NZ615126B2 - Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn - Google Patents

Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn Download PDF

Info

Publication number
NZ615126B2
NZ615126B2 NZ615126A NZ61512612A NZ615126B2 NZ 615126 B2 NZ615126 B2 NZ 615126B2 NZ 615126 A NZ615126 A NZ 615126A NZ 61512612 A NZ61512612 A NZ 61512612A NZ 615126 B2 NZ615126 B2 NZ 615126B2
Authority
NZ
New Zealand
Prior art keywords
soil
yarn
fluorochemical
bcf yarn
bcf
Prior art date
Application number
NZ615126A
Other versions
NZ615126A (en
Inventor
Daniel Reynolds
Ronnie Rittenhouse
Waehai Tung
Original Assignee
Invista Technologies Sarl
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201161453326P priority Critical
Priority to US61/453,326 priority
Application filed by Invista Technologies Sarl filed Critical Invista Technologies Sarl
Priority to PCT/US2012/029151 priority patent/WO2012125777A2/en
Publication of NZ615126A publication Critical patent/NZ615126A/en
Publication of NZ615126B2 publication Critical patent/NZ615126B2/en

Links

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G27/00Floor fabrics; Fastenings therefor
    • A47G27/02Carpets; Stair runners; Bedside rugs; Foot mats
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02GCRIMPING OR CURLING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, OR YARNS; YARNS OR THREADS
    • D02G3/00Yarns or threads, e.g. fancy yarns; Processes or apparatus for the production thereof, not otherwise provided for
    • D02G3/22Yarns or threads characterised by constructional features, e.g. blending, filament/fibre
    • D02G3/34Yarns or threads having slubs, knops, spirals, loops, tufts, or other irregular or decorative effects, i.e. effect yarns
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06BTREATING TEXTILE MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS, GASES OR VAPOURS
    • D06B3/00Passing of textile materials through liquids, gases or vapours to effect treatment, e.g. washing, dyeing, bleaching, sizing, impregnating
    • D06B3/04Passing of textile materials through liquids, gases or vapours to effect treatment, e.g. washing, dyeing, bleaching, sizing, impregnating of yarns, threads or filaments
    • D06B3/06Passing of textile materials through liquids, gases or vapours to effect treatment, e.g. washing, dyeing, bleaching, sizing, impregnating of yarns, threads or filaments individually handled
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M15/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M15/19Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D06M15/21Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D06M15/244Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds of halogenated hydrocarbons
    • D06M15/256Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds of halogenated hydrocarbons containing fluorine
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M15/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M15/19Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D06M15/21Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D06M15/263Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds of unsaturated carboxylic acids; Salts or esters thereof
    • D06M15/277Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds of unsaturated carboxylic acids; Salts or esters thereof containing fluorine
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M15/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment
    • D06M15/19Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with macromolecular compounds; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment with synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D06M15/37Macromolecular compounds obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D06M15/564Polyureas, polyurethanes or other polymers having ureide or urethane links; Precondensation products forming them
    • D06M15/576Polyureas, polyurethanes or other polymers having ureide or urethane links; Precondensation products forming them containing fluorine
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M2101/00Chemical constitution of the fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics or fibrous goods made from such materials, to be treated
    • D06M2101/16Synthetic fibres, other than mineral fibres
    • D06M2101/30Synthetic polymers consisting of macromolecular compounds obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D06M2101/34Polyamides
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M2200/00Functionality of the treatment composition and/or properties imparted to the textile material
    • D06M2200/01Stain or soil resistance
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M2200/00Functionality of the treatment composition and/or properties imparted to the textile material
    • D06M2200/10Repellency against liquids
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23957Particular shape or structure of pile
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2922Nonlinear [e.g., crimped, coiled, etc.]
    • Y10T428/2925Helical or coiled

Abstract

Disclosed are processes for applying anti-soil compositions onto BCF yarns during cable or air twisting processes prior to weaving, knitting or tufting into finished carpet. The process foregoes the need for downstream environmentally unfavorable dyeing and low pH chemical treatment processes on the finished carpet. The anti-soil composition can be comprised of a high specific surface energy chemical or other material, for example a fluorochemical. Further, the anti-soil composition can further comprise an anti-stain component. Also disclosed are systems, BCF yarns, and carpets made from the BCF yarn treated by the disclosed process. finished carpet. The anti-soil composition can be comprised of a high specific surface energy chemical or other material, for example a fluorochemical. Further, the anti-soil composition can further comprise an anti-stain component. Also disclosed are systems, BCF yarns, and carpets made from the BCF yarn treated by the disclosed process.

