KR20080081143A - Wet formed mat having improved hot wet tensile strengths - Google Patents

Wet formed mat having improved hot wet tensile strengths Download PDF

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Publication number
KR20080081143A
KR20080081143A KR1020087003995A KR20087003995A KR20080081143A KR 20080081143 A KR20080081143 A KR 20080081143A KR 1020087003995 A KR1020087003995 A KR 1020087003995A KR 20087003995 A KR20087003995 A KR 20087003995A KR 20080081143 A KR20080081143 A KR 20080081143A
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South Korea
Prior art keywords
binder
coupling agent
chopped strand
mat
silane
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KR1020087003995A
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Korean (ko)
Inventor
제리 에이치 씨 리
데이비드 알 머스
프랭크 씨 오브라이언-버니니
리앙 천
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오웬스-코닝 인텔렉츄얼 캐피탈 엘엘씨
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Priority to US11/208,224 priority Critical patent/US20070039703A1/en
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Application filed by 오웬스-코닝 인텔렉츄얼 캐피탈 엘엘씨 filed Critical 오웬스-코닝 인텔렉츄얼 캐피탈 엘엘씨
Publication of KR20080081143A publication Critical patent/KR20080081143A/en

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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H13/00Pulp or paper, comprising synthetic cellulose or non-cellulose fibres or web-forming material
    • D21H13/36Inorganic fibres or flakes
    • D21H13/38Inorganic fibres or flakes siliceous
    • D21H13/40Inorganic fibres or flakes siliceous vitreous, e.g. mineral wool, glass fibres
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03CCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF GLASSES, GLAZES, OR VITREOUS ENAMELS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF GLASS; SURFACE TREATMENT OF FIBRES OR FILAMENTS MADE FROM GLASS, MINERALS OR SLAGS; JOINING GLASS TO GLASS OR OTHER MATERIALS
    • C03C25/00Surface treatment of fibres or filaments made from glass, minerals or slags
    • C03C25/10Coating
    • C03C25/12General methods of coating; Devices therefor
    • C03C25/16Dipping
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D5/00Roof covering by making use of flexible material, e.g. supplied in roll form
    • E04D5/02Roof covering by making use of flexible material, e.g. supplied in roll form of materials impregnated with sealing substances, e.g. roofing felt
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H17/00Non-fibrous material added to the pulp, characterised by its constitution; Paper-impregnating material characterised by its constitution
    • D21H17/20Macromolecular organic compounds
    • D21H17/33Synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D21H17/46Synthetic macromolecular compounds obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D21H17/47Condensation polymers of aldehydes or ketones
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H17/00Non-fibrous material added to the pulp, characterised by its constitution; Paper-impregnating material characterised by its constitution
    • D21H17/20Macromolecular organic compounds
    • D21H17/33Synthetic macromolecular compounds
    • D21H17/46Synthetic macromolecular compounds obtained otherwise than by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds
    • D21H17/47Condensation polymers of aldehydes or ketones
    • D21H17/49Condensation polymers of aldehydes or ketones with compounds containing hydrogen bound to nitrogen

Abstract

Wet-laid chopped strand glass mats for use in roofing applications that have improved hot wet tensile strengths are provided. The chopped strand mats are formed by the application or inclusion of at least one coupling agent to the chopped strand mat during a wet-laid mat forming process. The coupling agent may be added to the chopped strand mat as part of a two-part binder composition that includes a binder and at least one coupling agent. Alternatively, the coupling agent may be added directly to the chopped strand mat independent of the binder. As a further alternative, the coupling agent(s) may be added to the white water in the wet-laid mat forming process and incorporated into the formed glass mat via the glass fibers. The binder may be a modified urea-formaldehyde binder, a non-modified urea-formaldehyde binder, and/or a formaldehyde-free binder. The coupling agent(s) may be silane coupling agents and/or reactive siloxanes.

