NL1013648C1 - Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger. - Google Patents

Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger. Download PDF

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Publication number
NL1013648C1
NL1013648C1 NL1013648A NL1013648A NL1013648C1 NL 1013648 C1 NL1013648 C1 NL 1013648C1 NL 1013648 A NL1013648 A NL 1013648A NL 1013648 A NL1013648 A NL 1013648A NL 1013648 C1 NL1013648 C1 NL 1013648C1
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NL
Netherlands
Prior art keywords
heat exchanger
channel
tap water
channels
heat transfer
Prior art date
Application number
NL1013648A
Other languages
Dutch (nl)
Inventor
Johannes Albertus He Willemsen
Original Assignee
Heatex Bv
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Publication date
Application filed by Heatex Bv filed Critical Heatex Bv
Priority to NL1013648A priority Critical patent/NL1013648C1/en
Priority to NL1013648 priority
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of NL1013648C1 publication Critical patent/NL1013648C1/en

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Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F13/00Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing
    • F28F13/06Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing by affecting the pattern of flow of the heat-exchange media
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D3/00Hot-water central heating systems
    • F24D3/08Hot-water central heating systems in combination with systems for domestic hot-water supply
    • F24D3/082Hot water storage tanks specially adapted therefor
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D20/00Heat storage plants or apparatus in general; Regenerative heat-exchange apparatus not covered by groups F28D17/00 or F28D19/00
    • F28D20/0034Heat storage plants or apparatus in general; Regenerative heat-exchange apparatus not covered by groups F28D17/00 or F28D19/00 using liquid heat storage material
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D7/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary tubular conduit assemblies for both heat-exchange media, the media being in contact with different sides of a conduit wall
    • F28D7/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary tubular conduit assemblies for both heat-exchange media, the media being in contact with different sides of a conduit wall the conduits being helically coiled
    • F28D7/022Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary tubular conduit assemblies for both heat-exchange media, the media being in contact with different sides of a conduit wall the conduits being helically coiled the conduits of two or more media in heat-exchange relationship being helically coiled, the coils having a cylindrical configuration
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F1/00Tubular elements; Assemblies of tubular elements
    • F28F1/02Tubular elements of cross-section which is non-circular
    • F28F1/06Tubular elements of cross-section which is non-circular crimped or corrugated in cross-section
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D17/00Domestic hot-water supply systems
    • F24D17/0073Arrangements for preventing the occurrence or proliferation of microorganisms in the water
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F2265/00Safety or protection arrangements; Arrangements for preventing malfunction
    • F28F2265/20Safety or protection arrangements; Arrangements for preventing malfunction for preventing development of microorganisms
    • Y02E60/142

Abstract

A heat exchanger raises the temperature of water which is subsequently to be used especially for showers and baths. The heat exchanger has a central inner passage (2; 152; 202, 252), and an outer passage (4; 104; 154; 204;254) which extends longitudinally in the direction of, but outside the inner passage (2; 152; 202, 252). The inner (2; 152; 202, 252) and outer (4; 104; 154; 204;254) passages are separated by a first wall (3; 153: 203; 253), and a second wall (5; 155; 205; 255) which delimits the outer passage (4; 104; 154; 204;254). The second wall (4; 104; 154; 204;254) has especially a profiled form. Preferred Features: The incorporation of a profiled outer wall to the outer passage maximizes the rate of heat transfer from the outer passage to the surrounding area. Further, the profile intensifies the heat transfer between the inner and outer passages, and reduces the time taken for the heat exchange to reach its maximum rate. The heat exchanger is positioned within a hot water storage tank. Following the shut-off of supply of heated heat-supply medium, the water which is subsequently to be drawn off cools more rapidly. The temperature of the water remains for only a short time in that range at which legionella bacteria can multiply. The water temperature recovers rapidly following re-introduction of heated heat-supply medium. Water which is to be drawn for especially washing purposes is held at the ready at a temperature below the 60 degrees C which is required for the survival of legionella bacteria, and is heated rapidly upon demand.

