KR20110021783A - Evaporative cooling tower enhancement through cooling recovery - Google Patents

Evaporative cooling tower enhancement through cooling recovery Download PDF

Info

Publication number
KR20110021783A
KR20110021783A KR1020107025818A KR20107025818A KR20110021783A KR 20110021783 A KR20110021783 A KR 20110021783A KR 1020107025818 A KR1020107025818 A KR 1020107025818A KR 20107025818 A KR20107025818 A KR 20107025818A KR 20110021783 A KR20110021783 A KR 20110021783A
Authority
KR
South Korea
Prior art keywords
air
heat
water
cooling
cooling tower
Prior art date
Application number
KR1020107025818A
Other languages
Korean (ko)
Inventor
재럴 웽거
Original Assignee
재럴 웽거
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US4603608P priority Critical
Priority to US61/046,036 priority
Application filed by 재럴 웽거 filed Critical 재럴 웽거
Publication of KR20110021783A publication Critical patent/KR20110021783A/en

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28CHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT WITHOUT CHEMICAL INTERACTION
    • F28C1/00Direct-contact trickle coolers, e.g. cooling towers
    • F28C1/06Direct-contact trickle coolers, e.g. cooling towers with both counter-current and cross-current
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28CHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT WITHOUT CHEMICAL INTERACTION
    • F28C1/00Direct-contact trickle coolers, e.g. cooling towers
    • F28C1/14Direct-contact trickle coolers, e.g. cooling towers comprising also a non-direct contact heat exchange
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D15/00Heat-exchange apparatus with the intermediate heat-transfer medium in closed tubes passing into or through the conduit walls ; Heat-exchange apparatus employing intermediate heat-transfer medium or bodies
    • F28D15/02Heat-exchange apparatus with the intermediate heat-transfer medium in closed tubes passing into or through the conduit walls ; Heat-exchange apparatus employing intermediate heat-transfer medium or bodies in which the medium condenses and evaporates, e.g. heat pipes
    • F28D15/0266Heat-exchange apparatus with the intermediate heat-transfer medium in closed tubes passing into or through the conduit walls ; Heat-exchange apparatus employing intermediate heat-transfer medium or bodies in which the medium condenses and evaporates, e.g. heat pipes with separate evaporating and condensing chambers connected by at least one conduit; Loop-type heat pipes; with multiple or common evaporating or condensing chambers

Abstract

Provided are methods for improving various types of evaporative cooling towers. Such a cooling tower is provided with a stream of water, an air intake stream of outside air that allows the flow of water to be cooled by outside air from an air inlet and evaporates a portion of the flow of water introduced into the outside air, and the water evaporated from the flow of water. It has an air discharge stream for the part and the outside air. The method provides a closed cycle cooling channel with a heated heat outlet and a cooled heat sink, locates the cooler in the air inlet and places the cooler in the flow of air at the air outlet. The flow of outside air at the inlet is cooled by a closed cycle cooling channel, increasing the capacity of the cooling tower to reduce the wet bulb temperature and to cool the flow of water.

Description

Improved evaporative cooling tower with recovery of cooling {EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER ENHANCEMENT THROUGH COOLING RECOVERY}

The present invention relates to an evaporative cooling tower with improved performance through cooling recovery.

The present invention relates to systems and methods for improving the potential range of performance and use of standard evaporative cooling towers. More specifically, the present invention transfers heat from the incoming air to the cold, humid air stream exiting the evaporation section, thereby pre-cooling the incoming outside air introduced through the evaporation section of the cooling tower. An increased cooling output is initiated using a heat transfer system or apparatus, such as an arrangement of heat siphons or heat pipes for chilling. This has the effect of reducing the wet bulb temperature of the incoming air and ultimately the reduction of the working fluid temperature, which is generally water in a closed loop or basin; The evaporative fluid cooler in the closed loop can be used to cool any of a number of industrial fluids and can be described as an evaporative condenser when the fluid phase changes from vapor to liquid. This decrease in temperature of the working fluid is effective for transferring heat from the air entering the inlet of the cooling tower to the air at the exhaust of the cooling tower, for outdoor conditions (dry bulb temperature and wet bulb temperature) and for the working fluid. It depends on the heat load.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an evaporative cooling tower having improved performance through cooling recovery.

