KR20140105450A - Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells - Google Patents

Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells Download PDF

Info

Publication number
KR20140105450A
KR20140105450A KR1020147014653A KR20147014653A KR20140105450A KR 20140105450 A KR20140105450 A KR 20140105450A KR 1020147014653 A KR1020147014653 A KR 1020147014653A KR 20147014653 A KR20147014653 A KR 20147014653A KR 20140105450 A KR20140105450 A KR 20140105450A
Authority
KR
South Korea
Prior art keywords
conductive
conductive foil
insulating layer
back sheet
adhesive layer
Prior art date
Application number
KR1020147014653A
Other languages
Korean (ko)
Other versions
KR101954476B1 (en
Inventor
케빈 마이클 코클리
Original Assignee
케빈 마이클 코클리
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201161553764P priority Critical
Priority to US61/553,764 priority
Priority to US201261597309P priority
Priority to US61/597,309 priority
Priority to US201261647658P priority
Priority to US61/647,658 priority
Priority to US13/663,273 priority patent/US10383207B2/en
Priority to US13/663,273 priority
Application filed by 케빈 마이클 코클리 filed Critical 케빈 마이클 코클리
Priority to PCT/US2012/062604 priority patent/WO2013066884A1/en
Publication of KR20140105450A publication Critical patent/KR20140105450A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of KR101954476B1 publication Critical patent/KR101954476B1/en

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K1/00Printed circuits
    • H05K1/02Details
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus peculiar to the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus peculiar to the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/042PV modules or arrays of single PV cells
    • H01L31/048Encapsulation of modules
    • H01L31/049Protective back sheets
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L31/00Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus peculiar to the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L31/04Semiconductor devices sensitive to infra-red radiation, light, electromagnetic radiation of shorter wavelength or corpuscular radiation and adapted either for the conversion of the energy of such radiation into electrical energy or for the control of electrical energy by such radiation; Processes or apparatus peculiar to the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof adapted as photovoltaic [PV] conversion devices
    • H01L31/042PV modules or arrays of single PV cells
    • H01L31/05Electrical interconnection means between PV cells inside the PV module, e.g. series connection of PV cells
    • H01L31/0504Electrical interconnection means between PV cells inside the PV module, e.g. series connection of PV cells specially adapted for series or parallel connection of solar cells in a module
    • H01L31/0516Electrical interconnection means between PV cells inside the PV module, e.g. series connection of PV cells specially adapted for series or parallel connection of solar cells in a module specially adapted for interconnection of back-contact solar cells
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K1/00Printed circuits
    • H05K1/18Printed circuits structurally associated with non-printed electric components
    • H05K1/189Printed circuits structurally associated with non-printed electric components characterised by the use of a flexible or folded printed circuit
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K3/00Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits
    • H05K3/10Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits in which conductive material is applied to the insulating support in such a manner as to form the desired conductive pattern
    • H05K3/20Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits in which conductive material is applied to the insulating support in such a manner as to form the desired conductive pattern by affixing prefabricated conductor pattern
    • H05K3/202Apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits in which conductive material is applied to the insulating support in such a manner as to form the desired conductive pattern by affixing prefabricated conductor pattern using self-supporting metal foil pattern
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K1/00Printed circuits
    • H05K1/02Details
    • H05K1/11Printed elements for providing electric connections to or between printed circuits
    • H05K1/111Pads for surface mounting, e.g. lay-out
    • H05K1/112Pads for surface mounting, e.g. lay-out directly combined with via connections
    • H05K1/113Via provided in pad; Pad over filled via
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2201/00Indexing scheme relating to printed circuits covered by H05K1/00
    • H05K2201/10Details of components or other objects attached to or integrated in a printed circuit board
    • H05K2201/10007Types of components
    • H05K2201/10143Solar cell
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/03Metal processing
    • H05K2203/033Punching metal foil, e.g. solder foil
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/17Post-manufacturing processes
    • H05K2203/175Configurations of connections suitable for easy deletion, e.g. modifiable circuits or temporary conductors for electroplating; Processes for deleting connections
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/50Photovoltaic [PV] energy
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor

Abstract

According to the present invention, a layer of conductive foil and insulating material is configured to interconnect a series of rear-contacting solar cells. Embodiments are provided in which a layer of conductive foil can be patterned to form a repeating set of electrically insulated interdigital fingers. Each set of interdigital fingers can be used to connect the bipolar contacts of the first rear-contact solar cell to the negative contact of the second adjacent rear-contact battery. The insulating layer is attached to the patterned conductive foil and provides mechanical support and / or electrical insulation. In some embodiments, the protective backsheet can be disposed below the conductive foil and / or insulating layer to provide additional mechanical support and environmental protection. In some embodiments, the layers of conductive foil and insulating material may be incorporated as interconnecting circuits in the back-contacting PV module.

Description

[0001] INTERDIGITATED FOIL INTERCONNECT FOR REAR-CONTACT SOLAR CELLS [0002] BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION [0003]

Cross-reference to related application

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61 / 553,764, filed October 31, 2011, entitled FOIL-BASED INTERCONNECT FOR REAR-CONTACT SOLAR CELLS FOR REMOTE- U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61 / 597,309, filed on February 10, 2012, entitled INTERDIGITATED FOIL INTERCONNECT FOR REAR-CONTACT SOLAR CELLS, Priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61 / 647,658, filed May 16, 2012, entitled INTERDIGITATED FOIL INTERCONNECT FOR REAR-CONTACT SOLAR CELLS FOR Rear-Contact Solar Cells , Each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

In order to increase the efficiency of a photovoltaic cell (PV cell) and reduce its manufacturing cost, it is desirable that both the positive and negative polarity contacts of the solar cell are accessible from the rear or non-light- Significant efforts have been made to develop batteries. Compared to a conventional front-contact solar cell, the rear-contact solar cell typically has a metal coverage of zero on a smaller or in some cases on the front surface of the cell. This avoids the tradeoff occurring in the front-contact cell between the conductivity of the metal front electrode and their coverage (or shadowing) on the light-incident side of the cell, Coupling, lower resistive power dissipation and higher conversion efficiency. Examples of post-contact solar cells are described in U.S. Patent Nos. 3,903,427, 3,903,428, 4,927,770, 5,053,083 and 7,276,724, and U.S. Patent Applications Nos. US2009 / 0314346, US2010 / 0139746, and US2009 / 0256254 . A thorough review of silicon-based rear-contact solar cell technology is described in Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. 2006; 14: 107-123.

In addition to providing higher efficiency, there are at least two different ways in which the incorporation of the rear-contacting solar cell can simplify the PV module and reduce its manufacturing cost. First, in a rear-contacting PV module manufacturing line, the back-contacting cell is directly connected to the electro-functional "conductive backsheet" And it may be possible to replace the tabbing and stringing operation. This can help improve the overall throughput of the manufacturing line. Then, for a silicon-based PV cell, the rear-contacting PV modules typically have a large thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) when the current-collecting tab is soldered thereto, coefficient of thermal expansion is better suited for incorporation of larger cells and thinner than front-contact PV modules because it causes mismatch stresses. Such CTE mismatch stresses and associated cell disruption are particularly problematic if the cell is thinner than about 200 [mu] m or greater than about 156 mm on one side. In contrast, the need for thicker metal conductors is significantly reduced in a rear-contacting solar cell because the output current is typically distributed across the back surface of the cell. This allows a thinner and wider metal conductor to be attached to the rear of the rear-contacting solar cell with low ohmic power loss and reduced breakdown from CTE mismatch stress.

However, at present, several factors related to the difficulty in interconnecting the rear-contacting solar cells limit their extensive implementation. One factor arises from the challenging dimensional requirements involved in the interconnect process. In many rear-facing solar cell constructions, it is desirable to have a contact spacing of the order of a few millimeters on the back surface of the cell, while the interconnected assembly of the back-contacting solar cells is typically at least 1 m2 in the finished PV module. It is difficult to manufacture a single circuit or device that can accommodate both of these dimensional requirements with high yield and low cost. Prior art wide area conductive backsheets typically utilize a "flex circuit" process in which a layer of conductive foil is patterned into interspersed positive and negative electrodes using mask and etch techniques (see, for example, 2010/0012172). In many cases, the manufacturing costs of these conductive backsheets are so high that their use in PV modules becomes impractical. The high cost can be attributed to the relative shortage of the availability of screen printing and etching equipment, which can partially handle rolls of 0.5-2 m width of the material, and to the low throughput associated with partially etching the thick metal foil.

In addition, it is a challenge to achieve sufficient long-term reliability from a front-contacting PV module incorporating a wide-area conductive backsheet. For example, these devices may be susceptible to electrical shorting during manufacture and / or prolonged outdoor exposure if one polarity electrode on the conductive back sheet is contacted with an opposite polarity electrode on the back-contacting solar cell. In addition, the silicon solar cell is less likely to be destroyed during assembly of the module of the rear-contacting PV module than the front-contacting PV module, but in some cases, ) CTE mismatch effects can lead to a significant accumulation of mechanical stresses during the main / night temperature cycling of the module. Over a long period of time, this may be due to the wrinkling and / or peeling of the conductive foil layer from the post-contact solar cell, or to the solder or electrically conductive < RTI ID = 0.0 > It may lead to mechanical breakage of a material such as an adhesive (ECA: electrically conductive adhesive). This can potentially lead to a significant reduction in the power output from the rear-contacting PV module.

A first embodiment of the invention is an interconnecting circuit comprising a layer of a conductive foil and an insulating material. The interconnect circuitry can be used to interconnect a series of rear-contact solar cells. The layer of conductive foil may be patterned to form a repeating set of electrically insulated interdigital fingers. Each set of interdigital fingers can be used to connect the bipolar contacts of the first rear-contact solar cell to the negative contact of the second adjacent rear-contact battery. The insulating layer is attached to the patterned conductive foil and provides mechanical support and electrical insulation. Further, in some embodiments, the protective backsheet can be disposed under the interconnecting circuitry to provide additional mechanical support and environmental protection.

Other aspects include various methods of manufacturing interconnect circuits. In one embodiment, a method of manufacturing an interconnecting circuit comprises first forming a series of slots through a portion of the conductive foil, then laminating a conductive foil to the insulating layer, Slitting the conductive foil and / or removing the connection tab to completely isolate adjacent areas of the conductive foil. In yet another embodiment, the techniques and processes used to form the interconnecting circuit connecting the linear array of back-contacting solar cells extend to the fabrication of two-dimensional interconnecting circuits. In yet another embodiment, a method of manufacturing an interconnect circuit includes kiss cutting a conductive foil to a carrier substrate, then depositing an insulating layer on the conductive foil using a patterned adhesive, And then removing the carrier substrate with an unwanted area of the conductive foil. Once completed, the interconnecting circuitry may optionally be laminated to a protective backsheet for assembly into a solar module or connected to a back-contacting solar cell.

Various embodiments are set forth in the following description and the accompanying drawings.
1A is a schematic sequential cut-away top view illustrating an example of an interconnect circuit according to one embodiment of the present invention.
1B is a schematic sequential cut-away plan view showing an example of an interconnect circuit in an upside-down configuration according to another embodiment of the present invention.
1C is a schematic plan view showing an example of a conductive back sheet according to another embodiment of the present invention.
1D is a schematic plan view showing an example of a rear-contacting PV module according to another embodiment of the present invention.
2A to 2F are schematic sequential plan views illustrating an example of fabrication of an interconnecting circuit according to another embodiment of the present invention.
3 is a schematic diagram showing an example of an apparatus that can be used to connect a back-contacting solar cell to an interconnecting circuit according to another embodiment of the present invention.
4A-4F are schematic, sequential top views illustrating an example of the fabrication of a two-dimensional interconnect circuit in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention.
5A-5E are schematic, sequential top-down views illustrating an example of the fabrication of a two-dimensional interconnect circuit in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention.
The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description of some embodiments of the techniques described herein, will be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. For purposes of illustrating the techniques described herein, some embodiments are shown in the figures. It should be understood, however, that the techniques described herein are not limited to the arrangements and means illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Moreover, it should be understood that the components of the figures are not to scale and that the relative size of one component to another component should not be inferred or interpreted as requiring such a relative magnitude.