Description

/029151 PROCESSES TO MAKE WATER AND OIL REPELLENT BCF YARN FIELD OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to anti—soil application processes for bulk continuous filament (BCF) carpet and related textile s, and specifically, to processes for ng anti—soil compositions on BCF yarns during cable or air twisting processes prior to weaving, knitting or tufting. The process foregoes the need to treat s and other textiles made from the BCF yarn, thus eliminating costly and environmentally unfavorable dyeing and low pH chemical treatment processes. Also disclosed herein are systems used to apply the anti-soil formulations to the BCF yarn, and soil repellant yarns, and carpets with improved anti—soil ties made from the BCF yarn of the sed process.
BACKGROUND OF THE TECHNOLOGY Carpets and other fabrics are currently treated with topical chemistrles for improved stain resistance and/or soil resistance. For nylon s, both stain blocker (e.g. acid dye blocker) and anti-soil with fluorochemicals are traditionally used. For polyester carpets, such as 2GT and BGT s, and polypropylene carpets, anti—soil chemistry may be applied lly to the tufted carpet as part of the carpet finishing process. Polyester and polypropylene carpets typically do not require a stain blocker treatment because of inherent stain resistance to acid dyes and stains owing to their lack of amine end groups that function as acid dye sites.
Topical application at the carpet my can be in the form of exhaust application and spray application. Exhaust application (i.e. flex-nip process at high (300 — 400 wt.%) wet pick—up), is known to e an improvement in efficacy over spray-on applications at 10—20 wt.% wet pick-up of anti-soil. Exhaust applications typically use higher amounts of water and energy to dry and cure the carpet than do spray applications. on fluorochemical products are designed to use less water and energy than exhaust applications, but they do not impart anti-soil properties that are as good as those provided by the exhaust ations owing to limited depth of penetration into the fabric, especially deep pile fabrics and those incorporating the tightly twisted yarns that are now becoming more popular.
While various processes are in use in the carpet ry for the dyeing and finishing of carpets, some large scale and some small, most of the carpet made today is dyed and finished on a continuous dye range. This is done mainly in one of two ways: in one case, a two stage process is employed, where the carpet is d and dyed first, steamed, rinsed, and excess water extracted; then stain blocker (SB) is d, the carpet is again steamed and washed, and then anti-soil fluorochemical (F0) is applied in the form of a foam or liquid spray and the carpet is finally dried. (See e.g.
US. Patent Nos. 5,853,814; 5,948,480 and W02000/000691). in the second, somewhat improved case, called the co-application process, the carpet is also steamed and dyed first, d again, rinsed and extracted; and then a blend of SB and FC is d together at high wet pick up, after which the carpet and chemicals are exposed once again to steam to fix the treatment, followed by drying. (See eg. US. Patent Nos. 6,197,378 and 5,520,962). in both cases, low pH solutions, excess water, and energy are required for the SB and FC to penetrate the carpet and achieve uniform ge.
In sum, the l prior art process is as follows: BCF yarn —>Twist —> heat set —> tufting —+ carpet —> dye ——> stain block / anti—soil.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION There is a desire to reduce the overall usage of l anti-soil formulations, especially formulations that contain fluorochemicals, for environmental and cost reasons. Further, there is also a desire to reduce the amount of water and low pH chemicals used to apply the anti-stain and anti—soil formulations. Thus, processes for applying such beneficial compositions using less water, nominal pH chemicals, and less energy are in demand.
While the development of a process that eliminates the current carpet treatment systems for applying anti—stain and anti—soil compositions is desirable; current processes do exist for good reasons. First, because the appearance of carpet has historically depended on the ability to dye wool or nylon or even polyester tufted carpets to the desired shade, it would not be permissible to treat the carpet with compositions such as anti-stain or anti—soil chemistries beforehand that might interfere with the process of uniform dyeing. Further, the dyeing process would tend to remove the topical treatment chemistries, rendering them ineffective.
