RU2489950C2 - Ergonomic high-heel footwear - Google Patents

Ergonomic high-heel footwear Download PDF

Info

Publication number
RU2489950C2
RU2489950C2 RU2011106347/12A RU2011106347A RU2489950C2 RU 2489950 C2 RU2489950 C2 RU 2489950C2 RU 2011106347/12 A RU2011106347/12 A RU 2011106347/12A RU 2011106347 A RU2011106347 A RU 2011106347A RU 2489950 C2 RU2489950 C2 RU 2489950C2
Authority
RU
Russia
Prior art keywords
heel
foot
sole
height
part
Prior art date
Application number
RU2011106347/12A
Other languages
Russian (ru)
Other versions
RU2011106347A (en
Inventor
Евгений Кузьмич Гуторов
Original Assignee
Евгений Кузьмич Гуторов
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Евгений Кузьмич Гуторов filed Critical Евгений Кузьмич Гуторов
Priority to RU2011106347/12A priority Critical patent/RU2489950C2/en
Publication of RU2011106347A publication Critical patent/RU2011106347A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of RU2489950C2 publication Critical patent/RU2489950C2/en

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/141Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form having an anatomical or curved form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/37Sole and heel units
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B21/00Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole
    • A43B21/24Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole characterised by the constructive form

Abstract

FIELD: personal use articles.
SUBSTANCE: invention relates to ergonomic footwear with the heat height equal to 15-33% of the foot length, its analogues having support step bend only in the sagital cross-section; the furniture specificity consists in its being designed with an outward tilt of the sole heel part and a front tilt of the sole heel part being less then 40 degrees, with the heel displaced towards the outside (laterally) relative to the foot heel centre.
EFFECT: ensuring optimal distribution of support load onto the foot sections.

Description

The invention relates to the modeling and sewing of women's shoes with high heels (HVAC). The aim of the invention is to reduce the supporting load on the forefoot (OSS) in the HVAC and to maximize shoe compliance with changes in the shape of the foot when climbing the heel. Modern HVAC models have curvature of the supporting footprint only in the sagittal section. This is due to the false assumption that when climbing to the heel, the OSS lengthens, why the front slope of the heel part of the sole (CPP) of the HVAC reaches 40 degrees. Excessive forward inclination of the CPC creates the effect of the heel sliding towards the toe. In a patent search, a prototype US 2010/0180467 A1 (ANGELA SINGLETON) Jul. 22,2010, in which the author proposes to reduce the load on the PIC with the help of a special insole that creates additional support for the heel against sliding forward due to an elastically elastic arch support that performs the longitudinal arch of the foot. The insole is shortened in length, does not cover the frame and does not change the angle of the front inclination of the frame. The bearing instep creates pressure on the plantar aponeurosis (PA) in the projection of the heel spur, and its atrophy. Analysis of the biomechanics of the foot in the HVAC revealed previously unknown patterns. It was found out and mathematically proved that a normal foot cannot increase the length of the OSS, because its extreme points (calcaneus and fingers) are fixed by longitudinal PA fibers. It has been theoretically established and clinically proven that the back flexion of the fingers causes a relative shortening of the PA leading to: a) plantar deviation of the heads of the metatarsal bones (GIC); b) to the deflection of the calcaneal tuber forward, which leads to: c) to the deepening of the longitudinal arches of the foot, which causes: d) pronation of the PIC and supination of the AIA, which: e) rejects the talus and its center of gravity of the body outwards. The listed changes in the shape of the foot are taken into account in the manufacture of ergonomic high-heeled shoes, which is achieved:

1. reduced front tilt

2. the creation of the outer slope of the CPC,

3. The external offset of the center of the heel support relative to the center of the heel.

The female model HVAC should be equated with extreme, because the foot does not have natural mechanisms to compensate for changes in the shape of the foot when climbing the heel.

So the female foot in the HVAC, like a prosthesis, can carry only the supporting function. Regulating functions of the foot, such as:

1. evenly distribute body weight on the area of the support,

2. dampen the step pulse,

3. create a toe force repulsion,

4. to maintain balance while standing on one foot,

almost completely off.