Thus, the air intake stream 22 for external air, the flow of water, a means for cooling the flow of water by evaporating the flow portion of the water which flows into the outside air from the air intake and enters the outside air, and the water An apparatus and method are provided for improving an evaporative cooling tower (10) having a portion of water evaporated from a stream of air and an air outlet for air. The proposed improvement provides a closed cycle heat transfer system having a portion to be heated, sometimes referred to as a "heat sink" and a portion to be cooled, sometimes called a "heat dissipation" and the heat to be cooled in the air discharge stream. Positioning the outlet and positioning the heat sink to be heated in the air intake stream. In this way, the flow of outside air is cooled by a closed cycle heat transfer system, thereby reducing the wet bulb temperature and increasing the capacity of the cooling tower to cool the flow of water through evaporation in the air stream. Such a closed circuit heat transfer system may include a heat wheel as known as one or more heat siphons, heat pipes, pump fluid loops, parallel plate heat exchangers, or rotary recoverers. Ideally, the water is cooled to a temperature lower than the wet bulb temperature of the outside air at the air intake, and even to the temperature approaching the dew point of the outside air at the air intake. In a situation where the air outlet is above the air inlet, the closed circuit heat transfer system is preferably a passive heat pipe or a heat siphon. If the evaporative cooling tower system is essentially designed to take full advantage of the closed cycle cooling system, it may be desirable for the closed cycle cooling system to be of a heat wheel or rotary recovery type.

FIG. 1 includes a containment cycle cooling system 30 with a water distribution 18 system represented by an injection device in this figure and a high surface area fill 20 flowing into the water basin 24 used as the working fluid. Figure is a schematic view showing an open cooling tower (10).
FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of another system in which drainage is injected into a closed loop containing a working fluid and includes a closed cycle cooling system.
FIG. 3 is an air line diagram made using a computer program of "Sixth Edition of Leading Analysis" of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE). This figure shows the same cooling tower with the estimated performance of the commercially available standard cooling tower used for the process range of 5.6 ° C. and the estimated performance according to the invention.
FIG. 4 is a diagram of a cooling tower with similar airflow from the American Air Conditioning Refrigeration Engineering Computer Program showing the performance of the same standard cooling tower over a process range of 2.2 degrees Celsius and the estimated performance in accordance with the present invention.
5A and 5B show sampling groups of cooling tower performance curves at 75% heat exchange effective ratio and various ambient conditions with relative evaporation and estimated coolant generation performance in accordance with the present invention for each range of 5.6 ° C and 2.2 ° C. The wet bulb depression parameter is the difference between the ambient dry bulb and wet bulb temperatures.
6A and 6B show sampling of cooling tower operating curves for temperature, ambient conditions, and heat exchange effective ratios of the same process range for cases where capacity and cooling water temperatures are matched to those achieved by standard cooling towers by regulating the flow of air. It is a figure which shows a group. This curve represents the fan speed needed for a standard cooling tower; Evaporative water consumption characteristics for the standard cooling towers are numerically similar to the relative fan speed.

Cooling the working fluid through evaporation of water is a traditional method. This evaporative cooling process works particularly well in relatively dry environments where the air has a significant capacity to absorb moisture as the phase changes from liquid to vapor by evaporation of water. In a cooling tower that does not have a thermal load on the cooling water, the temperature of the cooling water and the temperature of the working fluid in intimate contact with the cooling water may reach a wet bulb temperature corresponding to a specific ambient temperature and humidity. This theoretical limit is practically not reached because the heat load is usually located in the coolant. However, because the purpose of the cooling tower is to provide cooling water, lowering the wet-bulb temperature of the incoming air may allow the water to cool further, which may be more useful for cooling building or industrial processes. Known. Cooling tower performance is often described as "approach to wet bulb"; It is described that the cooling tower achieves 8 degrees of access to the wet bulb if the cooling tower produces 8 degrees of cooling water above the wet bulb temperature of the ambient air entering the tower.

An initial method to improve cooling tower capacity is to move large amounts of outside air through the tower and increase the surface area exposed to the air flow of water to be evaporated. Improve (reduce) access to the wet bulb by reducing the cooling load on the cooling tower; For a given cooling tower with a fixed water flow rate, the reduced load translates into a reduced operating process range (difference between working fluid inlet and outlet temperatures). For a given load, the same effect can be achieved by using a large cooling tower. However, even very large cooling towers cannot cool the water below the wet bulb temperature of the outside air entering the cooling tower. In order to improve the cooling tower, the water flowing through the heat exchanger is pre-cooled to the outside when the outside air is sufficiently cooled. This feature has the effect of reducing the process range (load) imparted to the tower, thereby improving access to wet bulbs and reducing water consumption, but cannot be used in high temperature outside air conditions.

