RU2385140C2 - Sole with tangential deformability - Google Patents

Sole with tangential deformability Download PDF

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Publication number
RU2385140C2
RU2385140C2 RU2007135172/12A RU2007135172A RU2385140C2 RU 2385140 C2 RU2385140 C2 RU 2385140C2 RU 2007135172/12 A RU2007135172/12 A RU 2007135172/12A RU 2007135172 A RU2007135172 A RU 2007135172A RU 2385140 C2 RU2385140 C2 RU 2385140C2
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RU
Russia
Prior art keywords
elements
sole
deformation
element
tangential
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RU2007135172/12A
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Russian (ru)
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RU2007135172A (en
Inventor
Ханс Георг БРАУНШВАЙЛЕР (CH)
Ханс Георг БРАУНШВАЙЛЕР
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Глиде`Н Лок Гмбх
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Priority to CH3272005 priority
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/184Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole the structure protruding from the outsole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/183Leaf springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/186Differential cushioning region, e.g. cushioning located under the ball of the foot
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/22Soles made slip-preventing or wear-resisting, e.g. by impregnation or spreading a wear-resisting layer
    • A43B13/24Soles made slip-preventing or wear-resisting, e.g. by impregnation or spreading a wear-resisting layer by use of insertions
    • A43B13/26Soles made slip-preventing or wear-resisting, e.g. by impregnation or spreading a wear-resisting layer by use of insertions projecting beyond the sole surface

Abstract

FIELD: personal use articles.
SUBSTANCE: sole, in particular for sport shoes, may be arranged with higher elastic deformability also in tangential direction forward and backward, as a result proper shock absorption is also achieved during inclined and slightly shifting treading. However, after critical deformation has been achieved in such deformed area, sole is substantially rigid relative to tangential deformation. Runner may again push off load point, also without losses in distance. According to invention, elastic deformability of sole is achieved also in tangential direction as a result of at least one first element, and its mentioned rigidity against tangential deformation after achievement of critical deformation, as well as extent of critical deformation in such deformed area is identified by at least one second element. While these first and second elements may be independently calculated, identified by size, there are more opportunities for practice regarding design, improvement and changes. Finally, in the area of heel and/or toe of sole there are multiply alternating zones, identified with at least one first element and zones identified with at least one second element.
EFFECT: provision of opportunity to avoid floating effect in case of high elastic deformations.
9 cl, 26 dwg

Description

The present invention relates to soles, in particular for athletic shoes with elastic deformability, also in the tangential direction back and forth, which, only after the occurrence of at least one critical deformation in such a deformed region, is essentially rigid with respect to tangential deformation.

Moreover, deformation in the tangential direction should be understood, for example, as a result of shear deformation in the tangential direction and, accordingly, parallel to the planar extension of the sole or its running surface. It is necessary to distinguish from this, for example, deformations caused by compression in the perpendicular direction to the planar extent of the sole or to its running surface. On a horizontal base, the tangential directions almost coincide with the horizontal and perpendicular with the vertical direction.

Elastically malleable soles are known in large numbers in a wide variety of embodiments, using elastic materials with very different stiffnesses. Soles with embedded air or gel socks are also known. They should absorb the loads arising during the run and protect the runner’s motor apparatus, in particular, his joints, and also contribute to a pleasant sense of movement.

Most sporting shoes with studs currently available in the trade have amortization characteristics that, under compression of the sole, allow depreciation primarily in the vertical direction and, accordingly, in the direction perpendicular to the running surface and which are however relatively rigid in the horizontal and accordingly tangential direction, and in this attitude with an inclined and somewhat shifting attack is not pliable enough. The latter could be justified, among other things, in that the great deformability of the sole would produce something like a floating effect in the horizontal direction, which would negatively affect the stability and safety of the position of the runner. Also, the runner would lose a certain distance segment at each step, since the sole would be slightly deformed when repelled from the contact point, respectively, only in the direction opposite to the repulsion. To a certain extent, the floating effect of course already occurs with standard sports shoes. To avoid this effect, the majority of such sports shoes have a front area of the sole, from which, as a rule, repulsion occurs, is made relatively rigid and unyielding.