Description

WET FORMED MAT HAVING IMPROVED HOT WET TENSILE STRENGTHS}

The present invention relates generally to chopped strand mats used in coating applications, and more particularly to chopped strand glass mats having improved hot wet tensile strength.

Fiberglass is commonly used as a reinforcement in the building composite industry because it does not shrink or stretch with changes in the surrounding environment. Coating materials such as coating shingles, roll coatings, and commercial coatings typically consist of glass fiber mats, asphalt coatings on fibrous mats, and particulate surface layers embedded in asphalt coatings.

To form a chopped strand mat suitable for use in coating materials, glass fibers are first formed by drawing a stream of molten glass material from a bushing or orifice. The molten glass can be drawn by a winder that collects the gathered filaments into a package or by a roller that pulls the fibers before the fibers are gathered and cut. Aqueous sizing composition is typically applied to the fibers after they are drawn from the bushing to prevent the fibers from breaking during subsequent processing, to prevent inter-filament tearing and compatibility with the fibers and the matrix resin to be reinforced. To improve. After treating the fibers with the sizing composition, the fibers can be packaged in the wet state as wet use chopped strand glass (WUCS).

The wet chopped fibers are then stirred to disperse and disperse the fibers in a water slurry containing surfactants, viscosity modifiers, dispersants, and / or other chemical agents. The slurry comprising dispersed fibers is then deposited on a mobile screen where a significant portion of the water is removed. The polymeric binder is then applied and the resulting mat is heated to remove the remaining water and to cure the binder. Urea formaldehyde binders are typically used because of their low cost. The asphalt is then applied to the mat by spraying the asphalt on one or both sides of the mat or passing the mat through the molten asphalt bath so that the asphalt layers are disposed on both sides of the mat. Particulate protective coatings may be applied to the asphalt coating mats. Asphalt-particulate coating mats can be used to form various coating materials such as coated singles.

Properties such as tear strength, dry tensile strength, and wet tensile strength are measured to determine the usefulness of chopped strand glass mats in coating applications. One particularly important property for coating mats is the maintenance of hot wet tensile strength. Hot wet strength provides an assessment of the durability of the coating mat. However, some of the conventional binders used to form coating mats, such as urea formaldehyde resins, tend to degrade under wet conditions, as found in the external environment in which the coating mats are used. It was found that deforming the urea formaldehyde binder with a latex modifier or the like increases not only the hot tensile strength but also the tear strength of the unmodified urea formaldehyde resin. Other examples of modifying the binder to improve mat properties such as tensile properties and tear strength are described below.

US 6,642,299 to Wertz et al. Discloses (1) styrene acrylic acid or styrene acrylate, (2) maleic anhydride, acrylic acid or acrylate, and adducts of styrene, or (3) styrene acrylic acid or styrene. An aqueous fiber mat adhesive binder composition comprising an additive of any one of a physical mixture of an acrylate copolymer and a styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, and a thermosetting ureaformaldehyde resin, is disclosed. The binder may be used to form glass fibers that exhibit hot tensile strength retention.

US Pat. No. 6,566,459 to Dopico et al. Discloses melamineureaformaldehyde resins modified with cyclic urea prepolymers and sodium metabisulfite. Glass mats formed by modified melamineureaformaldehyde resins claim to have improved hot wet tensile strength retention and good moisture resistance compared to ureaformaldehyde resins.

U. S. Patent No. 6,384, 116 to Chan et al. Discloses a binder composition formed of a urea formaldehyde resin modified with a water soluble nonionic amine oxide. Optionally, the ureaformaldehyde resin may be further modified with anionic acrylic latex and / or water soluble polymers having a weight average molecular weight of 100,000 to 2,000,000. The tensile strength of the glass mat formed by the modified urea formaldehyde resin is claimed to have good tear strength and improved tensile strength.