Second, as mentioned above, treatment of yarn or fabric for stain and soil resistance typically involves fixing with steam, and low pH may also be required especially for acid dyed fabrics. Therefore, it was deemed most practical to process carpets in the order described above, where carpet is formed, then steamed and dyed, steamed again, rinsed and extracted; and then SB and F0 is applied, again involving steaming and/or rinsing in the various processes of the prior art.
Carpets have also long been constructed of dyed or ted yarns, which constructions are treated in numerous possible ways, including the options of further dyeing, and the application of stain and/or soil resistant compositions with the concomitant use of steam and rinse water, as in the processes described above.
The invention disclosed herein es a process to make textile fabrics, ally tufted articles, without the requirement for subsequent stain and soil resistant chemistry application, thus ng the cost and waste of steam fixing and rinsing attendant with such large-scale fabric applications. As disclosed herein, the process involves ation of topical tries to dyed or pigmented yarns immediately after twisting or cabling one or more such yarns together. The chemistries are then heat-set onto the twisted yarn under dry conditions, and the twisted yarn subsequently weaved or tufted into a finished fabric or carpet. Novel systems that enable the ent ation of topical chemistries to yarn subsequent to twisting and prior to winding and heat-setting are also disclosed. ically, the disclosed process uses an atopical chemistry composition applicator positioned within a mechanical twisting process downstream of the twisted yarn p reel and upstream of the yarn winder. in sum, the disclosed process moves the backend, large scale and ul anti-soil application step, and if necessary, stain block application step, up front during yarn twisting. Thus, the carpet manufacturing process now becomes: BCF yarn —> twist —+ F0 (and optional SB) —> heat set (optionally dry heat set) ——-> tufting ~+ carpet. Surprisingly, the disclosed process is as effective, or even more effective, than processes of the prior art in terms of fabric soil resistance.
As describe above, the s of the disclosed invention is counter intuitive since treating the carpet yarn prior to heat setting and tufting is known to affect the quality of the finished carpet, particularly during dyeing. Further, the inventive process is also r ive because soil resistant itions tend to be very ult to apply uniformly to twisted yarn bundles at the usual line speed without substantial waste. Moreover, the disclosed process is counter intuitive because the prior art yarn twisting apparatuses have not previously accepted topical try applications to twisted yarn prior to g. However, as shown below, Nylon carpets manufactured with the treated BCF yarn show superior anti-soil properties over the same s without such treatment.
In one aspect, a process for treating d BCF yarn with an anti-soil composition comprising an anti-soil component is disclosed. The process comprises: (a) providing twisted BCF yarn; (b) winding said BCF yarn on a take-up reel; and (c) contacting said BCF yarn with said anti-soil composition while said BCF yarn is in motion and prior to said BCF yarn contacting and winding up on said take—up reel. The anti-soil composition can be comprised of a high specific surface energy chemical or other material, for example a fluorochemical that imparts high specific surface energy properties such as high contact angles for water and oil, or even a non—fluorochemical particulate al having similar properties. The anti-soil composition can r comprise an anti-stain component.
In another aspect, an ed, twisted BCF yarn comprising an anti—soil component is sed, wherein said anti-soil component is present on said twisted BCF yarn prior to tufting the BCF yarn. The anti-soil component is present at an on weight of fiber from about 100 ppm to about 1000 ppm. The yarn can comprise ide fiber and/or have polymer components selected from polyester and polypropylene. The yarn can be tufted and ctured into carpet or fabrics.
In a further aspect, a process for manufacturing carpet is disclosed comprising providing an untufted, twisted BCF yarn comprising an anti-soil component, tufting said BCF yarn, and weaving into said carpet. Because of the anti—soil component present on the BCF yarn prior to tufting and weaving, there is no need to treat the finished carpet with an anti-soil composition. 2012/029151 In yet another aspect, a system for applying an anti-soil composition to twisted BCF fiber is disclosed. The system comprises: (a) a first yarn take—up device that receives at least two individual yarn members and transmits a single yarn member; (b) an anti-soil composition ator disposed downstream of said yarn take-up device that applies said anti-soil composition to said single yarn member; and (c) a second yarn take-up device that receives said single yarn member. The anti-soil composition can be comprised of a high specific surface energy chemical or other material, for example a fluorochemical that imparts high specific surface energy properties such as high contact angles for water and oil, or even a uorochemical particulate material having similar ties. The anti—soil composition can further comprise an anti-stain component.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES ] Figure 1 shows the current cable twisting process.