The soles of the initially mentioned kind, which are also known from document WO 03/102430, in contrast, avoid the floating effect, despite pronounced tangential deformability, while after at least one critical deformation in such a deformed region they are essentially rigid with respect to tangential deformation. For the runner, after reaching critical deformation, a confident stance is obtained at the corresponding fulcrum and, accordingly, the load, from which he can again repel without loss in distance.

WO 03/102430 describes various exemplary embodiments by which one can well understand the principle of solution with the tangential deformability of the sole in combination with its rigidity after at least one critical deformation has been achieved. Thus, for example, tubular hollow elements made of rubber material are described which can be completely compressed under vertical, in particular, however, tangential deformation forward and backward, and then prevent further tangential deformation due to frictional connection between their upper and their lower shell halves corps.

The sole for sports shoes is known from EP 1264556, in which the sole comprises an outer, softer layer and an inner, more rigid layer. The protrusions on the inner, more rigid layer penetrate through the softer, outer layer and protrude from it in the form of spikes. Tangential deformability of the sole is not provided, and it would also be prevented by spikes.

The sole known from FR 2 709 929 is similarly constructed, with the inner layer provided with sharp, metal spikes.

From document UK 2285569, a training boot with a sole is known which comprises a pliable first and rigid second elements. The first elements are tilted at an angle backward in the direction of the heel and are compressed under load in this direction between the second stubborn elements, which then take the load. Corresponding deformation of the first elements forward is not possible due to their location relative to the second elements.

From JP 5309001, a shoe with a sole is known, which in the inner zone is provided with protrusions tangentially deformable in all directions and provided with a cavity. This inner zone is surrounded by a marginal zone with stiff, lower ribs that take on the load, starting with a certain deformation of the hollow protrusions.

From a registered German utility sample G 8126601, a shoe with a sole is known in which pieces in the form of brushes are inserted with a stiff bristle pointing backwards. The bristles should make possible a quick start forward, as well as sliding forward by pushing it back. Corresponding deformation of the bristles forward is not provided and, perhaps, is not possible.

From document US 3299544, a shoe with a sole is known, the front heel region of which is provided with transverse, backward inclined ribs. The posterior marginal zone of the calcaneal region forms a slightly lower plateau in comparison with the ribs. In normal running, the ribs must come into contact with the floor before the plateau and bend back elastically before the plateau comes into contact with the floor and limit further deformation of the ribs.

From document DE 29818243 a running shoe with a sole with backward inclined elements is known, which, when stepped on, recline in the direction of the heel and overlap the rest of the sole.

In the framework of the practical application, known from WO 03/102430 of the principle, as well as the tubular hollow elements described there, it turned out that they cannot meet, at least in their specifically described form, all the requirements of practice. It is no coincidence that, in the field of sports shoes, sports shoes are specially designed and take into account the requirements of the respective sport, almost all sports shoes, and, above all, the performance of the sole plays a correspondingly important, if not decisive, role for their respective suitability.

An object of the present invention is to improve the sole of the kind known from document WO 03/102430 so that it is better aligned with various practice requirements, including the requirements of various sports, in an economical manner.

This problem is solved according to the invention by means of the features that are indicated in the claims.

Both functionalities necessary for the desired effect, namely tangential deformability, on the one hand, and rigidity with respect to tangential deformation after at least one critical deformation is achieved, on the other hand, are realized according to the invention by different elements. Since at least one first and at least one second element can be independently designed, sized and manufactured, in practice we get much more possible design options, implementation and possible changes, with which it is possible to better achieve the desired adaptation to the requirements practice than this happens in the case of elements such as the known tubular hollow elements, which simultaneously perform both of the above functions.

The corresponding division into several tangentially deformable first elements and several rigid second elements essentially also provides for the aforementioned document JP 5309001. However, there the first and second elements are located separately from each other: the first elements in the inner zone and the second elements in the edge zone surrounding the inner zone . Thus, it may turn out that the runners on the so-called inner or outer part of the foot, which will be discussed below, roll exclusively on rigid elements located in the marginal zone, or, if rolled through the middle of the sole, only the first elements are practically loaded, and when this comes to a floating effect, which the invention seeks to avoid.

