidone and N-vinylimidazole, manganese phthalocyanine, peroxidase, and mixtures thereof. If used, these agents are usually contained in an amount of from about 0.01% to about 10% and / or from about 0.01% to about 5%, and / or from about 0.05% to about 2% by weight on dry basis weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the nonwoven fabric.

viii. Chelating agents

[00226] The threads may contain one or more chelating agents, for example, one or more chelating agents based on iron and / or manganese ions and / or another metal. Such chelating agents can be selected from the group consisting of: aminocarboxylates, aminophosphonates, multifunctionally substituted aromatic chelating agents, and mixtures thereof. If used, these chelating agents are usually contained in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 15% and / or from about 0.1% to about 10%, and / or from about 0.1% to about 5%, and / or from about 0.1% to about 3% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material.

[00227] Chelating agents can be selected by those skilled in the art to ensure inclusion of a heavy metal (eg, Fe) in the chelate complex without adversely affecting enzyme stability due to excessive binding of calcium ions. Non-limiting examples of chelating agents can be found in US 7445644, US 7585376 and US 2009/0176684 A1.

[00228] Useful chelating agents include heavy metal chelating agents such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and / or catechol, including but not limited to Tiron. In embodiments where a dual chelating agent system is used, the chelating agents may be DTPA and Tiron.

[00229] DTPA has the following basic molecular structure:

Figure 00000014

[00230] Tiron, also known as 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulfonic acid, is a member of the catechol series and has the basic molecular structure shown below:

Figure 00000015

[00231] Other sulfonated catechols may also be used. In addition to disulfonic acid, the term “tiron” may also include mono- or disubstituted salts of said acid, such as, for example, disodium sulfonate, which have the same basic molecular structure as disulfonic acid.

[00232] Other chelating agents suitable for use in the present invention may be selected from the group consisting of: aminocarboxylates, aminophosphonates, multifunctionally substituted aromatic chelating agents, and mixtures thereof. In one example, chelating agents include, but are not limited to: HEDP (hydroxyethane dimethylene phosphonic acid); MGDA (methyl glycine diacetic acid); GLDA (glutamine-N, N-diacetic acid); and mixtures thereof.

[00233] If not limited to theory, it is generally accepted that the beneficial effects of these materials are due, in part, to their exceptional ability to remove heavy metal ions from washing solutions through the formation of soluble chelates; other beneficial effects include preventing the formation of inorganic films or scale. Other suitable chelating agents for use in the present invention are commercial series of chelating agents from DEQUEST, as well as chelating agents from Monsanto, DuPont and Nalco, Inc.

[00234] Aminocarboxylates that can be used as chelating agents include, but are not limited to, ethylenediamine tetraacetates, N- (hydroxyethyl) ethylenediamine triacetates, nitrilotriacetates, ethylenediamine tetraproprionates, triethylenetetriamine diamine, ethylene diamine diamine, and metal and mixtures thereof. Aminophosphonates are also suitable for use as chelating agents in the compositions of the present invention if at least small fractions of the total amount of phosphorus are retained in the yarns, while said amino phosphonates include ethylene diamine tetrakis (methylene phosphonates). In one example, these aminophosphonates do not contain alkyl or alkenyl groups containing more than about 6 carbon atoms. Multifunctional substituted aromatic chelating agents can also be used in the compositions of the present invention. See US patent No. 3812044, issued May 21, 1974, Connor et al. Non-limiting examples of compounds of this type in acid form are dihydroxy disulfobenzenes, such as 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-disulfobenzene.

[00235] In one example, the biodegradable chelating agent comprises ethylene diamindisuccinate ("EDDS"), for example the [S, S] isomer, such as described in US Pat. No. 4,704,233. The trisodium EDDS salt may be used. In another example, EDDS magnesium salts may also be used.

[00236] One or more chelating agents may be present in the yarns in an amount of from about 0.2% to about 0.7% and / or from about 0.3% to about 0.6% by weight of the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of nonwoven fabric.

ix. Foam suppressors

[00237] Compounds for reducing or suppressing foam formation may be included in the yarn. Foam suppression can be of particular importance in the so-called “high concentration wash process” as described in US Pat. Nos. 4,489,455 and 4,489,574, as well as in front-loading washing machines.

[00238] A variety of materials can be used as foam suppressors, with foam suppressors widely known to those skilled in the art. See, for example, Kirk Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, Third Edition, Volume 7, pages 430-447 (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1979). Examples of defoamers include monocarboxylic fatty acid and its soluble salts, high molecular weight hydrocarbons such as paraffin, fatty acid esters (e.g., fatty acid triglycerides), monovalent fatty acid esters, aliphatic C 18 -C 40 ketones (e.g. stearone) , N-alkylated aminotriazines, waxy hydrocarbons, preferably having a melting point below about 100 ° C, silicone defoamers and secondary alcohols. Foam suppressants are described in US patent No. 2954347; 4,265,779; 3,455,839; 3,933,672; 4,652,392; 4,978,471; 4,983,316; 5,288,431; 4,639,489; 4,749,740; and 4,798,679; 4,075,118; European Patent Applications No. 89307851.9; EP 150872; and DOS 2124526.

[00239] With respect to any filaments and / or fibrous structures containing such filaments intended for use in automatic washing machines, foam should not be generated in excessive quantities so as not to overfill the washing machine. Foam suppressors, if used, are present in a “foam suppressant amount”. By “foam suppressing amount” is meant that a formulation designer can select an amount of a given foam control agent that will substantially control foam formation, resulting in a low foaming detergent for use in automatic washing machines.

[00240] The yarns of the present invention typically contain foam suppressants in an amount of from 0% to about 10% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material. If, for example, monocarboxylic fatty acids and their salts are used as defoamers, they can be present in amounts of up to about 5% and / or from about 0.5% to about 3% by weight on a dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material . Silicone defoamers are typically used in yarns in an amount of up to about 2.0% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material, although large quantities may be applicable. Monostearyl phosphate defoamers are typically used in yarns in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 2% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven. Hydrocarbon foam suppressants are typically used in yarns in an amount of from about 0.01% to about 5.0% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven fabric, although large quantities may be applicable. Alcohol foam suppressors are typically used in yarns in an amount of from about 0.2% to about 3% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven.

x Foam Enhancers

[00241] If strong foaming is desired, foaming enhancers such as C 10 -C 16 alkanolamides can be incorporated into the yarns, typically in an amount of from 0% to about 10% and / or from about 1% to about 10% by weight per dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the nonwoven fabric. C 10 -C 14 monoethanol and diethanolamides are a typical class of such foaming enhancers. It is also preferable to use such foaming enhancers with highly foaming surfactants, such as the above amine oxides, betaines and sultaines. To provide additional foam, water-soluble salts of magnesium and / or calcium, such as MgCl 2 , MgSO 4 , CaCl 2 , CaSO 4 and others, in amounts from about 0.1% to about 2% by weight can be added to the yarns, if necessary on the dry weight of the thread and / or the dry weight of the nonwoven material.

xi. Emollients

[00242] One or more emollients may be present in the yarn. Non-limiting examples of suitable emollients include quaternary ammonium compounds, for example a quaternary ammonium ester compound, silicones such as polysiloxanes, clays such as smectites, and mixtures thereof.

[00243] In one example, emollients include a tissue softener. Non-limiting examples of tissue softening agents include finely dispersed smectites, such as those described in US 4,062,647, as well as other tissue softening clays known in the art. A fabric softener may be present in the yarns in an amount of from about 0.5% to about 10% and / or from about 0.5% to about 5% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven fabric. Fabric softening clays can be used in combination with amine and / or cationic softening agents, such as those disclosed in US Pat. No. 4,375,416 and US Pat. No. 4,291,071. Cationic emollients can also be used without clay to soften tissues.

xii. Conditioning Agents

[00244] The yarns may contain one or more conditioning agents, such as high melting point fatty compounds. A high melting point fatty compound may have a melting point of approximately 25 ° C. or more, and may be selected from the group consisting of: fatty alcohols, fatty acids, derivatives of fatty alcohols, derivatives of fatty acids and mixtures thereof. Fatty compounds with a low melting point (less than 25 ° C) are not intended for use as conditioning agents. Non-limiting examples of high melting point fatty compounds can be found in the International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary, Fifth Edition, 1993, and CTFA Cosmetic Ingredient Handbook, Second Edition, 1992.

[00245] One or more high melting point fatty compounds may be present in the yarn in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 40% and / or from about 1% to about 30%, and / or from about 1.5% to about 16%, and / or from about 1.5% to about 8% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material. Conditioning agents may provide beneficial conditioning effects, such as a slipping sensation when applied to wet hair and / or tissues, a feeling of softness and / or moisture on dry hair and / or tissues.

[00246] The filaments may contain a cationic polymer as a conditioning agent. The concentration of cationic polymer in the yarn, if present, is usually in the range from about 0.05% to about 3% and / or from about 0.075% to about 2.0%, and / or from about 0.1% to about 1 , 0% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material. Non-limiting examples of suitable cationic polymers may be characterized by cationic charge densities of at least 0.5 meq / g and / or at least 0.9 meq / g and / or at least 1.2 meq / g and / or at least 1.5 meq / g, at a pH of from about 3 to about 9 and / or from about 4 to about 8. In one example, cationic polymers suitable for use as conditioning agents may have a cationic charge density, less than 7 meq / g and / or less than 5 meq / g , at a pH of from about 3 to about 9 and / or from about 4 to about 8. In the present invention, the term "cationic charge density" of a polymer refers to the ratio of the number of positive charges on the polymer to the molecular weight of the polymer. The weight average molecular weight of such suitable cationic polymers will typically be from about 10,000 to 10 million, and in one embodiment, from about 50,000 to about 5 million, and in another embodiment, from about 100,000 to about 3 million.

[00247] Suitable cationic polymers for use in filaments may contain cationic nitrogen-containing moieties, such as quaternary ammonium and / or cationic protonated amine moieties. Any anionic counterions can be used in combination with cationic polymers as long as the cationic polymers retain the ability to dissolve in water, as well as as long as the counterions retain the ability of physical and chemical compatibility with other components of the threads, or until the counterions begin to otherwise negatively affect the characteristics of the product, the stability or aesthetic properties of the threads. Non-limiting examples of such counterions include halides (e.g., chloride, fluoride, bromide, iodide), sulfates, and methyl sulfates.