US Pat. Nos. 5,914,365 and 6,084,021 to Chang et al. Disclose water soluble binder compositions containing ureaformaldehyde resins modified by water soluble styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer (SMA). The binder composition is used in the preparation of fiber mats which can be used as substrates in the production of coated single and composite coatings. Fiberglass mats made using the binder composition are claimed to exhibit improved wet tensile strength, wet mat strength, dry tensile strength, and tear strength.

U. S. Patent No. 5,851, 933 to Swartz et al. Discloses a method of making a nonwoven fibrous mat that gives good tear strength to coating products. The mat is formed by a wet process in which the applied binder contains an aqueous ureaformaldehyde resin and a self-crosslinked copolymer of vinyl acrylic or polyvinyl acetate.

US Pat. Nos. 5,445,878, 5,518,586 and 5,656,366 to Mirous disclose urea-formaldehyde resins modified with water-insoluble anionic phosphate esters. It is claimed that glass fiber mats formed using whitewater glass slurries containing modified urea-formaldehyde resins and hydroxyethyl cellulose as binders exhibit high tear strength.

U. S. Patent No. 4,430, 158 to Jackey et al. Discloses the application of a binder composition containing urea formaldehyde resin and 0.01 to 5% by weight of surfactants that are able to wet the surface of highly sized glass fibers. A method of improving the wet tensile strength of sized fiberglass mats is disclosed. The surfactant is preferably an ionic surfactant such as sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate.

US Patent Publication No. 2005/0070186 to Shoemake et al. Discloses a thermoset urea aldehyde resin modified by an amount of protein that enhances the binding useful as a binder in the formation of a glass fiber mat. Preferably, the protein is a vegetable protein and even more preferably soy protein. Glass mats are claimed to exhibit substantially equivalent wet tensile strength, tear strength, and dry tensile strength with ureaformaldehyde resin binders modified with synthetic additives.

Despite this disclosure, there is a need in the art for new binder compositions for fiber mats that further improve mat tensile and / or tear strength properties.

It is an object of the present invention to a two-part binder composition formed from a binder premix and at least one coupling agent. The type of binder forming the binder premix is not particularly limited and may include modified urea formaldehyde binders, unmodified urea formaldehyde binders, formaldehyde-free binders, and combinations thereof. have. Further, the binder may be formed as a "one-part package" in which the binder is premixed with the modifier and packaged in a one component system, or as a "two part package" in which the binder and the modifier are not premixed. In a preferred embodiment, the binder is a standard urea formaldehyde binder modified with a styrene butadiene louver latex modifier. Suitable examples of coupling agents used in the binder composition of the present invention include silane coupling agents and reactive siloxanes. In a preferred embodiment, the coupling agent is an aminosilane coupling agent. Weak organic acids may be added to the binder composition to hydrolyze the silane coupling agent.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide chopped strand mats for use in coating applications having improved hot wet tensile strength. The chopped strands may be formed from a plurality of glass fibers held together in a sheet form by a two-part binder composition. The glass fibers used to form chopped strand glass mats are A type glass fibers, C type glass fibers, E type glass fibers, S type glass fibers, and E-CR type glass fibers (e.g. Advantex ® glass available from Owens Corning). Fibers), wool glass fibers, or combinations thereof. Optionally, other reinforcing fibers such as mineral fibers, carbon fibers, ceramic fibers, natural fibers, and / or synthetic fibers may be present in the chopped strand mat in addition to the glass fibers. It is preferable that a binder is said two-part binder composition.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a method of making chopped strand glass mats with improved hot wet tensile strength which adds a coupling agent to the chopped strand mat via a binder in a wet mat processing line. The chopped glass fibers are added to a whitewater containing various surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers, and / or other chemicals while stirring to form a glass fiber slurry. The slurry is deposited on a mobile forming wire or a porous conveyor to form a web of interlocking fibers. Water is removed by a vacuum system or the like, and a binder containing one or more coupling agents is applied to the web of fibers. Water remaining in the web is removed, the binder is cured and the binder coated web is passed through a drying oven to form chopped strand glass mats. It is preferable that a binder is said two-part binder composition.