Therefore, the invention provides that in the calcaneal region and / or in the region of the toe of the sole, in the longitudinal direction (from the heel to the region of the toe), zones are repeatedly alternated, which are defined, on the one hand, by at least one first element and, on the other hand, by at least one second element. As a result of this, it is ensured that when rolling through the heel and / or through the toe region, both functionalities are always used in a sufficiently close temporal as well as spatial relation to each other. Therefore, the characteristic of the sole according to the invention substantially corresponds to that of WO 03/102430.

The first few elements may be provided. The zones defined by at least one first element can be formed respectively by one, however, and several of such first elements. Accordingly, several second elements can be provided, and zones defined by at least one second element can be formed respectively by one, however, and several of such second elements.

As well as soles known from document WO 03/102430, the sole according to the present invention can also have such dimensional parameters that at least one critical deformation during running is locally limited only in the correspondingly maximally loaded zone, and also in time only around the maximum load . In this case, at least one critical deformation, in which, so to speak, the tangential deformability of the sole according to the invention is frozen, may depend on the type of deformation. Deformation also does not have to be only tangential. Critical deformation can also be achieved with a purely transverse and, accordingly, vertical deformation.

According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, critical deformation is achieved only after a tangential and / or vertical course of deformation, which is more than 20% of the deformable sole thickness, in certain cases even more than 50% of this thickness. Preferably, the tangential deformability should even almost correspond to the vertical deformability. Absolutely, it can generally be about one centimeter.

With the deformation and shock absorption paths thus calculated, the sole according to the invention effectively softens the forces and loads resulting from running. First of all, the sole according to the invention behaves optimally, absorbing upon landing, since it can be gently applied under the prevailing horizontal forces in the direction of movement, for example, due to shear forces. In the case of running shoes with soles equipped with spikes according to the prior art, even if they are made with pronounced vertical attenuation due to the practically absent tangential deformability, a high maximum load is obtained. When rolling, the sole according to the invention assumes the prevailing vertical forces due to vertical deformations, also absorbing well. However, in addition, she also reacts in this phase with a variety of tangential deformations in different directions to movements between the foot and the floor, which are expressed, as a rule, in circular slippage of the foot in the boot and often lead to worn socks or even to the formation of blisters. The shoe does not interfere with the movement that the foot, when rolling, would begin to perform in relation to the floor. The boot makes running largely free of fatigue possible. At full load in the repulsion phase, the sole according to the invention, on the contrary, loses its shock-absorbing properties almost completely. In this phase, depreciation is no longer needed and would only be an obstacle to effective repulsion. In the push phase, the sole according to the invention behaves “rigidly”.

On the soles that have been used longer by various runners, large differences can be fixed in relation to their prevailing loads. This is due to the different running styles that are characteristic of individual runners. Differences are also obtained from different running distances. So sprinters are mainly runners on the so-called forefoot with a load almost exclusively on the toe area. In contrast, styers land in most cases on the heel and roll over the entire foot. Here, the so-called runners are distinguished on the outer and inner part of the foot. Runners on the outside of the foot land on the outside of the heel, roll along the outside of the metatarsus and push off also in the outside of the toe and, accordingly, from the toe. For runners on the inside of the foot, this is the opposite. There are also mixed forms in which, for example, they land outside, roll through the metatarsus and push away from the thumb and vice versa. The sole according to the invention, due to the fact that it can deform vertically, as well as in the tangential direction back and forth, can adapt well to all these various loads and contribute to the natural movements of the foot.

The invention is explained below in more detail using examples of execution and in connection with the drawings. They are showing:

Figure 1 is a sports shoe, a side view, with a sole according to the first embodiment of the invention, namely: a) without loads, b) loaded obliquely forward and c) when pushing back;

Figure 2 - the first and second sole elements of figure 1 in a schematic detailed view, namely: a) without loads, b) loaded obliquely forward and c) loaded vertically;

Figure 3 is a similar representation of the same first and second elements, however, partially embedded and fixed by kinematic closure in the midsole;

Figure 4 - in the same representation, a form of execution in which only the first element is embedded in the midsole, the second elements, on the contrary, are made integrally with it;

5 is an embodiment of the embodiment of FIG. 4, wherein: a) in an unloaded condition and b) in a loaded state, wherein the first elements are embedded, however, so deep in the midsole 4 that there are more in the second elements as special parts dont need;

6 - a) and b) schematically, further variants of the views according to figure 5;

7 is a schematic detailed view of a continuous layer or a layer with the first and second elements formed on it, namely: a) without loads, b) loaded obliquely forward and c) loaded vertically;

Fig.8 a) -d) - several top views of the working surface of the soles according to the invention; and

Fig.9 a) -e) - further layers according to Fig.7 in an unloaded state.