Some cooling process water is used to pre-cool the outside air entering the cooling tower to reduce the wet bulb temperature for further improvement of the cooling tower. In view of the potential coolant temperature achieved by the cooling tower, this approach has essentially the same effect on the present invention. However, in contrast to the improvements described herein, using cooling process water for pre-cooling consumes significant cooling tower capacity, and consequently reduces cooling tower output that is substantially useful (remaining). At some high ambient temperature conditions, the portion of the cooling tower capacity required for such pre-cooling may be equal to the total power of the cooling tower so that it does not produce a purely useful cooling effect.

As discussed below, a closed loop heat transfer system is used to transfer heat to relatively cold (but relatively high humidity) air exiting the tower to reduce the temperature of the relatively warm (but low humidity) air entering the cooling tower. It is not used in advance. This improvement extends the theoretical performance limits of the cooling tower and reduces evaporative water consumption from a wet bulb temperature to a generally low dew point temperature without sacrificing capacity.

Thus, shown in FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a cooling tower 10 with a cooling load L that transfers heat for the cooling process to working water 12. The air entering the cooling tower inlet 22 is shown as coming from the bottom left. The air is introduced through the cooling tower by a conventional power fan 14, which in particular enters the tower through the surrounding inlet at the same height as the air injection stream 22 and the air outlet stream 16 is above that height. It can be removed or added by using convective flow in very large hyperbolic towers exiting the tower between 300 and 500 feet. The injection of working water 18 circulates down through the filler 20 in a countercurrent manner, and the filler 20 is operated to increase the surface area of the water and increase the contact with the warm dry air rising through the filler. A portion of the water is evaporated and the remaining liquid water is cooled, which is used to cool the load (L), which may be collected in the basin 24 and may be a building, or from a condenser of an industrial process refrigeration system or power plant. It is used for other cooling tasks such as absorbing heat transfer from the load L.

Also schematically shown is a heat recovery or transfer system comprising a closed circulation heat transfer system 26 of known type that operates continuously with the evaporative water cooling cycle but is separate from the evaporative water cooling cycle. A heat dissipation coil 28 is located in the outlet air stream 16 and dissipates heat into the outflow air stream. The heat is circulated from the heat sink coil 30 in contact with the incoming air stream entering the air inlet 22, thereby cooling the incoming air stream. Such a closed circulation heat transfer system may consist of one or more heat siphons, heat pipes, pump fluid loops, parallel plate heat exchangers, or heat wheels.

More specifically, this closed circulation heat transfer system 26 may be a pump liquid loop, a parallel plate or a heat wheel, but at least a fresh installation is preferred, which is relatively cold in which the working fluid in the heat pipe exits the cooling tower. One or a series of parallel heat pipes or well-known forms of heat siphon, which are operated underneath with a warm heat recovery coil at the air inlet, utilizing what can normally be drawn down by gravity after condensing by the exhaust stream 16 Can be. Here, the working fluid of the heat pipe evaporates, or the fluid temperature of the heat siphon increases and absorbs some of the heat from the cooling inlet air to lower the wet bulb temperature. Cooling the inlet air prior to sending the inlet air through the cooling tower and exposing the inlet air to countercurrent water in the cooling tower will have significant advantages in the cooling water provided to the basin.

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of a slightly different standard type of cooling tower 10 with a pipe surface area coil 32 comprising a working fluid 12 used for process cooling or refrigeration load L. FIG. This cooling coil is washed in a water jet 18 that falls into the basin 24 through the outside air (with or without convection enhancement as described above) being pulled through the cooling tower by the fan 14 in a countercurrent manner. . Here again, the enhancement system 26 is schematically shown as having a heat recovery coil 28 in a cold exhaust air stream 16 and a heat sink coil 30 that influences warm air before entering the tower through the air inlet. It is. As in the system shown in FIG. 1, the closed loop heat transfer system 26 may be a system selected from one or more heat pipes, heat siphons, or heat wheels, which is the separation distance and direction of the incoming air stream to be cooled. And an exhaust air stream from which heat from the selected closed loop heat transfer system can be dissipated.