Description

Short designation: Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating system with such a heat exchanger
The invention relates to a heat exchanger according to the introductory part of claim 1 and to a tap water heating installation.
When heating tap water, the problem arises that in warm water with a temperature between 25 ° C and 55 ° C, health-threatening growth of Legionella bacteria can arise after a long period of time. In order to counteract such accretion, the aim is often to keep the stored water at a high temperature, preferably higher than 60 ° C.
In various systems, however, the problem arises that water is present for a longer period of time that the target temperature has not, or at least not had, a sufficient length.
It is an object of the invention to provide a solution which makes it possible to combat the growth of Legionella bacteria in such systems.
This object is achieved according to the present invention by designing a heat exchanger according to claim 1. The invention can also be embodied in a tap water heating installation according to claim 11 or 12, in which a heat exchanger according to the invention is incorporated.
By using a profiled outer wall 25 of the outer channel, a greater heat transfer from the outer channel to the environment is obtained at a given temperature difference. It is also thereby achieved that the heat transfer between the inner channel and the outer channel is more intensive and starts more quickly.
When the heat exchanger is placed outside a hot water reservoir, it is thus achieved that tap water in the outer channel cools faster after the supply of heated heat transfer medium has been stopped. As a result, the temperature of the water remains only for a short time in an area in which the growth of Legionella bacteria is possible. On the other hand, the water temperature of the tap water is raised again relatively quickly when the heated heat transfer medium is supplied again.
When the heat exchanger is placed in a hot water reservoir, tap water flowing through the inner channel can be effectively heated before it flows into the hot water reservoir, if heat transfer medium 10 is supplied to the outer channel in response to the supply of tap water through the inner channel. The heating of the tap water is very effective because of the short reaction time of the heat exchanger and the increased heat transfer from heat transfer medium in the outer channel to water in the inner channel. Due to the effective preheating of 15 tap water that has flowed in, it is prevented that when hot water is supplied to the hot water reservoir at the bottom of the hot water reservoir, such a cold zone is created that the temperature therein for a long time is below the temperature of at least 60 ° C required to prevent Legionella accretion. remains.
Furthermore, by the enhanced heat transfer from the outer channel to the water in the reservoir, the return temperature of the heat transfer medium is lowered. This improves the efficiency of heating the heat transfer medium and thereby increases the effective water heating capacity of the installation.
Particularly advantageous embodiments of the invention are described in the dependent claims.
Next, further objects, aspects of implementation, effects and details of the invention are described with reference to embodiments. Reference is made to the drawing, in which: Fig. 1 is a top view of an example of a heat exchanger according to the invention, Fig. 2 is a side view of the heat exchanger according to Fig. 1, 1 01 3648 -3- Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line III-III in fig. 1, figures 4-7 are views according to fig. 3 of alternative exemplary embodiments,
Fig. 8 a sectional view along the line VIII-VIII
Fig. 1 is a cut-away side view of one end of the heat exchanger with connections for supply or discharge pipes, Fig. 9 is a schematic representation of a tap water heating installation according to the invention, and Fig. 10 is a schematic representation of a further tap water heating installation according to the invention.
Figures 1-3 and 8 show a first example of a heat exchanger according to the invention.
The heat exchanger 1 is designed for heating tap water, which is also referred to as sanitary water, tap water or drinking water. As regards the water-conducting part thereof, heat exchangers for heating tap water are often made of copper or at least copper alloys, since they conduct heat well and, as far as is known, to a health-threatening release of substances to the passing water. However, other materials can also be used, such as plastics and other metals, such as stainless steel and aluminum, with or without a lining of the tap water-conducting channel.
The heat exchanger 1 is designed as an elongated element with a central inner channel 2 with an outer boundary formed by a first wall 3 and outer channels 4 located outside the central channel and extending in the longitudinal direction of the inner channel 2. The outer channels 4 have an inner boundary formed by the first wall 3 and an outer boundary formed by a second wall 5. According to this example, the heat exchanger is designed as a double, coaxial pipe running along a helix.