With the aid of FIG. 1, an embodiment is first described, which, however, is not necessarily preferred, however, by which one can well imagine the invention.

Figure 1 shows a running shoe 2 according to the invention, provided with a sole 1. The sole 1 is formed by a large number of first profiled hollow elements 3a, which are already known from WO 03/102430, as well as several second elements 3b in the form of protruding pads. Hollow elements 3a may have a height of, for example, 15 mm, and elements 3b in the form of protruding pads, a height of, for example, 10 mm. Both the hollow elements 3a and the second elements 3b can be arranged respectively over the entire width of the running shoe 2. However, they could also be arranged in several rows next to each other. Also, the elements 3b in the form of protruding pads could at least partially annularly surround individual or several hollow elements 3a. Elements 3a, 3b are fixed on the lower side of the midsole 4 of the running shoe 1, for example by gluing.

The hollow elements 3a are made of a material that can elastically deform under stresses arising during running. The second elements 3b, as well as the midsole 4 may also have a certain flexibility, however, they are essentially stiff compared to the hollow elements 3a, in particular, stiff with respect to tangential deformation. The hollow elements 3a are also higher in comparison with the elements 3b in the form of protruding pads and therefore protrude downward with respect to them.

The hollow elements 3a form, in the sense of the above definition, respectively "zones defined by at least one first element". If several hollow elements 3a are located side by side, then they can also be jointly assigned to such a zone. Correspondingly, this applies to the second elements 3b in the form of protruding pads that "form defined zones with at least one second element". As a result of this, in the longitudinal direction of the sole, different zones alternate repeatedly both in the toe and in the heel. If the second elements 3b in the form of protruding pads at least partially annularly surround individual or several hollow elements 3a, then different zones on the sole area are further mixed together.

If the running shoe 2, as shown in Fig. 1b) and is illustrated by the load arrow P1, is exposed to the load obliquely forward when it comes, then first only the above hollow elements 3a come into contact with the floor 5 and when the load is elasticly damped, they deform vertically, however , also horizontally. This deformation is limited by adjacent second elements 3b in the form of protruding pads, as soon as the hollow elements 3a are at the same height with them on the same line. From this moment, the second elements in the form of protruding pads take up the bulk of the load, and they do not allow any at least significant tangential shift of the running shoe with respect to floor 5 due to their higher rigidity. The carrier of the running shoe has a firm and firm floor stand in this phase. In addition, it can, as shown in Fig. 1c), also again be repelled from the position according to Fig. 1c) to perform the next step without having to put up with loss in distance, since the second elements in the form of protruding pads also in a substantial volume, they practically cannot deform horizontally, in the direction of the new load during repulsion, indicated by arrow P2.

Figure 2 shows in detail one of the hollow elements 3a, as well as two elements 3b in the form of protruding pads in figure 1, namely: a) in an unloaded condition and b) including tangentially loaded. Under the designation c), the deformation is vertical and accordingly shown vertically downward, from which it becomes obvious that the advantages explained above with respect to stability and repulsion without loss in distance are achieved even under a purely vertical load.

With the sole described above, the hollow elements 3a allow for their desired elastic deformability, while the elements 3b in the form of protruding pads, on the one hand, determine and limit the possible degree of deformation of the hollow elements 3a and, on the other hand, provide the desired rigidity of the sole against tangential deformation after reaching critical deformation. Since these two functionalities are distributed between different elements, there is a large degree of freedom in the implementation of these elements. For example, different materials may be used for the first and second elements. Hollow elements 3a should also not longer allow for rigid frictional coupling under load, as in WO 03/102430, and are generally substantially less loaded. First of all, they do not have to bear the full dynamic weight and are unloaded by the second elements 3b with a still non-critical degree of deformation. It is advantageous if the surfaces of the second elements 3b which come into contact with the floor have good “adhesion” with respect to the floor, which, if necessary, can be achieved due to the special properties of these surfaces.