The following detailed description of specific embodiments of the invention will be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. As used herein, an element or step that is referred to in an singular and begins with an "a " or" an "should be understood as not excluding a plurality of elements or steps unless explicitly stated. Further, the citation of "one embodiment" should not be construed as excluding the existence of further embodiments incorporating the recited features. Moreover, an "comprising" or "having" an element or a plurality of elements having a particular nature may include additional elements that do not have that property.

Unless stated otherwise, within the detailed description, the "front" surface of the layer is generally a surface that faces the light-incident side of the back-contacting PV module, even though light is not directly incident on that particular surface ; It should be noted that the "rear" surface refers to the surface of the layer facing away from the light-incident side of the module. Similarly, the words associated with the upper ("upper", "top" and "above") are generally intended to indicate positions closer to the light-incident side of the module, while words associated with the lower "bottom" and "beneath") are intended to describe further positions. Further, the term "opening" in the detailed description includes, but is not limited to, apertures, slits, slots or gaps of any shape or size, whether the material is completely or partially surrounded by the material from the layer And any missing or missing material from a given layer.

A first embodiment of the present invention is an interconnect circuit that can be used to electrically connect a linear array of back-contacting solar cells in series. Interconnecting circuit 100 includes an insulating layer 110, a conductive foil 120 patterned to form a repeating set of interdigitated fingers 125, an optional dielectric < RTI ID = 0.0 > An insulating layer 130 and an optional second adhesive layer 140. In some embodiments, the interconnecting circuit 100 includes at least one rear-contacting solar cell 145, but generally there is no need for the rear-contacting solar cell 145 to be present. The optional dielectric insulating layer 130 and the second adhesive layer 140 may be patterned with a series of openings through which the electrical connection from the conductive foil 120 to the rear-contacting solar cell 145 is formed. Although the interconnecting circuit 100 is shown in FIG. 1A as being several times the length of the rear-contacting solar cell 145, the length of the circuit is actually 1 to 100 times the length of the rear- Lt; / RTI >

The insulating layer 110 provides electrical insulation and mechanical support to the conductive foil 120 and another upper layer of the interconnecting circuit 100. In some embodiments, the insulating layer 110 may be initially processed into a sheet form and subsequently laminated to the conductive foil 120 using a first adhesive layer (not shown). Examples of the sheet material that may be suitable for the insulating layer 110 include polyimide (PI), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), ethylvinyl acetate But are not limited to, polyvinyl butyral (PVB). The insulating layer 110 should have sufficient electrical resistance to prevent lateral shunting between adjacent interdigitated fingers 125 in general. Further, the composition and thickness of the insulating layer 110 may be selected to minimize distortion of the spacing between the interdigital fingers 125 that may occur during processing. This assists in ensuring that adjacent sets of interdigital fingers 125 are properly aligned with the contacts of the rear-contact solar cell 145. The thickness of the insulating layer 110 within the range 10-125 占 퐉 may be sufficient to meet this requirement. In some cases, the insulating layer 110 may comprise a multilayer stack of insulating layers or films. In some embodiments, a layer of PET with a thickness of 10-100 [mu] m is used as the insulating layer 110 due to its low cost, good processability, and good electrical insulation properties.

The conductive foil 120 includes any sufficient electrically conductive material that is capable of withstanding typical processing and field exposure conditions encountered by the rear-contacting PV module. Suitable materials for the conductive foil 120 include, but are not limited to, aluminum, copper, steel, titanium, molybdenum, tungsten, and alloys thereof. The thickness of the conductive foil 120 should generally be large enough to provide a current path with low electrical resistance, but should not be so large that an excessively high CTE mismatch stress occurs in the finished assembly. In the case of aluminum or copper foil, a thickness within the range of 10-200 [mu] m may be sufficient to meet these criteria. In another embodiment, a foil thickness within the range 25-150 [mu] m may be used. In another embodiment, a layer of aluminum foil of 50-100 [mu] m can be used due to its good conductivity and low cost. The conductive foil 120 may be bonded to the insulating layer 110 using a first adhesive layer (not shown). Adhesive types that may be suitable for the first adhesive layer include, but are not limited to, pressure sensitive adhesives, contact adhesives, thermoplastic adhesives, cross-link adhesives, UV curable adhesives or two-component adhesives.

The conductive foil 120 may be at least partially coated with a surface finish material (not shown). The purpose of the surface finishing material is to prevent the formation of insulating oxide at the interface between the conductive foil 120 and the conductive adhesive material (not shown) connecting the conductive foil 120 to the back- And potentially provide a solderable surface. Surface finishes that can provide a suitable surface include tin, lead, zinc, nickel, silver, palladium, platinum, gold, indium, chromium, copper, alloys thereof, organic solderability preservative (OSP) But are not limited to, electrically conductive materials. The surface finishing material may be plated, sputtered or cold welded or otherwise applied. In some embodiments, the thickness of the surface finish may be in the range of 0.05 microns to 10 microns. In other embodiments, a thickness within the range of 0.1 占 퐉 to 2.5 占 퐉 may be used.

The use of strong surface finishes can be particularly important as aluminum or its alloys in conductive foils tend to form insulating natural oxides easily in the presence of oxygen or moisture. In this case, to provide a long-term stability surface, the surface finishing material should generally have resistance to internal-diffusion of oxygen and / or moisture. For example, zinc, silver, tin, copper, nickel, chromium or gold plating may be particularly well suited to the formation of oxidation-resistant surfaces on aluminum.

Further, in some applications, the conductive foil 120 can be used as a conductive foil (for example, in applications where a solder or solder paste is used in the formation of electrical connections to a rear-contacting solar cell or in the attachment of a bus bar to a conductive foil) Solderable is preferred. In the case of an aluminum conductive foil, it may be desirable that the melting temperature of the surface finish material is significantly higher than the melting temperature of solder. Otherwise, if the surface finishing material melts during the melting of solder, oxygen can penetrate into the molten surface finishing layer to oxidize the aluminum surface, thereby reducing conductivity at the interface and potentially resulting in loss of mechanical adhesion do. Therefore, in a rear-contacting PV module that generally benefits from a coalescing melt temperature of less than 350 占 폚 so that CTE mismatch effects can be minimized, it can be used for a conductive foil comprising zinc, silver, copper, nickel, chromium or gold- It can be a suitable surface finish.

Each set of interdigital fingers 125 provides a continuous electrical path from both contacts of the first rear-contact solar cell to the negative contacts of the second adjacent rear-contact solar cell. The layout of the adjacent set of interdigital fingers 125 should generally be at least partially aligned with the pattern of positive and negative contacts on the rear surface of the rear-contacting solar cell 145. The distance between the edges of one finger and the immediately adjacent edges of the adjacent fingers should generally be large enough to ensure good electrical insulation between adjacent fingers of the adjacent set, Should be small enough to leave a tolerance of about 0.5-1 mm for the placement of the interdigitated fingers 145. Although the pattern of the interdigitated fingers 125 shown in Figure 1 represents a square wave-like shape, in other embodiments, Shaped fingers 125 may be deformed into almost any other shape with the general intention that they must be electrically insulated from each other and overlap with appropriate contacts on the rear surface of the rear-contact solar cell 145. For example, in an embodiment in which the rear-contacting solar cell 145 has contacts just near the edge of the cell, the length of the interdigitated fingers is the rear- There can be significantly less than the length of the battery 145, another potential reason for modifying the pattern of interdigitated finger-type fitting 125 A) would reduce the resistive power loss in the below finger; B) improving the module yield by increasing the contact pad landing area near the contact opening; C) reducing the mechanical stress on the interconnect circuitry 100; Or D) simplifying the fabrication process of the interconnecting circuit 100.

In addition to patterning the conductive foil 120 with the interdigital fingers 125, additional openings (not shown) that help to provide some degree of internal-plane stress relief to the layer, in some embodiments, May be formed in the foil 120. Optionally, the conductive foil 120 may be selectively < RTI ID = 0.0 > selectively < / RTI > selected, for example, using photo-anodization to provide a protective insulating layer of metal oxide in the region of the foil that is not in electrical contact with the conductive adhesive and / Lt; / RTI >

The optional dielectric insulating layer 130 provides electrical insulation between the adjacent set of interdigital fingers 125 and also between the interdigital fingers 125 and the rear-contacting solar cell 145. An opening is formed in the dielectric insulating layer 130 in the region where electrical conduction is required between the conductive foil 120 and the rear-contacting solar cell 145 (e.g., near the point of contact of the rear-contacting solar cell 145) . In the case where a printable electrical connection material, such as a silver-filled epoxy or solder paste, is used to connect the conductive foil 120 to the back-contacting solar cell 145, the presence of the dielectric insulation layer 130 may be & It is possible to prevent electrical shorts between adjacent interdigital fingers 125 if excessive dispersion of the interdigital fingers 125 occurs during processing. In some embodiments, the dielectric insulating layer 130 may comprise a printable material that can be deposited using screen printing, flexographic printing, ink jet printing, gravure printing, or other printing techniques. It may not be necessary to include the dielectric insulating layer 130 in the interconnecting circuit 100 in a mechanically robust embodiment where the second adhesive layer 140 has sufficient electrical insulation. This can help reduce the manufacturing cost of the interconnecting circuit 100.

The second adhesive layer 140 provides adhesive bonding between the post-contact solar cell 145 and the underlying interconnect circuitry 100. An opening may be patterned in the second adhesive layer 140 such that an electrical contact is formed between the conductive foil 120 and the back-contacting solar cell 145, as in the case of the dielectric insulating layer 130. [ The second adhesive layer 140 should generally have a high electrical resistance such that it does not bypass the adjacent contact points on the interconnecting circuit 100 or on the rear-contacting solar cell 145 sideways. Adhesive types that may be suitable for the second adhesive layer 140 include but are not limited to pressure sensitive adhesives, contact adhesives, thermoplastic adhesives, cross-link adhesives, UV curable adhesives, two-component adhesives, B-stage adhesives, But are not limited to, ashes. Optionally, a pigment may be added to the second adhesive layer 140 to improve the reflectivity of the interconnecting circuit 100.

In some embodiments, the second adhesive layer 140 is initially formed in liquid form (i.e., from a molten state or from a solution) using screen printing, flexographic printing, ink jet printing, gravure printing, ) May be applied to either the conductive foil 120 or the rear-contacting solar cell 145. In some embodiments, the application of the second adhesive layer 140 in liquid form (e.g., between the interdigitated fingers 125) can be done in a liquid form, since the initially liquid adhesive may flow before coagulation / To fill any voids or gaps in the underlying layer (e. G., At the corners of the conductive foil 120), or to smoothen any protrusions or sharp edges present. This can help improve the yield and / or long term reliability of the rear-contacting PV module. Alternatively, the second adhesive layer 140 may be provided in a sheet form and then laminated to either the conductive foil 120 or the rear-contacting solar cell 145. In these embodiments, the apertures may optionally be coated with a second adhesive layer (not shown) prior to lamination using rotating die cutting, mating-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, flat bed die cutting, punching, laser cutting, 140). In another embodiment, the second adhesive layer 140 may be laminated to either the conductive foil 120 or the back-contacting solar cell 145 as a continuous sheet, followed by removal, such as etching or laser ablation, The formation of the opening into the second adhesive layer 140 using the technique is performed.

The required thickness of the second adhesive layer 140 may be in the range of 10 to 500 [mu] m, depending on the nature of the layer and the process technology and materials used to make the back-contacting PV module. In embodiments where the electrical connection material used in the opening of the second adhesive layer 140 is expensive (such as in a silver-based conductive epoxy, for example, which can be as expensive as $ 1 / g), the overall The cost can generally be reduced by reducing the thickness of the second adhesive layer 140. [ This reduces the volume of electrical connection material required to fill the openings in the second adhesive layer 140 to form a contact between the conductive foil 120 and the rear-contacting solar cell 145. For example, the thickness of the second adhesive layer 140 of between 1 μm and 200 μm can be used to help reduce the required amount of electrical connection material. In another embodiment, a thickness of 1 [mu] m to 100 [mu] m may be used. In yet another embodiment, a layer thickness of 1 [mu] m to 50 [mu] m may be used.