[00248] Non-limiting examples of such cationic polymers are described in CTFA Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary, 3rd edition, edited by Estrin, Crosley, and Haynes, (The Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association, Inc., Washington, Columbia (1982)). "

[00249] Other cationic polymers suitable for use in such filaments may include polysaccharide-based cationic polymers, cationic guar gum derivatives, quaternary nitrogen atomic cellulose ethers, cationic artificial polymers, cationic esterified cellulose copolymers, guar and starch. If used, the cationic polymers in the present invention are soluble in water. In addition, suitable cationic polymers for use in filaments are described in US 3962418, US 3958581, and US 2007/0207109 A1, each of which is incorporated herein by reference.

[00250] The filaments may contain a non-ionic polymer as a conditioning agent. Polyalkylene glycols having a molecular weight of greater than about 1000 are applicable in the present invention. Polyalkylene glycols having the following general formula are applicable:

Figure 00000016

where R 95 is selected from the group consisting of: H, methyl, and mixtures thereof.

[00251] Silicones can be incorporated into the threads as conditioning agents. Silicones useful as conditioning agents typically contain water-insoluble, water-dispersible, non-volatile fluid substances that form emulsified liquid particles. Suitable conditioning agents for use in the composition are conditioning agents that are generally silicones (e.g., silicone oils, cationic silicones, silicone gums, highly refractory silicones and silicone resins), organic conditioning oils (e.g., hydrocarbon oils, polyolefins and fatty esters ) or combinations thereof, or conditioning agents that otherwise form liquid, dispersed particles in an aqueous matrix of a surfactant present invention. Such conditioning agents should be physically and chemically compatible with the main components of the composition, and should not otherwise negatively affect the stability of the product, its aesthetic properties or characteristics.

[00252] The concentration of conditioning agents in the strands may be sufficient to provide the necessary beneficial effects in conditioning. This concentration may vary depending on the conditioning agent, the required conditioning characteristics, the average particle size of the conditioning agent, the type and concentration of other components, and also depending on other similar factors.

[00253] The concentration of silicone conditioning agents is usually in the range of from about 0.01% to about 10% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material. Non-limiting examples of suitable silicone conditioning agents, as well as optional suspending agents for silicone, are described in reissued US Pat. No. 3,54584, US Pat. No. 5,104,646; 5,106,609; 4,152,416; 2,826,551; 3,963,500; 4,364,837; 6607717; 6,482,969; 5,807,956; 5,981,681; 6207782; 7,465,439; 7,041,767; 7,217,777; U.S. Patent Applications Serial No. 2007/0286837 A1; 2005/0048549 A1; 2007/0041929 A1; UK patent No. 849433; Germany patent No. DE 10036533, each of which is incorporated into this description by reference; however, they are also disclosed in the following sources: Chemistry and Technology of Silicones, New York: Academic Press (1968); General Electric Silicone Rubber Product Data Sheets SE 30, SE 33, SE 54 and SE 76; Silicon Compounds, Petrarch Systems, Inc. (1984); and also in Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Engineering, vol. 15, 2d ed, pp 204-308, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1989).

[00254] In one example, the strands may also contain at least one organic conditioning oil as a conditioning agent, either alone or in combination with other conditioning agents, such as silicones (described herein), in an amount of from about 0.05% up to about 3% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material. Suitable conditioning oils include hydrocarbon oils, polyolefins and fatty esters. The conditioning agents described by Procter & Gamble in US Pat. Nos. 5,674,478 and 5,750,122 are also suitable for use in the compositions of the present invention. The conditioning agents described in US Pat. Nos. 4,529,586, 4,507,880, 4,663,158, 4,197,865 are also suitable for use in the present invention. , 4217914, 4381919 and 4422853, each of which is incorporated into this description by reference.

xiii. Humidifiers

[00255] The threads may contain one or more humectants. The humectants in the present invention are selected from the group consisting of polyhydric alcohols, water soluble alkoxylated nonionic polymers and mixtures thereof. If present, humectants may be included in the yarns in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 20% and / or from about 0.5% to about 5% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven.

xiv. Suspending Agents

[00256] The yarns may further comprise a suspending agent in concentrations effective to suspend water-insoluble material in a dispersed form in the compositions or in concentrations effective to alter the viscosity of the composition. Such concentrations of suspending agents are in the range of from about 0.1% to about 10% and / or from about 0.3% to about 5.0% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material.

[00257] Non-limiting examples of suitable suspending agents include anionic polymers and non-ionic polymers (for example, vinyl polymers, acyl derivatives, long chain amine oxides and mixtures thereof, fatty acid alkanolamides, long chain long chain alkanolamide esters, glyceryl ethers with lower fatty acids, about 16 carbon atoms, secondary amines containing two fatty alkyl fragments, each of which has at least about 12 carbon atoms kind). Examples of suspending agents are described in US patent No. 4741855.

xv. Enzymes

[00258] One or more enzymes may be present in the strand. Non-limiting examples of suitable enzymes include proteases, amylases, lipases, cellulases, carbohydrases, including mannanases and endogluconases, pectinases, hemicellulases, peroxidases, xylanases, fofolipases, esterases, cutinases, keratanases, reductases, oxidases, phenol oxidases, lipolases, lipases, lipases, lipases, lipases penosanases, malanases, glucanases, arabinosidases, hyaluronidases, chondroitinases, laccases and mixtures thereof.

[00259] Enzymes can be incorporated into threads for a variety of purposes, including, inter alia, removing protein, carbohydrate, or triglyceride contaminants, preventing dye transfer during tissue washing, and for tissue repair. In one example, the strands may contain proteases, amylases, lipases, cellulases, peroxidases, and mixtures thereof of any suitable origin, for example, plant, animal, bacterial, fungal and yeast. The choice of enzymes used is influenced by factors such as optimal activity indicators at a certain pH level and / or optimal stability indicators, heat resistance and resistance to other additives, such as active agents, for example, detergent components present in the threads. In one example, the enzyme is selected from the group consisting of: bacterial enzymes (e.g. bacterial amylases and / or bacterial proteases), fungal enzymes (e.g. fungal cellulases), and mixtures thereof.

[00260] Enzymes may be present in amounts sufficient to provide an "amount that provides effective purification." The term “effective cleaning amount” refers to any amount capable of providing cleaning, stain removal, stain removal, bleaching, deodorization, or a freshness enhancing effect for substrates such as fabrics, dishes, and the like. In terms of practicality, in known commercial products, standard amounts of active enzyme per gram of yarn and / or fiber are up to 5 mg by weight, more typically from 0.01 mg to 3 mg. In other words, the yarns can typically contain from about 0.001% to about 5% and / or from about 0.01% to about 3%, and / or from about 0.01% to about 1% by weight of the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of nonwoven fabric.

[00261] One or more enzymes can be applied to the thread and / or fibrous structure after the production of the thread and / or fibrous structure.

[00262] The range of enzyme materials and means for incorporating them into the yarn forming composition, which may be a synthetic detergent composition, is also disclosed in WO 9307263 A; WO 9307260 A; WO 8908694 A; U.S. Patent Nos. 3,553,139; 4,101,457; and U.S. Patent No. 4,507,219.

xvi. Enzyme stabilization system

[00263] If enzymes are present in the threads and / or fibers, an enzyme stabilization system may be included in the threads. Enzyme stabilization can be carried out in various ways. Non-limiting examples of enzyme stabilization methods are disclosed and shown in the examples in US Pat. Nos. 3,600,319 and 3,519,570; documents EP 199405, EP 200586; and WO 9401532 A.

[00264] In one example, an enzyme stabilization system may contain calcium and / or magnesium ions.

[00265] An enzyme stabilization system may be present in an amount of from about 0.001% to about 10% and / or from about 0.005% to about 8%, and / or from about 0.01% to about 6% by weight on a dry weight basis of the yarn and / or dry weight of non-woven material. The enzyme stabilization system can be any stabilization system compatible with the enzymes present in the strands. Such an enzyme stabilization system may be substantially provided with other active agents of the composition, or it may be added separately, for example, by a formulation designer or enzyme manufacturer. Such enzyme stabilization systems may include, for example, calcium ion, magnesium ion, boric acid, propylene glycol, short chain carboxylic acids, boric acids, and mixtures thereof, while they are designed to solve various stabilization problems.

xvii. Washing components

[00266] The threads may contain one or more detergent components. Non-limiting examples of suitable detergent components include zeolite detergent components, aluminosilicate detergent components, silicate detergent components, phosphate detergent components, citric acid, citrates, nitrilotriacetic acid, nitrilotriacetate, polyacrylates, acrylate / maleate copolymers and mixtures thereof.

[00267] In one example, the detergent component is selected from the group consisting of: aluminosilicates, silicates, and mixtures thereof, which may be included in the threads. Detergent components can be incorporated into yarns to help control the mineral content, especially to control calcium and / or magnesium hardness in washing water, or to help remove contaminant particles from surfaces. For use in the present invention, synthesized crystalline ion-exchange materials or their hydrates are also suitable, characterized by a chain structure and anhydride composition represented by the following general formula I: x (M 2 O) · ySiO 2 · zM′O, where M is Na and / or K, M ′ is Ca and / or Mg; y / x is from 0.5 to 2.0 and z / x is from 0.005 to 1.0, as disclosed in US patent No. 54427711.

[00268] Non-limiting examples of other suitable detergent components that may be included in the threads include phosphates and polyphosphates, for example, their sodium salts; carbonates, bicarbonates, sesquicarbonates and carbonate minerals other than, not including sodium carbonate or sesquicarbonate; organic mono-, di-, tri- and tetracarboxylates, for example, water-soluble surface inactive carboxylates in the form of an acid, sodium, potassium or alkanolammonium salt, as well as oligomeric or water-soluble low molecular weight polymeric carboxylates, including aliphatic and aromatic; and phytic acid. These detergent components may be supplemented with borates, for example, for pH buffering, or with sulfates, for example sodium sulfate, or any other fillers or carriers that may be important in the development of stable surfactants and / or filaments containing detergents Components.

[00269] Other detergent components may be selected from polycarboxylates, for example, copolymers of acrylic acid, copolymers of acrylic acid and maleic acid, and copolymers of acrylic acid and / or maleic acid and other suitable ethylene monomers with additional functional groups of various types.