Figure 2 shows one aspect of the disclosed process.
DEFINITIONS While mostly familiar to those versed in the art, the following definitions are provided in the st of y.
] OWF (On weight of : The amount of chemistry that was applied as a % of weight of fiber.
WPU (Wet pick-up]: The amount of water and solvent that was applied on carpet before drying off the carpet, expressed as a % of weight of fiber.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION A process for treating twisted BCF yarn is sed comprising contacting the BCF yarn with an anti-soil composition while said yarn is in motion and prior to contacting and winding the yarn onto a take-up reel or winder to create a yarn package or cake. The anti-soil composition comprises an anti-soil component and is adapted to be applied onto twisted BCF yarn at a wet pick-up of between about 5 wt.% and about 50 wt.%., including between about 10 wt.% and about 30 wt%, about 20 wt.% to about wt.%, and about 10 wt.% to about 20 wt.%. The twisted BCF yarn can be optionally WO 25777 heat set after contacting the yarn with the oil composition. Heat setting temperatures can range from about 125°C to about 200°C, including from about 160°C to about 195°C. Heat setting dwell times can range from about 0.5 to about 4 minutes, including from about 0.5 to about 3 minute and from about 0.5 to about 1 minute.
Anti-soil components for use in the disclosed anti-soil compositions impart high ic surface energy properties such as high contact angles for water and oil (e.g. water and oil “beads up” on surfaces d by it). The anti—soil ent can comprise a fluorochemical dispersion, which dispersion may be predominantly either ic or anionic, including those selected from the group ting of fluorochemical allophanates, fluorochemical polyacrylates, fluorochemical urethanes, fluorochemical carbodiimides, chemical quanidines, and fluorochemicals incorporating C-2 to C-8 chemistries. Alternatively, the chemical can have less than or equal to eight fluorinated carbons, including less than or equal to six fluorinated carbons. Example fluorochemical anti-soil components include: DuPont TLF 10816 and 10894; Daikin TG 2511, and DuPont Capstone RCP. Non-fluorinated anti-soil components can include: nes, silsesquioxanes and fluorosilanated and fluoroalkylated particulates, anionic non-fluorinated surfactants and anionic hydrotrope non-fluorinated surfactants, including sulfonates, sulfates, phosphates and carboxylates. (See US. Patent No. 6,824,854, herein incorporated by reference).
The oil compositions can also have an optional stain blocker component comprising an acidic moiety which associates with polymer amine end groups and protects them from staining by acidic dye stains. The general category of chemicals le to the process of the instant invention can comprise any chemical that blocks positively charged dye sites. Stain blockers are available in various forms such as syntans, sulfonated novolacs, or sulfonated aromatic aldehyde condensation products , and/or reaction products of formaldehyde, phenol, polymethacrylic acid, maleic anyhydride, and sulfonic acid. They are usually made by reacting formaldehyde, phenol, polymethacrylic acid, maleic anyhydride, and sulfonic acid ing on specific chemistry. Further, the stain blocker is typically water soluble and generally penetrates the fiber while the anti—soil, usually a chemical, is a non- water soluble dispersion that coats the surface of fiber.
] Examples of stain blockers include, but are not limited to: phenol formaldehyde polymers or mers such as CEASESTAIN and STAINAWAY (from American Emulsions Company, lnc., Dalton, Ga), MESITOL (from Bayer ation, Rock Hill, NC), ERIONAL (from Ciba Corporation, Greensboro, NC), INTRATEX (from Crompton & s Colors, |nc., Charlotte, NC), STAlNKLEER (from Dyetech, |nc., Dalton, Ga.), LANOSTAlN (from Lenmar Chemical Corporation, Dalton, Ga.), and SR—300, SR-400, and SR-SOO (from E. l. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del.); polymers of methacrylic acid such as the SCOTCHGARD FX series carpet protectors (from 3M Company, St. Paul Minn.); sulfonated fatty acids from Rockland React-Rite, lnc., Rockmart, Ga); and stain resist chemistries from ArrowStar LLC, Dalton and Tri-Tex, Canada.