Hollow elements 3a may be characterized as “shock absorbing elements”, and protruding-shaped elements 3b as supporting elements.

The forms of execution presented above are characterized by extremely large deformation paths, which between the unloaded state, for example, according to Fig. 1a) and the state, for example, according to Fig. 1b) can total more than 20%, and in certain cases even more than 50% of the vertical protrusion of the hollow elements 3a above the elements 3b in the form of a protruding platform. The runner sways as a result "like on the clouds", and at the same time, however, at no time does he experience a state of uncertain stability.

In the above described embodiments, the first and / or second elements 3a, 3b are subjected to rather high variable loads, including due to tangential and, accordingly, shearing forces. With a purely adhesive fastening technique, the elements could tear off from the midsole 4 over time. Improvement can be achieved here by partial termination and, if necessary, additional fixation by geometrical closure of the elements 3a and / or 3b in the midsole 4, as shown in Fig. 3 for one of the hollow elements 3a and two elements 3b in the form of protruding pads.

Figure 4 shows a form of execution in which only the presented hollow element 3a is embedded in the midsole 4, and both elements 3b, on the contrary, are formed integrally with the midsole 4 and molded directly on it. Additionally, the fixation of the hollow element 3a in the midsole 4 is improved by the dovetail joint.

The embodiment of FIG. 4 is presented in FIG. 5, namely: a) in an unloaded state and b) in a loaded state. The hollow elements 3a are embedded here so deeply in the midsole 4 that the protruding second elements, such as the elements 3b described above, become completely unnecessary and therefore also not formed. In this embodiment, the “normal” surface 4.1 of the midsole 4 assumes the function of the second elements 3b described above. So that the hollow elements 3a can be "sunk" into the recesses 4.2 in which they are located, i.e. deform obliquely and accordingly inward until they are on a straight line with the surface 4.1 of the midsole, the recesses 4.2 should be made wide enough and accordingly long, as shown in figure 5.

Figures 6a) and b) show the following variants, similar to Figure 5, in which the first elements 3a are also embedded relatively deep in the midsole 4 and in which the "normal" surface 4.1 of the midsole 4 assumes the function of the second elements 3b described above. The individual variants of FIG. 6 differ in this respect only due to the formation of the first elements 3a. On the left side of FIG. 6, respectively, the unloaded state and on the right side the loaded state in the phase of critical deformation are represented.

In the execution of FIG. 6a), the first including inclined and accordingly tangentially deformed element 3a is made in the form of a pin. The recess 4.2 in the midsole 4 can be made here, for example, round and along its edge to have equal clearance on all sides relative to the pin 3a located in its center, as is sketchy shown in both detailed views at the bottom of FIG. 6a).

In the embodiment of FIG. 6b), the deformable element 3a is formed in the form of a tube with an axis perpendicular to the midsole 4. The rest of the execution and presentation corresponds to FIG. 6a).

Fig. 7a) shows a layer 6 of an elastically deformable material with first elements 6a and second elements 6b alternately formed thereon in an unloaded state. This layer 6 can be performed as a whole and with a large surface. In the direction perpendicular to the plane of the drawing, the same sequence of the first 6a and second elements 6b can be provided, so that a structure is obtained in which one first element is respectively surrounded by four second elements and vice versa. The first and second elements in this case are mixed with each other, as already indicated. Appropriately cut pieces of this layer can be secured by gluing, for example, on the underside of the running shoe, respectively, on the midsole 4 of the running shoe 2 of FIG. 1, as is schematically represented in FIG. 8a).

The first elements 6a are in the form of truncated cones, are hollow and slightly higher than the second elements 6b, which are composed of solid material, which are also in the form of truncated cones. The first elements 6a are relatively soft, as the first elements 3a described above, and can be deformed tangentially forward and backward, as well as vertically. Due to their shape symmetrical with respect to the axis of rotation, the first elements 6a can even equally tangentially deform in all directions, which may be an additional advantage with respect to the desired rolling behavior.