Referring to Figures 3 and 4, the improved performance of the cooling process and apparatus of the present invention shown in Figures 1 and 2 will be apparent. 3 is an air line of normal temperature at the same level. The performance curve, shown as "standard cooling tower ...", represents an air side process of the relatively standard commercially available cooling tower mechanism type shown in FIGS. In this example, the air entering the cooling tower has a wet bulb temperature of 21.1 ° C. and a dew point of 12.2 ° C. and is estimated at 37.8 ° C. at about 22% relative humidity. As air passes through the cooling tower, the air absorbs moisture and cools below ambient temperature. Regarding the 5.6 ° C. process range, the cooling tower output air temperature of the sample has a water output temperature stabilized at about 26.1 ° C. and is shown at 27.1 ° C. The performance curve shown as "Enhanced Cooling Tower 75% Effectiveness ..." shows the same cooling tower estimation performance with the heat recovery system as previously described. It is assumed here that this heat recovery system has a heat exchange effective ratio of 75%. That is, it is a combination of heat recovery coils at the air inlet and outlet that can transfer 75% of heat from the inlet air to the outlet air. This can cool the inlet air temperature once the entire system has stabilized to a new temperature of about 28.1 ° C. at 37.8 ° C. This 75% effectiveness is shown in the air line as the difference of 75% between the newly stabilized outlet temperature of about 27.7 ° C. and the outside air temperature entering the heat recovery coil at 37.8 ° C.

Thus, the improved system reduces the temperature of the working fluid to about 23.8 ° C. with a cooling advantage of −2.2 ° C. The drop of 2.2 ° C. in water temperature is approximately effective, even considering the major maintenance costs of the installation of the heat siphon and / or heat pipe and the small but measurable limitations on the air flow generated by imparting the heat exchange surface of the heat transfer device. Can be. Since the cooling load on the cooling tower working fluid can be more easily satisfied, the apparatus of the present invention can reduce the size of a typical cooling tower and thus the total energy required to move air, water, etc., and reduce fan power. The outflow tower system can be operated with reduced airflow. In addition, the lower coolant temperature can improve the energy performance of the refrigeration process by reducing the energy consumed, and can improve the energy performance of the power generation process by increasing the generated energy. In addition, the improvement of the cooling tower reduces the evaporation of water and the water required to construct for standard cooling towers as will be described in detail below in FIGS. 5 and 6.

4 is a similar curve but here the process range is 2.2 ° C. This 2.2 ° C. range is equivalent to increasing the cooling tower capacity for the load and reduces access to the wet bulb of the standard cooling tower. Here, the analysis is similar and the estimated 75% effective heat exchange is also applied. However, the 2.2 ° C. range causes the cooling tower outlet temperature to be proportionally lowered when the improved curve at equilibrium indicates that the coolant temperature is estimated to reach 19.5 ° C. As in the system shown in FIG. 3, this is comparable to cooling water of 23.3 ° C. for the same cooling tower without improvement, resulting in a cooling advantage of 3.8 ° C. In addition, the coolant temperature is 1.5 ° C., lower than the ambient wet bulb temperature that would not be possible in a standard cooling tower. This lower coolant temperature does not require refrigeration and can only provide building cooling using an evaporation process. Currently used evaporative cooling processes for buildings add moisture to the building air to partially counteract the pleasant benefits of cooling.

These performance improvements are shown in FIGS. 5A and 5B, which show performance curves in the 2.2 ° C. and 5.6 ° C. ranges for standard cooling towers and 2.2 ° C. and 5.6 ° C. data for enhanced cooling towers. In the case of 5.6 ° C. with wet bulb depression of 16.7 ° C. and ambient wet bulb temperature of 21.1 ° C., the achieved cooling water temperature is 23.8 ° C., matching the conditions shown in FIG. 3 where the expected water evaporation is 84% for a standard cooling tower. In the case of 2.2 ° C. with wet bulb depression of 16.7 ° C. and ambient wet bulb temperature of 21.1 ° C., the achieved coolant temperature is 19.5 ° C. which matches the conditions shown in FIG. 3 where the expected water evaporation is 61% for a standard cooling tower.