[00270] The content of the detergent component can vary widely, depending on the purpose. In one example, the threads may contain one or more detergent components in an amount of at least 1% and / or from about 1% to about 30%, and / or from about 1% to about 20%, and / or from about 1% to about 10%, and / or from about 2% to about 5% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn.

xviii. Clay Mud Removal / Prevention Agents

[00271] The filaments may contain water-soluble ethoxylated amines, characterized by properties that remove clay mud, as well as preventing its re-deposition. Such water soluble ethoxylated amines may be present in the yarns in an amount of from about 0.01% to about 10.0% and / or from about 0.01% to about 7%, and / or from about 0.1% to about 5%, by weight the weight of one or more water-soluble ethoxylated amines to the dry weight of the yarn and / or the dry weight of the non-woven material. Non-limiting examples of suitable agents for removing and preventing the re-deposition of clay mud are described in US patent No. 4597898; 4,548,744; 4,891,160; European Patent Applications No. 111965; 111984; 112592; and WO 95/32272.

xix. Polymer Removal Agents

[00272] The yarns may contain polymeric decontaminants, hereinafter referred to as "SRAs". If used, SRAs are typically contained in an amount of from about 0.01% to about 10.0% and / or from about 0.1% to about 5% and / or from about 0.2% to about 3.0% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material.

[00273] SRAs typically have hydrophilic segments for hydrophilizing the surface of hydrophobic fibers, such as polyester and nylon fibers, and hydrophobic segments intended to be applied to the hydrophobic fibers and held there until the washing and rinsing cycles are completed, thereby acting as a carcass for hydrophilic segments. This can provide, in subsequent washing steps, easier removal of contaminants left after treatment with SRA.

[00274] SRAs may include, for example, a plurality of charged, i.e. anionic or even cationic (see US patent No. 4956447), as well as uncharged monomer units, while the structures can be linear, branched or even star-shaped. These may include terminal fragments that are particularly effective in controlling molecular weight or altering physical or surface active properties. Structures and charge distributions can be adapted for use with various types of fibers or textiles, as well as for use with various detergents or detergents. Non-limiting examples of SRAs are described in US Pat. Nos. 4,968,451; 4,711,730; 4,721,580; 4,702,857; 4,877,896; 3,959,230; 3,893,929; 4000093; 5,415,807; 4,201,824; 4,240,918; 4,525,524; 4,201,824; 4,579,681; and 4,798,989; European Patent Application No. 0219048; 279,134 A; 457,205 A; and DE 2335044.

xx. Polymer Dispersing Agents

[00275] Polymeric dispersing agents can advantageously be used in filaments in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 7% and / or from about 0.1% to about 5%, and / or from about 0.5% to about 4% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the nonwoven material, especially in the presence of zeolite and / or layered silicate detergent components. Suitable polymeric dispersing agents may include polymeric polycarboxylates and polyethylene glycols, although other agents known in the art may also be used. For example, many modified or unmodified polyacrylates, polyacrylates / maleates or polyacrylates / methacrylates are widely used. If not limited to theory, it is generally accepted that polymer dispersants enhance the overall action of detergent components of a detergent when used in combination with other detergent components (including low molecular weight polycarboxylates) due to inhibition of crystal growth, peptization of aerosol removable contaminants, as well as preventing repeated precipitation. Non-limiting examples of polymeric dispersants are disclosed in US Pat. No. 3,308,067, European Patent Application No. 6,615, EP 193360.

xxi. Alkoxylated Polyamine Polymers

[00276] Alkoxylated polyamines may be included in the strands to provide for suspension of contaminants, removal of grease and / or aerosol contaminants. Such alkoxylated polyamines include, but are not limited to, ethoxylated polyethyleneimines, ethoxylated hexamethylenediamines and their sulfated versions. Polypropoxylated polyamine derivatives may also be included in the yarns. A wide variety of amines and polyalkyleneimines can undergo alkoxylation to various degrees and, optionally, they can be further modified to provide the aforementioned beneficial effects. A useful example is a polyethyleneimine base having a molecular weight of 600 g / mol, ethoxylated to 20 EO groups on NH, and available from BASF.

xxii. Alkoxylated Polycarboxylate Polymers

[00277] Alkoxylated polycarboxylates, such as those made from polyacrylates, may be included in the strands to provide further improvement in fat removal. Such materials are described in documents WO 91/08281 and PCT 90/01815. From a chemical point of view, these materials contain polyacrylates containing one ethoxyl side chain for every 7-8 acrylate units. Side chains are characterized by the formula - (CH 2 CH 2 O) m (CH 2 ) n CH 3 , where m is in the range of 2-3 and n is in the range of 6-12. The side chains are linked by ether bonds to the polyacrylate "backbone" to provide a "comb" structure to the polymer. The molecular weight may vary, but it is usually in the range of from about 2000 to about 50,000. Such alkoxylated polycarboxylates can be from about 0.05% to about 10% by weight based on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the non-woven material.

xxiii. Amphiphilic grafted copolymers

[00278] The yarns may contain one or more amphiphilic grafted copolymers. An example of a suitable amphiphilic grafted copolymer comprises (i) a polyethylene glycol base; and (ii) at least one side moiety selected from polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, and mixtures thereof. A non-limiting example of a commercially available amphiphilic grafted copolymer is Sokalan HP22, supplied by BASF.

xxiv. Solvents

[00279] The filaments may contain solvents designed to accelerate dissolution, for example, if the filaments contain more than 40% surfactant, to reduce the formation of its insoluble or poorly soluble clusters, which can sometimes form, or if surfactants are used in cold water. Non-limiting examples of solvents include sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, magnesium chloride and magnesium sulfate.

xxv. Buffer systems

[00280] The composition of the threads can be selected so that when it is used for wet cleaning, for example, for washing clothes or washing dishes, washing water has a pH of from about 5.0 to about 12 and / or from about 7.0 to 10.5. In the case of washing dishes, the pH of the washing water is usually from about 6.8 to about 9.0. In the case of washing clothes, the pH of the washing water is usually from 7 to 11. Methods for maintaining the pH at recommended levels of use include the use of buffers, alkalis, acids, etc., while these methods are well known to specialists in this field. These methods include the use of sodium carbonate, citric acid or sodium citrate, monoethanolamine or other amines, boric acid or borates, as well as other pH-regulating compounds, well known in the art.

[00281] Yarns useful as “low pH” detergent compositions may be included, being particularly suitable for surfactant systems and may, when used, provide a pH of less than 8.5 and / or less than 8.0 and / or less than 7.0 and / or less than 7.0 and / or less than 5.5 and / or up to about 5.0.

[00282] Filaments providing a dynamic pH level may be included. In such filaments, wax coated citric acid particles can be used in combination with other pH controlling agents, wherein (i) after 3 minutes after contact with water, the pH of the washing solution is more than 10; (ii) after 10 minutes after contact with water, the pH of the washing solution is less than 9.5; (III) after 20 minutes after contact with water, the pH of the washing solution is less than 9.0; and (iv) optionally, wherein the equilibrium pH of the washing solution is in the range of over 7.0 to 8.5.

xxvi. Heat generating agents

[00283] The filaments may contain a heat generating agent. The composition of the heat-generating agents is selected so that heat is generated in the presence of water and / or oxygen (for example, contained in air, etc.), and thus the rate of decomposition of the fibrous structure in the presence of water and / or oxygen and / or increased efficiency of one or more active agents contained in the threads. The heat generating agent may be simultaneously or alternatively used to increase the rate of release of one or more active agents from the fibrous structure. The composition of the heat generating agent is selected so that an exothermic reaction is achieved upon contact with oxygen (for example, oxygen contained in air, in water, etc.) and / or water. Many different materials and material combinations can be used as heat generating agents. Non-limiting examples of heat generating agents that can be used in the fibrous structure include electrolytes (e.g., aluminum chloride, calcium chloride, calcium sulfate, copper (II) chloride, copper (I) chloride, iron (III) sulfate, magnesium chloride, magnesium sulfate, manganese chloride, manganese sulfate, potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, sodium acetate, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate, sodium sulfate and the like), glycols (e.g. propylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, etc.), lime (e.g. quicklime, hydrated lime, etc.), metals (e.g. chromium, honey , iron, magnesium, manganese, etc.), metal oxides (e.g., aluminum oxide, iron oxide, etc.), polyalkyleneamine, polyalkyleneimine, polyvinylamine, zeolites, glycerin, 1,3-propanediol, polysorbate esters (e.g. , Tweens 20, 60, 85, 80), and / or polyglycerol ethers (e.g., Noobe, Drewpol and Drewmulze, available from Stepan). The heat generating agent may be formed from one or more materials. For example, a heat generating agent can be formed solely from magnesium sulfate. In another non-limiting example, a combination of about 2-25 weight percent activated carbon, about 30-70 weight percent iron powder, and about 1-10 weight percent metal salt can form a heat generating agent. It may be desirable that other or additional materials can be used alone or in combination with other materials to form a heat generating agent. Non-limiting examples of materials that can be used to form the heat-generating agent used in the fibrous structure are disclosed in US patent No. 5674270 and 6020040; as well as US patent applications No. 2008/0132438 and 2011/0301070.

xxvii. Decomposition accelerators

[00284] The filaments may contain decomposition accelerators used to increase the rate at which the fibrous structure decomposes in the presence of water and / or oxygen. If used, decomposition accelerators are usually designed to release gas under the influence of water and / or oxygen, which in turn causes mixing of the area near the fibrous structure to accelerate the decomposition of the carrier film of the fibrous structure. If used, decomposition accelerators can also or alternatively be used to increase the rate of release of one or more active agents from the fibrous structure, however this is not necessary. If used, decomposition accelerators can also or alternatively increase the effectiveness of one or more active agents in the fibrous structure, however this is not necessary. Decomposition accelerators may include one or more materials, such as, among others, alkali metal carbonates (e.g., sodium carbonate, potassium carbonate, etc.), alkali metal hydrogen carbonates (e.g., sodium hydrogen carbonate, potassium hydrogen carbonate, etc.), carbonate ammonium and the like The water-soluble strip may optionally contain one or more activators designed to activate or increase the activation rate of one or more decomposition accelerators in the fibrous structure. It may be desirable for one or more activators to be included in the fibrous structure, even when the fibrous structure does not contain a decomposition accelerator; however, this is not necessary.For example, the activator may contain an acidic or basic compound, and this acidic or the basic compound can be used as an additive to one or more active agents in the fibrous structure when the decomposition accelerator is included or not included in the fibrous structure. If applicable, non-limiting examples of activators that can be incorporated into the fibrous structure include organic acids ( for example, hydroxycarboxylic acids [citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, lactic acid, gluconic acid, etc.], saturated aliphatic carboxylic acids [vinegar hydrochloric acid, succinic acid, etc.], unsaturated aliphatic carboxylic acids [for example, fumaric acid, etc.]. Non-limiting examples of materials that can be used to form decomposition accelerators used in the fibrous structure are disclosed in US Patent Application No. 2011/0301070.