However, according to the potential challenge associated with using a relatively thin second adhesive layer 140, it is possible to fill all voids or gaps in the layer stack (such as gaps between interdigital fingers) There may be an adhesive material that is insufficient to prevent any protrusions or sharp edges in the foil being permanently pressed through the adhesive and electrically shorting to the post-contact solar cell. In some embodiments, these problems can potentially be avoided by: A) initially (e.g., by screen printing, gravure printing, or the like) to have a tendency to fill (or to smooth out any protrusions) By applying an adhesive layer 140; Or B) by providing an additional planarizing layer between the two to help eliminate clearance or protrusion between the conductive foil 120 and the post-contact solar cell 145. Each of these embodiments will be discussed elsewhere in the description.

Due to the relatively large CTE mismatch between the semiconductors such as silicon and the many conductive foils, in some cases, the conductive foil 120 from the back- And / or may be prone to peeling. The conductive foil comprising aluminum has a higher CTE (23 ppm / C to 17 ppm / C) of aluminum and a higher electrical resistivity (2.8E-6 ohmcm to 1.7E-6 ohmcm) May be particularly vulnerable to such effects. (Although not a problem in itself, the higher resistivity of aluminum generally requires that a thicker aluminum foil layer is required to generate the same electrical sheet resistance as copper if a given electrical sheet resistance is required and this is due to mechanical stress buildup in the layer stack To help prevent wrinkling in the conductive foil, in some embodiments, the second adhesive layer 140 has a melt flow index (MFI, as defined by ASTM D1238) , 2.16 kg, < RTI ID = 0.0 > 190 C). ≪ / RTI > The MFI of the thermoplastic adhesive / sealant is less than 1 dg / min at 190 C (in which case the flow of the adhesive is very low under applied force / stress) to greater than 50 dg / min (in which case the adhesive tends to rapidly flow ). ≪ / RTI > The rear-contacting PV module is typically not exposed to temperatures as high as 190 C in outdoor use, but in some embodiments, the MFI can be used as a predictor of the tendency of the second adhesive layer 140 to creep during long-term operation.

Thermoplastic adhesives with an MFI higher than 20 dg / min are typically more susceptible to creep than STR® Photocap® EVA 15420 (a widely-used commercially-available cross-linked EVA sealant) Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > 10 dg / min, < / RTI > can better prevent wrinkling in the conductive foil than the cross-linked EVA product described above. In some embodiments, the second adhesive layer 140 having an MFI of less than or equal to about 4 dg / min can be used in a 50 to 100 탆 thick aluminum conductive foil to be used in a rear-contacting PV module without significant wrinkle formation during main / I can do it. In another embodiment, a second adhesive layer 140 having an MFI of about 8 dg / min or less may be sufficient. The correlation between the tendency of the conductive foil 120 to corrode and the MFI of the second adhesive layer 140 is dependent on the number of times of -40 C to < RTI ID = 0.0 > It should be noted that this can be measured directly by quantifying the degree of wrinkling in the conductive foil layer according to the + 85C temperature cycle.

According to the potential challenge associated with using the second adhesive layer 140 of low-MFI in the rear-contacting PV module, the module stacking at a typical process temperature and duration (e.g., 120-160C for 5-60 minutes) The adhesive may not flow sufficiently sufficiently to fill the voids or gaps in the layer stack. Similar to the problem encountered when using the relatively thin second adhesive layer 140 as described above, in some embodiments, these problems can be solved by: A) filling the adhesive with any gap (or by smoothing the protrusions (By, for example, screen printing, gravure printing or the like, from a molten or dissolved state) in a liquid form at an early stage; Or B) additional flattening between these two to eliminate gaps between the conductive foil 120 and the rear-contacting solar cell 145 and to smooth the protrusions so that the second adhesive layer 140 is not required to flow significantly, Lt; / RTI > layer.

A series of electrical connections (not shown) may be formed between the conductive foil 120 and the rear-contacting solar cell 145 via the optional dielectric insulating layer 130 and the opening in the second adhesive layer 140 have. In some embodiments, the conductive foil 120 may be directly pressed in contact with the post-contact solar cell 145 at these locations, while in other embodiments, the electrical connecting material may be used to form the contacts . Suitable materials for forming potentially electrical connections include, but are not limited to, solder, solder paste, conductive ink, isotropic ECA, anisotropic ECA, and bulk metal conductors. In some embodiments, the electrical connection includes a printable or dispensable material such as a solder paste or a silver flake-filled, epoxy-based ECA.

In some embodiments, it is desirable that the material used to form the electrical connection when these areas are exposed to oxygen or moisture during module operation has resistance to interface and bulk oxidation. In some cases, resistance to corrosion and / or oxidation may be improved through the inclusion of corrosion inhibitors into the electrical interconnect material. The use of a corrosion inhibitor is advantageous because the upper surface of the conductive foil 120 (i.e., the conductive foil itself in the absence of a surface finishing material or surface finishing material) has a negative reduction potential (i.e., a greater tendency to oxidize) May be particularly important. For example, if the electrical connection material is a silver-flake-filled ECA, then a conductive foil comprising a surface finishing material and / or a metal such as tin, lead, zinc, nickel, silver, palladium, indium, aluminum or copper, Can take advantage of. A common function of the corrosion inhibitor is to form a protective but non-electrically insulating layer on the surface of the surface finish or conductive foil that acts as a barrier to oxidation. For example, chelating agents such as amino acids or other carboxylic acid-containing molecules can be used as corrosion inhibitors in electrical interconnect materials.

The rear-contact solar cell 145 includes any type of solar cell in which both positive and negative contacts are accessible from the rear surface of the solar cell. The rear-contact solar cell 145 can be patterned such that its positive and negative contacts are arranged in alternating rows and / or columns. This can help ensure that each of the interdigitated fingers 125 can traverse the rear surface of the rear-contacting solar cell 145 to reach all of the contacts of a given polarity type. In some embodiments, the post-contact solar cell 145 may be fabricated from a single- or multi-crystalline silicon wafer. Examples of silicon back-contact solar cells that can be incorporated into the rear-contacting PV module include metal wrap-through cells, emitter wrap-through cells, back junction cell, an all-back-contact cell, an interdigitated back-contact cell, a rear-contact-passivation emitter rear local diffusion cell a rear-contact-adapted passive emitter rear locally-diffused cell, a rear point-contact cell, a rear-contact-adapted silicon heterojunction cell, (Also known as a dichroic bond with a layer or HIT) and a rear-contact-adapted concentrator cell. Typical non-condensing silicon-based rear-contacting solar cells may have a thickness in the range of 10 to 300 microns and a width and / or diameter in the range of 100 to 450 microns.

In some embodiments, the relative positions of the insulating layer and the patterned conductive foil may be reversed in a layer stack of interconnecting circuits. An example of an interconnecting circuit in this configuration referred to herein as "reverse configuration" is shown in the sequential cut-away top view of FIG. The back layer of the reversing interconnect circuit 102 includes a conductive foil 122 patterned to form a repeating set of interdigital fingers 127. An insulating layer 112 and an optional second adhesive layer 142 are disposed over the conductive foil 122. The reversing interconnect circuit 102 may also include at least one rear-contacting solar cell 147, but generally there is no need for the rear-contacting solar cell 147 to be present. 1B, a series of openings is formed in the insulating layer 112 and the second adhesive layer 142 to allow the electrical connection from the conductive foil 122 to the rear-contacting solar cell 147 to be formed .

There are at least two potential advantages to the inversion configuration shown in Figure 1B. First, in some embodiments (such as the embodiment shown in FIG. 1B), the insulating layer 112 may be used as a replacement for the dielectric insulating layer, thereby reducing the total number of layers, 102). The insulating layer 112 may then serve as a planarizing surface to help eliminate the protrusions, voids, or gaps between the back-contacting solar cell 147 and the other layers of the interconnecting circuit 102.

In embodiments where the electrical connection material used to fill the openings in the insulating layer 112 and / or the second adhesive layer 142 is expensive, the overall cost of the rear-contacting PV module is generally insulated Can be reduced by reducing the thickness of the layer (112) and / or the second adhesive layer (142). Further, unless stated otherwise, it will be appreciated that embodiments describing features of the interconnecting circuit 100 of FIG. 1A, the process technology used to fabricate the interconnecting circuit 100, or the conductive backsheet and / or the back- The method and / or device structure used to incorporate the interconnecting circuit 100 into the PV module may also optionally be applied to the inverting interconnecting circuit 102 of FIG. 1B, and vice versa.

Another embodiment is a conductive back sheet 150 comprising one or more interconnecting circuits 100. 1C is a plan view showing a conductive back sheet 150 according to this embodiment. As shown in the figure, one or more interconnecting circuits 100 are disposed on the protective backsheet 160. A connecting bus bar 170 electrically connects the interconnecting circuits 100 in series. The external connector 180 sends current to the junction box or other external terminal through the conductive backsheet 150.

Protective back sheet 160 Te Raise (Tedlar) ®, PET, EVA primer, polyethylene traditional front of - and can include some or all of the contact layer, which can be found in the PV back sheet, while the other embodiment The protective backsheet 160 can be made from a completely new material. Similarly, the protective backsheet may be commercially available in some embodiments, or it may be custom made or made in other embodiments. The purpose of the protective backsheet 160 is to provide mechanical and environmental protection from the external environment. In addition, the protective backsheet 160 may comprise a continuous layer of insulating material (e.g., PET) that prevents high voltage discharge through the backsheet when multiple rear-contacting PV modules are connected in series.

In the inverted configuration, the back surface of the interconnecting circuit 102 (such as that shown in Figure 1B) includes a patterned conductive foil 122. In some embodiments, when the reversing interconnect circuitry 102 is attached to the protective backing sheet, the top layer of the protective backing sheet may be removed into the gap within the conductive foil 122 during the heat-lamination step (e.g., (E.g., into the space between the layer stacks 127), thereby helping to remove voids from the layer stack. For example, the thickness of the adhesive layer, which is at least 50% of the thickness of the conductive foil 122, may be sufficient to flow into the gaps in the conductive foil 122 to remove voids from the layer stack. In another embodiment, an adhesive layer thickness that is at least about the same as the thickness of the conductive foil 122 may be sufficient (e.g., if the conductive foil has a thickness of 100 microns, the adhesive layer may have a thickness of at least about 100 microns).

For this purpose, a number of commercially available "TPE" protective backsheets include a top adhesive layer that is sufficiently thick and mobile enough to flow into the gaps in the conductive foil 122. [ However, many of the top adhesive layers (e.g., polyolefin, polyethylene, non-cross-linked EVA or other low temperature thermoplastic adhesive layer) within the TPE backsheet are initially non-permanent in character. If these layers are directly bonded to the interconnecting circuit 102 during the lamination step, then in many cases, the bond will break immediately thereafter even if the adhesive layer is thick enough to fill the gaps in the conductive foil 122. For example, if a Madico TPE HD protective backsheet is directly laminated to the reversing interconnect circuit 102, the junction will break after a small number of hours (e.g., less than 10 hours) at 85C / 85% RH aging. In order to overcome this problem, in some embodiments, a thin adhesion-promoting tie layer (not shown) may be applied to the top adhesive layer of the protective backing sheet 160 and / Can be applied to the bottom of the circuit 102. This helps to form a relatively permanent bond between the protective backsheet 160 and the interconnect circuitry 102. In the example given above, the addition of a 1-10 mu m thick tie layer to the top adhesive layer of the protective backsheet 160 prior to bonding with the interconnecting circuit 102 results in a lifetime of the junction up to 3000 hours at 85C / 85% RH aging To thereby form an almost-permanent joint using an adhesive that is essentially initially non-permanent in nature. In some embodiments, a sufficiently strong bond can be achieved using a tie layer thickness that is less than about 20% of the thickness of the top adhesive layer of the protective backsheet 160. In another embodiment, the tie layer thickness may be less than about 10% of the thickness of the top adhesive layer.