If, when climbing the heel, the deflection of the fingers to the rear of the foot reaches 90 degrees relative to the metatarsal bones, the relative shortening of the aponeurosis will be ¼ of the circumference, the radius of which is equal to the radius of the CCP. So the relative shortening will be:

a) for the 1st finger: pi * d * 90: 360 = 3.14 * 3.5 * 90: 360 = 2.7 cm,

b) for the 5th finger: pi * d * 90: 360 = 3.14 * 1.0 * 90: 360 = 0.78 cm, where d is the diameter of the CCP.

Figure 9 shows the plantar deviation of the metacarpal bones with back flexion of the fingers by 90 degrees. In this case, the PIC is penetrated (lowered towards the sole) at the angle ABC, determined by the difference in the diameters of the CCP and approximately 12 degrees.

The fact of the deepening of the longitudinal plantar arch was established when studying photographs of the foot in profile with marks applied to the skin. On the outline from the photograph of the medial edge of the right foot (figure 4), it is seen that when lifting to the heel, with a height of 33% (1/3) of the length of the foot, the depth of the arch increases by 23-24 degrees. The heel rises to the heel due to flexion in the metatarsophalangeal joints along the line of the finger fold. The pronation of the PIC, fixed on the podium, leads to the response tilt of the foot outwards (supination) and to twisting it along the longitudinal axis. In Fig.1-2 (outline with photographs taken from above), the deviation of the feet outwards (supination of the heels) is noted during the transition from the support on the entire foot to the support on the socks. The position was fixed under the condition of uniformity of the supporting load on the gas-compressor plant. The ABC angle is formed by the intersection of the lines of the finger folds.

When viewed from the back (Figure 3), the external tilt of the feet leads to supination of the heels, the supporting planes of which, when crossing the horizontal, form the angles of the BAC and the ICA. The magnitude of these angles depends on the height of the heel.

Because the talus is deflected together with the foot, the center of gravity of the body (CTT) also deviates outward in proportion to the height of the heel. Figure 6 shows the deviation of the CTT outwardly at an OKM angle.

To compensate for changes in the shape of the foot in proportion to the height of the heel

1. creates an external slope of the CPC,

2. decreases the front slope of the CPC,

3. The center of the heel support on the podium is shifted outward.

The external inclination of the CPC will allow to remove the excess load on the medial edge of the PIC caused by plantar deviation of the metatarsal bones. With a maximum ergonomic heel height of 1/3 of the foot length, the optimal external inclination of the CPC is 12 (11-13) degrees (ABC angle of FIG. 6). An increase in the height of the heel by 1 cm above 3 cm increases the external inclination of the KPCH by 1.33 degrees for each centimeter of height (1.33 g. * 4 = 5.3 degrees, etc.). The heel height up to 3 cm inclusive of the external inclination of the CPC does not require, because foot shape changes are minimal.

On a high-heeled PIC, there are 2 forces acting:

a) the force of gravity having a vertical vector and

b) the sliding force of the foot forward along the inclined plane of the CPC shoe (horizontal vector).

The construction of a parallelogram of the decomposition of gravity (P = 100 kg) applied to the talus in a standing position on one leg (Fig. 8 OP) indicates that 68.3% of gravity acts on the heel equal to 1/3 of the length of the foot on the calcaneus, and 31.7% on the forefoot.

Gravity P1 acting on the calcaneal tubercle, in turn, decomposes into vertical and horizontal modules. The heel takes over the vertical module, and the horizontal module on an inclined plane presses the fingers into the toe of the shoe. The value of the horizontal module is directly proportional to the front slope of the shoe frame relative to the horizontal. On Fig presents the decomposition of the vertical module of the supporting load P1 = 68.3% of the body weight attributable to the calcaneal tubercle on a high heel. When the CPC is tilted forward by 10 degrees, the front module (CA) acting on the PIC is 16.2% of P1, at an angle of 20 degrees (CB) - 28.5%, at an angle of 35 degrees (CD) - 42.2% from P1.