III. Active Agent Release

[00285] One or more active agents may be released from the filament when the filament is in a start up condition. In one example, one or more active agents may be released from the yarn or part of the yarn when the yarn or part of the yarn loses its characteristic features, in other words, when it loses its physical structure. For example, a yarn loses its physical structure when the material that forms the yarn dissolves, melts, or undergoes any other transformative action in which the yarn structure is lost. In one example, one or more active agents are released from the strand when the morphology of the strand changes.

[00286] In another example, one or more active agents can be released from the yarn or part of the yarn when changing the characteristics of the yarn or part of the yarn, in other words, when changing its physical structure, and not its loss. For example, a thread changes its physical structure during swelling, shrinkage, elongation and / or shortening of the material forming the thread while maintaining its thread-forming properties. [00287] In another example, one or more active agents can be released from the thread, and the morphology of the thread remains unchanged (the thread does not lose and does not change its physical structure).

[00288] In one example, a thread can release an active agent when the thread is under start-up conditions, thereby releasing the active agent, for example, when the characteristic of the thread is lost or changed, as described above. Non-limiting examples of starting conditions include exposure of the yarn to a solvent, a polar solvent such as alcohol and / or water, and / or a non-polar solvent, which can be carried out sequentially, depending on whether it contains the material forming the filaments, a material soluble in a polar solvent, and / or a material soluble in a non-polar solvent; exposing the thread to heat, for example, temperatures above 75 ° F and / or above 100 ° F, and / or above 150 ° F, and / or above 200 ° F, and / or above 212 ° F; exposure to the cold thread, for example, temperatures below 40 ° F and / or below 32 ° F, and / or below 0 ° F; the impact on the thread of force, for example, tensile forces exerted by the consumer when using the thread; and / or the effect of a chemical reaction on the thread; impact on the thread of the condition, which leads to phase changes; the impact on the thread changes in pH and / or changes in pressure and / or changes in temperature; exposing the thread to one or more chemicals, as a result of which the thread releases one or more active agents; exposure to the thread of ultrasound; exposure to a thread of light and / or radiation of certain wavelengths; exposure to a thread of various ionic forces; and / or exposure to a thread of active agent released from another thread.

[00289] In one example, one or more active agents may be released from the threads when a nonwoven fabric containing these threads is subjected to a stimulant selected from the group consisting of: pretreating contaminants on a fabric product with a nonwoven fabric; the formation of a washing solution by contacting the nonwoven material with water; canting of non-woven material in the dryer; heating non-woven material in the dryer and their combination.

IV. Composition for forming threads

[00290] The threads are made from a composition for forming threads. The composition for forming filaments may be a composition based on a polar solvent. In one example, the yarn forming composition may be an aqueous composition comprising one or more yarn forming materials and one or more active agents.

[00291] In the manufacture of yarns from a yarn composition, the yarn composition can be processed at temperatures from about 50 ° C to about 100 ° C and / or from about 65 ° C to about 95 ° C, and / or from about 70 ° C to approximately 90 ° C.

[00292] In one example, the composition for forming the threads may contain at least 20% and / or at least 30%, and / or at least 40%, and / or at least 45%, and / or at least from 50% to about 90%, and / or up to about 85%, and / or up to about 80%, and / or up to about 75% by weight of one or more yarn-forming materials, one or more active agents and mixtures thereof. The yarn composition may contain from about 10% to about 80% by weight of a polar solvent, such as water.

[00293] The composition for forming filaments can have a capillary number of at least 1 and / or at least 3, and / or at least 5, while the composition for forming filaments can be effectively treated with a polymer to form a fiber from a hydroxyl polymer.

[00294] The capillary number is a dimensionless quantity used to express the likelihood of such droplet fragmentation. A higher capillary number indicates a higher stability of the fluid when exiting the head. The capillary number is determined as follows:

Figure 00000017

V is the velocity of the fluid at the outlet of the head (units of length at a time),

η is the viscosity of the fluid in the conditions of the head (mass units per length * time),

σ is the surface tension of a fluid substance (mass units at time 2 ). If speed, viscosity, and surface tension are expressed as a set of consistent units, the resulting capillary number will be dimensionless; units of individual components will be reduced.

[00295] The capillary number is determined for conditions at the head exit. Fluid velocity is the average velocity of a fluid passing through a head opening. The average speed is determined as follows:

Figure 00000018

Vol ′ = volumetric flow rate (units of length 3 at a time)

Area = cross-sectional area of the head outlet (units of length).

[00296] If the hole of the head is round, then the flow rate of the fluid can be determined as follows:

Figure 00000019

R is the radius of the round hole (unit length).

[00297] The viscosity of the fluid will depend on temperature, and it may also depend on shear rate. The determination of shear fluidizing fluid includes shear rate dependence. The surface tension will depend on the composition of the fluid, as well as the temperature of the fluid.

[00298] In the process of forming the fibers, the filaments should maintain their initial stability as they leave the head. A capillary number is used to express a criterion for a given initial stability. Under the conditions of the head, the capillary number should be more than 1 and / or more than 4.

[00299] In one example, the composition for forming the threads is characterized by a capillary number of at least 1 to about 50 and / or from at least 3 to about 50, and / or from at least 5 to about 30.

[00300] In one example, the composition for forming the threads may contain one or more separating agents and / or lubricants. Non-limiting examples of suitable resolving agents and / or lubricants include fatty acids, fatty acid salts, fatty alcohols, fatty esters, sulfonated fatty acid esters, fatty amine acetates and fatty amides, silicones, aminosilicones, fluoropolymers and mixtures thereof.

[00301] In one example, the composition for forming the threads may contain one or more anti-sticking and / or reducing stickiness agents. Non-limiting examples of suitable anti-caking and / or tackifying agents include starches, modified starches, crosslinked polyvinylpyrrolidone, crosslinked cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, silica, metal oxides, calcium carbonate, talc and mica.

[00302] Active agents may be added to the composition for forming the yarn before forming and / or during the process of forming the yarn, and / or they can be added to the yarn after it is formed. For example, a flavoring active agent may be applied to the yarn and / or nonwoven fabric containing the yarn after forming the yarn and / or nonwoven fabric. In another example, the active agent in the form of an enzyme can be applied to the thread and / or non-woven material containing this thread, after forming the thread and / or non-woven material. In yet another example, one or more active agents in the form of particles, such as one or more active agents for internal use, for example, bismuth subsalicylate, which may not be suitable for passing through the spinning process in the manufacture of the yarn, may be applied to the yarn and / or non-woven material containing this thread, after forming the thread and / or non-woven material.

V. A method of manufacturing a thread

[00303] Threads can be made by any suitable method. A non-limiting example of a suitable method for making yarns is described below.

[00304] In one example, a method for manufacturing a yarn includes the following steps: a. providing a composition for forming yarns containing one or more yarn-forming materials and one or more active agents; and b. drawing the composition for forming the yarns into one or more yarns containing one or more yarn-forming materials and one or more active agents that can be released from the yarns under the conditions of the intended use, while the overall level of one or more yarn-forming materials present in the yarn, is less than 65% and / or 50% or less by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent, and the total level of one or more active agents present in the thread is more than 35% and / or 50% or more by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or the dry weight of the detergent.

[00305] In one example, any volatile solvent, such as water, present in the composition for forming the filaments, for example, by drying as the filament is formed, is removed in the drawing step. In one example, more than 30% and / or more than 40%, and / or more than 50% by weight of a volatile solvent of the composition for forming filaments, such as water, is removed at the stage of drawing, for example, by drying the produced yarn.

[00306] The composition for forming filaments can contain any suitable total amount of filament forming materials and any suitable total amount of active agents, since a thread produced from a composition for forming filaments has a total number of filament forming materials in the filament, comprising from about 5% to 50 % or less by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent, and a total amount of active agents in the thread of 50% to about 95% by weight on the dry weight of the thread and / or dry weight of the detergent facilities.

[00307] In one example, the composition for forming the threads can contain any suitable total number of filament forming materials and any suitable total number of active agents, since the thread produced from the composition for forming filaments is characterized by a total number of filament forming materials in the yarn, comprising from about 5 % to 50% or less by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or dry weight of the detergent, and a total amount of active agents in the yarn of 50% to about 95% by weight on the dry weight of the yarn and / or hoi weight detergent, wherein the weight ratio of filament-forming material to the additives is 1 or less.

[00308] In one example, the yarn forming composition comprises yarn forming materials in an amount of from about 1% and / or from about 5%, and / or from about 10% to about 50%, and / or up to about 40%, and / or up to about 30% and / or up to about 20% by weight by weight of the composition for forming the threads; active agents in an amount of from about 1% and / or from about 5%, and / or from about 10% to about 50%, and / or up to about 40%, and / or up to about 30%, and / or up to about 20 % by weight by weight of the composition for forming threads; and a volatile solvent, such as water, in an amount of from about 20% and / or from about 25%, and / or from about 30%, and / or from about 40%, and / or up to about 80%, and / or about 70%, and / or up to about 60%, and / or up to about 50% by weight by weight of the composition for forming the threads. The yarn composition may contain minor amounts of other active agents, for example, less than 10% and / or less than 5%, and / or less than 3%, and / or less than 1% by weight of plasticizers, acidity regulators and other active agents by weight of the composition for forming threads.

[00309] The yarn forming composition can be formed by extrusion into one or more yarns by any suitable extrusion method, for example, by blow molding and / or spunbond technology. In one example, the composition for forming threads is drawn into a plurality of threads by means of blow molding technology. For example, the composition for forming filaments can be injected from an extruder into a die used in blow molding technology. When you exit one or more holes in the die, designed to form the threads, the composition for forming threads is drawn through air to form one or more threads. The yarns can then be dried to remove any remaining solvent, such as water used for molding.