Successive turns of the heat exchanger are spaced apart. This is conducive to heat dissipation to the environment. A mutual distance of the windings to approximately the diameter of the outer wall of the circumferential double pipe of the heat exchanger thereby provides a considerable promotion of the heat exchange with a relatively compact construction.
In operation, at least during the heating of tap water in the heat exchanger, a heat transfer fluid flows through the inner channel 2 or the outer channels 4 and the tap water flows through the other of the two channels 2, 4. The tap-10 water in the channel 4 or 2 is then heated by heat exchange with the heat transfer fluid in the other channel 2, respectively. 4.
Fig. 9 shows a building 9, which is provided with a tap water heating installation with a heat exchanger 1 as shown in Figures 1-3 and 8. This tap water heating installation further includes: a solar collector 10, heat transfer channels 11 , 12, 13, 14 for circulating a heat transfer medium and tap water channels 15, 16 for supplying and draining tap water. The inner channel 2 of the heat exchanger 1 communicates with the heat transfer channels 13, 14 for circulating a heat transfer medium 18 in a heat output circuit which also includes a storage container 17 for holding a stock of heat transfer medium and a heat transfer medium. pump 19 is included. The outer channels 4 communicate with the tap water channels 15, 16. The solar collector 10, storage container 17 and the channel 11 between the solar collector 10 and the storage container 17 form a collector circuit, in which a pump 20 is also included. For further details of implementation regarding the installation for capturing and transferring solar energy to the tap water, reference is made to Dutch patent application 1013261, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
In operation, a heat transfer medium - generally in the form of water with optional additives - is circulated through pump 20 in the collector circuit, the heat transfer medium being heated in the solar collector and then in the solar collector. holder 17 is collected. The temperature of the water 18 in the container 17 generally remains below 60 ° C. In response to the water being drawn off via the tap water delivery channel 16, the pump 19 is started, so that heated heat transfer medium 18 is fed from the storage container 17 to the heat exchanger 1. The tap water in the outer channels 4 of the heat exchanger is then heated by heat transfer from the heat transfer medium in the inner channel of the heat exchanger. When the withdrawal of heated tap water via the tap water dispensing channel 16 is stopped, the pump 19 also stops and the heat exchanger 1 cools down again to ambient temperature. Because the tap water to be used in the heat exchanger 1 is thus not kept at an elevated temperature for a very long time, which permits the growth of Legionella bacteria, the risk of contamination with Legionella bacteria is considerably reduced.
Fig. 10 shows a tap water heating installation, the heat exchanger 1 of which is located in a hot water reservoir 7 with a storage space for storing a supply of tap water 20 therein. Channels 63, 64 connect to the outer channels 4 of the heat exchanger 1 for supplying and discharging heat transfer medium, in this example water from an external central heating installation, hereinafter referred to as "central heating water". The inner channel 2 of the heat exchanger 1 is connected to a cold water supply pipe 65 for supplying cold or at least heatable tap water and at the other end opens into the storage space of the storage container 7. In the cold water supply pipe 65 a flow switch 21 included for sensing flow 30 through the cold water supply line 65. The flow switch 21 is connected to a control unit 22 which in turn is connected to a pump 23 in the circuit for circulating the central heating water for operating that pump 23. A tap water dispensing channel 66 further connects to the supply holder 7 for dispensing heated tap water 8 from the holder 7.
1013648 -6-
In operation, when heated tap water 8 is tapped via the tap water delivery channel 66, cold tap water is supplied from the storage container 7 via the tap water supply channel 65. This results in a change of state of the flow switch 21, which is registered by the associated control system. In response, the control system 22 operates the pump to start the circulation of central heating water. It is noted that starting the circulation of CV water can also be done in response to detecting other phenomena associated with cold water supply such as drop in temperature below a certain minimum or detection of flow in the delivery channel . The pump and the control unit can for instance also form part of a central heating boiler or the like arranged for cooperation with an external tap water heating installation. In addition, the circulation of central heating water through the outer channels 4 also takes place in response to registration of a temperature in the storage container 7 below a certain minimum. For the detection of that temperature, a sensor (not shown) is present in the storage container 7, which sensor is also connected to the control unit 22 for transmitting a signal representing the temperature thereon.