Given the fact that the calcaneal tuber is deflected forward when the longitudinal arch is deepened, it is possible to accordingly reduce the forward inclination of the central limb. Calculations show that with a heel height of 1/3 of the foot length, the optimal forward inclination of the CPC is 18 degrees. 1 cm of the heel height requires 2 degrees of front tilt of the CPC. A similar gradation can be applied to any heel height.

The deviation of the talus and the center of gravity outside, necessitates a corresponding displacement of the center of the heel support on the podium (MN 6) for stability of the support.

The offset of the heel relative to the center of the heel K (Fig. 5) is equal to the product of the heel height (h) by the tangent (tg) of the ABC angle (Fig. 6) of the outer inclination of the CPC: h * tg12 = 8 * 0.22 = 1.76 cm.

The above formula is true for all sizes of shoes with heels 4 cm and above.

The optimal height of the heel should be strictly tied to the size of the foot. Lifting the heel leads to the transition of the PIC from horizontal to vertical. The transition occurs along an arc of a circle whose radius is equal to the distance between the centers of rotation of the talus and GPK-1 (OM Fig. 8). X-ray measurements and calculations show that when the PIC is tilted at an angle of 70 degrees to the horizontal, the heel height is 1/3 of the foot length. A further increase in the angle of inclination significantly increases the load on the forefoot, practically without changing the height of the heel. An increase in foot size of 1 cm increases the height of the optimal heel by 3.5 mm. The heel height is the vertical difference between the center of the heel and the support GPK-1, (D and C of Figure 5).

Changes in the shape of the foot are determined by a single factor of relative shortening of the PA when climbing to a high heel. For this reason, changes in the shape of ergonomic shoes are functionally closely interconnected and cannot be used individually.

The essential features of the invention are:

1) the outer slope of the CPC,

2) reduced front inclination of the CPC,

3) the center of the heel support displaced outwardly on the podium.

The external inclination of the CPC can be achieved in two ways:

a) a corresponding (wedge-shaped) recess of the outer edge of the CPC (angle ABC of FIG. 6) and or

b) a wedge-shaped thickening of the inner edge of the supporting insole of the CPC (pos. 1 of Fig. 7) with simultaneous hardening of the outer part of the backdrop from stapling (pos. 2 of Fig. 7).

Figure 10 shows the outline of the medial edge of a real cast sole. AB - the heel part of the sole corresponds to the hindfoot and makes up 30% of the length of the supporting track. BC - the beam part of the sole corresponds to the longitudinal arch (heel) of the foot and is 40% of the length of the supporting track. CD - the toe of the shoe corresponds to the toes and makes up 30% of the length of the supporting footprint (on the 1st finger). Br, Cr are the radii of the arc of the transition from one part of the sole to the other, which is approximately 3 cm.

With an increase in the radius, support pressure increases on the plantar aponeurosis in the projection of the longitudinal arch, which can lead to atrophy. A decrease in the front inclination of the central limb along the medial edge of the sole by the ABC angle was made due to thickening of the sole.

11 shows the principle of reducing the front inclination of the CPC along the lateral edge of the sole due to its wedge-shaped thinning. Such changes in the forward inclination of the CPC allow you to simultaneously create the necessary external inclination of the CPC. The remaining positions and symbols in FIG. 11 correspond to FIG. 10.

As a result, taking into account the foregoing, women's shoes with heels with a height of 15% of the length of the foot or more are obtained, having bends of the supporting track in the sagittal section and a front inclination of the heel part of the sole, reaching 35-40 degrees to the horizontal, characterized in that it has:

1. the outer slope of the heel of the sole of the shoe and

- the outer slope is 1.3-1.4 degrees per cm of heel height;

- the outer slope is complemented by the torsion (twisting) of the hard Gelenka according to the angle of the outer slope of the heel of the sole;

2. reduced front inclination of the heel part

- the front slope of the heel of the sole is 2 (1.8-2.2) degrees per 1 cm of the height of the heel,

- the bend of the sole from the heel to the bundle and from the bundle to the toe is carried out along an arc with a radius of 3 cm;

3. the center of the heel support on the podium is shifted outward relative to the center of the heel by an amount equal to the product of the height of the heel and the tangent of the angle of the external inclination of the heel of the sole.