[00310] In order to form a fibrous structure, the filaments can be collected on a molding element, for example, on a relief belt.

VI. Detergent

[00311] Detergents containing one or more active agents can be characterized by new properties and features and / or combinations thereof, compared with known detergents containing one or more active agents.

A. Fibrous structure

(00312] In one example, the detergent may comprise a fibrous structure, for example, a nonwoven material. One or more and / or multiple threads may form a fibrous structure using any suitable method known in the art. The fibrous structure may be used to deliver active agents from filaments when the fibrous structure is under the conditions of the intended use of filaments and / or fibrous structure.

[00313] Although the fibrous structures can be in solid form, the yarn composition used to make the yarn can be in liquid form.

[00314] In one example, the fibrous structure may contain many identical or essentially identical in relation to the composition of the threads. In another example, the fibrous structure may contain two or more different filaments. Non-limiting examples of differences in yarns may include physical differences, such as differences in diameter, length, topography, shape, stiffness, flexibility, etc .; chemical differences, such as crosslinking level, solubility, melting point, glass transition temperature, active agent, filament forming material, color, amount of active agent, amount of filament forming material, the presence of any coating on the filament, belonging to biodegradable or biodegradable filament, accessory to hydrophobic or non-hydrophobic filaments, contact angle, etc .; differences in whether the thread changes its physical structure when it is in the conditions of the intended use; differences with respect to whether the morphology of the thread changes when it is under the conditions of the intended use; and differences in the rate of release by the thread of one or more active agents when the thread is in the conditions of the intended use. In one example, two or more filaments in a fibrous structure can be made from the same filament forming material, but at the same time contain different active agents. Examples are possible in which various active agents may be incompatible with each other, for example, an anionic surfactant (such as an active shampoo agent) and a cationic surfactant (such as an active hair conditioner).

[00315] In another example, the fibrous structure may comprise two or more different layers of filaments forming the fibrous structure in the z-direction of the fibrous structure. The threads in the layer may be similar, or may differ from the threads of another layer. Each layer may contain many identical or essentially identical or different threads. For example, filaments that can release the active agents contained in them at a higher rate than other filaments in the fibrous structure can be located closer to the outer surface of the fibrous structure.

[00316] In another example, the fibrous structure may be characterized by different regions, for example, regions differing in bulk, density and / or thickness. In another example, the fibrous structure may contain a relief on one or more surfaces. The surface of the fibrous structure may comprise a pattern, for example, an ordered, repeating pattern. A relief pattern may be extruded into the fibrous structure. In another example, the fibrous structure may comprise holes. The holes can be arranged in an ordered, repeating pattern.

[00317] In one example, the fibrous structure may contain separate regions of filaments that are different from other parts of the fibrous structure.

[00318] Non-limiting examples of the use of the fibrous structure include, but are not limited to, bases for use in a tumble dryer, bases for use in a washing machine, rags for washing dishes, bases for cleaning and / or polishing hard surfaces, bases for cleaning and / or polishing floors, component batteries, wet wipes for babies, wet wipes for adults, feminine hygiene wipes, paper towels, window cleaning bases, oil holding and / or absorbing bases, foundations containing insect repellent s, chemical basics for swimming pools, fundamentals for use in the food industry, oral fresheners, deodorants, waste disposal bags, packaging films and / or wrapping materials, dressings for wounds, drug delivery vehicles, building insulation materials, coat and / or underlying layers for cereals and / or plants, adhesive bases, bases for skin care, bases for hair care, bases for aromatizing air, bases for processing and / or filtering water, bases for cleaning toilets, bases for sweets, food for For animals, bedding for livestock, bases for whitening teeth, bases for cleaning carpets and other suitable applications of active agents.

[00319] The fibrous structure may be used on its own, or it may be coated with one or more active agents.

[00320] In another example, the fibrous structure can be compressed into a film, for example, by applying a compressive force and / or heating the fibrous structure to convert the fibrous structure into a film. This film will contain active agents that were present in the threads. The fibrous structure can be completely transformed into a film, or parts of the fibrous structure can remain in the film after the fibrous structure is partially converted into a film. Films can be used for any suitable purpose for which active agents can be used, including, but not limited to, those exemplified by the fibrous structure.

B. Methods of using detergent

[00321] Non-woven materials or films containing one or more active tissue care agents can be used in a method for treating a fabric product. A method of processing a fabric product may include one or more steps selected from the group including: (a) pre-processing the fabric product before washing the fabric product; (b) contacting a fabric product with a washing solution formed by contacting a nonwoven material or film with water; (c) contacting a fabric product with a nonwoven fabric or film in a dryer; (d) drying the fabric article in the dryer in the presence of a nonwoven material or film; and (e) a combination of the above steps.

[00322] In some embodiments, the method may further include the step of pre-wetting the non-woven material or film before contacting it with the fabric product to be pre-treated. For example, a nonwoven fabric or film may be pre-moistened with water, and then adhered to a portion of the fabric containing pre-treated contamination. Alternatively, the fabric may be wetted, and the nonwoven fabric or film may be placed on or adhered to it. In some embodiments, the method may further include the step of selecting only a portion of the nonwoven material or film for use in processing a fabric product. For example, if only one fabric article is to be processed, a portion of the nonwoven fabric or film may be cut off and / or torn off and then either placed on or adhered to the fabric, or placed in water to form a relatively small amount of washing solution, which can then be used for preliminary tissue processing. Thus, in accordance with the tasks, the user can manually adapt the method of processing tissue. In some embodiments, at least a portion of the nonwoven material or film may be applied to the fabric to be treated using some device. Examples of such devices include, but are not limited to, brushes and sponges. Any step or several of the above steps may be repeated to achieve the desired tissue treatment effect.

VII. A method of manufacturing a fibrous structure

[00323] The following methods were used in implementing Examples 1-8 of the present invention described herein. Fibrous structures were formed using a small-sized device, a schematic representation of which is shown in FIG. 7. A pressure tank suitable for intermittent operation was filled with suitable molding material. The pump used was a Zenith ® pump, type PEP II, characterized by a capacity of 5.0 cubic centimeters per revolution (cm 3 / rev), manufactured by Parker Hannifin Corporation, a division of Zenith Pumps, Sanford, North Carolina, USA. The flow of material to the head was controlled by adjusting the number of revolutions per minute (rpm) of the pump. The tank, pump and head were connected by tubes.

[00324] The head of FIG. 8 has several rows of circular nozzles arranged relative to each other with a pitch P (FIG. 8) of approximately 1.524 millimeters (approximately 0.060 inches). The nozzles had different internal diameters of approximately 0.305 millimeters (approximately 0.012 inches) and different external diameters of approximately 0.813 millimeters (approximately 0.032 inches). Each individual nozzle was surrounded by an annular expanding hole for supplying exhaust air to each individual melt capillary. The material extruded through the nozzles was surrounded and substantially pulled by cylindrical flows of humidified air supplied through the openings.

[00325] The drawing air can be provided by heating the compressed air from the compressed air source using an electric heater, for example, a heater manufactured by Chromalox, a division of Emerson Electric, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. The required amount of steam was added to saturate or approximately saturate the heated air under certain conditions in a temperature-controlled electrically heated feed tube. Condensate was removed in an electrically heated temperature controlled separator.

[00326] The primary fibers were dried with a stream of drying air at a temperature of from about 149 ° C (about 300 ° F) to about 315 ° C (about 600 ° F) from an electric heater (not shown), with air being supplied through nozzles for supplying drying air and was produced at an angle of approximately 90 degrees with respect to the general orientation of the primary non-thermoplastic extrudable fibers. Dried primary fibers were collected on a collecting device, for example, on a moving perforated belt, or on a molding element. Adding a vacuum source directly below the forming zone can facilitate fiber collection.

[00327] Table 2 below shows an example of a composition for forming filaments intended for the manufacture of filaments and / or a fibrous structure suitable for use as a detergent for washing clothes. This mixture was made and placed in a pressure tank, shown in FIG. 8.

Figure 00000020

Figure 00000021

[00328] Dry primary yarns can be assembled on the molding element, as described above. The design of the molding element provides areas that are permeable to air, due to their characteristic design. The threads used to create the molding element will be impermeable, and the cavities between the threads will be permeable. In addition, a relief may be applied to the molding element to provide additional impermeable areas that may be continuous, intermittent, or half-solid in nature. The vacuum used at the installation point is used to facilitate the bending of the fibers into the relief provided. An example of such molding elements is shown in FIG. 9.

[00329] The basic drawing conditions were obtained by collecting a fibrous nonwoven material on a collecting molding member. The fibrous nonwoven material was allowed to fall downward from the head and samples were collected after vacuum treatment. This process was repeated and samples obtained on eight molding elements of various designs were collected. Corresponding images of the molding element and the ultimately obtained fibrous structures are shown in FIG. 10 (i.e., examples 1-8 of the present invention described herein). These fibrous structures can then be further processed.

[00330] Methods of forming a fibrous structure are described in more detail in US patent No. 4637859.

[00331] In addition to the methods described herein, when forming regions characterized by various properties (eg, average densities) in fibrous structures, other methods may also be used to achieve the desired results. One such example includes an embossing method used to form such areas. Suitable embossing methods are described.

U.S. Patent Application Publication Nos. 2010/0297377, 2010/0295213, 2010/0295206, 2010/0028621 and 2006/0278355.

Test methods

[00332] Unless otherwise specified, all tests described in this description, including tests described in the Definitions section of this description, as well as the following test methods, were carried out using samples at 23 ° C ± 1 ° C and relative humidity 50% ± 2% for a minimum of 2 hours before testing. All tests were carried out under the same environmental conditions. Samples with defects such as wrinkles, tears, holes and the like were not tested. Samples that are under the conditions described in the present description, in the framework of the present invention were considered as dry samples (for example, "dry threads"). In addition, all tests were conducted in a room with the same conditions.

The method of measuring the bulk

[00333] The bulk of the non-woven fabric structure and / or the dissolving fibrous structure is measured using a stack of twelve fit samples using a top-loading analytical balance with an accuracy of ± 0.001 g. The balance is protected from air movement and also from other interference through a screen . For the preparation of all samples, a precision knife is used with a die cutting die measuring 3,500 inches ± 0,0035 inches by 3,500 inches ± 0,0035 inches.