6A and 6B show performance improvements from other operating methods that match the cooling tower capacity and cooling water temperature of the improved cooling tower for a standard cooling tower. This figure shows performance curves in the range 2.2 ° C. and 5.6 ° C. for a standard cooling tower and performance curves of 2.2 ° C. and 5.6 ° C. for an improved cooling tower. For 5.6 ° C. with wet bulb depression of 16.7 ° C. and ambient wet bulb temperature of 21.1 ° C., the required fan speed is 75% and the expected water evaporation for a standard cooling tower is 75%. For 5.6 ° C. with wet bulb depression of 16.7 ° C. and ambient wet bulb temperature of 21.1 ° C., the required fan speed is 52% and the expected water evaporation for a standard cooling tower is 50%.

Accordingly, the described and proposed improved methods and cooling tower systems can be readily applied to a wide range with direct building cooling, industrial process cooling, and the like.

Thus, since the cooling tower is affected by the flow of air below the ambient temperature when the system is operating at steady state, the improved cooling tower can reduce the amount of water evaporated for equivalent operating loads and ambient temperature. Any chosen closed cycle cooling system will somewhat limit the flow of air in and out of the cooling tower, but the reduction in fan efficiency can be fine compared to the overall benefit of the cooling effectiveness. In particular, this is evident in new systems in which a variety of speed motors are provided for the new or with the motor. Instead of reducing the temperature of the operating water for a given load, the fan speed can be reduced to proportionally reduce the air flow while the fan speed is maintained at the same capacity and cooling water temperature as a standard cooling tower. Since the losses are assumed to be negligible in the variable speed control circuit, the power consumption of the electric motor is a function of the volume of air moved per unit time for the third power. Although the fan power at full speed increases slightly with respect to the addition of a closed cycle heat exchange system, if the cooling requirements of the load can be satisfied by driving the fan at half the original speed, the electrical power required to drive the fan is required for full speed operation. You can dive to one-eighth of what you need. 6 shows this graphically.

Air conditioning systems in large buildings often use cooling towers for heat transfer from water-cooled refrigeration systems. Since the cost for operating such a refrigeration system is quite high, such a cooling system is configured to allow the generation of the appropriate temperature of the water cooled directly from the cooling tower without the operation of the cooler during the weak conditions of dry bulb and wet bulb temperature of the outside air. This is called "free cooling" because a refrigeration system that requires relatively energy is not required. By providing a cooling system with the above-described improvements, the time of "free cooling", which is cooling that does not require operating the refrigeration system, can be increased by hundreds of hours per year, resulting in cost savings and quick recovery for the above-mentioned improvements. Can be achieved.

The increased cooling effectiveness of the method can help with new real systems with outdated additional refrigeration systems as described above. Many actual systems use chlorinated fluorocarbon (CFCs) refrigerants known to harm the ozone layer. Environmentally acceptable alternative refrigerants may be used in place of CFCs, but the use of such alternative refrigerants is known to reduce the effectiveness of refrigeration systems such that cooling towers are large and must be replaced by high capacity units or the entire refrigeration system. Should be replaced. By newly installing the actual cooling tower with the above-described improved system, the actual refrigeration system can satisfy the cooling load without replacing the actual cooling tower even if it has an environmentally acceptable refrigerant.

Claims (11)