The aforementioned changes in the shape of high-heeled shoes make it possible to achieve maximum compliance with the shape of the foot and the shape of the shoe. This, in turn, makes it possible to optimally distribute the supporting load on the departments of the foot, reduce the risk of the negative impact of high heels on the foot, prevent early deformation of the forefoot, and expand the age, weight and time ranges of wearing high-heeled shoes.

Description of drawings and abbreviations.

Figure 1. Abris photo in the position “heels together, socks apart”, support on the whole foot, top view. AB and BC - lines of the finger fold.

Figure 2. The same as figure 1 in the position of support on the socks, top view.

Figure 3. The same as figure 2, rear view. BAC and ICA are the angles of the external tilt (supination) of the heels.

Figure 4. Abris photo of the medial edge of the right foot. The deepening of the longitudinal arch during the transition to the support on the toe. ABC - corners of the longitudinal arch.

Figure 5. The outline of the reference footprint of the left foot. C is the center of the heel. DC - line of longitudinal arch. DB is the line of the transverse arch. AA - section line (Fig.6, 7).

6. Section AA (figure 5) of the right foot with a high heel, rear view. An option to achieve the inclination of the heel part of the sole outwards due to the deepening of the sole. О is the center of gravity of the body, ABC is the angle of the external tilt of the sole, OK is the vertical axis of the foot without a heel, ON and KM are vertical, MN is the offset of the center of the heel support outward. K is the center of the heel.

7. Section AA (Fig. 5). An option to achieve the external inclination of the heel part of the sole due to the wedge-shaped thickening of the insole of the CPC. O is the center of gravity. ABC - the angle of the sole. 1 - wedge-shaped insole. 2 - hardened outer part of the backdrop.

Fig. 8. Scheme of the distribution of body weight in the departments of the foot on the heel. O is the center of gravity. OR - gravity of the body. ORRE - a parallelogram of the decomposition of gravity into the front and rear sections of the foot. OE - front module. OF - rear module. CP1 - rear vertical module. CA, CB, CD - front sliding force modules P1 acting on the toe. CP1, AP1, BP1, DP1 - the magnitude of the vertical modules of the force acting on the back of the foot.

K is the center of the heel support. OM is the radius of the arc along which the foot rises to the heel. M is the center of rotation of the head of the 1st metatarsal bone. N is the projection of gravity on the podium.

Fig.9. Scheme of plantar deviation of the heads of the metatarsal bones with back flexion of the fingers by 90 degrees. ABC - pronation angle of the forefoot when climbing to a high heel.

Figure 10. Outline of the inner edge of the right shoe with molten soles. AB - heel (back) part of the sole (CP). Sun beam (front) part of the sole. CD is the toe of the sole. Br, Cr - radius of the arc of the transition from one part of the sole to the other. BAE - the angle of inclination of the CPC.

11. Outline of the outer edge of the right shoe. Designations are the same as in figure 10.

ABBREVIATIONS OSS - reference footprint GPC - metatarsal head AIA - hindfoot PIC - forefoot PA - plantar aponeurosis TTC - the center of gravity of the body KChP - heel part of the sole HVAC - high-heeled shoes.

Claims (6)

1. Ergonomic heel shoes with a height of 15-33% of the length of the foot, the analogues of which have a bend of the support track only in the sagittal section, characterized in that the shoes are made with an external inclination of the heel of the sole, with a front inclination of the heel of the sole of less than 40 ° and offset heel outward (laterally) relative to the center of the heel of the foot.
2. Shoes according to claim 1, characterized in that it has an external inclination of the heel part of the sole equal to 1.3-1.4 ° per 1 cm of the height of the heel.
3. Shoes according to claim 1, characterized in that it has a torsion (twisting) of a hard gellet in accordance with the angle of the external inclination of the heel part of the sole.
4. Shoes according to claim 1, characterized in that the front slope of the heel part of the sole of the ergonomic heel (1/3 of the length of the foot) should not exceed 27 ° to the horizontal (3 ° to 1 cm of the height of the heel).
5. Shoes according to claim 1, characterized in that the sole is bent from the heel part to the bundle part and from the bundle part to the toe part in an arc of 3 cm radius.
6. Shoes according to claim 1, characterized in that it has a lateral displacement of the center of the heel relative to the center of the heel by an amount equal to the product of the height of the heel and the tangent of the angle of the external inclination of the heel of the sole.
RU2011106347/12A 2011-02-21 2011-02-21 Ergonomic high-heel footwear RU2489950C2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
RU2011106347/12A RU2489950C2 (en) 2011-02-21 2011-02-21 Ergonomic high-heel footwear