The second elements 6b, in contrast, are essentially rigid and functionally consistent with the second elements 3b) described above. Elements 6a and 6b may be smaller than elements 3a and 3b. For example, the height h1 of the entire layer 6 and, therefore, of the first elements 6a may be 8-12 mm, preferably 10 mm and the height h2 of the second elements 6b 4-8 mm, preferably 6 mm. The thickness of the layer 6 in the transition regions between the first and second elements may be, for example, 2 mm, the thickness of the base of the first elements 6a being, however, preferably greater than 2 mm. The horizontal spacing between the centers of the first and second elements 6a, 6b may be, for example, 10-20 mm, preferably 15 mm.

Fig. 7b) shows a layer 6 inclined on the floor 5. The first elements 6a under this load are deformed vertically, first of all, however, tangentially respectively horizontally, and do not protrude above the second elements 6b. Further deformation of the first elements 6a is prevented by the second elements 6b. The intervals between the first and second elements are selected in magnitude preferably just such as to make possible for the first elements 6a the deformation shown. The magnitude of the path of tangential deformation to achieve critical deformation is larger than the possible path of vertical deformation and in absolute terms is a good 5 mm for the above dimensions.

Fig. 7c) shows layer 6 under vertical load.

The elasticity of the first elements 6a should have been chosen approximately such that critical deformation occurs at a load of about 1-10 kg. This value is dependent on the number of elements and their location on the sole surface (local density), the desired damping and the weight of the runner. The runner should be able to, at least when repelled, with its weight (dynamic if necessary), cause critical deformation. This is important for all possible forms of execution of the soles according to the invention and, accordingly, for elements similar to element 3a. For small shoe sizes (= rather a lightweight runner), different flexibility should be selected as necessary, respectively a different number of first elements 3a / 6a than for large sizes of shoes (= rather a heavy runner). In the case of the first elements similar to element 3a, as a rule, the number of 8-15 elements distributed over the area of the heel and the area of the toe is sufficient. In the case of the first elements like element 6a, as a rule, more than 20 elements will be required due to their smaller size.

Regarding the shaping of the first 6a and second elements 6b of the layer 6 of FIG. 7 and their location relative to each other, an additional range of embodiments arises. For example, the second elements 6b can be formed perpendicular to the plane of the drawing as elongated ribs, regularly or irregularly formed pads, or such as shown in fig.8) and c). The second elements 6b could even form a cohesive surface in which the first elements 6a are scattered, just as shown in fig.8d).

From the geometries shown in Fig. 8, it is seen that the first elements 6a are located mixed with the second elements 6b, regularly sealed between the second elements 6b, and therefore are protected from increased loads with high abrasion. Along each possible rolling path, the first and second elements are loaded, as a result, in each case in a narrow spatial as well as temporal sequence, so that the sole's behavior and perception of movement are always determined by both elements. The mixed distribution of the first and second elements also extends to the entire toe and heel area.

In the transition region between the heel and the toe, as a rule, neither the first nor the second elements become necessary. Therefore, for most applications, it is sufficient if the layers 6 are located separately, respectively, only in the area of the toe and heel. Instead of or in addition to the transverse distribution with respect to the longitudinal direction of the shoe, a longitudinal distribution could also be made. A longitudinal distribution and a transverse distribution with four layers 6 are shown in FIG. 8c). Thus, with standard elements, it would also be possible to fit to different sizes of shoes due to the fact that these elements are simply suitably located, in particular, at a more or less strong distance from each other. Finally, different layers with different characteristics could be provided in different areas.

The zones introduced above, which are defined either by at least one first element or at least one second element, can be equated with the first elements 6a and, accordingly, the second elements 6b in the forms of execution according to Fig. 8. In the example of FIG. 8b), the several first elements 6a located in the transverse direction adjacent to each other could also respectively be assigned to only one zone. On the contrary, in the example of FIG. 8d), the connected surface 6b) can be understood as formed by several zones that alternate in the longitudinal direction with the first elements 6a and, accordingly, with the zones formed by them.

Further possibilities for the formation of layers 6 are described hereinafter with the help of figa) -e).

In the layer 6 shown in FIG. 9a), the first elements 6a correspond to the elements of FIG. 7. The second elements 6b are made with a rectangular cross section.