  1. A flow of water, an air inlet receiving an air intake stream comprised of outside air such that the flow of water is affected by an air stream and the flow of water is cooled by evaporating a portion of the flow of water, and from the flow of water A method of improving an evaporative cooling tower having a portion of evaporated water and an air outlet for an air discharge stream, the method comprising:
    a) providing a closed cycle heat transfer system having a heat release and a heat sink;
    b) allowing said heat releaser to be affected by said air discharge stream;
    c) causing the heat sink to be affected by the air discharge stream, wherein heat is transferred to the air discharge stream and the flow of outside air is cooled by the closed cycle heat transfer system, thereby providing a wet bulb of the flow of outside air. Increasing the capacity of the cooling tower to reduce temperature and cool the flow of water.
  2. The method of claim 1,
    And said closed circuit heat transfer system is selected from the group of heat exchange systems comprising a thermal siphon, a heat pipe, a pump fluid loop, a parallel plate heat exchanger and a heat wheel.
  3. The method of claim 1,
    And said closed circuit heat transfer system is a heat pipe.
  4. The method of claim 1,
    And said water can be cooled at an air inlet to a temperature lower than the wet bulb temperature of the outside air.
  5. The method of claim 1,
    Wherein said water can be cooled at an air inlet to a temperature approaching the dew point temperature of outside air.
  6. The method of claim 1,
    And the air outlet is above the air inlet.
  7. The method of claim 6,
    And said closed circuit heat transfer system is a heat pipe or a heat siphon.
  8. The method of claim 1,
    And said closed circuit heat transfer system is a heat wheel.
  9. In a method of cooling a process to a predetermined load and temperature,
    A water evaporation cooling tower having an outside air inlet for receiving an air intake stream from the atmosphere, an air outlet for discharging the air discharge stream from the cooling tower, and a supply of water that is evaporated and cooled by air moving from the air inlet to the air outlet. Providing a;
    Transferring heat from the cooling load to the air discharge stream;
    Providing a closed circuit heat transfer system having a heat sink and a heat dissipation;
    Positioning a heat sink in the air intake stream, and positioning a heat outlet in the air exhaust stream,
    The dry bulb temperature of the air discharge stream is lower than the dry bulb temperature of the air intake stream, so that heat is transferred from the air discharge stream to the air intake stream, thereby lowering the dry bulb and wet bulb temperature,
    The flow of the air stream is reduced to meet predetermined load and temperature requirements,
    The amount of water evaporated from the supply of water is reduced compared to the same cooling tower without a closed circuit heat transfer system.
  10. The method of claim 9,
    The cooling load is selected from refrigeration systems, power plant condensers, industrial processes or building spaces.
  11. The method of claim 9,
    The closed circuit heat transfer system is selected from the group consisting of heat pipes, heat siphons, heat wheels, parallel plate heat exchangers and pump fluid loops.
KR1020107025818A 2008-04-18 2009-04-18 Evaporative cooling tower enhancement through cooling recovery KR20110021783A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US4603608P true 2008-04-18 2008-04-18
US61/046,036 2008-04-18

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
KR20110021783A true KR20110021783A (en) 2011-03-04

Family

ID=41199486

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
KR1020107025818A KR20110021783A (en) 2008-04-18 2009-04-18 Evaporative cooling tower enhancement through cooling recovery

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (1) US20110174003A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2279386A1 (en)
KR (1) KR20110021783A (en)
CN (1) CN102057243A (en)
AU (1) AU2009237550A1 (en)
IL (1) IL208764D0 (en)
RU (1) RU2010143983A (en)
WO (1) WO2009129517A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN102080898A (en) * 2011-02-22 2011-06-01 王红斌 Lithium bromide absorbing evaporative condensing water chilling unit
KR101250050B1 (en) * 2011-04-27 2013-04-02 주식회사 경동나비엔 Apparatus and method for evaporative cooling of coolant
WO2013011413A1 (en) * 2011-07-15 2013-01-24 Stellenbosch University Splash grids for rain or spray zones
US8899061B2 (en) * 2011-09-23 2014-12-02 R4 Ventures, Llc Advanced multi-purpose, multi-stage evaporative cold water/cold air generating and supply system
CN103376007A (en) * 2012-04-28 2013-10-30 朱杰 Heat pipe negative-pressure cooling tower
JP6403664B2 (en) 2012-05-07 2018-10-10 フォノニック デバイセズ、インク Thermoelectric heat exchanger components including protective heat spreading lid and optimal thermal interface resistance
US20130291555A1 (en) 2012-05-07 2013-11-07 Phononic Devices, Inc. Thermoelectric refrigeration system control scheme for high efficiency performance
US9057564B2 (en) * 2012-12-17 2015-06-16 Baltimore Aircoil Company, Inc. Cooling tower with indirect heat exchanger
RU2522135C1 (en) * 2012-12-26 2014-07-10 Валерий Леонидович ОСТРОВСКИЙ Fan cooling tower
US9279619B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-08 Baltimore Aircoil Company Inc. Cooling tower with indirect heat exchanger
US9255739B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-02-09 Baltimore Aircoil Company, Inc. Cooling tower with indirect heat exchanger
US9174164B2 (en) 2013-12-30 2015-11-03 Gas Technology Institute Apparatus for dehumidifying gas and methods of use
US10197310B2 (en) 2014-06-20 2019-02-05 Nortek Air Solutions Canada, Inc. Systems and methods for managing conditions in enclosed space
WO2015199819A1 (en) * 2014-06-26 2015-12-30 Exxonmobil Upstream Research Company Pre-cooler for air-cooled heat exchangers
US9593871B2 (en) 2014-07-21 2017-03-14 Phononic Devices, Inc. Systems and methods for operating a thermoelectric module to increase efficiency
US10458683B2 (en) 2014-07-21 2019-10-29 Phononic, Inc. Systems and methods for mitigating heat rejection limitations of a thermoelectric module
CN104596182A (en) * 2015-02-05 2015-05-06 福建德兴节能科技有限公司 Low-energy-consumption circulating water cooling system and method
AU2016265882A1 (en) 2015-05-15 2018-01-18 Nortek Air Solutions Canada, Inc. Using liquid to air membrane energy exchanger for liquid cooling
JP2018526611A (en) * 2015-09-10 2018-09-13 マンターズ コーポレイションMunters Corporation Method and apparatus for minimizing water using an evaporative cooling device
US9976810B2 (en) * 2015-10-01 2018-05-22 Pacific Airwell Corp. Water recovery from cooling tower exhaust
EP3400407A4 (en) 2016-01-08 2019-08-07 Nortek Air Solutions Canada, Inc. Integrated make-up air system in 100% air recirculation system
WO2017173239A1 (en) * 2016-03-31 2017-10-05 Oceaneering International, Inc. Membrane microgravity air conditioner
CN109863350A (en) * 2016-05-09 2019-06-07 蒙特斯公司 Direct evaporating-cooling system with accurate temperature control
CN107166582B (en) * 2017-05-11 2019-05-24 珠海格力电器股份有限公司 Air conditioning cooling water system, air-conditioning system and air conditioning cooling water system control method
CN109163576B (en) * 2018-07-23 2020-05-29 华信咨询设计研究院有限公司 Anti-freezing energy-saving heat pipe cooling system and control method thereof
CN109764435A (en) * 2018-12-20 2019-05-17 陕西优斯达环境科技有限公司 A kind of cooling water cooler cooling system of the evaporation with cold recovery