Material types that may be suitable for the tie layer include, but are not limited to, a pressure sensitive tie layer, a thermoplastic tie layer, a thermoset tie layer, a cross-linked tie layer, a UV curable tie layer, a two-component tie layer or other material. In some embodiments, a cross-coupled tie layer may be used. Additionally, in some embodiments, the tie layer material described above may optionally be used to bond the base-configuration interconnect circuit 100 (as shown in FIG. 1A) to the protective backsheet 160 have.

The connecting bus bar 170 provides a serial connection between adjacent interconnecting circuits 100. In some embodiments, the conductive bus bar 170 is disposed on the interconnecting circuit 100 and accordingly either before or after the interconnecting circuit 100 is laminated to the protective backing sheet 160 The conductive bus bar 170 is disposed below the interconnecting circuit 100 and may be attached to the interconnecting circuit 100. In another embodiment, Before (or during) the interconnect circuit. Techniques that may be used to attach the connecting bus bar 170 to the interconnecting circuit 100 include but are not limited to soldering, brazing, ultrasonic welding, laser welding or bonding with a conductive adhesive such as PSA or epoxy It does not.

In some embodiments, stress-relieving properties such as gaps, openings or other flexible-generating structures can be included in the design of the connecting bus bar 170. This can help to reduce the accumulation of stress on the connecting bus bar 170 during main / ambient cycling. Additionally, in some embodiments, the connecting bus bar 170 may be configured such that a first bus bar is attached to an end (not shown) of each interconnecting circuit 100 and a second connecting bus bar is attached between two adjacent first bus bars May be attached using a two-step process (not shown) used to form a simple electrical connection.

External connector 180 directs current from the terminals of interconnecting circuit 100 and / or connecting bus bar 170 to the outside of the module. The external connector 180 may provide a point of contact for attachment of the bypass diodes to between adjacent interconnecting circuits 100. In some embodiments, the external connector 180 is attached to the connecting bus bar 170 and the interconnecting circuit 100 after the connecting bus bar 170 and the interconnecting circuit 100 are attached to the protective backing sheet 160. In some embodiments, While in other embodiments external connectors 180 are attached to connecting bus bar 170 and interconnecting circuit 100 before (or during) the incorporation of these devices into conductive backsheet 150. In an alternative, some or all of the external connector 180 and / or the connecting bus bar 170 may be incorporated into one or more external connector assemblies (not shown) prior to their connection to the interconnecting circuit 100 . This can simplify the serial connection of the interconnecting circuit 100.

Another embodiment is a rear-contacting PV module 190 that includes a conductive backsheet 150 and one or more rear-contacting solar cells 145, as shown in the plan view of Figure ID. The rear-contacting PV module 190 may optionally further include a transparent cover sheet such as a protective back sheet, a seal material, a rear junction box, a frame and a low-iron tempered glass (not shown). In some embodiments, a conventional method, such as vacuum lamination, can be used to fabricate the rear-contacting PV module, but instead of the traditional tableting and stringing step, the rear- Can be placed on the interconnecting circuit 100 using a pick-and-place robot.

Before the placement of the rear-contacting solar cell 145 onto the conductive back sheet 150, an electrical connecting material (not shown) may optionally provide the interconnecting circuit 100 with a rear-contacting solar cell 145 electrically To the second adhesive layer and / or into the opening in the dielectric insulating layer. Techniques that can be used to electrically connect the back-contacting solar cells 145 to the interconnecting circuit 100 include joining with conductive adhesives such as soft soldering, brazing, laser welding, or PSA or silver-loaded epoxy But are not limited to these.

In embodiments where a second adhesive layer is not incorporated during manufacture of the interconnecting circuit 100 and / or the conductive backsheet 150, an adhesive or sealant layer (not shown) 145 and / or on the conductive backsheet 150 prior to placement of the conductive adhesive material. An opening may be formed in the sheet so that an electrical connection is formed between the interconnecting circuit 100 and the rear-contact solar cell 145. In these embodiments, the adhesive / sealant material that may be used to bond the interconnecting circuit 100 to the post-contact solar cell 145 includes but is not limited to EVA, PVB, polyolefin, polyurethane or silicone Do not.

In another embodiment, the rear-contacting PV module includes interconnect circuitry 100 and a rear-contacting solar cell 145, but does not include a protective backsheet 160. This rear-contacting PV module (not shown) may be fabricated using an interconnecting circuit 100 that is laminated to the back sheet of glass, for example, instead of the protective backsheet 160.

Although the interconnecting circuit shown in Figs. 1A-1D is shown as connecting a linear array of rear-contacting solar cells, it can be used in two dimensions (e.g., in a serpentine pattern for serial connection throughout the rear- It is contemplated that the interconnecting circuit connecting the back-contacting solar cells is also an embodiment. A method of fabricating a two-dimensional interconnect circuit will be described below.

There are potential advantages in constructing the interconnect circuitry as a separate component from the protective backsheet. That is, it enables the separation of each function. Since the purpose of the interconnecting circuit (providing the electrical connections) is different from the purpose of the protective backsheet (which generally provides chemical, mechanical and electrical isolation from the surrounding environment) In the example, a more powerful PV module can be imported. Furthermore, this separation can provide a supply chain advantage. That is, the manufacturer of the interconnecting circuitry and / or the conductive backsheet may rely on a commercially available protective backsheet instead of developing itself as an option. For this purpose, several commercially available protective backsheets [e.g., 3M Scotchshield Film TM , Madiko TPE HD and Dunmore Dun-Solar TM TPE] (100) and inverting interconnect circuit (102).

In addition, two other advantages can potentially be derived from the incorporation of interconnect circuitry as a separate component from the protective backsheet. First, in some embodiments, a connecting bus bar may be attached behind the interconnecting circuit (i.e., between the interconnecting circuit and the protective backsheet). This can typically help to reduce the inactive area near the edge of the module provided for the bus connection, thereby leading to an increase in module efficiency. It is then simple to pattern the interconnecting circuitry at a size slightly smaller than the size of the protective backsheet. This may be accomplished without requiring complicated process steps or creating an electrical insulation gap (or marginal portion) between the interconnecting circuit and the edge of the protective backsheet (and thus the edges of the rear-contacting PV module, ). ≪ / RTI >

Yet another embodiment is a method of manufacturing an interconnecting circuit as shown in the sequential plan view of Figures 2A-2F. In FIG. 2A, a series of discontinuous openings or slots 210 are patterned in the starting roll or sheet of the conductive foil 200. The starting width of the roll of the conductive foil 200 may be in the range of about half the width of the back-contacting solar cell to more than twice the width of the back-contacting solar cell. Although a relatively long and narrow slot 210 is shown in FIG. 2A, it should be noted that the slot may actually include a wide variety of shapes and / or sizes depending on the pattern of contacts on the rear-contacting solar cell. Various methods may be used to form the slot 210, including but not limited to punching, flat bed die cutting, mating-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting, . In one embodiment, rotary die cutting may be used to form slots 210 from a continuous roll of conductive foil 200.

Of the total required volume of conductive foil to be removed in the manufacturing process of the interconnect circuit, in some embodiments, approximately 65-99% may be removed during formation of the slot 210. Near the end of the slot 210, the connection tab 220 may optionally be left in place to help preserve the mechanical integrity of the conductive foil 200 (i.e., removed during the process of forming the slot) . If the connection tab 220 is not left in place, the conductive foil 200 will become thinner in the vicinity of the slot 210, thereby leading to difficulties in handling the conductive foil 200 during subsequent processing steps. In some embodiments, the use of the connection tab 220 may cause the number of fingers in each set of interdigital fingers to be increased. For example, a periodicity within the interdigital fingers of less than about 3 cm (i.e., a finger-finger spacing of less than 1.5 cm) may be possible through the use of a connection tab. In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 2 cm. In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 1.5 cm.

In addition, the mechanical integrity of the conductive foil 200 can be further enhanced by ensuring that the slot 210 does not extend all the way to the edge of the conductive foil 200. [ The presence of the unpatterned edge areas in the conductive foil is advantageous when, for example, the interconnecting circuit has a low number of rear contacts or is used to connect a rear-contact solar cell having contacts near the edge of the cell, May be particularly useful in embodiments that occupy a large fraction of the area of the solar cell.

In FIG. 2B, a roll or sheet of insulating layer 230 is laminated to the back surface of conductive foil 200. A first adhesive (not shown) may be used to laminate the two layers together. Adhesive types that may be used to laminate the layers include, but are not limited to, hot melt adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, B-stage adhesives, thermoset adhesives, thermoplastic adhesives or cross-link adhesives. Care must be taken that when a first adhesive is applied in liquid form, generally a significant amount of adhesive will not seep out through the slot 210 onto the front surface of the conductive foil 200. The starting width of the insulating layer 230 may be in the range of a width approximately equal to the width of the back-contacting solar cell to a width of more than twice the width of the rear-contacting solar cell.

The insulating layer 230 does not need to act as a cutting or patterning surface for patterning the slot 210 because the insulating layer 230 is applied after formation of the slot 210. [ This allows a relatively thin insulating layer 230 to be used in the interconnecting circuit. In some embodiments, the thickness of the insulating layer 230 may be about 50 microns or less. In another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 25 microns. In yet another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 12.5 占 퐉.

In some embodiments, a dielectric insulating layer (not shown) may then be applied to the front surface of the conductive foil. An opening may be formed in the dielectric insulating layer such that an electrical connection is formed between the conductive foil 200 and the positive and negative contact of the back-contacting solar cell.

In the reverse configuration, the insulating layer 230 is deposited on the front surface of the conductive foil 200 instead of the back surface. In this configuration, the insulating layer 230 may provide some degree of electrical insulation between the conductive foil 200 and the post-contact solar cell 145, thereby potentially eliminating the need for a dielectric insulating layer. Prior to laminating the insulating layer 230 to the conductive foil 200, the insulating layer 230 may be patterned with an opening (not shown) that at least partially matches the pattern of the contact portion of the back-contacting solar cell. Techniques that may be used to create openings in the insulating layer 230 include but are not limited to punching, flat bed die cutting, matched-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting, . In one embodiment, rotary die cutting can be used to form openings in the insulating layer 230 due to its high throughput and low cost. In alternate embodiments, in some embodiments, a continuous sheet of insulating layer 230 may be laminated to conductive foil 200 followed by an opening into insulating layer 230 using an ablation technique, such as etching or laser ablation, Is performed.

Next, returning to the basic configuration shown in FIG. 2C, the second adhesive layer 240 may optionally be applied to the front surface of the conductive foil. In another embodiment (not shown), the second adhesive layer 240 may be applied to the dielectric insulating layer first (e.g., before or after the insulating layer is applied to the conductive foil and / or the opening is patterned) May be applied to the front surface of the insulating layer in solar cells or in the case of a reversed configuration. The second adhesive layer 240 may be patterned with an opening 250 corresponding to the position of the positive and negative polarity contacts on the back-contacting solar cell. Further, although the second adhesive layer 240 is shown as being applied prior to the subsequent removal step shown in Figures 2d-2e, in other embodiments, the second adhesive layer 240 may be applied to these and / Can be applied later.

In some embodiments, the second adhesive layer 240 may be applied in liquid form from a solution or molten state. Techniques, including but not limited to screen printing, rotary screen printing, flexographic printing, gravure printing, slot coating, ink jet printing or spray coating, may be used to form the second adhesive layer 240 in areas where openings 250 are not present, Lt; / RTI > In an alternative, if the second adhesive layer 240 is provided in the form of a sheet or a roll, the opening may be patterned before the layer is optionally applied to another layer. Techniques that can be used to create openings in the second adhesive layer 240 include punching, flat bed die cutting, matched-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting, But are not limited to these. In yet another embodiment, the second adhesive layer 240 can be laminated to either the conductive foil, the dielectric insulating layer, or the back-contacting solar cell as a continuous sheet, followed by a removal technique such as etching or laser ablation The formation of the opening into the used second adhesive layer 240 is performed.