Another object of the present invention relates to a method of making chopped strand glass mats with improved hot wet tensile strength which individually adds a coupling agent to the web of chopped fibers during formation of the chopped strand mat in a wet mat processing line. The chopped glass fibers are added to a whitewater containing various surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers, and / or other chemicals while stirring to form a glass fiber slurry. The slurry is deposited on a mobile forming wire or a porous conveyor to form a web of interlocking fibers. Water is removed from the web by conventional vacuum or air intake systems. The binder is applied to the web by a binder applicator. The binder used is not particularly limited and may include any conventional partial or two-part binder known to those skilled in the art. In addition, before or after applying the binder, a coupling agent is applied to the surface of the web. The coupling agent may be added to the web at any position before the web enters the drying oven. Suitable coupling agents include silane coupling agents and reactive siloxanes. Preferably, the coupling agent is one or more aminosilanes. Once the binder and coupling agent are applied to the web, the web is passed through a drying oven to remove the remaining water and to cure the binder composition.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a method of forming a chopped strand mat with improved hot wet tensile strength by adding a coupling agent to the whitewater in a wet chopped strand mat processing line. Suitable coupling agents include silane coupling agents and reactive siloxanes. Preferably, the coupling agent is one or more aminosilanes. The glass fibers are placed in a whitewater containing coupling agent (s) and any conventionally used surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers and / or other suitable chemicals to form the glass slurry. The slurry is deposited on a porous conveyor or wire mesh and a significant portion of the water is removed by a vacuum system or the like. The binder is applied to a web of fibers, which is conveyed to a drying oven where the remaining water is removed and the binder cures. The binder can be any conventional binder known to those skilled in the art.

An advantage of the present invention is that the chopped strand mat formed according to any embodiment of the present invention disclosed herein may be formed of fibers treated with a size composition with or without a coupling agent. As a result, virtually any glass fibers can be used to form the chopped strand glass mat of the present invention.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the two-part binder composition of the present invention can be used in chopped strand mat forming processes without changing the process parameters or the equipment of the current wet mat processing line.

Another advantage of the present invention is that applying or including one or more coupling agents to the chopped strand mat during the wet mat forming process improves the hot wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the step of including the coupling agent (s) in the chopped strand mat during the wet process results in an improvement in the dry tensile strength of the single formed. As a result, an authorized manufacturer can run a single production line at a higher speed with a lower tear or "breakage" of a single, and increased productivity can be achieved.

The foregoing and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description. However, the drawings are for illustrative purposes and are not to be construed as limiting the invention.

Advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of the invention, particularly when associated with the accompanying drawings.

1 is a schematic diagram of a wet process line for forming chopped strand mat using a two-part binder composition in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention.

2 is a schematic diagram of a wet process line for forming a chopped strand mat illustrating the step of applying a coupling agent to a web in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention.

Unless stated otherwise, all technical and scientific terms used herein have the same meaning as understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. Although any methods and materials similar or equivalent to those described herein can be used in the practice or testing of the present invention, the preferred methods and materials are described herein. All references cited herein, including published or corresponding U.S. or foreign patent applications, issued U.S. or foreign patents, or any other reference, are all the data, tables, figures, and texts listed in the cited references. The whole including these is integrated as a reference, respectively.

In the drawings, the thicknesses, layers and regions of lines may be exaggerated for clarity. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout. When an element is said to be "on" another element, the element may be in direct contact with or facing another element, or there may be other intervening elements. Also, the terms "web" and "mat" herein may be used interchangeably.

The present invention relates to a nonwoven wet chopped strand glass mat for use in coating applications with improved hot wet tensile strength. The present invention is based, at least in part, on the discovery that improved hot wet tensile strength in the chopped strand mat can be achieved by applying or including one or more coupling agents to the chopped strand mat during the wet mat forming process. Conventionally, coupling agents have been added to the size material applied to the glass fibers during formation of the glass fibers.