] The anti-soil composition is adapted to t the twisted BCF yarn while it is in motion and prior to contacting the take-up reel or winder. Further, the anti-soil composition can be at a neutral pH (e.g. 6 to 8) because the yarn can be optionally heat set after application of the composition. The process foregoes the need for harsh low pH chemicals.
Any suitable device that applies wet ingredients to a dry substrate can perfOrm the ting. Such devices include, but are not limited to: applicator pad, c tip, ceramic ring, nip s, wet-wick, dip—tank, sprayer, and mister. Further, the contacting can be done by one or more devices, where each device can be the same or different. For example, two, three, or more application devices can be used to apply the anti—soil ition at different points in the s. Further, one or more application devices can apply an anti-soil component and one or more separate devices an anti-stain component. Multiple application s and locations can provide better application uniformity when using certain BCF yarns.
The wet pick-up of anti-soil composition is between about 5 wt.% and about 50 wt.%., including between about 10 wt.% and about 30 wt%, about 20 wt.% to about 30 wt.%, and about 10 wt.% to about 20 wt.%. The resulting twisted BCF yarn, if a fluorine based anti-soil component is used, can have an on weight of fiber from about 100 ppm to about 1000 ppm fluorine, including from about 100 to about 500 ppm fluorine, from about 200 to about 400 ppm, and from about 100 ppm to about 300 ppm fluorine. If the anti-soil composition further comprises a stain blocker, it is present on weight of fiber from about 500 ppm to about 4%, including from about 1000 ppm to about 3%, from about 0.5% to about 2%, and from about 0.5% to about 1%.
Common stain rs use sulfonated moieties as part of the chemistry, which s in the presence of sulfur on the treated fiber. The sulfur content can range from about 50 ppm with 5% stain blocker to about 1 ppm with 0.1% stain blocker on weight of fiber. Thus, based on the above stain r concentrations, the sulfur content on weight of fiber will range from about 0.5 ppm to about 40 ppm, including from about 1 ppm to about 30 ppm, from about 5 ppm to about 20 ppm, and from about 5 ppm to about 10 ppm. Sulfur content can be determined by x-ray diffraction or other methods.
The anti-soil composition can further comprise a component selected from the group consisting of: odor control agents, anti—microbial agents, ungal agents, fragrance agents, bleach resist agents, softeners, and UV stabilizers.
The twisted BCF yarn can be made from polyamide fibers, such as those made from nylon 6,6, nylon 6, nylon 4,6, nylon 6,10, nylon 10,10, nylon 12, its copolymers, and blends f. Further, the twisted BCF yarn can also have additional polymer components, such as polyester and/or polyolefin components. The polyolefin component can be polypropylene. The additional polymer components can be incorporated with the polyamide (by melt—blend or co-polymerization) prior to making a polyamide fiber (e.g. a polyamide/polyester fiber), or can be stand-alone fibers that are twisted with the polyamide fibers to make the twisted BCF yarn.
] As stated above, the BCF yarn can be manufactured with olefin, polyamide, and / or ter polymer components. An cted benefit of the disclosed s has been discovered in that, whereas a small amount of anti—soil ition is applied compared to known exhaust ses, a high anti-soil component content, such as fluorine, is achieved on the surface of the yarn. Further, the anti-soil composition applied in the process of the disclosed invention can be either fluorochemical or non-fluorochemical based, or a mixture of fluorochemical or fluoropolymer material with non-fluorinated soil resistant materials.
The disclosed process may be applied to yarns that do not e uent dyeing, having either a t or pigment included in their composition prior to twisting. The pigmented yarns can be made by solution dyed as well as cationic and c dyed fibers. Yarns suitable for use in the process may further comprise inherent stain resistance, whether by base composition as in the case of polypropylene or polyester, or by the inclusion of strong acid functionality in the polymer composition of the yarn, as in the case of nylon. Use of dyed or pigmented yarns (i.e. colored yarns) with the sed s eliminates the need for subsequent dyeing and enables the creation of colored carpets that are soil resistant, without the need for subsequent dyeing and soil resistant al application.
Where both inherently stain resistant and d yarns are employed in the disclosed process, then all of the cost of dyeing, and of SB/FC application to the tufted carpet are eliminated. As observed above, this not only reduces the cost of making carpets having superior performance utes, but also minimizes the environmental impact of carpet manufacture by reducing water, steam and energy consumption.