In the reverse configuration, in some embodiments, the insulating layer is patterned with openings prior to lamination to the conductive foil as described above. In these embodiments, the second adhesive layer 240 may optionally be applied to the front surface of the insulating layer prior to formation of the opening into the insulating layer (e.g., by laminating the sheet or forming a coating). The openings can then be patterned in both layers at the same time using a single cutting or removing step, thereby potentially simplifying the overall fabrication process of the interconnect circuitry. The use of an insulating layer as a support layer for the second adhesive layer 240 during patterning can help improve the dimensional stability of the second adhesive layer 240. This approach tends to substantially increase the tendency of the unsupported adhesive material to distort or strain during patterning (or subsequent thereto) as the layer thickness is reduced, so that the second adhesive layer 240 may be thin (e.g., Lt; / RTI > thickness). Once the second adhesive layer 240 and the insulating layer are stacked together and the openings are patterned on them, the rear surface of the insulating layer can be laminated to the conductive foil.

2d, the edges of the laminate, including the patterned conductive foil, the first adhesive, the insulating layer, and the optional second adhesive layer, may be patterned to form the slit edge 260, Lt; / RTI > process. During the slitting process, the insulating layer provides mechanical support to the conductive foil, along with optional connecting tabs, to help prevent the conductive foil from being mechanically separated when the edge is removed. After the removing step, the final width of the laminate may be in a range of about 1/2 of the width of the back-contacting solar cell to about 1.5 times the width of the back-contacting solar cell. In one embodiment, the final width of the stack is approximately equal to the width of the back-contacting solar cell.

Next, a connection tab is removed from the conductive foil to form an electrically insulated set of interdigitated fingers 270, as shown in FIG. 2E. The fact that the conductive foil is supported by the insulating layer, as in the cutting / slitting step shown in Figure 2D, ensures that these sets of interdigital fingers 270 will not be mechanically separated during removal of the connection tab. This greatly simplifies the handling of the interdigitated fingers 270 and helps maintain their alignment during subsequent processing steps. In addition, in some embodiments, the insulating layer is incorporated as a separate component from the protective backsheet in the back-contacting PV module, thereby forming an opening in the insulating layer during removal of the connecting tabs without compromising the environmental resilience of the module It is possible. This is in contrast to the insulating layer most commonly found in commercially available protective backsheets, which are typically formed in series to maximize electrical insulation. An example of the opening formed in the insulating layer during removal of the connection tab is shown at position 275 in Figure 2e.

A variety of methods including but not limited to punching, flat bed die cutting, matching-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser ablation, large voltage application, Can be used to remove. In some embodiments, the line-of-sight alignment system can be used to ensure that the cutting device precisely removes the connection tab. In one embodiment, rotary die cutting associated with the line of sight alignment system can be used to remove the connection tabs. The die cutting pattern used to remove the connection tab may be formed to be slightly larger than the size of the tab itself to ensure that the connection tab is completely removed by the cutting device.

In an alternative embodiment, in some embodiments, the connection tab can be removed without forming an opening in the insulation layer. For example, if the first adhesive is selectively applied so that there is no first adhesive bonding the conductive foil to the insulating layer in the area immediately adjacent the insulating layer, the connecting tab will not be directly bonded to the insulating layer, Can be removed using a partial cutting technique such as cutting or laser cutting. In some embodiments, laser cutting combined with vacuum removal can be used to remove the connection tabs.

In some embodiments, a surface finish (not shown) may be coated or applied to the exposed upper surface of the conductive foil to help prevent prolonged oxidation and / or corrosion. The surface finishing material may be plated, sputtered or cold welded or otherwise applied. Once the surface finish is plated, in some embodiments, the surface finish can be applied after applying the second adhesive layer, thereby reducing the total volume of plated material. This can help reduce the manufacturing cost of the interconnect circuitry. Furthermore, in embodiments where it is desirable to apply a surface finish using an electroplating, the surface finish can be applied prior to removal of the connection tab, whereby electrical continuity of the conductive foil can be maintained during the plating process.

If the conductive foil and insulating layer are fed in roll form, the rolls can be cut into separate sheets to form one or more interconnecting circuits 295 as shown in FIG. 2F. Precise edge cuts 280 are formed to ensure that both interconnecting circuits 295 adjacent to the edge cuts 280 (i. E. On both their left and right sides) can be used in the rear- . Once cut, in some embodiments, the length of the interconnecting circuit 295 can be approximately the same as the length of a typical series-connected string of a rear-contacting solar cell. For example, if the length of each of the rear-contacting solar cells is approximately 156 mm and the series-connected strings connect ten batteries, the length of the interconnecting circuit 295 may be approximately 1560-1590 mm Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > 1-2 mm < / RTI >

Once the roll is cut into separate interconnecting circuits 295, the connecting bus bar 290 can optionally be attached to the end. Techniques that may be used to attach the connecting bus bar 290 to the interconnect circuit 295 include but are not limited to soldering, brazing, laser welding, or bonding with a conductive adhesive such as PSA or epoxy . In the basic configuration shown in Figs. 2A-2F, the connecting bus bar 290 may be attached to the upper surface of the conductive foil, or in another embodiment may be insulated using laser welding, ultrasonic soldering or any other bonding technique Layer to the bottom surface of the conductive foil. In the reverse configuration, the connecting bus bar 290 can optionally be attached to the exposed rear surface of the conductive foil; The completed interconnecting circuit 295 may then be attached to the protective backsheet (e.g., as a connecting bus bar 290 disposed between the bottom surface of the conductive foil and the top surface of the protective backsheet).

Once the interconnecting circuit 295 is fabricated, at least two different approaches can be used to incorporate the interconnecting circuit into the back-contacting PV module. In the first embodiment, one or more interconnecting circuits 295 are stacked on the protective backsheet to form a conductive backsheet (as shown in Figure 1C). The spacing between adjacent circuits can be precisely controlled during lamination to prevent adjacent interconnecting circuits from contacting each other and potentially leading to electrical shorting. The connecting bus bars 290 may be interconnected to form a series connection between successive interconnecting circuits 295. Once the interconnect circuit 295, the bus bar 290 and any external connectors are incorporated into the conductive backsheet, the back-contacting solar cells are then (for example, dispensed conductive adhesive dots and placed on the pick-and- To place the rear-contacting solar cell in use), and can be machined to form a rear-contacting PV module.

In an alternative, one or more rear-contacting solar cells may be attached to the interconnect circuit before the interconnect circuit is attached to the protective back sheet. Figure 3 illustrates an example of a battery interconnect device 300 that may be used to continuously apply an electrical connection material and a back-contacting solar cell 370 to interconnect circuitry 310. [ The dispensing tool 320 may first be used to deposit electrical connection material, such as ECA or solder paste, on the exposed contact pads of a portion of the interconnect circuitry 310. [ The conveyor 330 then moves the interconnecting circuit 310 incrementally forward to the pick-and-place robot 350 which places the rear-contacting solar cell 370 on the interconnecting circuit 310 . The pick-and-place robot 350 may be equipped with a line-of-sight alignment system for improving the placement accuracy of the rear-contact solar cell 370. The conveyor then transports the interconnecting circuitry 310 forward to the optional thermal region 360. Conductive material or combination thereof to form a bond with the back-contacting solar cell 370 when the insulating adhesive material and / or the electrical interconnect material does not have sufficient tack at room temperature. Either of which can be used. In some embodiments, pressure may be applied to the interconnect circuitry 310 and the rear-contacting solar cell 370 to provide a more intimate adhesion during heating. Once fabricated, in some embodiments, interconnected subassemblies are then overlaid onto a front glass cover sheet (not shown) that is covered with a seam material for attachment of bus bars and subsequent lamination to the back sheet Lt; / RTI >

The methods and techniques shown in Figs. 2A-2F can be extended to the fabrication of large-width interconnecting circuits capable of connecting a two-dimensional array of back-contacting solar cells. Figures 4A-4F illustrate examples of processes that may be used to form a two-dimensional interconnect circuit. In FIG. 4A, a series of discontinuous openings or slots 410 are cut into the starting roll or sheet of the conductive foil 400. Slot 410 is similar to that shown in Fig. 2A except that additional slots can be cut in areas that will ultimately occupy space between the series-connected strings of the back-contacting solar cell. These slots are shown along line 427 in FIG. 4A. Although a relatively long and narrow slot 410 is shown in FIG. 4A, it should be noted that the slot may actually include a wide variety of shapes and / or sizes depending on the pattern of the contacts on the rear-contacting solar cell. The techniques for forming the slots include, but are not limited to, punching, flat bed die cutting, mating-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting or combinations thereof. In one embodiment, rotary die cutting may be used to form slots 410 from a continuous roll of conductive foil 400. [

Of the total required volume of the conductive foil to be removed in the manufacturing process, approximately 65-99% may be removed during formation of the slot 410. The connection tabs 420 may be left in place to help preserve the mechanical integrity of the conductive foil 400 (i.e., they may not be removed during the process of forming the slots). As in other embodiments, the use of the connection tabs 420 may cause the number of fingers in each set of interdigital fingers to be increased. For example, a periodicity within the interdigital fingers of less than about 3 cm (i.e., a finger-finger spacing of less than 1.5 cm) may be possible through the use of a connection tab. In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 2 cm. In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 1.5 cm. In addition, the string-to-connection tab 425 may be left in place in addition to the connection tab 420 to further preserve the mechanical integrity of the conductive foil 400.

In Fig. 4B, a roll or sheet of insulating layer 430 is laminated to the backside surface of the patterned conductive foil 400. Fig. A first adhesive (not shown) may be used to laminate the two layers together. Adhesive types that may be used to laminate the layers include, but are not limited to, hot melt adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, B-stage adhesives, thermoset adhesives, thermoplastic adhesives or cross-link adhesives. Care must be taken that when a first adhesive is applied in liquid form, generally a significant amount of adhesive does not seep through the slot 410 onto the front surface of the conductive foil 400. [

The insulating layer 430 does not need to act as a cutting or patterning surface for patterning the slots 410 because the insulating layer 430 is applied after formation of the slots 410. [ This allows a relatively thin insulating layer 430 to be used in a two-dimensional interconnect circuit. In some embodiments, the thickness of the insulating layer 430 may be about 50 microns or less. In another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 25 microns. In yet another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 12.5 占 퐉.

In some embodiments, a dielectric insulating layer (not shown) may then be applied to the front surface of the conductive foil. An opening may be formed in the dielectric insulating layer such that the electrical connection is formed between the conductive foil 400 and the positive and negative contacts of the rear-contact solar cell.

As previously described, in the reverse configuration, the insulating layer 430 is deposited on the front surface of the conductive foil 400 instead of the back surface. In this configuration, the insulating layer 430 can provide some degree of electrical insulation between the conductive foil 400 and the post-contact solar cell, thereby potentially eliminating the need for a dielectric insulating layer. Prior to laminating the insulating layer 430 to the conductive foil 400, the insulating layer 430 may be patterned with an opening (not shown) that at least partially matches the pattern of the contacts of the back-contacting solar cell. Techniques that may be used to create openings in insulating layer 430 include punching, planar bed die cutting, matched-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting, . In one embodiment, rotary die cutting can be used to form openings in the insulating layer 430 due to its high throughput and low cost. In alternate embodiments, in some embodiments, a continuous sheet of insulating layer 430 may be laminated to conductive foil 400 followed by an opening into insulating layer 430 using an ablation technique, such as etching or laser ablation, Is performed.