[00334] Using a precision die cut die, square patterns are cut. Collected cut square samples together to form a stack of twelve samples thick. Measure the mass of a pile of samples and record the result with an accuracy of 0.001 g.

[00335] The bulk is calculated in pounds / 3000 ft 2 or g / m 2 as follows:

Bulk = (mass of a stack) / [(area of one square sample in a stack) × (number of square samples in a stack)]

For example,

Bulk (lbs / 3000 ft 2 ) = [[stack weight (g) / 453.6 (g / lb)] / [12.25 (inches 2 ) / 144 (inches 2 / feet 2 ) × 12]] × 3000 or ,

Bulk (g / m 2 ) = stack weight (g) / [79.032 (cm 2 ) / 10,000 (cm 2 / m 2 ) × 12]

[00336] A result is obtained with an accuracy of 0.1 lb / 3000 ft 2 or 0.1 g / m 2 . The dimensions of the samples can be changed or they can be adjusted using a precision stamp, such as the one mentioned above, with the surface area of the samples in the stack is at least 100 square inches.

Water Test Method

[00337] The water content (moisture) present in the yarn and / or fiber and / or nonwoven material is measured using the following water content test method.

[00338] A thread and / or non-woven material or parts thereof (“sample”) in the form of pre-cut sheets are placed in an air-conditioned room with a temperature of 23 ° C ± 1 ° C and a relative humidity of 50% ± 2% at least 24 hours before testing. Each sample is characterized by an area of at least 4 square inches, with the samples being small enough to fit properly on the pan. Under the temperature and humidity conditions defined above, using a balance with an accuracy of at least four decimal places, the mass of the sample is recorded every five minutes until it changes by less than 0.5% compared to the previous mass value over a 10-minute period . The final mass value is recorded as "equilibrium mass". For 10 minutes, the samples are placed for drying on top of the foil in an oven with a forced air flow for 24 hours at a temperature of 70 ° C ± 2 ° C and a relative humidity of 4% ± 2%. After 24 hours of drying, the samples are removed and weighed for 15 seconds. This weight is the dry weight of the sample.

[00339] The water content (moisture) in the sample is calculated as follows:

Figure 00000022

The contents in% of water (moisture) in the sample, obtained as a result of three measurements, are averaged to obtain the resulting content in% of water (moisture) in the sample. The resulting value is rounded to 0.1%.

Dissolution Test Method

Devices and materials (see also Figs. 11 and 12):

600 ml beaker 240

Magnetic stirrer 250 (Labline, model No. 1250 or equivalent)

Stirring stick 260 magnetic stir bar (5 cm)

Thermometer (1 - 100 ° C, accuracy +/- 1 ° C)

Die cutting stamp - stainless steel die cutting stamp 3.8 cm × 3.2 cm

Timer (0-3600 seconds or 1 hour) accurate to the second. The timer used should have a sufficient total measuring time range in case the sample has a dissolution time of more than 3600 seconds. However, the timer must be accurate to the second.

35 mm sliding mount 270, Polaroid (commercially available from Polaroid Corporation, or equivalent).

35 mm slide mount holder 280 (or equivalent)

Cincinnati city water or its equivalent, characterized by the following properties: Total hardness = 155 mg / l CaCO 3 ; calcium content = 33.2 mg / l; magnesium content = 17.5 mg / l; phosphate content = 0.0462.

Test report

[00340] Balance the samples in an environment with a constant temperature of 23 ° C ± 1 ° C and relative humidity: 50% ± 2% for at least 2 hours.

[00341] The bulk of the sample materials is measured using the bulk measurement method.

[00342] Three test specimens were cut out from a non-woven fabric dissolution test using a die cut (3.8 cm × 3.2 cm) so that they fit in a 35 mm sliding mount 270 that has open dimensions area 24 × 36 mm.

[00343] Each sample is fixed in a separate sliding mount 270 of size 35 mm.

[00344] Place the stirring rod 260 of the magnetic stir bar in a 240 ml beaker 240 with a volume of 600 ml.

[00345] Turn on the water flow from the water supply (or equivalent) and measure the temperature of the water with a thermometer, and adjust the hot or cold water if necessary to maintain the required test temperature. The test water temperature is 15 ° C ± 1 ° C. Upon reaching the test temperature, fill the beaker 240 with tap water in a volume of 500 ml ± 5 ml with a temperature of 15 ° C ± 1 ° C.

[00346] Place the beaker 240 on a magnetic stirrer 250, turn on the stirrer 250, and adjust the stirring speed until a funnel appears so that the bottom of the funnel is at 400 ml of beaker 240.

[00347] A 35 mm sliding mount 270 is fixed in the crocodile clip 281 of the 35 mm sliding mount holder 280 so that the long end 271 of the sliding mount 270 is parallel to the surface of the water. The crocodile clip 281 should be located in the middle of the long end 271 of the sliding mount 270. The depth adjuster 285 of the holder 280 should be installed so that the distance between the bottom of the depth adjuster 285 and the bottom of the crocodile clip 281 is ~ 11 +/- 0.125 inches. With this setup, the surface of the sample is perpendicular to the flow of water. Slightly modified examples of the location of the 35 mm slide mount and the slide mount holder are shown in FIG. 1-3 of US patent No. 6787512.

[00348] At the same time, the locked sliding mount together with the clamp is lowered into the water and the timer is started. The sample is lowered so that it is centered in the laboratory vessel. When the structure of the nonwoven material is destroyed, decay occurs. The time when this occurs is recorded as the decay time. When the entire visible nonwoven structure is released from the sliding fastener, the sliding fastener is lifted and at the same time insoluble fragments of the nonwoven structure continue to be observed in the solution. Dissolution occurs when all fragments of the nonwoven structure are no longer visible. The time when this occurs is recorded as the time of dissolution.

[00349] The measurement of the time of decay and dissolution is carried out with three copies of each sample and the obtained data is recorded. The average decay and dissolution times are given in seconds.

[00350] The average decay and dissolution times are normalized with respect to the bulk by dividing the average decay or dissolution times by the bulk of the sample determined according to the bulk measurement method described herein. The decay and dissolution times, normalized with respect to the bulk, are given in seconds / gram per square meter of sample (s / (g / m 2 )).

Average Density Determination Method

[00351] The fibrous structures may contain mesh regions and many separate zones characterized by different densities. A cross section of such a fibrous structure is shown in FIG. 13 using an SEM micrograph. The indicated areas of the fibrous structure are shown in the micrograph by means of zones with different thicknesses. Such differences in thickness are one of the factors responsible for the superior performance of these fibrous structures.

[00352] Areas with a greater thickness are characterized by lower structural density and are usually referred to as “pads”. Areas with less thickness are characterized by greater structural density and, as a rule, they are usually called "ribs".

[00353] The density of regions within the fiber structure was measured by cutting on the first length area of at least 2-3 ribs and pads, by means not previously used the PTFE treated razor blade with a cutting edge, such as a GEM ®, available from the company Ted Pella Inc. Only one cut is made with one razor blade. Each transversely cut sample is mounted in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) sample holder, secured with graphite paste, and then frozen by immersion in liquid nitrogen. The sample was transferred to a scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber at -90 ° C, coated with gold / palladium for 60 seconds and analyzed using a commercially available SEM equipped with a cryosystem, for example, Hitachi S-4700 with Alto Cryosystem and PCI software (passive image capture) for image analysis, or sample analysis is carried out using an equivalent SEM system and equivalent software. All samples are analyzed in a frozen state to ensure their original size and shape in vacuum when in a scanning electron microscope.

[00354] The thicknesses of the pads and ribs, or mesh regions and individual zones are determined using image analysis software, and this software is aligned with the EMS equipment. Since measurements are sample thicknesses, this software is standard on all EMS equipment. Measurements are taken at locations where the thickness of the region or zone is characterized by its corresponding local maximum values. Thickness values for at least 2 individual, separate mesh regions (or separate zones) are recorded and then averaged and reported as the average thickness of the mesh region. The average thickness is measured in microns.

[00355] Regardless of this, the bulk of the sample whose density is measured is determined using the bulk measurement method described in the present description. The bulk, measured in grams per square meter (g / m 2 ), is calculated using the bulk measurement method, and the obtained value is used to calculate the density of the region.

[00356] The following is an example of calculating the average density of the mesh region and the average density of a single zone for a sample with a bulk of 100 g / m 2 , the average thickness of the mesh region of 625 microns and the average thickness of an individual zone of 311 microns.

FROM R e d n I am I am net density areas of ( g cm 3 ) = about from n about at n but I am weight t about l u and n but mesh area = one hundred g m 2 625 × 10 - 6 m × m 2 one × 10 6 cm 3 = 0.16 g from m 3

Figure 00000023

FROM R e d n I am I am density of a single zone ( g cm 3 ) = about from n about at n but I am m but from from but single zone thickness = one hundred g m 2 311 × 10 - 6 m × m 2 one × 10 6 cm 3 = 0.32 g cm 3

Figure 00000024

Diameter Method

[00357] The diameter of a single filament or filament in the structure of a nonwoven material or film is determined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) or an optical microscope and image analysis software. A magnification of 200 to 10,000 times is selected to ensure proper magnification of the threads for measurement. When using SEM, compounds based on gold or palladium are sprayed onto the samples to prevent the formation of an electric charge and thread vibrations in the electron beam. In relation to the image (or image on the monitor screen) obtained using SEM or an optical microscope, the manual procedure for determining the diameters of the threads is used. Using the mouse and cursor, they search for the edge of an arbitrarily selected thread and then measure across its width (i.e., perpendicular to the direction of the thread at a given point) to the other edge of the thread. A calibrated and calibrated image analysis tool provides sizing after enlargement in order to obtain real values in microns. In the case of filaments in a nonwoven fabric or film structure, several filaments are randomly selected on a sample of nonwoven fabric or film using an SEM or optical microscope. At least two parts of the non-woven material or film (or non-woven material inside the product) are cut and tested in this way. In total, at least 100 such measurements are performed and then the data is recorded for statistical analysis. The recorded data is used to calculate the average (average) diameter of the threads, the standard deviation of the diameter of the threads and the median diameter of the threads.