The glass fibers used to form chopped strand glass mats are A type glass fibers, C type glass fibers, E type glass fibers, S type glass fibers, and E-CR type glass fibers (e.g. Advantex ® glass available from Owens Corning). Fibers), wool glass fibers, or combinations thereof. In one or more preferred embodiments, the glass fibers are wet chopped strand glass fibers (WUCS). Wet chopped strand glass fibers can be formed by conventional processes known in the art. Wet chopped strand glass fibers preferably have a water content of 5-30%, even more preferably a water content of 5-15%.

The use of other reinforcing fibers, such as mineral fibers, carbon fibers, ceramic fibers, natural fibers, and / or synthetic fibers such as polyester, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polyolefins, and / or polypropylene fibers, is used in chopped strand glass mats. Are considered within the scope of the invention. As used herein, the term “natural fiber” refers to plant fiber extracted from any part of a plant, including but not limited to stem, seed, leaf, root or bast. The term "synthetic fiber" as used herein refers to any artificial fiber having suitable reinforcing properties. However, it is preferable that all the fibers of the chopped strand mat are glass fibers.

Glass fibers can be formed by conventional methods known to those skilled in the art. For example, the glass fibers may be formed by drawing a stream of molten glass material from a bushing or orifice. The drawn glass fibers may have a diameter of about 5 to 30 microns, preferably 10 to 20 microns. After the glass fibers are drawn from the bushing, an aqueous sizing composition is applied to the fibers. The sizing can be applied by conventional methods such as by means of an application roller or by spraying the size directly onto the fibers. The size prevents the glass fibers from breaking during subsequent processing, prevents inter-filament tears, and ensures the integrity of the strands of the glass fibers, such as the interconnection of the glass filaments forming the strands.

Size compositions applied to glass fibers typically comprise one or more film formers (polyvinyl alcohol film formers, cellulose film formers, polyurethane film formers, polyester film formers and / or epoxy resin film formers, etc.). ), One or more lubricants, and one or more silane coupling agents (such as aminosilane or methacryloxy silane coupling agents). The coupling agent chemically interacts with the glass fibers to connect the glass fibers with a binder or polymer matrix. If desired, weak acids such as acetic acid, boric acid, metaboric acid, succinic acid, citric acid, formic acid, and / or polyacrylic acid can be added to the size composition to aid in hydrolysis of the silane coupling agent. The size composition may be applied to the glass fibers with a Loss on Ignition (LOI) of approximately 0.05-2.0% in dry fibers. The LOI can be defined as the percentage of organic solid material remaining on the glass fiber side after heating the glass fiber side to a temperature sufficient to burn or pyrolyze the organic size from the fiber.

Incorporating the coupling agent into the size composition sized the amount of time that the coupling agent can react with the fiber so that the coupling agent is not washed away from the fiber in the whitewater slurry of the wet mat forming process as described in detail below. It requires a step through which the fibers are placed. By removing the coupling agent from the sizing composition applied to the glass fibers during fiber formation, and applying or incorporating the coupling agent (s) into the chopped strand mat of the mat forming line, the glass fibers may be It is assumed that the time requirement to be passed can be reduced or eliminated. Removing the coupling agent in the size composition is believed to result in the fibers having improved stability and longer shelf life. Furthermore, fibers sized by sizes that do not include a coupling agent are believed to have the ability to be used immediately in wet processes (eg, directly from glass forming lines), which is the total for the production of chopped strand mats and coated singles. Reduce manufacturing time

Further, by removing the coupling agent from the sizing composition, it is assumed that the negative effect of the chemical interaction between the coupling agent and the other drug in the size composition is eliminated and the efficiency of the remaining drug of the size is increased. In particular, since there is little to no reaction with the lubricant of the size composition, it is believed that the product dispersibility is improved.