Tap water is heated before it flows into the storage container 7 via the inner channel 2 by heat transfer from central heating water flowing through the outer channels 4. As a result, the time in an area at the bottom of the storage container 7 is below the target temperature (usually more than 60 ° C). The growth of Legionella-30 bacteria is thus prevented. It is noted that, nevertheless, a temporary temperature gradient is admitted into the tap water 8 when draining. This is conducive to keeping the tap temperature as constant as possible when larger amounts of hot water are delivered.
The mouth 24 of the inner channel 2 is located in a lower part of the storage space. This prevents the, although pre-heated, yet still relatively cold tap water flowing into the storage container from reaching the inlet of the draw-off channel 66 prematurely.
To further limit the formation of cold zones, provision may be made for the tap water flowing in to have a slight stirring effect.
The second wall 5 of the heat exchanger 1 is provided with a profiling 6 which extends over almost the entire length of the channels 2, 4.
Thanks to the profiling of the outer wall 5 of the heat exchanger 1, at a given temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the environment, a stronger heat transfer from the heat exchanger to the environment is obtained than is the case with a heat exchanger with a substantially smooth coat.
This is advantageous when the heat exchanger is placed in a relatively cool environment (see fig. 9), because after the heating water has been withdrawn from the heat exchanger, the heated tap water left in the heat exchanger 1 cools faster and consequently cools down for an even shorter period of time in a temperature range in which growth of Legionella bacteria is possible. This is especially true if the tap water is in the outer channels 4.
If the heat exchanger 1 is placed in a hot water reservoir 25 (see fig. 10), the more intensive heat exchange with the environment is advantageous, because then a better heat transfer from the heat transfer medium in the heat exchanger 1 to the tap water 8 in the hot water reservoir 7 is obtained. The accelerated heating of tap water 8 which is already present in the storage container 7 is advantageous for counteracting the prolonged presence of temperature zones in which accretion of Legionella bacteria is possible.
Thanks to the profiling of the outer wall 5 of the heat exchanger 1, it is also achieved that the heat exchange between the outer channels 4 and the inner channel 2 reacts faster to the supply of heated heat transfer radii and that the heat transfer between the inner channel and the outer channels 4 are more intensive. This is caused by the more limited volume and the reduced average radial dimension of the outer channels 4. The latter 5 can be realized without the maximum radial dimension of the outer channels being greatly limited. Namely, the latter would make the outer channels sensitive to eccentricity of the first wall with respect to the second wall, which in turn would entail unevenly distributed flow.
In the application shown in Fig. 10, the faster reaction and the more intensive heat transfer between the inner channel 2 and the outer channels 4 is advantageous, because the tap water supplied via the inner channel 2 is heated faster and to a higher temperature. The higher temperature of the water flowing out through the mouth 24 into the interior of the storage container is advantageous for further limiting the time in which the storage container has 7 temperatures in the lower zones at which growth of Legio-20 nella bacteria is possible.
The profiling of the second wall 4 extends in the longitudinal direction of the channels 2, 4. This is advantageous for limiting the flow resistance experienced by the water in the outer channels 4. According to the example shown, the profiling runs parallel to the channels 2, 4, so that the profiling is easy to apply, for instance by rolling or extruding. However, it is also possible for the profiling extending in the longitudinal direction of the channels 2, 4 to run at an angle with respect to the channels 30, for example by designing them in a helical manner.
In the heat exchanger 1 according to the example shown in Figures 1-3 and 8 as well as in the examples of heat exchangers whose cross-sections are shown in Figures 5-7, the first wall 3, respectively. 153, 203, 253 and the second wall 5, respectively. 155, 205, 255 in circumferentially distributed locations in communication with each other. This 1013648-9 offers the advantage that the profiling of the second wall 5, 155, 205, 255 keeps the inner pipe centered with respect to the outer pipe. The centering obtained therewith ensures that the flow passage surface through the outer channel 104 or the outer channels 4, 154, 204 is evenly distributed over the circumference thereof.
The centering of the inner pipe is maintained very accurately even when the elongated heat exchanger is bent in a pipe bending machine, because the profiled outer pipe conforms to the inner pipe during bending so that it remains in contact with the inner pipe. For example, the centering is better preserved than when bending a heat exchanger with a smooth outer pipe and a profiled inner pipe.