In the layer shown in FIG. 9b), the first elements 6a consist of a continuous material, also have a thickened head on a thinner neck and can therefore also deform well tangentially in different directions.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 9c) and d), the first elements 6a are formed by form-stable bulges 6aa, which are connected by an elastically deformable membrane 6ab with the second elements 6b and thus can deflect both vertically and approximately equally horizontally.

In the version shown in FIG. 9e), two elastic layers are connected to each other, at least the outer layer being continuous and relatively flat to concavities. Concavities form together with approximately mirror convexities the inner layer of the first elements 6a. In addition, concavities, like a shock absorber, allow the various first elements 6a to simultaneously tangentially deform in different directions. The second elements 6b will be formed by the outer layer between the concavities and the protruding pads or ribs lying below, similar to FIG. 9a).

In the framework of the above description, only individual examples of possible forms of execution were considered. Needless to say, other forms of execution are possible, and they can, in particular, be obtained from mixed forms of the described examples.

Reference List

1 - sole

2 - running shoe

3a — first elements, hollow elements

3b - second elements, elements in the form of protruding pads

4 - midsole

4.1 - midsole surface

4.2 - recess in the midsole

5 - floor

6 - layer

6a - the first elements of layer 6

6b - second elements of layer 6

P1 - arrow of the load upon contact

P2 - repulsion arrow

h1 - height of the whole layer 6

h2 is the height of the second elements 6b

Claims (9)

1. The sole, in particular for athletic shoes, with elastic deformability also in the tangential direction back and forth, which, only after reaching critical deformation in such a deformed area, is essentially rigid to tangential deformation,
moreover, its elastic deformability also in the tangential direction is ensured by the first several elements (6a), and its mentioned rigidity against tangential deformation after the onset of one critical deformation, as well as the degree of critical deformation in such a deformed region, is determined by at least one second element (6b)
moreover, in the area of the heel and / or in the area of the toe of the sole defined by at least one first element of the zone and defined by at least one second element of the zone repeatedly alternate in the longitudinal direction,
moreover, the first elements are symmetric about the axis of rotation and can be tangentially deformed in all directions in the same way,
moreover, the first elements are hollow and up to critical deformation can also be deformed only in the vertical direction.
2. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one first element in comparison with at least one second element, when viewed from the sole, protrudes until critical deformation is achieved.
3. The sole according to claim 1 or 2, characterized in that at least one first element after the onset of critical deformation is in such a deformed region on one straight line with at least one second element.
4. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one second element is unloaded until critical deformation is achieved in such a deformed region.
5. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one first and / or at least one second element is fixed on the lower side of the midsole.
6. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one first and / or at least one second element is partially embedded in the lower side of the midsole.
7. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that at least one first and / or at least one second element is formed as part of an intermediate sole.
8. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that the critical deformation is achieved only after a tangential and / or vertical path of deformation of the sole, which is more than 20% of its deformable thickness, in particular, even more than 50% of this thickness.
9. The sole according to claim 1, characterized in that the magnitude of the path of possible tangential deformation to achieve critical deformation approximately corresponds to the path of possible vertical deformation to achieve critical deformation.
RU2007135172/12A 2005-02-24 2006-02-23 Sole with tangential deformability RU2385140C2 (en)

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EP (1) EP1858358B1 (en)
JP (1) JP5398144B2 (en)
KR (1) KR101276771B1 (en)
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ES2523886T3 (en) 2014-12-02
KR101276771B1 (en) 2013-06-20
MX2007011043A (en) 2007-11-22
CN106923439A (en) 2017-07-07
US20080209766A1 (en) 2008-09-04
JP5398144B2 (en) 2014-01-29
KR20070106577A (en) 2007-11-01
CN101128131A (en) 2008-02-20
CA2597987C (en) 2011-11-15
EP1858358B1 (en) 2014-08-13
US20120167412A1 (en) 2012-07-05
JP2008531092A (en) 2008-08-14
EP1858358A1 (en) 2007-11-28
RU2007135172A (en) 2009-03-27
WO2006089448A1 (en) 2006-08-31
CA2597987A1 (en) 2006-08-31

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