In conventional size compositions, the coupling agent reacts with the glass fibers. Sometimes the coupling agent is very reactive (eg, aminosilane A-1100 from GE Silicones, etc.) and reacts simultaneously with more than one glass fiber. This interaction between the glass fibers can cause "clumping" or interconnection of the glass fibers. By removing the coupling agent from the size composition, the size composition is left without reactants that react with the glass fibers and cause such undesirable "clumping". Therefore, the problem caused by the size of the coupling agent (ie, the interconnection of the glass fibers by the coupling agent) is eliminated by the present invention.

After the fibers have been treated with the sizing composition, the fibers can be cut and packaged as wet chopped strand glass (WUCS) and processed into a wet chopped strand mat as follows. The chopped strand mat formed in accordance with any embodiment of the present invention as disclosed herein may be formed of fibers treated with a size composition with or without a coupling agent. This is a desirable feature that differs from conventional wet processes, and substantially any glass fiber can be used to form the chopped strand glass mat of the present invention. The chopped glass fibers may have a length of 0.5 to 2.0 inches. Preferably, the chopped glass fibers have a length of 1 to 1.5 inches.

In one embodiment of the invention, the coupling agent (s) is added to the chopped strand as part of a two-part binder composition. In particular, the chopped strand mat is formed from a plurality of glass fibers held together in sheet form by a binder premix and a two-part binder composition comprising a coupling agent package or coupling agent containing two or more coupling agents.

An embodiment of a process for forming a chopped strand mat using the two-part binder composition of the present invention is shown in FIG. 1. The chopped glass fibers 10 comprise various surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers, and / or other chemical agents and into the mixing tank 16 which is stirred to disperse the fibers and form chopped strand glass fiber slurry (not shown). It may be provided to a conveying device such as the conveyor 12 by the storage container 14 for conveyance. The glass fiber slurry deposits the slurry on a conveying device such as a mobile screen or a porous conveyor 20 to form a fibrous web (mat) of fibers 22 bonded to each other, and a head box that removes a substantial portion of water from the slurry. 18) can be delivered. Water may be removed from the web (mat) 22 by conventional vacuum or air intake systems (not shown). The two-part binder composition 24 according to the invention is then applied to the web by a binder applicator 26. The binder coating web 28 then passes through a drying oven 30 to remove the remaining water and to cure the binder composition 24. The cured binder composition 24 provides a preservation to the glass mat 32. The formed nonwoven chopped strand mat 32 emerging from the oven 30 is formed of irregularly dispersed glass fiber filaments. Nonwoven chopped strand mat 32 may be wound onto a take-up roll 34 for storage for later use, as shown.

The two-part binder composition of the present invention can be used in chopped strand mat forming processes without having to change process variables such as oven drying time, conveyor speed. Furthermore, the binder composition of the present invention can be applied to chopped strands in conventional wet mat manufacturing lines without changing the current equipment.

The two-part binder composition is formed from a binder premix and a coupling agent package or coupling agent comprising two or more coupling agents. The binder premixes can be modified or unmodified formaldehyde binders (eg phenolformaldehyde binders), modified ureaformaldehyde binders (eg latexes, styrene butadiene latexes, styrene / maleic anhydride copolymers, polyvinyl acetates, vinyls). Modified with acrylic copolymers, melamine, or melamine derivatives), unmodified urea formaldehyde binders, formaldehyde-free binders such as acrylic binders, styrene acrylonitrile binders, styrene butadiene louver binders, polyvinyl acetate binders, Vinyl acrylic binders, polyurethane binders, and combinations thereof. Further, the binder may be formed as a "partial package" in which the binder is premixed with the modifier and packaged as a one component system, or as a "partial package" in which the binder and the modifier are not premixed. In a preferred embodiment, the binder is a standard urea formaldehyde binder modified with a styrene butadiene louver latex modifier such as DL 490NA (available from Dow Reichhold).