In the exemplary embodiments according to Figures 3, 6 and 7, the first wall 3 and 3, respectively. 203, 253 and the second wall 5 resp. 205, 255 in circumferentially spaced locations abut each other. This provides the said centering without the need to use spacers 20 175 as in the example shown in FIG. A further advantage of the direct contact of the first and the second wall against each other is that, by direct heat conduction from the first wall to the second and vice versa, the heat transfer between the first channel 2, 202, 252 and the second channel 4, 204, 254 as well as further promoting heat transfer between the heat exchanger and the environment. This applies in particular if the walls 3, 203, 253, 5, 205, 255 are made of thermally conductive material such as metal. Particularly suitable are, for example, copper and aluminum and their alloys, with or without a lining.
The embodiments according to Figures 3, 5, 6 and 7 are further provided with a plurality of outer channels 4, 154, 35 204, 254 which are distributed over the circumference of the first wall. The outer channels therefore each have a separate relatively small cross section. This offers the advantage that the formation of deposits and areas with reduced 101 3648 -10- • flow is prevented. As soon as a deposit forms in an area, the pressure drop over that area increases, which increases the eroding effect of the water on the deposit and will in many cases be included.
In the heat exchangers according to Figures 3, 5, 6 and 7, the second wall 5, 155, 205, 255 has a substantially uniform wall thickness. This offers the advantage that the second wall can be manufactured by rolling from a prefabricated pipe material. The second wall 105 of the exemplary embodiment shown in Fig. 4 is particularly suitable for extrusion production. The ribs 126 are then in principle continuous. It is also possible to provide separate blades instead of continuous ribs. These can for instance be mounted in slots milled or punched in the second wall. The use of separate vanes makes it possible to mix the fluid in the outer channel 104 particularly intensively, which is conducive to the heat transfer.
Profiles particularly suitable for manufacture by rollers are those in which circumferentially successive portions of the second wall 5, 155, 205, 255 are circumferentially alternately increasing and decreasing distances from the first wall 3, 153, 203, 253 located. A wave profile, for example as shown in Figures 3 and 7, is particularly favorable here, because the maximum local deformation of the material remains relatively limited.
The heat exchanger according to the exemplary embodiment shown in Fig. 5 is further provided with a core 183 which rests against said first wall 153 along three lines distributed in the circumferential direction of the first wall 153. Between that core and the first wall there are three inner channels 152. The core 183 limits the volume of the fluid in the center of the inner pipe which is further conducive to rapid heating and cooling of the heat exchanger, especially if the core 183 is manufactured from a material with a low thermal capacity, such as plastic.
1 01 3648 -11-
In the heat exchanger shown in Fig. 6, the second wall 203 is also profiled. This is advantageous for promoting the heat transfer between the inner channel 202 and the outer channels 204 and thereby also the heat transfer between the inner channel 202 and the environment of the heat exchanger.
The first wall 253 of the heat exchanger of Figure 7 has a flattened shape. This also offers the advantage that the inner channel 252 at a given circumference of the first wall 253 has a reduced flow-through surface, which allows a better heat exchange between the inner channel 252 and the outer channels 254 as well as with the environment.
Fig. 8 shows a connection area of the heat exchanger 15 according to Figs. 1-3. In the connection area, the second wall 5 has a substantially smooth shape in the circumferential direction. This is advantageous for attaching a coupling piece 27 to the heat exchanger 1. The proposed coupling piece has two sleeves 28, 29 which are offset from one another in the axial direction of the heat exchanger 1. The second wall 5 is shortened further than the first wall 3 and is connected to the inner diameter widest of the two cuffs 28, 29. The first wall is connected to the inner diameter narrowest of the two cuffs 28, 29.
The outer channels 4 communicate via the widest sleeve 29 with a passage 30 through a third sleeve 31 which is oriented transversely of the part of the heat exchanger 1 at the location of the coupling piece 27. The pipe 30, which is intended to be connected to the outer channels 4, must be connected to this. The pipe to be connected to the inner duct 2 must be connected to the sleeve 28 in line with the heat exchanger 1.
The heat exchanger 1 has a transition area in which the second wall 4 gradually transitions from a substantially smooth shape to the profiled shape. The transition to the profiled portion of the heat exchanger 1, therefore, causes little flow resistance.
It will be clear to the skilled person that the invention is not limited to the above-described embodiments, but that many other variants and embodiments are possible within the scope of the invention. For example, the double pipe of the heat exchanger can be wound into a shape other than a helix, such as curved back and forth in one or more planes in a spiral and more angularly extending heat exchangers are possible. The shape of the heat exchanger in cross section and the design of the connection can also be carried out in many other ways.
1 0 1 36 4 8