The twisted BCF yarn made with the various aspects of the disclosed s, by itself or blended with non-treated fibers and yarns, can be tufted and manufactured into carpets or fabrics. Carpets made with the twisted BCF yarn exhibit an oil repellency rating of 5 or higher and a water repellency rating of 5 or higher.
Alternatively, the disclosed s can also be advantageously applied in certain processes where a styling advantage might be derived from differential dyeing and finishing after carpet formation. For example, a soil resistant or stain resistant twisted yarn of the disclosed invention could optionally be tufted into a carpet among untreated yarns prior to dyeing, thus creating an aesthetic alternative.
Further disclosed is a system for applying the anti-soil composition to the d BCF yarn. The system includes: (a) a first yarn p device that receives at least two individual yarn members and transmits a single yarn ; (b) an anti—soil composition applicator disposed downstream of the first yarn take-up device that applies the anti-soil composition to the single yarn member; and (c) a second yarn take- up device that receives the single yarn member. The first yarn take-up device can be a take—up roll or reel that can twist the at least two individual yarn members into a single yarn member. The individual yarn members can be single filaments or fibers, or yarns made from a plurality of filaments or fibers. The applicator can be any suitable device that applies wet ingredients to a dry substrate, including, but not limited to: applicator pad, nip s, wet-wick, dip-tank, r, and mister. The wet pick-up of composition is between about 5 wt.% and about 50 wt.%., including between about 10 wt.% and about 30 wt%, about 20 wt.% to about 30 wt.%, and about 10 wt.% to about 20 wt.%.
The resulting twisted BCF yarn, if a ne based anti—soil component is used, can have an on weight of fiber from about 100 ppm to about 1000 ppm fluorine, including from about 100 to about 500 ppm fluorine, from about 200 to about 400 ppm, and from about 100 ppm to about 300 ppm fluorine. If the anti-soil composition further comprises a stain blocker, it is t on weight of fiber from about 500 ppm to about 4%, including from about 1000 ppm to about 3%, from about 0.5% to about 2%, and from about 0.5% to about 1%. The second yarn take-up device can be a winder.
Figure 1 shows the t cable twisting process. Here, creel yarn 10 and bucket yarn 15, which is fed at a spindle speed of 7000 rpm, pass through an anti- balloon device 20 and onto a take—up roll 25. From here, the twisted yarn 30 is wound up on a winder 35. Figure 2 shows one aspect of the disclosed process. Here, creel yarn 110 and bucket yarn 115, which is fed at a spindle speed of 7000 rpm, pass through alloon device 120 and onto a p roll 125. An anti-soil composition applicator 140 is disposed downstream of take—up roll 125, which applies an oil component to the twisted yarn 130. From here, the twisted and treated yarn is wound up on a winder 135.
The disclosed process is counterintuitive and surprisingly results in yarn that contains acceptable anti-soil properties when manufactured into a carpet or fabric.
One would expect that rearranging the process as described above would fowl up down-stream carpet cturing processes and lead to poor quality carpet. Thus, the results ed below are surprising and unexpected.
EXAMPLES The following are examples of nylon 6,6 carpets made from two 922 denier beige color solution dyed BCF fibers that have been treated various aspects of the process disclosed above and similar fibers with no treatment. Selection of alternative anti-soil components and stain blocker components, fibers and textiles having ent surface chemistries will necessitate minor adjustments to the variables herein described.
Test Methods Acid Dye Stain Test.
Acid dye stain resistance is evaluated using a procedure modified from the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) Method 175-2003, “Stain Resistance: Pile Floor Coverings.” 9 wt % of aqueous staining soiution is prepared, according to the manufacturer’s directions, by mixing —flavored KOOL- AlD® powder (Kraft/General Foods, White Plains, N.Y., a powdered drink mix containing, inter alia, FD&C Red No. 40). A carpet sample (4x6-inch) is placed on a flat non—absorbent surface. A hollow plastic 2-inch (5.10m) diameter cup is placed tightly over the carpet sample. Twenty mi of the KOOL-AlD® staining solution is poured into the cup and the solution is allowed to absorb completely into the carpet sample. The cup is removed and the stained carpet sample is allowed to sit undisturbed for 24 hours.