Next, returning to the basic configuration shown in FIG. 4C, a second adhesive layer 440 may optionally be applied to the front surface of the conductive foil. In another embodiment (not shown), the second adhesive layer 440 may be applied to the dielectric insulating layer first (e.g., before or after the insulating layer is applied to the conductive foil and / or the opening is patterned) May be applied to the front surface of the insulating layer in solar cells or in the case of a reversed configuration. In the second adhesive layer 440, openings 450 corresponding to the positions of the positive and negative polarity contacts on the back-contacting solar cell may be patterned. Further, although the second adhesive layer 440 is shown as being applied prior to the subsequent removal step shown in Figs. 4D-4E, in other embodiments, the second adhesive layer 440 may be applied to these and / Can be applied later.

In some embodiments, the second adhesive layer 440 may be applied in liquid form from the solution or melt. Techniques, including but not limited to screen printing, rotary screen printing, flexographic printing, gravure printing, slot coating, ink jet printing or spray coating, may be used to form the second adhesive layer 440 in areas where openings 450 are not present. Lt; / RTI > In an alternative, if the second adhesive layer 440 is provided in the form of a sheet or a roll, the opening may be patterned before the layer is optionally applied to another layer. Techniques that may be used to create openings in the second adhesive layer 440 include punching, flat bed die cutting, matched-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser cutting, But are not limited to these. In yet another embodiment, the second adhesive layer 440 may be laminated as a continuous sheet to either the conductive foil, dielectric insulating layer, or rear-contacting solar cell, followed by removal techniques such as etching or laser ablation The formation of the opening into the used second adhesive layer 440 is performed.

In the reverse configuration, in some embodiments, the insulating layer is patterned with openings prior to lamination to the conductive foil as described above. In these embodiments, the second adhesive layer 440 may optionally be applied to the front surface of the insulating layer prior to formation of the opening into the insulating layer (e.g., by laminating the sheet or forming a coating). The openings can then be patterned in both layers at the same time using a single cutting or removing step, thereby potentially simplifying the overall fabrication process of the interconnect circuitry. The use of an insulating layer as a support layer for the second adhesive layer 440 during patterning can help improve the dimensional stability of the second adhesive layer 440. [ This approach has the advantage that the second adhesive layer 440 may be thin (e.g., 100 占 퐉) as the layer thickness is reduced and the tendency of the unsupported adhesive material to distort or deform during patterning (or thereafter) tends to increase substantially Lt; / RTI > thickness). Once the second adhesive layer 440 and the insulating layer are laminated together and the openings are patterned on them, the back surface of the insulating layer can be laminated to the conductive foil.

4D, the edges of the laminate, including the patterned conductive foil, the first adhesive, the insulating layer, and the optional second adhesive layer, may be removed to form the slit edge 460, Lt; / RTI > process. During the slitting process, the insulating layer provides mechanical support to the conductive foil and, with optional connecting tabs and connecting tabs between the strings, helps prevent the conductive foil from being mechanically separated when the edges are removed. The final width of the laminate can be approximately the same as the width of the rear-contact solar cell in the embodiment shown in Fig. 2d, but in the embodiment shown in Fig. 4d the final width is several times wider than the width of the rear- It can be big. For example, if the width of the post-contact solar cell is 156 mm and there are six series-connected strings of post-contact solar cells in the PV module, the final width of the stack can be approximately 936-960 mm Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > 1-2 mm < / RTI > In another embodiment, the final width of the stack may be 0.8 to 1.5 times the width of the post-contact solar cell multiplied by the number of series-connected strings of the back-contacting solar cells in the PV module. In another embodiment, for example, where the availability of roll-to-roll processing equipment with a width of, for example, 500-1500 mm is limited, the final width of the laminate may be a composite of two, three or four rear- Can be within 20% of the width.

Next, the connection tabs and the connection tabs between the strings are removed to form an electrically insulated set of interdigitated fingers 470 and an electrically insulated adjacent string, as shown in FIG. 4e. The fact that the conductive foil is supported by the insulating layer, such as in the cutting / slitting step shown in Figure 4d, means that these sets of interdigital fingers 470 are mechanically removed during the removal of the connection tabs and the connection tabs between the strings. It will not be detached. This greatly simplifies the handling of the interdigitated fingers 470 and helps to maintain their alignment during subsequent processing steps. Further, in some embodiments, the insulating layer is incorporated as a separate component from the protective back sheet in the back-contacting PV module, so that during removal of the connecting tabs 420 without compromising the environmental resilience of the module, Can be formed. This is in contrast to the insulating layer most commonly found in commercially available protective backsheets, which are typically formed in series to maximize electrical insulation. Examples of openings formed in the insulating layer during removal of the connection tabs between the connection tabs and the strings- are shown at locations 472 and 475, respectively, in Fig. 4e.

A variety of methods including but not limited to punching, flat bed die cutting, matched-metal die cutting, male / female die cutting, rotary die cutting, laser ablation, It can be used to remove the connection tab between the strings. In some embodiments, the line-of-sight alignment system can be used to ensure that the cutting device precisely removes the connection tabs and the connection tabs between the strings. In one embodiment, rotary die cutting associated with the line of sight alignment system can be used to remove the connection tabs and the connection tabs between the strings. The die cutting pattern used to remove the connecting tabs between the connecting tabs and the string- can be formed slightly larger than the tab itself to ensure that the connecting tabs are completely removed by the cutting device.

In an alternative, in some embodiments, the connecting tabs and the connecting tabs between the strings can be removed without forming openings in the insulating layer. For example, if the first adhesive is selectively applied so that there is no first adhesive bonding the conductive foil to the insulating layer in the area immediately adjacent the insulating layer, the connecting tabs between the connecting tabs and the string- And may be removed using a partial cutting technique such as kiss cutting or laser cutting. In some embodiments, laser cutting combined with vacuum removal can be used to remove the connection tabs.

In some embodiments, some string-to-string connection tabs may be left in place (i.e., not removed) at locations where electrical connections between adjacent strings are required. For example, a connection tab between the strings can be left at the alternate end of the series-connected strings to electrically connect the adjacent strings in series. An example of a connection tab between the remaining strings is shown at location 477 in Figure 4e.

If the conductive foil and insulating layer are fed in roll form, the rolls can be cut into separate sheets to form one or more two-dimensional interconnecting circuits, as shown in Figure 4f. Precise edge cutout 480 is formed to ensure that both two-dimensional interconnecting circuits adjacent (i.e., both on its left and right sides) to edge cutout 480 can be used in the post-contact PV module . Once cut, in some embodiments, the length of the two-dimensional interconnect circuit may be approximately the same as the length of a typical series-connected string of a rear-contact solar cell. For example, if the length of each of the rear-contacting solar cells is 156 mm and the circuit is used to interconnect 10 cells, the length of the two-dimensional interconnect circuit may be approximately 1560-1590 mm Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > 1-2 mm < / RTI >

Once the roll is cut into separate two-dimensional interconnecting circuits, the connecting bus bar 490 can optionally be attached to the alternating end of the adjacent series-connected strings 495. [ Techniques that can be used to attach the connecting bus bar 490 to the string 495 include but are not limited to soft soldering, brazing, laser welding, or bonding with a conductive adhesive such as PSA or epoxy. In the basic configuration shown in Figures 4A-4F, the connecting bus bar 490 may be attached to the upper surface of the conductive foil, or in another embodiment may be insulated using laser welding, ultrasonic soldering or any other bonding technique. Layer to the bottom surface of the conductive foil. In the reverse configuration, the connecting bus bar 490 may be attached to the exposed rear surface of the conductive foil 400; The completed two-dimensional interconnect circuitry may then be attached to the protective backsheet (e.g., as a connecting bus bar 290 disposed between the bottom surface of the conductive foil 200 and the top surface of the protective backsheet) .

As in the previous embodiments, at various stages of the process, the surface finish can be applied to the exposed surface of the conductive foil 400 to help prevent prolonged oxidation and / or corrosion. In addition, the completed two-dimensional interconnecting circuit may first be laminated to the protective backsheet, or may first be attached to the rear-contacting solar cell, thereby completing the manufacture of the rear-contacting PV module (not shown) do.

According to an advantage of the embodiment shown in Figs. 2A-2F and Figs. 4A-4F, a conductive backsheet comprising interconnecting circuitry, two-dimensional interconnecting circuitry and interconnecting circuitry can be used as roll- Cost, high-throughput process technology. In their simplest form, the embodiment described in Figures 2a-2f and 4a-4f comprises a series of three steps. That is, while the first removal step removes most of the unwanted areas of the starting conductive foil sheet, leaving a conductive foil material sufficient to preserve its mechanical integrity; The conductive foil is then attached to an insulating carrier substrate providing mechanical support; Followed by removal of unwanted regions of the remainder of the conductive foil. With this approach, it is possible to manufacture interconnecting circuits comprising the machine-supported and electrically-insulated regions of the conductive foil using low-cost process technology. The interconnecting circuitry can then be used to interconnect the back-contacting solar cells.

Although some of the manufacturing methods shown in Figs. 2A-2F and Figs. 4A-4F involve the use of connection tabs to help preserve the mechanical integrity of the conductive foil, in other embodiments, Can be formed. An example of such a process flow is shown in sequential plan view in Figures 5a-5e. First, in Figure 5A, the bottom surface of the roll or sheet of conductive foil 500 is laminated to the temporary carrier substrate 510. A temporary or low-tack adhesive (not shown) is preferably used to attach the conductive foil 500 to the carrier substrate 510. A temporary adhesive that may not be optionally patterned may ideally be removed from the carrier foil 500 at a predetermined location without leaving a residue on the conductive foil 500 when the foil 500 is later stripped from the carrier substrate 510, Should be able to retain the conductive foil 500.

Next, in FIG. 5B, a pattern of interdigitated fingers 520 is cut (ie, partially) into the conductive foil / carrier substrate stack. The position of the kiss cutting portion is indicated by a dotted line in Fig. 5B. The kiss cutting portion should start from the conductive foil side of the layer stack and generally should be deep enough to allow the conductive foil to be fully cut by the cutting device but not so deep that the carrier substrate is also completely cut. Techniques including, but not limited to, flat bed kiss cutting, rotary kiss cutting, water jet kiss cutting or laser kiss cutting can be used to kiss the layer stack. In one embodiment, rotary kiss cutting may be used due to its high speed and low cost.

To help ensure that the carrier substrate is not completely cut through the kissing process, it is desirable that the thickness of the carrier substrate 510 be greater than the precise depth of the kissing device. For example, in embodiments where a rotating kiss cutting is used to pattern the conductive foil, the thickness of the carrier substrate 510 of about 50 to 150 [mu] m may provide sufficient cutting tolerance. In yet another embodiment, a thickness of about 50 to 100 [mu] m may be sufficient. Further, it is advantageous to include a material that has sufficient durability such that carrier substrate 510 provides mechanical support to the conductive foil during the kiss-cutting process, but is not rigid enough to precisely cut. The carrier substrate includes but is not limited to PET coated with polyethylene, polyimide, paper, PEN or a low-tack adhesive. In one embodiment, the carrier substrate 510 comprises PET.

In contrast to other embodiments where the connecting tabs are left in place when the conductive foil is patterned, in the embodiment shown in Figure 5B, the completed set of interdigital fingers can be patterned with a single kiss-cutting step. This is due to the mechanical support provided by the carrier substrate 510 during the cutting process. The kiss cutting pattern may include a gap 525 between adjacent sets of interdigitated fingers 520. This helps ensure that the adjacent interdigital fingers 520 are not electrically shorted together in the final interconnect circuit and provides alignment tolerances for subsequent process steps. In some embodiments, the size of the gap 525 may be greater than or equal to about 2 mm. In another embodiment, the gap 525 may be greater than or equal to about 1 mm.