Family Cites Families (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1943116A (en) * 1932-03-14 1934-01-09 Henry O Forrest Refrigerating system
US2214880A (en) * 1933-01-25 1940-09-17 Robert B P Crawford Regenerative cooling system
US4023949A (en) * 1975-08-04 1977-05-17 Schlom Leslie A Evaporative refrigeration system
SE420764B (en) * 1977-09-22 1981-10-26 Munters Ab Carl DEVICE FOR AN EVAPORATIVE COOLER
US4380910A (en) * 1981-08-13 1983-04-26 Aztech International, Ltd. Multi-stage indirect-direct evaporative cooling process and apparatus
US4476065A (en) * 1983-04-20 1984-10-09 Niagara Blower Co. Increased capacity wet surface air cooling system
US4713943A (en) * 1983-11-09 1987-12-22 Wainwright Christopher E Evaporative cooler including an air-to-air counter-flow heat exchanger having a reverse temperature profile
US4660390A (en) * 1986-03-25 1987-04-28 Worthington Mark N Air conditioner with three stages of indirect regeneration
US4938035A (en) * 1987-10-20 1990-07-03 Khanh Dinh Regenerative fresh-air air conditioning system and method
US4827733A (en) * 1987-10-20 1989-05-09 Dinh Company Inc. Indirect evaporative cooling system
US4857090A (en) * 1988-02-23 1989-08-15 Pneumafil Corporation Energy conservation system for cooling and conditioning air
US4928657A (en) * 1989-03-02 1990-05-29 Walbro Corporation In-tank fuel reservoir with fuel level sensor
US4926657A (en) * 1989-06-30 1990-05-22 Bomar Elmer B Heat pipe assisted evaporative cooler
US5349829A (en) * 1992-05-21 1994-09-27 Aoc, Inc. Method and apparatus for evaporatively cooling gases and/or fluids
FI96797C (en) * 1993-08-10 1999-01-19 Abb Installaatiot Oy System for cooling the supply air in an air conditioner
US7231967B2 (en) * 1994-01-31 2007-06-19 Building Performance Equipment, Inc. Ventilator system and method
AUPM755094A0 (en) * 1994-08-18 1994-09-08 F F Seeley Nominees Pty Ltd Intensification of evaporation and heat transfer
US5921315A (en) * 1995-06-07 1999-07-13 Heat Pipe Technology, Inc. Three-dimensional heat pipe
US5727394A (en) * 1996-02-12 1998-03-17 Laroche Industries, Inc. Air conditioning system having improved indirect evaporative cooler
IT1295160B1 (en) * 1997-07-02 1999-04-30 Enrico Medessi Universal equipment for the recovery of the cooling fluid in heat exchange circuits
US6394174B1 (en) * 1999-01-29 2002-05-28 Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd System for reclaiming process water
US6434963B1 (en) * 1999-10-26 2002-08-20 John Francis Urch Air cooling/heating apparatus
CA2400149C (en) * 2000-02-23 2012-01-03 Leslie Schlom A heat exchanger for cooling and for a pre-cooler for turbine intake air conditioning
AT258302T (en) * 2000-06-28 2004-02-15 Balcke Duerr Gmbh Cooling tower
US7197887B2 (en) * 2000-09-27 2007-04-03 Idalex Technologies, Inc. Method and plate apparatus for dew point evaporative cooler
KR100409265B1 (en) * 2001-01-17 2003-12-18 한국과학기술연구원 Regenerative evaporative cooler
US6779784B2 (en) * 2001-11-02 2004-08-24 Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc. Cooling tower method and apparatus
US6845629B1 (en) * 2003-07-23 2005-01-25 Davis Energy Group, Inc. Vertical counterflow evaporative cooler
US7322205B2 (en) * 2003-09-12 2008-01-29 Davis Energy Group, Inc. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems
KR100607204B1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2006-08-01 (주) 위젠글로벌 Method for evaporative cooling of coolant and apparatus thereof
US7698906B2 (en) * 2005-12-30 2010-04-20 Nexajoule, Inc. Sub-wet bulb evaporative chiller with pre-cooling of incoming air flow
US7510174B2 (en) * 2006-04-14 2009-03-31 Kammerzell Larry L Dew point cooling tower, adhesive bonded heat exchanger, and other heat transfer apparatus
WO2007139558A1 (en) * 2006-06-01 2007-12-06 Exaflop Llc Warm cooling for electronics
US20080173032A1 (en) * 2007-01-18 2008-07-24 Az Evap, Llc Evaporative Cooler With Dual Water Inflow
NZ581338A (en) * 2007-05-09 2011-10-28 Mcnnnac Energy Services Inc Cooling system wherein cool air exiting a heat element in used to feed a primary cooling tower