Following incubation, the stained sample is rinsed thoroughly under cold tap water, excess water is d by fugation, and the sample is dried in air. The carpet sample was visually inspected and rated for ng according to the FD&C Red No. 40 Stain Scale described in AATCC Method 175-2003. Stain ance is measured using a 1-10 scale. An undetectable test staining is accorded a value of 10.
Oil and Water Repellency Tests The following s were used for oil repellency tests.
Rating Number Liquid Composition OUCJ'I-PQNA Kaydol (Mineral Oil) 65% / 35% Kaydol / n-Hexadecane decane n-Tetradecane n-Dodecane n—Decane The following liquids were used for water repellency tests Rating Number Liquid Composition % lsopropanol % Water 1 2 98 2 5 95 3 1O 90 4 20 80 30 . 7O 6 40 60 Repellency test procedure Five drops of rating number 1 liquid are placed from a height of 3 mm onto the carpet surface. it after 10 seconds, four out of the five drops were still visible as spherical to hemispherical, the carpet is given a g rating. Repeat the test with a higher rating number liquid. The repellency rating of the sample is the highest rating number liquid used to pass the repellency test. s with a rating of 4 or higher have good oiling properties. Without anti-soil treatment, most nylon carpets have a rating of 1 for both oil and water repellency. e 1 (Comparative) Two 922 denier beige color on dyed Nylon 66 BCF made from cationic dyeable polymer were cable twisted on a Volkman at 7000 rpm to form a 6.0 tpi two ply yarn using the process described in figure 1. The winding speed was about 50 ypm.
The cable twisted yarn was subsequently heat-set on a n with 200°C dry air.
The holdup time in the channel was about 60 seconds. The heat treated yarn was converted into a 35 oz per square yard, 1/12 gauge, 3/8” pile height cut pile carpet.
Example 2 (Inventive) Two 922 denier beige color solution dyed Nylon 66 BCF made from cationic dyeable polymer were cable twisted on a Volkman at 7000 rpm to form a 6.0 tpi two ply yarn using the process described in figure 2. The winding speed was about 50 ypm. A chemical applicator was inserted between the take up roll and winder as described in figure 3 option A. A 1A. inch wide cotton wick (Wet Wick by Perperell MA) was used to apply 50% A-201 anti-soil chemical onto the cable d yarn at a wet-pickup of about wt%. The cable twisted yarn went through the wet wick at about 50 ypm. The cable twisted yarn was subsequently heat-set on a Suessen with 200°C dry air. The holdup time in the channel was about 60 s. The heatset yarn was analyzed to have 925 ppm Fluorine. The heat treated yarn was converted into a 35 oz per square yard, 1/12 gauge, 3/8” pile height cut pile carpet.
Example 3 (Inventive) Two 922 denier beige color solution dyed Nylon 66 BCF made from cationic dyeable polymer were cable twisted on a Volkman at 7000 rpm to form a 6.0 tpi two ply yarn using the process described in figure 2. The winding speed was about 50 ypm. A chemical applicator was inserted n the take up roll and winder as described in figure 2. A 1A. inch wide cotton wick (Wet Wick by Perpereii MA) was used to apply % A-201 anti-soil chemical onto the cable twisted yarn. The cable twisted yarn went through the wet wick at about 50 ypm. The cable twisted yam was subsequently heat- set on a n with 200°C dry air. The holdup time in the channel was about 60 seconds. The t yarn was analyzed to have :445 ppm Fluorine. The heat treated yarn was ted into a 35 oz per square yard, 1/12 gauge, 3/8” pile height cut pile carpet.
Example 4 (Inventive) Two 922 denier beige color solution dyed Nylon 66 BCF made from cationic dyeable polymer were cable twisted on a Volkman at 7000 rpm to form a 6.0 tpi two ply yarn using the process bed in figure 2. The winding speed was about 50 ypm. A chemical applicator was inserted between the take up roll and winder as described in figure 2. A 1/2 inch wide cotton wick (Wet Wick by Perperell MA) was used to apply 12.5% A—201 anti-soil chemical onto the cable twisted yarn. The cable twisted yarn went through the wet wick at about 50 ypm. The cable twisted yarn was subsequently heat-set on a Suessen with 200°C dry air. The holdup time in the channel was about 60 seconds. The t yarn was analyzed to have 270 ppm Fluorine. The heat treated yarn was converted into a 35 oz per square yard, 1/12 gauge, 3/8" pile height cut pile carpet.