In parallel with the steps shown in Figs. 5A-5B, in Fig. 5C, a patterned adhesive layer 530 is printed on a roll or sheet of insulating layer 540. Fig. Although the pattern of patterned adhesive layer 530 may be designed to be approximately matched to the pattern of interdigitated fingers 520, in some embodiments, the size of the features of patterned adhesive layer 530 is limited by the interdigitated fingers 520). [Accordingly, the size of the adhesive gap 535 in which the adhesive is not printed can be slightly increased). For example, in some embodiments, the size of the adhesive gap 535 may be between 100% and 250% of the size of the gap 525 between the interdigitated fingers. In another embodiment, the size of the adhesive gap 535 may be between 100% and 150% of the size of the gap 525 (e.g., if the size of the gap 525 is 2 mm, the size of the adhesive gap 535) May be 2 to 3 mm. The increase in the size of the adhesive gap 535 with respect to the gap 525 helps to create a tolerance that ensures that the patterned adhesive layer 530 is bonded only to the desired area of the conductive foil 500, .

5A, the adhesive attaching the conductive foil 500 to the carrier substrate 510 preferably has a temporary or low-tack property, but the patterned adhesive layer 530 shown in FIG. 5C is ideally nearly-permanent Or high-stick nature. The patterned adhesive layer 530 may include an adhesive type including, but not limited to, a pressure sensitive adhesive, a contact adhesive, a thermoplastic adhesive, a thermoset adhesive, a cross-link adhesive, a UV curable adhesive, or a two- . In one embodiment, the patterned adhesive layer 530 comprises a cross-linking adhesive that can be thermally cured.

5D, the insulating layer 540 is attached to the exposed surface of the conductive foil 500 (i.e., the surface of the conductive foil 500 facing the carrier substrate 510) via the patterned adhesive layer 530 . The patterned adhesive layer 530 may be aligned with the kissing pattern of the interdigitated fingers 520 using, for example, an in-line laminating apparatus including a line-of-sight alignment system. The laminating apparatus may further include a curing station (e.g., heat or UV) to activate the patterned adhesive layer 530. [ Care must be taken to prevent the patterned adhesive layer 530 from bonding to areas of the conductive foil occupying the gaps 525 between the interdigital fingers 520 during the lamination step. In one embodiment, the larger size of the adhesive gap 535 with respect to the gap 525 provides a tolerance to help ensure that this does not occur.

The region of the conductive foil 500 occupying the carrier substrate 510 and the gap 525 is then covered with an insulating layer 540 to form a roll of patterned foil 550 mechanically supported, And the interdigitated fingers 520 are peeled off. (Note that although the example shown in FIG. 5E shows a view through the insulating layer, the insulating layer generally need not be transparent.) The interdigital fingers 520 may be formed of a high-adhesive patterned adhesive layer The region of the conductive foil occupying the gap is not in contact with the patterned adhesive layer 530 but is instead brought into contact with the insulating layer 540 when it is peeled off. - remains attached to the adhesive carrier substrate.

As in other embodiments, if the conductive foil 500 and the insulating layer 540 are provided in roll form, the rolls can then be cut into separate sheets to form interconnecting circuits (not shown). In addition, a connecting bus bar may optionally be attached to the alternating end of an adjacent series-connected string. Further, at various stages of the process, the surface finish can be applied to the exposed surface of the conductive foil 500 to prevent prolonged oxidation and / or corrosion as described elsewhere.

As in other embodiments, the completed interconnect circuitry may optionally be attached to the protective backsheet in either a basic configuration or a reversed configuration. In an inverted configuration, in some embodiments, the insulating layer 540 may be patterned with a series of openings corresponding to the contacts of the back-contacting solar cells prior to their attachment to the conductive foil 500. In addition, the insulating layer 540 may optionally be deposited on a second adhesive layer (not shown) on the side opposite the patterned adhesive layer 530 prior to its patterning or attachment to the conductive foil 500.

There are at least two potential advantages in using a carrier substrate as a support substrate for patterning the conductive foil 500 prior to attachment of the insulating layer 540. [ First, the carrier substrate may be formed relatively thick (e.g., with a thickness of 50-100 mu m as described above) to provide a tolerance for the kiss-cutting step, but the insulating layer 540 may be formed after the kiss- It can be kept relatively thin. In some embodiments, this may be particularly useful in reversed configurations where a thin insulating layer may be required. For example, the use of a carrier substrate may allow an insulating layer that is thinner than about 50 microns to be implemented in the interconnecting circuit. In another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 25 microns. In yet another embodiment, the insulating layer thickness may be less than or equal to about 12.5 占 퐉.

The presence of the support carrier substrate 510 in the peeling step shown in Figures 5D-5E may then cause the unwanted areas of the conductive foil 500 to peel off the interdigital fingers 520 without rupturing the foil It helps to ensure that you are. This can help to increase the overall yield of the interconnect circuit manufacturing process. This approach is advantageous when: A) the kissing pattern in the conductive foil is complex; B) when there is a high number of fingers per interdigital finger or rear-contact solar cell; Or C) the spacing between the fingers is narrow, since they are typically the state in which the unsupported conductive foil most easily ruptures. In some embodiments, use of the carrier substrate 510 may enable periodicity within the interdigital fingers of less than about 3 cm (i.e., finger-finger spacing of less than 1.5 cm). In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 2 cm. In another embodiment, the periodicity may be less than about 1.5 cm.

The methods and apparatus described herein can be extended to interconnects of electronic devices, including, but not limited to, integrated circuits, resistors, capacitors, inductors, batteries and other electronic components and / or power supplies. The various embodiments of the present invention potentially provide advantages in terms of scalability, manufacturing cost and / or throughput.

It should be understood that the above description is meant to be illustrative and not limiting. For example, the above-described embodiments (and / or aspects thereof) may be used in combination with each other. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the scope thereof. The dimensions, the type of material, the orientation of the various components, and the number and location of the various components described herein are intended to limit the parameters of any embodiment and are by no means limiting and are merely exemplary embodiments. Many other embodiments and variations within the spirit and scope of the claims will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon reviewing the above description. The scope of the invention should, therefore, be determined with reference to the appended claims, along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled. In the appended claims, the terms "including" and "in which" are used as the plain-English equivalent of the respective terms "comprising" and "wherein". Furthermore, in the following claims, terms related to sequences ("first", "second" and "third", etc.) are used merely as labels and do not impose numerical requirements on their objects. Furthermore, the following claims are not to be construed as a limitation on the scope of the functional claims, unless such claims are explicitly used to mean " means for " It shall not be interpreted on the basis of 35 USC § 112 Section 6.

Claims (27)

  1. A protective back sheet;
    An insulating layer;
    A patterned conductive foil comprising interdigitated fingers
    / RTI >
    The patterned conductive foil is attached to the insulating layer and is mechanically supported by the insulating layer.
    Conductive backsheet.
  2. The conductive back sheet according to claim 1, wherein the insulating layer is disposed under the conductive foil and on the protective back sheet.
  3. The conductive back sheet according to claim 1, wherein the conductive foil is disposed on the protective back sheet and below the insulating layer, and the insulating layer includes an opening that at least partially coincides with the pattern of the contact portion of the back-contacting solar cell.
  4. The conductive back sheet according to claim 3, wherein the protective back sheet further comprises an upper adhesive layer.
  5. 5. The conductive backsheet of claim 4, wherein the top adhesive layer thickness is at least 50% of the thickness of the conductive foil.
  6. 6. The conductive back sheet of claim 5, wherein the top adhesive layer at least partially occupies an opening or a gap in the patterned conductive foil.
  7. The conductive back sheet according to claim 4, wherein the tie layer is disposed between the conductive foil and the upper adhesive layer of the protective back sheet.
  8. The conductive back sheet according to claim 2 or 3, wherein the insulating layer does not extend all the way to the edge of the protective back sheet.
  9. 9. The backsheet of claim 8, wherein the width of the insulating layer is within 20% of the width of the back-contacting solar cell.
  10. The conductive back sheet according to claim 8, wherein the width of the insulating layer is within 20% of the composite width of the two rear-contact solar cells.
  11. 9. The conductive backsheet of claim 8, wherein the width of the insulating layer is within 20% of the width of the back-contacting PV module.
  12. 3. The conductive back sheet according to claim 2, wherein the connecting bus bar is disposed below the insulating layer and above the protective back sheet, and is electrically connected to the conductive foil through the insulating layer.
  13. 4. The conductive back sheet of claim 3, wherein the connecting bus bar is disposed under the patterned conductive foil and over the protective back sheet and is electrically connected to the conductive foil.
  14. 4. The conductive back sheet of claim 3, wherein the second adhesive layer is disposed over the insulating layer and the second adhesive layer comprises an opening that at least partially overlaps the opening in the insulating layer.
  15. 15. The conductive backsheet of claim 14, wherein the second adhesive layer has a thickness of less than about 100 [mu] m.
  16. 15. The conductive backsheet of claim 14, wherein the second adhesive layer has a thickness of less than about 50 [mu] m.
  17. 4. The conductive back sheet according to claim 2 or 3, wherein the patterned conductive foil comprises aluminum.
  18. 18. The conductive back sheet of claim 17, wherein the aluminum is coated with a surface finish selected from the group of zinc, silver, copper, nickel, chromium or gold.
  19. 18. The conductive backsheet of claim 17, wherein the second adhesive layer has a melt flow index index less than about 8 dg / min.
  20. 18. The conductive backsheet of claim 17, wherein the second adhesive layer has a melt index index less than about 4 dg / min.
  21. 19. The conductive backsheet of claim 18, wherein the conductive backsheet is further incorporated into a back-contacting PV module, wherein the back-contacting PV module comprises an electrically conductive adhesive material containing a corrosion inhibitor.
  22. The conductive back sheet of claim 1, wherein the insulating layer comprises an opening that at least partially overlaps the opening in the patterned conductive foil.
  23. The conductive back sheet of claim 1, wherein the patterned adhesive layer is disposed between the insulating layer and the patterned conductive foil.
  24. 24. The conductive back sheet according to claim 22 or 23, wherein the insulating layer has a thickness of less than about 50 [mu] m.
  25. 24. The conductive back sheet according to claim 22 or 23, wherein the pattern of the interdigital fingers has a periodicity of about 3 cm or less.
  26. A method of manufacturing an interconnect circuit,
    In a first removing step, forming a pattern of discontinuous openings in the conductive foil;
    Laminating a conductive foil on the mechanical supporting insulating layer;
    Removing a remaining unneeded portion of the conductive foil to form the interdigital fingers of the mechanically supported electrical insulation set in a second removal step
    ≪ / RTI >
  27. A method of manufacturing an interconnect circuit,
    In a first lamination step, a conductive foil is laminated to a temporary carrier substrate comprising a low-tack adhesive;
    Kissing a pattern of interdigital fingers with a conductive foil;
    Forming a patterned adhesive layer of high-tackiness on the insulating layer, the pattern in the adhesive layer at least partially conforming to the pattern of the interdigitated fingers in the conductive foil;
    Stacking the exposed surface of the conductive foil in an insulating layer via a patterned adhesive layer in a second laminating step such that the patterned adhesive layer is aligned with a kissing pattern of the interdigitated fingers;
    Stripping unnecessary areas of the temporary carrier substrate and the conductive foil
    ≪ / RTI >
KR1020147014653A 2011-10-31 2012-10-30 Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells KR101954476B1 (en)

Priority Applications (9)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161553764P true 2011-10-31 2011-10-31
US61/553,764 2011-10-31
US201261597309P true 2012-02-10 2012-02-10
US61/597,309 2012-02-10
US201261647658P true 2012-05-16 2012-05-16
US61/647,658 2012-05-16
US13/663,273 US10383207B2 (en) 2011-10-31 2012-10-29 Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells
US13/663,273 2012-10-29
PCT/US2012/062604 WO2013066884A1 (en) 2011-10-31 2012-10-30 Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
KR20140105450A true KR20140105450A (en) 2014-09-01
KR101954476B1 KR101954476B1 (en) 2019-03-05