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
IL208764D0 (en) 2010-12-30
RU2010143983A (en) 2012-05-27
WO2009129517A1 (en) 2009-10-22
US20110174003A1 (en) 2011-07-21
EP2279386A1 (en) 2011-02-02
CN102057243A (en) 2011-05-11
AU2009237550A1 (en) 2009-10-22

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10782036B2 (en) Heat dissipation systems with hygroscopic working fluid
KR102099693B1 (en) Methods and systems for mini-split liquid desiccant air conditioning
US8590333B2 (en) Data center cooling
US8635881B2 (en) Data center with low power usage effectiveness
Nadjahi et al. A review of thermal management and innovative cooling strategies for data center
US20170292722A1 (en) Methods and systems for liquid desiccant air conditioning system retrofit
Daraghmeh et al. A review of current status of free cooling in datacenters
FI58686B (en) Foerfarande foer vaermeoeverfoering mellan fraonluft och tilluft i en ventilationsanlaeggning
Yau et al. A review on the application of horizontal heat pipe heat exchangers in air conditioning systems in the tropics
JP4782462B2 (en) Geothermal heat pump device, geothermal heat device equipped with the same, and control method for geothermal heat pump device
KR100607204B1 (en) Method for evaporative cooling of coolant and apparatus thereof
KR940011341B1 (en) Air-pre-cooler method and apparatus
TWI422318B (en) Data center module
US7430878B2 (en) Air conditioning system and methods
She et al. Thermodynamic analysis of a novel energy-efficient refrigeration system subcooled by liquid desiccant dehumidification and evaporation
Harby et al. Performance improvement of vapor compression cooling systems using evaporative condenser: An overview
CN100557337C (en) Heating vent air regulating system with power-actuated aftercooler
EP3280233B1 (en) Server rack heat sink system with combination of liquid cooling device and auxiliary heat sink device
EP2143839B1 (en) Cloth dryer
US4333517A (en) Heat exchange method using natural flow of heat exchange medium
KR20160018492A (en) In-ceiling liquid desiccant air conditioning system
US6405543B2 (en) High-efficiency air-conditioning system with high-volume air distribution
JP2005249258A (en) Cooling system
US4295342A (en) Heat exchange method using natural flow of heat exchange medium
US20190271490A1 (en) Systems and methods for managing conditions in enclosed space

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
WITN Withdrawal due to no request for examination