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
RU2011106347/12A RU2489950C2 (en) 2011-02-21 2011-02-21 Ergonomic high-heel footwear
DE201110054164 DE102011054164A1 (en) 2011-02-21 2011-10-04 An ergonomic shoe with a high heel
PCT/RU2012/000289 WO2012125082A2 (en) 2011-02-21 2012-04-16 Ergonomic high-heeled shoe

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
RU2011106347A RU2011106347A (en) 2012-08-27
RU2489950C2 true RU2489950C2 (en) 2013-08-20

Family

ID=46605046

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
RU2011106347/12A RU2489950C2 (en) 2011-02-21 2011-02-21 Ergonomic high-heel footwear

Country Status (3)

Country Link
DE (1) DE102011054164A1 (en)
RU (1) RU2489950C2 (en)
WO (1) WO2012125082A2 (en)

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100180467A1 (en) * 2007-09-28 2010-07-22 Angela Singleton Insole Support System For Footwear
US20110035967A1 (en) * 2008-03-13 2011-02-17 Gad Shmueli Orthopedic shoe

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5174052A (en) * 1991-01-03 1992-12-29 Schoenhaus Harold D Dynamic stabilizing inner sole system
WO1992018025A1 (en) * 1991-04-19 1992-10-29 Alexei Stepanovich Bakshinov Footwear
KR20100134167A (en) * 2009-06-15 2010-12-23 김흥록 Modern dance shoes rear hoof

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100180467A1 (en) * 2007-09-28 2010-07-22 Angela Singleton Insole Support System For Footwear
US20110035967A1 (en) * 2008-03-13 2011-02-17 Gad Shmueli Orthopedic shoe

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2012125082A2 (en) 2012-09-20
DE102011054164A1 (en) 2012-08-23
RU2011106347A (en) 2012-08-27
WO2012125082A3 (en) 2013-01-17

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8341856B2 (en) Footwear with orthotic midsole
KR101287391B1 (en) Shoe insole
US7168185B2 (en) Shoes sole structures
US7926203B2 (en) Dance footwear
US6629376B1 (en) Shoe sole with a concavely rounded sole portion
US20120180336A1 (en) Footwear
CN103120438B (en) For the U-shaped supporting system of footwear
CN1231158C (en) Sole
US20030217482A1 (en) Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
EP0860121B1 (en) Shoe sole and shoe and sandal including the sole
US8256142B2 (en) Anatomically correct flexible contoured footbed insole
US9788602B2 (en) Basketball insole
EP0424471B1 (en) Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US4453322A (en) Sandal having side wall for preventing pronation
US4578882A (en) Forefoot compensated footwear
US4567678A (en) Orthopedic shoe
US4642911A (en) Dual-compression forefoot compensated footwear
US8590178B2 (en) Stability and comfort system for an article of footwear
US6789331B1 (en) Shoes sole structures
US5058585A (en) Orthotic shoe insert
US6594922B1 (en) Medial/lateral counter foot stabilizer
JP2012511959A (en) Insoles for footwear for high-heeled shoes
CN1067567A (en) Tripod support for human foot
US5921004A (en) Footwear with stabilizers
US8523194B2 (en) Forefoot wedge insert for footwear

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
FA92 Acknowledgement of application withdrawn (lack of supplementary materials submitted)

Effective date: 20130121

FZ9A Application not withdrawn (correction of the notice of withdrawal)

Effective date: 20130213

MM4A The patent is invalid due to non-payment of fees

Effective date: 20140222

NF4A Reinstatement of patent

Effective date: 20151227

MM4A The patent is invalid due to non-payment of fees

Effective date: 20170222