Examples of suitable binders for use in the binder premixes of the present invention are Bordon FG 472 (a urea formaldehyde resin binder commercially available from Bordon Chemical Co.), GP ® -2984 (modified urea formaldehyde commercially available from Georgia-Pacific). Resin binders), GP ® -2948 (modified urea formaldehyde resin binders available from Georgia-Pacific), and GP ® -2928 (modified ureaformaldehyde resin binders commercially available from Georgia-Pacific). The binder premix may be present in the binder composition in an amount of 40 to 80% by weight relative to the active solids of the binder composition, preferably 55 to 70% by weight relative to the active solids of the binder composition.

In addition, the binder composition of the present invention includes one or more coupling agents. The following coupling agents can be used in any of the examples described herein. Any suitable coupling agent identified by one skilled in the art can be used in the present invention. The coupling agent or coupling agent package is 0.02 to 5.0% by weight relative to the active solids of the binder composition, preferably 0.1 to 1.0% by weight relative to the active solids of the binder composition and even more preferably to the active solids of the binder composition. It may be present in the binder composition in an amount of 0.1 to 0.5% by weight, and most preferably 0.2 to 0.5% by weight relative to the active solids of the binder composition.

Preferably, the at least one coupling agent is a silane coupling agent. Examples of silane coupling agents that can be used in the present size composition may be characterized by the functional groups amino, epoxy, vinyl, methacryloxy, azido, ureido, and isocyanato. . Suitable silane coupling agents include, but are not limited to, aminosilanes, silane esters, vinylsilanes, methacryloxysilanes, epoxysilanes, sulfur silanes, ureidosilanes, and isocyanatosilanes. Non-limiting examples of silane coupling agents used in the present invention

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00001
-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (
Figure 112008012404980-PCT00002
-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) (A-1100), n-phenyl-
Figure 112008012404980-PCT00003
-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (Y-9669), n-trimethoxy-silyl-propyl-ethylene-diamine (A-1120), methyl-trichlorosilane (A-154),
Figure 112008012404980-PCT00004
-Chloropropyl-trimethoxy-silane (A-143), vinyl-triacetoxy silane (A-188), and methyltrimethoxysilane (A-1630). Other examples of suitable silane coupling agents are listed in Table 1. All silane coupling agents identified above and in Table 1 are commercially available from GE Silicones.

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00005

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00006

The silane coupling agents used in the present invention may be replaced with other coupling agents or mixtures. For example, A-1387 can be replaced by a modification in which the methanol solvent is replaced by ethanol. A-1126 (GE Silicones), an aminosilane coupling agent comprising a mixture of approximately 24% by weight of diaminosilane modified in a methanol solution with trimethoxy-silyl-propyl-ethylene-diamine (Dow Corning) Z-6020). A-1120 or Z-6020 may be substituted with prehydrolyzed modifications. Z-6020 is deficient in alcohol solvent and can be replaced by Z-6137 (available from Dow Corning), a pre-hydrolyzed variant containing 33% diaminosilane in water at a solid concentration of 24%. . Furthermore, A-1100 can be replaced with Y-9244, which is a pre-hydrolyzed form of A-1100, which reduces or eliminates ethanol emissions.

In addition, vinylaminosilanes such as Z-6032 and Z-6224 (both commercially available from Dow Corning) may be useful as coupling agents in the present invention. Z-6032 is a 40% silane solution in methanol, a specific gravity of 0.9% at 25 ° C, a refractive index of 1.395 at 25 ° C, and a viscosity of 2.2 at 25 ° C. The formula is (CH 5 O) 3 -SiCH 2 CH 2 CH 2 NHCH 2 CH 2 NHCH 2 -O-CH = CH 2 -HCl, and N-2- (vinylbenzylamino) -ethyl-3-amino propyltrime Oxy silane-monohydrogen chloride. Z-6224 has a specific gravity of 0.88 at 25 ° C., a refractive index of 1.388 at 25 ° C. and is a neutralized (chloride free) variant of Z-6032.