[00358] Another useful statistical analysis is to calculate the number of threads characterized by a parameter below a certain upper limit. To obtain such statistics, the software is programmed to calculate how many results of thread diameters are below the upper limit, and this number (divided by the total amount of data and multiplied by 100%) is given as a percentage, as a percentage below the upper limit, for example , the percentage of filaments with a diameter of less than 1 micrometer, or, for example, the percentage of filaments of submicron diameter. We indicate the measured diameter (in microns) of an individual round thread as d i .

[00359] In the case of filaments characterized by non-circular cross sections, the value of the diameter of the thread is defined as the hydraulic diameter, which is equal to four cross-sectional areas of the thread divided by the perimeter of the cross-section of the thread (the outer perimeter in the case of hollow threads). The number average, alternatively, average diameter is calculated as follows:

Figure 00000025

Tensile test method: Elongation, tensile strength. PE and modulus of elasticity

[00360] Elongation, tensile strength, total energy (PE) and tangential modulus of elasticity are measured using a tensile tester with a constant tensile speed with a computer interface (a suitable device is EJA Vantage, available from Thwing-Albert Instrument Co. Berlin, New Jersey) using a strain gauge sensor, for which the measured forces are in the range of 10% -90% of the measuring range of the sensor. Both the movable (upper) and fixed (lower) pneumatic grippers are equipped with jaws trimmed with smooth stainless steel, 25.4 mm high and wider than the width of the test sample. The grippers are supplied with air at a pressure of approximately 60 psi. inch.

[00361] Eight valid samples of a nonwoven fabric structure and / or a dissolving fibrous structure are divided into two stacks of four samples each. Samples in each stack are equally oriented relative to the longitudinal direction (MD) and the transverse direction (CD). One of the piles is for testing in the MD direction, and the other in the CD direction. Using a precision knife of one inch size (Thwing Albert JDC-1-10, or the like), 4 test strips in the MD direction from one stack and 4 test strips in the CD direction from another stack of 1.00 inch ± 0 are cut 01 wide and 3.0-4.0 inches long. Each strip of a single valid sample is used as a one piece test.

[00362] A tensile tester is programmed to perform a tensile test, collect data on the applied force, as well as tensile data with a data collection rate of 20 Hz as the slider is raised at a speed of 2.00 inches / min (5, 08 cm / min) until the sample ruptures. The rupture sensitivity is set to 80%, i.e., the test is stopped when the measured force drops to 20% of the maximum peak force, after which the slider is returned to its initial position.

[00363] Adjust the length of the test portion of the sample to 1.00 inches. Zero the slider and the strain gauge. Place at least 1.0 inch of the whole sample in the upper jaws, align it vertically inside the upper and lower jaws, and close the upper jaws. Place the whole sample in the lower jaws and close them. The whole specimen should be under sufficient tension to exclude any sagging, but at the same time, the tensile force measured by the strain gauge should be less than 5.0 g. The device for tensile testing is started, and data collection is also started. Repeat the test in a similar fashion for all four solid specimens intended for testing in the CD direction and four solid specimens intended for testing in the MD direction.

[00364] The software is programmed to calculate the following, based on the plot of the applied force (g) versus tensile (inches):

[00365] The tensile strength is the maximum peak force (g) divided by the width (inches) of the sample, and is issued in g / inch with an accuracy of 1 g / inch.

[00366] The modified length of the test portion of the sample is calculated as the tensile (inches) measured at a force of 3.0 g, added to the initial length of the test portion of the sample (inches).

[00367] Elongation is calculated as tensile (inches) at maximum peak force divided by the changed length (inches) of the test portion of the sample, multiplied by 100, and is issued in% with an accuracy of 0.1%.

[00368] The total energy (PE) is calculated as the area under the force curve, integrated from zero stretch to stretch at the maximum peak force (g * inch) divided by the product of the changed length (inches) of the test portion of the sample by the width (inches) of the sample accurate to 1 g * inch / inch 2 .

[00369] The force (g) versus tensile curve (inches) is rebuilt as a force (g) versus tensile curve. Relative elongation is defined herein as elongation (inches) divided by the changed length (inches) of the test portion of the specimen.

[00370] The software is programmed to calculate the following, based on the plot of the applied force (g) versus relative tensile strength (inches):

[00371] The tangential modulus of elasticity is calculated as the slope of the straight line drawn between the two data points on the curve of the force (g) versus relative tension, while one of the data points used is the first data point recorded at a force of 28 g, and the other the data point is the first data point recorded at a force of 48 g. This slope is then divided by the width of the sample (2.54 cm) and a value is generated with an accuracy of 1 g / cm.

[00372] Tensile strength (g / inch), elongation (%), total energy (g * inch / inch 2 ) and tangential modulus of elasticity (g / cm) are calculated for four solid samples designed for testing in the direction of CD and four solid specimens intended for testing in the direction of MD. The average value of each parameter is calculated separately for samples intended for testing in the direction of CD and samples intended for testing in the direction of MD.

Calculations:

Geometrical average tensile strength = square root of [tensile strength in the direction of MD (g / inch) × tensile strength in the direction of CD (g / inch)]

Geometric mean maximum elongation = square root of [elongation in the direction of MD (%) × elongation in the direction of CD (%)]

Geometric mean PE = square root of [PE in the MD direction (g * inch / inch 2 ) × PE in the CD direction (g * inch / inch 2 )]

Geometric mean elastic modulus = square root of [elastic modulus in the MD direction (g / cm) × elastic modulus in the CD direction (g / cm)]

Total dry strength (TDT) = ultimate strength in the MD direction (g / inch) + ultimate strength in the CD direction (g / inch)

Total PE = PE in the MD direction (g * inch / inch 2 ) + PE in the CD direction (g * inch / inch 2 )

Full modulus of elasticity = modulus of elasticity in the direction of MD (g / cm) + modulus of elasticity in the direction of CD (g / cm)

Strength ratio = tensile strength in the direction of MD (g / inch) / tensile strength in the direction of CD (g / inch)

Topographic measurements of fibrous structures characterized by different densities

[00373] Topographic measurements of fibrous structures having different densities are obtained using a computer-controlled interference optical profiler. Systems based on an optical profilometer measure the physical dimensions of the test surface, as a result of which a diagram of the elevations on the surface (along the z axis) on their location on the x-y plane is obtained. A suitable optical profiler should have such a field of view and resolution in the x-y plane so that the resulting images contain at least 10 pixels along the narrowest measured element. A suitable instrument is the GFM Mikrocad system with ODSCAD software version 4 or 6, or an equivalent system available from GFMesstechnik GmbH, Teltov, Germany.

[00374] If necessary, in order to make the samples properly representative for accurate measurements of surface characteristics, very fine white powder is sprayed onto the surface to be measured in small quantities. Preferably, this powder is NORD-TEST Developer U 89, available from Helling GmbH, Heidgraben, Germany, which is designed to detect cracks in metal parts and welds. Samples should be aged at 23 ° C ± 2 ° C and a relative humidity of 50% ± 2% for at least 2 hours immediately before applying this powder, and also for at least 2 hours after applying the powder. Care must be taken to deposit only the minimum amount of white powder needed to create a thin reflective white coating.

[00375] Samples must be aged at 23 ° C ± 2 ° C and a relative humidity of 50% ± 2% for at least 2 hours immediately prior to measurement.

[00376] The measured area of the fibrous structure is limited only to areas containing areas with different densities, while other areas or zones that may be present are not taken into account. The sample is placed with a measured surface directed upward under the projection head of the profilometer and perpendicular to it. Follow the manufacturer's instructions and provide optimized lighting and reflection conditions as prescribed by the manufacturer. Then receive and save digital images.

[00377] Any part of the image that is not part of the measured area should be cropped. Such cropping should be done before any subsequent image processing, filtering or analysis of measurements. The size of the resulting cropped image may vary between samples and images, depending on the size of the relief region of the sample.

[00378] Before taking measurements, the images are processed using appropriate software in order to slightly smooth out the noise in the images, as well as to reduce unevenness or waviness due to the overall shape of the sample. Such noise filtering includes the removal of invalid pixel values (black pixels characterized by a gray value at the border of the black grayscale range), as well as the removal of peak values or sharply protruding peaks (too bright pixels identified by the software as statistical deviations). Then apply a polynomial high-pass filter with the following settings: n = 8, differentiation. For samples with very small details, on which it is difficult to see the relief details, a Fourier filter can be applied (for example: a 5 mm wave filter, as a result, a fine structure is visible). Using such a Fourier filter, it removes parts larger than the length of the filter operator, defining them as noise, and then reduces the variance, reducing the statistical standard deviation of the topographic measurements. Thus, it is necessary that the size of the filter operator be larger than any part under consideration in order to prevent filtering of these parts. Processed images, such as a relief image shown in FIG. 14, can be displayed, analyzed and measured. Figure 14 was cropped, then alignment was performed by filtration with a polynomial filter (n = 8, differentiation) to remove unevenness due to the total undulation of the sample.

[00379] Then, measurements are performed based on the processed relief images in order to obtain three-dimensional parameters of the height difference (E) as well as the width (T) of the transition region. These measurements are performed using software to outline the considered rectilinear regions on the image of the sample topography on the x-y surface, and then generate height profile graphs along these rectilinear regions. The considered rectilinear regions are delineated in such a way that they cover several different places within the image, intersecting the continuous regions and centers of neighboring separate zones. The lines are drawn in such a way that they halve each transition region between the continuous and separate zones, at an angle perpendicular to the long axis of the transition region, as shown in FIG. 15. As shown in FIG. 15, several considered rectilinear regions, drawn through solid and separate zones, halve the transition regions at an angle perpendicular to the long axis of the transition region. Then, the parameters (E) and (T) are measured based on the height profile graphs constructed from the data of the considered rectilinear regions.

[00380] In the height profile graph, the X axis of the graph represents the length of the line, and the Y axis represents the surface height in the vertical direction, perpendicular to the flat surface of the sample. The difference in height (E) is measured in micrometers as the vertical rectilinear distance from the highest point of the peak to the lowest point of the adjacent recess, on the height profile graph, as shown in FIG. 16. As shown in FIG. 16, a graph of the height profile along the considered rectilinear region, constructed on the basis of the image of the surface topography, displays several values of the height difference (E). As a rule, this shows the maximum vertical difference in height between the surface of a continuous region and an adjacent separate zone, or vice versa. The width (T) of the transition region is measured in micrometers as the width of the curve along the X axis of the central sixty percent (60%) of the height difference (E), on the height profile graph, as shown in FIG. 17. As shown in FIG. 17, a graph of the height profile along the considered straight-line region, based on the image of the surface topography, displays several values of the width (T) of the transition region. As a rule, this shows the steepness of the transition from a continuous region to a neighboring separate zone, or vice versa.