Family

ID=48192684

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
KR1020147014653A KR101954476B1 (en) 2011-10-31 2012-10-30 Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (1) US10383207B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2774173A4 (en)
KR (1) KR101954476B1 (en)
CN (1) CN103988283A (en)
WO (1) WO2013066884A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
TW201225752A (en) * 2010-12-10 2012-06-16 Askey Computer Corp Printed circuit board grounding structure for use with communication apparatus
US8975510B2 (en) 2011-03-25 2015-03-10 Cellink Corporation Foil-based interconnect for rear-contact solar cells
US10383207B2 (en) 2011-10-31 2019-08-13 Cellink Corporation Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells
TWI643351B (en) * 2013-01-31 2018-12-01 澳洲商新南創新有限公司 Solar cell metallisation and interconnection method
US9502596B2 (en) * 2013-06-28 2016-11-22 Sunpower Corporation Patterned thin foil
WO2015004830A1 (en) * 2013-07-08 2015-01-15 ソニー株式会社 Method for determining curing conditions, method for producing circuit device, and circuit device
US9112097B2 (en) 2013-09-27 2015-08-18 Sunpower Corporation Alignment for metallization
ITTV20130192A1 (en) * 2013-11-21 2015-05-22 Vismunda Srl "Automatic and the method of manufacturing a conductive backsheet plant with encapsulating layer and integrated dielectric, for photovoltaic panels"
JP6260236B2 (en) * 2013-12-03 2018-01-17 大日本印刷株式会社 Manufacturing method of current collecting sheet for solar cell
TW201547181A (en) 2014-03-12 2015-12-16 Gtat Corp Photovoltaic module with flexible circuit
US9231129B2 (en) 2014-03-28 2016-01-05 Sunpower Corporation Foil-based metallization of solar cells
US9818903B2 (en) 2014-04-30 2017-11-14 Sunpower Corporation Bonds for solar cell metallization
KR20170017895A (en) 2014-06-11 2017-02-15 신에쓰 가가꾸 고교 가부시끼가이샤 Solar cell and method for manufacturing solar cell
DE102014211707A1 (en) * 2014-06-18 2015-12-24 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e.V. Solar module with increased service life
US10211443B2 (en) 2014-09-10 2019-02-19 Cellink Corporation Battery interconnects
US9147875B1 (en) * 2014-09-10 2015-09-29 Cellink Corporation Interconnect for battery packs
JP6199839B2 (en) * 2014-09-30 2017-09-20 信越化学工業株式会社 Solar cell and manufacturing method thereof
US10059471B2 (en) 2014-10-24 2018-08-28 Solaero Technologies Corp. Method for releasing a deployable boom
US20160137319A1 (en) * 2014-10-24 2016-05-19 Solaero Technologies Corp. Method for releasing a deployable boom
US9004410B1 (en) * 2014-10-24 2015-04-14 Alliance Spacesystems, Llc Deployable boom for collecting electromagnetic energy
CN107408544B (en) 2015-02-03 2019-09-13 塞林克公司 The system and method that can be transmitted with electric energy for combined hot
ITUB20152112A1 (en) * 2015-07-13 2017-01-13 Vismunda Srl Photovoltaic cell type for the mwt dedicated conductive backsheet.
WO2017019308A1 (en) * 2015-07-27 2017-02-02 Sierra Nevada Corporation Solar array system and method of manufacturing
CN105071039B (en) * 2015-07-28 2018-08-03 深圳顺络电子股份有限公司 A kind of NFC antenna
US9504148B1 (en) 2015-12-02 2016-11-22 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, Llc Rapid PCB prototyping by selective adhesion
US10418933B2 (en) 2015-12-08 2019-09-17 Alta Devices, Inc. Versatile flexible circuit interconnection for flexible solar cells
WO2018186180A1 (en) * 2017-04-05 2018-10-11 シャープ株式会社 Back-electrode-type solar cell having wiring sheet, solar cell module, and method for manufacturing back-electrode-type solar cell having wiring sheet
CN106944745A (en) * 2017-04-22 2017-07-14 山东拜科通新材料科技有限公司 A kind of laser processing for processing large format circuit
WO2019005752A1 (en) * 2017-06-26 2019-01-03 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Wire interconnection for solar cells
WO2019195803A1 (en) * 2018-04-06 2019-10-10 Sunpower Corporation Laser assisted metallization process for solar cell fabrication

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2010092981A (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-22 Sharp Corp Solar battery, backside contact solar battery, wiring substrate, and method of manufacturing solar battery
JP2010182877A (en) * 2009-02-05 2010-08-19 Sharp Corp Solar cell, wiring sheet, solar cell with wiring sheet, and solar cell module
KR20110008284A (en) * 2008-04-29 2011-01-26 어플라이드 머티어리얼스, 인코포레이티드 Photovoltaic modules manufactured using monolithic module assembly techniques
KR20110014231A (en) * 2008-07-02 2011-02-10 샤프 가부시키가이샤 Solar battery module and method for manufacturing the same

Family Cites Families (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3903428A (en) 1973-12-28 1975-09-02 Hughes Aircraft Co Solar cell contact design
US3903427A (en) 1973-12-28 1975-09-02 Hughes Aircraft Co Solar cell connections
US4234352A (en) 1978-07-26 1980-11-18 Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. Thermophotovoltaic converter and cell for use therein
US4927770A (en) 1988-11-14 1990-05-22 Electric Power Research Inst. Corp. Of District Of Columbia Method of fabricating back surface point contact solar cells
US5053083A (en) 1989-05-08 1991-10-01 The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior University Bilevel contact solar cells
JP3126926B2 (en) * 1996-09-09 2001-01-22 新日本製鐵株式会社 Semiconductor elements gold alloy thin wire and a semiconductor device
US6160215A (en) 1999-03-26 2000-12-12 Curtin; Lawrence F. Method of making photovoltaic device
JP2001094136A (en) 1999-09-22 2001-04-06 Canon Inc Method for manufacturing semiconductor element module and solar cell module
US7449629B2 (en) 2002-08-21 2008-11-11 Truseal Technologies, Inc. Solar panel including a low moisture vapor transmission rate adhesive composition
JP2004228333A (en) * 2003-01-23 2004-08-12 Canon Inc Photovoltaic cell and its manufacturing method
US20050022857A1 (en) 2003-08-01 2005-02-03 Daroczi Shandor G. Solar cell interconnect structure
US7276724B2 (en) 2005-01-20 2007-10-02 Nanosolar, Inc. Series interconnected optoelectronic device module assembly
WO2008080160A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-07-03 Advent Solar, Inc. Interconnect technologies for back contact solar cells and modules
DE102007013553A1 (en) 2007-03-19 2008-09-25 Q-Cells Ag Solar cell device, solar cell module and connection arrangement
JP2008294080A (en) 2007-05-22 2008-12-04 Sanyo Electric Co Ltd Solar cell and manufacturing method of same
US8420412B2 (en) * 2008-03-14 2013-04-16 Dow Corning Corporation Method of forming a photovoltaic cell module
US20090256254A1 (en) 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 General Electric Company Wafer level interconnection and method
KR101260901B1 (en) * 2008-05-12 2013-05-06 듀폰-미츠이 폴리케미칼 가부시키가이샤 Crosslinkable ethylene copolymer, solar battery sealing material sheet produced from the crosslinkable ethylene copolymer, and solar battery module using the solar battery sealing material sheet
CA2724383A1 (en) 2008-06-04 2009-12-10 Solexant Corp. Thin film solar cells with monolithic integration and backside contact
US20100051085A1 (en) 2008-08-27 2010-03-04 Weidman Timothy W Back contact solar cell modules
US20100186804A1 (en) 2009-01-29 2010-07-29 Emcore Solar Power, Inc. String Interconnection of Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction Solar Cells on Flexible Perforated Carriers
JP2010278358A (en) 2009-05-29 2010-12-09 Nitto Denko Corp Adhesive seal material for end portion of frameless solar cell module, frameless solar cell module, and sealed structure of end portion thereof
CA2766227A1 (en) * 2009-06-25 2010-12-29 Husnu M. Kalkanoglu Roofing products, photovoltaic roofing elements and systems using them
DE102010004112A1 (en) 2009-06-29 2010-12-30 Bosch Solar Energy Ag Method for producing a foil-type electrical connector for solar cells, connecting element produced in this way and method for electrically connecting at least two solar cells to a solar module
US8507792B2 (en) * 2009-08-25 2013-08-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Solar panels with adhesive layers
TW201210058A (en) 2010-05-12 2012-03-01 Applied Materials Inc Method of manufacturing crystalline silicon solar cells using epitaxial deposition
KR101110826B1 (en) 2010-08-17 2012-02-24 엘지전자 주식회사 Solar cell panel
WO2012058053A2 (en) 2010-10-29 2012-05-03 Applied Materials, Inc. Monolithic module assembly using back contact solar cells and metal ribbon
US20120285501A1 (en) * 2010-12-29 2012-11-15 E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Integrated back-sheet for back contact photovoltaic module
US8975510B2 (en) 2011-03-25 2015-03-10 Cellink Corporation Foil-based interconnect for rear-contact solar cells
US10383207B2 (en) 2011-10-31 2019-08-13 Cellink Corporation Interdigitated foil interconnect for rear-contact solar cells
WO2013063738A1 (en) * 2011-10-31 2013-05-10 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Integrated back-sheet for back contact photovoltaic module

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR20110008284A (en) * 2008-04-29 2011-01-26 어플라이드 머티어리얼스, 인코포레이티드 Photovoltaic modules manufactured using monolithic module assembly techniques
KR20110014231A (en) * 2008-07-02 2011-02-10 샤프 가부시키가이샤 Solar battery module and method for manufacturing the same
JP2010092981A (en) * 2008-10-06 2010-04-22 Sharp Corp Solar battery, backside contact solar battery, wiring substrate, and method of manufacturing solar battery
JP2010182877A (en) * 2009-02-05 2010-08-19 Sharp Corp Solar cell, wiring sheet, solar cell with wiring sheet, and solar cell module

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2013066884A1 (en) 2013-05-10
EP2774173A4 (en) 2015-06-03
US10383207B2 (en) 2019-08-13
CN103988283A (en) 2014-08-13
EP2774173A1 (en) 2014-09-10
KR101954476B1 (en) 2019-03-05
US20130112233A1 (en) 2013-05-09

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
TWI462315B (en) Photovoltaic module utilizing an integrated flex circuit and incorporating a bypass diode
CN104272475B (en) The battery of back contact solar photovoltaic module semiconductor wafer and module processing
EP2917940B1 (en) High efficiency configuration for solar cell string
CN101874305B (en) Solar battery, method for manufacturing solar battery, method for manufacturing solar battery module, and solar battery module
US5667596A (en) Photovoltaic device and manufacturing method of the same
US10056504B2 (en) Photovoltaic module
US20120006378A1 (en) Thin film solar cell strings
US20100084001A1 (en) Solar cell module
KR20090084741A (en) Solar cell module and method for producing of solar cell module
KR101422706B1 (en) Method of coupling photovoltaic cells and film for implementing it
US20110300664A1 (en) Solar cell interconnection, module and panel method
TWI504000B (en) Photovoltaic module with integrated energy storage
AU2007305487B2 (en) Formed photovoltaic module busbars
US20110067751A1 (en) Photovoltaic modules manufactured using monolithic module assembly techniques
KR20120051031A (en) Monolithic module assembly using back contact solar cells and metal ribbon
CN1082727C (en) Group of cell elements, and solar cell module prodn. method
US20080236655A1 (en) Solar module manufacturing processes
EP2345072A2 (en) Combined diode, lead assembly incorporating an expansion joint
EP1900038A1 (en) A solar cell interconnection process
US9865753B2 (en) Metallization of solar cells using metal foils
US20130000715A1 (en) Active backplane for thin silicon solar cells
JP2005252062A (en) Solar cell device
US20100024881A1 (en) Interconnect Technologies for Back Contact Solar Cells and Modules
JP3888939B2 (en) Solar cell module
TW200843129A (en) Photovoltaic module utilizing a flex circuit for reconfiguration

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
N231 Notification of change of applicant
A201 Request for examination
E902 Notification of reason for refusal
E701 Decision to grant or registration of patent right
GRNT Written decision to grant