Claims (13)

  1. A heat exchanger for heating tap water, comprising: a central inner channel (2; 152; 202; 252), at least one outer channel (4; 104; 154; 204; 254) extending lengthwise from said inner channel (2; 152 ; 202; 5 252) extending beyond said inner channel (2; 152; 202; 252), a first wall (3; 153; 203; 253) between said inner channel (2; 152; 202; 252) and said at least one outer channel (4; 104; 154; 204; 254) and a second wall (5; 105; 155; 205; 255) forming an outer boundary of said at least one outer channel (4; 104; 154; 204; 254), with characterized in that said second wall (5; 105; 155; 205; 255) is profiled.
  2. A heat exchanger according to claim 1, wherein said profiling (6) extends longitudinally of said 15 channels (2, 4; 104; 152, 154; 202, 204; 252, 254).
  3. The heat exchanger according to claim 1 or 2, wherein said first wall (3; 105; 203; 253) and said second wall (5; 155; 205; 255) communicate in circumferentially spaced locations.
  4. A heat exchanger according to claim 3, wherein said first wall (3; 203; 253) and said second wall (5; 105; 205; 255) abut in circumferentially distributed locations.
  5. Heat exchanger according to claim 2 or 3, wherein several of said outer channels (4; 154; 204; 254) are distributed over the circumference of the first wall (3; 153; 203; 253).
  6. 6. Heat exchanger according to one of the preceding claims, wherein said second wall (5; 105; 155; 205; 255) has a substantially uniform wall thickness.
  7. The heat exchanger according to claim 5, wherein circumferentially successive portions of the second wall (5; 155; 205; 255) alternately increase in circumferential direction 101 3648 -14 and decrease distance from said first wall (3; 153; 203; 253 ) are located.
  8. Heat exchanger according to claim 5 or 6, wherein said profiling (6) is designed as a wave profile.
  9. Heat exchanger according to any one of the preceding claims, further comprising a connection area, wherein said second wall (5) has a substantially smooth shape in a circumferential direction and a transition area in which said second wall (5) gradually transitions from said, substantially smooth shape to said profiled shape.
  10. Heat exchanger according to any one of the preceding claims, which forms a number of successive windings at a mutual distance from one another.
  11. Tap water heating system with a heat exchanger (1) according to any one of the preceding claims, further comprising a solar collector (10), heat transfer channels (11-14) for circulating a heat transfer medium and tap water channels (15, 16) for supplying and discharging tap water, said inner channel (2) communicating with said heat transfer channels (11-14) for circulating a heat transfer medium and said at least one outer channel (4) communicating with said tap water channels (15, 16).
  12. Tap water heating system with a heat exchanger (1) according to any one of claims 1-10, further comprising a hot water reservoir (7) with a storage space for storing a supply of tap water (8) and channels (64, 65) for the supplying and extracting a heat transfer medium, the heat exchanger (1) being located in said inner space, said at least one outer channel (4) having said channels (64, 65) for supplying and extracting (64 65) of a heat transfer medium communicating and the inner channel (2) opening into said storage space.
  13. The tap water heating installation according to claim 12, wherein an opening (24) of said inner channel (2) is located in 1013648 * -15- * a lower part of said storage space. 1 01 3648
NL1013648A 1999-11-23 1999-11-23 Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger. NL1013648C1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
NL1013648A NL1013648C1 (en) 1999-11-23 1999-11-23 Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger.
NL1013648 1999-11-23

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
NL1013648A NL1013648C1 (en) 1999-11-23 1999-11-23 Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger.
EP99204200A EP1103775A3 (en) 1999-11-23 1999-12-08 Heat exchanger and water heating system using same
DE29922010U DE29922010U1 (en) 1999-11-23 1999-12-15 Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating system with such a heat exchanger

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
NL1013648C1 true NL1013648C1 (en) 2001-05-28

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NL1013648A NL1013648C1 (en) 1999-11-23 1999-11-23 Anti-Legionella heat exchanger and tap water heating installation with such a heat exchanger.

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EP (1) EP1103775A3 (en)
DE (1) DE29922010U1 (en)
NL (1) NL1013648C1 (en)

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WO1997005441A1 (en) * 1995-07-28 1997-02-13 Kinto Investments & Securities Heat exchanger of 'tube-in-tube' type

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EP1103775A2 (en) 2001-05-30
DE29922010U1 (en) 2000-03-23

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