[00381] If the sample has separate zones that can be assigned to two or more separate classes, which can be determined by visual inspection of their general shape, size, height and density, then the individual values (E) and (T) should be are defined for each class of separate zones and neighboring continuous regions forming pairs with them.

[00382] If visually it seems that the sample has more than one relief from separate zones in different places on the product, then each relief is characterized by its own values (E) and (T), determined independently of the other relief (s).

[00383] If the sample has a first and an adjacent second region, the first and second regions visually appearing different in terms of surface height, then the article is characterized by the values (E) and (T) measured in these regions. In this case, it is necessary to adhere to all the instructions of the method described in the present description, while the first and second areas can be replaced as a solid region, and the individual zones indicated in this method.

[00384] Images of five identical product samples are taken for each test relief, and for each identical sample, measurements are made of at least ten height difference (E) values for each class of individual zones and ten widths (T) of transition regions for each class of individual zones. These steps are repeated for each flat surface of each sample. The values (E) and (T) are given in relation to a flat surface, calculating the largest value (E). For each parameter defined for a particular relief and class of a separate zone, the values obtained from testing each of five identical samples are averaged to obtain the final value of each parameter.

Examples

[00385] The following are examples 1-8 of the present invention. As shown, the average thickness and average density of the mesh region and individual zones may vary. It is also shown, in particular, that as an example 2, a sample characterized by a plurality of regions is considered, and the average thickness and average density are given for each of these regions.

Figure 00000026

Figure 00000027

[00386] The following are the tensile strengths in the MD direction, the maximum elongation in the MD direction, PE in the MD direction and the elastic modulus in the MD direction for examples 3, 4 and 8 of the present invention.

Figure 00000028

[00387] The following are the tensile strengths in the CD direction, the maximum elongation in the CD direction, PE in the CD direction and the elastic modulus in the CD direction for examples 3, 4 and 8 of the present invention.

Figure 00000029

Figure 00000030

[00388] The following are values of geometric mean tensile strength, geometric mean maximum elongation, geometric mean PE and geometric mean elastic modulus for examples 3, 4 and 8 of the present invention.

Figure 00000031

[00389] The following are data obtained by profilometry of samples 1-8 of the present invention, including, for example, the height difference (E) and the width (T) values of the transition regions.

Figure 00000032

Figure 00000033

[00390] The following are moisture content data for Examples 2, 3, and 8 of the present invention.

Figure 00000034

[00391] The following are the values of the dissolution time and decomposition for examples 2-4 and 8, obtained in accordance with the dissolution test method described in the present description.

Figure 00000035

[00392] The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the indicated exact numerical values. On the contrary, unless otherwise indicated, each such size should be implied both as a specified value and as a functionally equivalent range covering a given value. For example, a dimension indicated as “40 mm” should be understood as “approximately 40 mm”.

[00393] For purposes of clarity, the full value of "wt.%" Does not exceed 100 wt. %

[00394] The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the indicated exact numerical values. On the contrary, unless otherwise indicated, each such size should be implied both as a specified value and as a functionally equivalent range covering a given value. For example, a dimension indicated as “40 mm” should be understood as “approximately 40 mm”.

[00395] Each document referred to in the present description, including any cross-reference or related patent or application, is hereby fully incorporated into this description by reference, with the exception of clearly indicated exceptions or other restrictions. The citation of any document is not an assumption that it is a prototype of any disclosed or claimed invention, or that it, or in combination with another source or sources, provides explanations, assumptions or discloses any of these inventions. Also, in the event that any meaning or definition of a term in this document contradicts any meaning or definition of the same term in the document incorporated herein by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to such a term in this document shall have priority .

[00396] Although specific embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Thus, the appended claims are intended to cover all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.

Claims (31)

1. A fibrous structure (key 20) for processing a fabric product containing yarns, in which the yarns contain one or more yarn-forming materials, at least one of said one or more yarn-forming materials contains a hydroxyl polymer, and one or more active tissue care agents released from filaments under the conditions of the intended use, wherein the fibrous structure further comprises:
(a) a continuous mesh region (key 22), wherein the mesh region is characterized by a first average density; and
(b) a plurality of individual zones (key 24) characterized by a second average density, the individual zones being distributed over a mesh region, wherein said first average density and second average density are different.
2. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that the first average density is from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 .
3. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that the second average density is from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 .
4. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that the continuous mesh region is a macroscopically monoplanar, embossed, continuous mesh region.
5. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that the total level of said one or more filament-forming materials present in the filaments is less than 80% by weight on the dry weight of the filament, and the total level of said one or more active agents present in threads, is more than 20% by weight on the dry weight of the threads.
6. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that said one or more filament-forming materials and said one or more active agents are contained in the filament in a weight ratio of less than 4.0 filament-forming materials and active agents.
7. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that said one or more filament forming materials comprise a polymer.
8. The fibrous structure according to claim 7, characterized in that said polymer is selected from the group consisting of: pullulan, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, hydroxyethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, carboxymethyl cellulose, sodium alginate, xanthan gum, gum tragacum gum, gum tragacum gum, , polyacrylic acid, copolymer of methyl methacrylate, carboxyvinyl polymer, dextrin, pectin, chitin, levan, elsinan, collagen, gelatin, zein, gluten, soy protein, casein, gender vinyl alcohol, carboxylated polyvinyl alcohol, sulfonated polyvinyl alcohol, starch, starch derivatives, hemicellulose derivatives, hemicelluloses, proteins, chitosan, chitosan derivatives, polyethylene glycol ether tetrametilenglikolevogo, hydroxymethylcellulose and mixtures thereof.
9. The fibrous structure according to p. 1, characterized in that it is characterized by a bulk mass of approximately 1500 g / m 2 or less, measured in accordance with the method of measuring the bulk described in this application.
10. The fibrous structure of claim 1, wherein said one or more active tissue care agents include a surfactant.
11. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that said fibrous structure contains two or more different active agents for tissue care.
12. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that said fibrous structure further comprises a solvent.
13. The fibrous structure according to p. 1, characterized in that it is characterized by a water content of from about 0% to about 20%, measured in accordance with the method for testing the water content described in this application.
14. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that it is characterized by an average decay time of approximately 60 s or less, measured in accordance with the solubility test method described in this application.
15. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that it has an average dissolution time of approximately 600 s or less, measured in accordance with the solubility test method described in this application.
16. The fibrous structure according to p. 1, characterized in that it is characterized by an average decay time, normalized with respect to the bulk, of approximately 1.0 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, measured in accordance with the solubility test method described in this application.
17. The fibrous structure according to p. 1, characterized in that it is characterized by an average dissolution time, normalized in relation to the main mass of approximately 10 s / (g / m 2 ) or less, measured in accordance with the solubility test method described in this application.
18. The fibrous structure according to claim 1, characterized in that at least some of the filaments are characterized by a diameter of less than 50 μm, measured in accordance with the method for determining the diameter described in this application.
19. A fibrous structure for processing a fabric product containing yarns, in which the yarns contain one or more yarn-forming materials, at least one of said one or more yarn-forming materials contains a hydroxyl polymer, and one or more active agents for care of the tissue released from the threads under the conditions of the intended use, while the fibrous structure further comprises at least a first region and a second region, each of these first and second regions Astea is characterized by at least one general intensive property, wherein said at least one general intensive property of the first region is quantitatively different from the indicated at least one general intensive property of the second region.
20. The fibrous structure according to claim 19, characterized in that the general intensive property is selected from the group consisting of density, bulk, height, opacity and any combination thereof.
21. The fibrous structure according to claim 19, characterized in that said at least one general intensive property includes a density, wherein the first region is characterized by a relatively higher density compared to the relatively lower density of the second region.
22. The fibrous structure according to p. 21, characterized in that the average density of the first region is from about 0.15 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 and the average density of the second region is from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.15 g / cm 3 .
23. The fibrous structure according to claim 19, characterized in that said at least one general intensive property includes a density, wherein the first region is characterized by a relatively lower density compared to the relatively higher density of the second region.
24. The fibrous structure according to p. 23, characterized in that the average density of the first region is from about 0.05 g / cm 3 to about 0.15 g / cm 3 and the average density of the second region is from about 0.15 g / cm 3 to about 0.80 g / cm 3 .
25. The fibrous structure of claim 19, wherein the first region comprises from about 5% to about 95% of the total area of the fibrous structure.
26. The fibrous structure according to p. 19, characterized in that the second region comprises from about 5% to about 95% of the total area of the fibrous structure.
27. A method of manufacturing a fibrous structure, the method comprising the step of laying a plurality of filaments on a three-dimensional molding element containing an ordered repetitive relief, thereby forming a fibrous structure containing filaments, the filaments containing one or more filament forming materials, at least one of said one or more filament-forming materials contains a hydroxyl polymer and one or more active tissue care agents released from the filaments under pre-conditions application, wherein the fibrous structure further comprises at least a first region and a second region, wherein each of said first and second regions is characterized by at least one common intensive property, wherein said at least one common intensive property of the first region is quantitatively different from said at least one common intensive property of the second region.
28. The method according to p. 27, characterized in that the at least one general intensive property includes a density, while the first region is characterized by a relatively higher density, compared with the relatively lower density of the second region.
29. The method according to p. 27, characterized in that the at least one general intensive property includes a density, while the first region is characterized by a relatively lower density, compared with the relatively higher density of the second region.
30. A method of processing a fabric product requiring such processing, the method comprising the step of processing a fabric product through a fibrous structure according to claim 1.
31. The method according to p. 30, characterized in that the processing step includes one or more steps selected from the group consisting of:
(a) pretreatment of a fabric product before washing;
(b) bringing the fabric article into contact with a washing solution formed by a nonwoven fabric and water;
(c) bringing the fabric product into contact with the nonwoven fabric in the dryer;
(d) drying the fabric product in the dryer in the presence of a nonwoven fabric; and
(e) combinations of the above steps.
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