Table 1 below reports the repellency and stain tests of the four examples. Here, s made from the treated BCF yarn show excellent and good oil and water repellency ratings. This indicates that the disclosed inventive process is an able replacement to existing exhaust type applications for ng anti-soil compositions to carpets and fabrics.
Table 1 Example Oil Rating Water Rating Stain Rating Remarks 1 1 1 10 no repellency 2 6 6 10 excellent repellency 3 6 6 10 excellent repellency 4 5 5 10 good repellency
[00046] The invention has been bed above with reference to the various aspects of the disclosed treatment process, treated fibers, carpets, fabrics, and systems used to apply anti-soil compositions to BCF yarn. Obvious modifications and alterations will occur to others upon reading and understanding the proceeding detailed ption. It is intended that the invention be construed as including all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the claims.
The reference in this specification to any prior publication (or information derived from it), or to any matter which is known, is not, and should not be taken as an acknowledgment or admission or any form of suggestion that that prior publication (or ation derived from it) or known matter forms part of the common general dge in the field of endeavour to which this specification relates. hout this specification and the claims which follow, unless the context requires otherwise, the word "comprise", and variations such as "comprises" and "comprising", will be understood to imply the inclusion of a stated r or step or group of rs or steps but not the exclusion of any other integer or step or group of integers or steps.

Claims (10)

THE CLAIMS DEFINING THE INVENTION ARE AS FOLLOWS:
1. A process for treating twisted BCF yarn with an anti-soil composition sing an anti-soil component, said process comprising: 5 a. providing twisted BCF yarn; b. winding said BCF yarn on a take-up reel; and c. contacting said BCF yarn with said anti-soil composition while said BCF yarn is in motion and prior to said BCF yarn contacting and winding up on said takeup reel. 10
2. The process of claim 1, further comprising dry heat g said BCF yarn after contacting said BCF yarn with said anti-soil composition.
3. The s of claim 1 or 2, n said oil component comprises a fluorochemical.
4. The process of any one of claims 1 to 3, wherein the anti-soil 15 composition has a pH from about 3 to about 8.
5. The process of claim 3, n said fluorochemical is selected from the group consisting of: fluorochemical allophanates, fluorochemical polyacrylates, fluorochemical urethanes, fluorochemical carbodiimides, fluorochemical quanidines, and fluorochemicals orating C-2 to C-8 chemistries. 20
6. The process of claim 3, n said fluorochemical has less than or equal to six fluorinated carbons.
7. The process of claim 3, wherein said fluorochemical is a fluorochemical
8. The process of any one of claims 1 to 7, wherein said anti-soil 25 composition further comprises a component selected from the group consisting of: odor control agents, antimicrobial agents, anti-fungal agents, fragrance agents, bleach resist agents, softeners, and UV stabilizers.
9. The process of any one of claims 1 to 8, wherein said anti-soil composition r comprises an anti-stain component. 30
10. The process of claim 9, n said anti-stain component is selected from the group consisting of: syntans, sulfonated novolacs, sulfonated aromatic aldehyde condensation products (SACs) and/or reaction products of formaldehyde,
NZ615126A 2011-03-16 2012-03-15 Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn NZ615126B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161453326P true 2011-03-16 2011-03-16
US61/453,326 2011-03-16
PCT/US2012/029151 WO2012125777A2 (en) 2011-03-16 2012-03-15 Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
NZ615126A NZ615126A (en) 2015-06-26
NZ615126B2 true NZ615126B2 (en) 2015-09-29

Family

ID=

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20140065346A1 (en) Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn
US20140255644A1 (en) Processes to dye and treat bcf yarn
CA2885292C (en) Apparatus and method for applying colors and performance chemicals on carpet yarns
AU2011326497A1 (en) Aqueous dispersion of dye, stain-blocker, and fluorochemical and its use in the manufacture of carpet
NZ615126B2 (en) Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn
US20150233048A1 (en) Processes to make water and oil repellent bcf yarn
AU2013318234A1 (en) Processes to dye and treat BCF yarn
WO2014047143A1 (en) Processes to dye and treat single bcf yarn