Furthermore, the coupling agent may comprise a functionalized organic substrate (ie one or more organic functional groups bonded to the organic substrate). Exemplary types of functionalized organic substrates include alcohols, amines, esters, ethers, hydrocarbons, siloxanes, silazanes, silanes, silanols, lactams, lactones, anhydrides, carbines, nitrenes, orthoesters, imides, Enamines, imines, amides, imides, and olefins. The functionalized organic substrate may interact and / or react with the surface of the glass fibers to provide sufficient coupling or bonding between the glass fibers and the binder material. In particular, one end of the molecule reacts or interacts with the glass surface and the other end of the molecule reacts or interacts with the binder. By selecting one or more suitable functionalized organic substrates for the coupling agent system, the desired mechanical properties can be obtained between the glass fibers and the binder.

Other examples of compounds useful as coupling agents in the present invention include silicones containing tailored or functionalized coupling agents (eg, silanes, silanol, and / or siloxanes) with organic polymers. For example, the polyurethane and tailored silane can function as a coupling agent to bond the glass fibers and the binder. Other examples include silanols tailored or functionalized with polyamides. In this example, when the amine is neutralized, it is believed that a cationic charge is formed in the amine that allows an ionic bond to form between the amine and the glass fiber. At this time, the organic portion of the molecule, that is, the organic polymer, is covalently bonded to the binder.

In addition, reactive siloxanes can be used as coupling agents. Examples of reactive siloxanes include DC-1171, DC-75SF, and DC-2-7887 (all commercially available from Dow Corning). The reactive siloxane is considered to be a linear or branched structure having the following monomer unit (I).

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00007

R 1 , R 2 , R 3 , R 4 , R 5 and R 6 may differ from one monomer unit to another monomer unit, and may be alkyl (preferably methyl group) or hydride. When branched, R 1 , R 2 , R 3 , R 4 , R 5 and R 6 may be formed of one or more monomer units (I). The reactivity of reactive siloxanes and their properties as blocking agents increase with increasing number of hydride groups for R 1 , R 2 , R 3 , R 4 , R 5 and R 6 .

The binder composition may contain small amounts of weak organic acids, such as acetic acid, formic acid, succinic acid, and / or citric acid, and may hydrolyze the silane of the coupling agent. The organic acid is preferably acetic acid. The organic acid may be present in the binder composition in an amount of 0.1 to 1.0% by weight of the binder composition, preferably 0.3 to 0.6% by weight of the binder composition.

Furthermore, the binder composition may optionally contain conventional additives for improving process and production performance, such as fire retardants, dyes, oils, fillers, colorants, ultraviolet stabilizers, lubricants, wetting agents, surfactants, and / or antistatic agents. .

In a second embodiment of the invention, the coupling agent (s) are added separately to the web of chopped fibers during the formation of the chopped strand mat in a wet mat processing line. One embodiment of adding the coupling agent individually to the chopped strand mat is shown in FIG. 2. The chopped glass fiber 10 includes various surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers, and / or chemicals and is transported to the mixing tank 16 which is stirred to disperse the fiber to form a chopped glass fiber slurry (not shown). To a conveying device such as conveyor 12 by means of storage container 14. The fiberglass slurry can be delivered to a head box 18 that deposits the slurry on a conveying device, such as a mobile screen or a porous conveyor 20, to remove a significant portion of water from the slurry to form a web (mat) 22. . Water may be removed from the web 22 by conventional vacuum or air intake systems (not shown).

The binder 24 is applied to the web 22 by the binder applicator 26. The binder used is not particularly limited and may include any conventional partial or two-part binder composition known to those skilled in the art. The coupling agent 36 can then be applied to the web (mat) 22 by a suitable applicator 38, such as a spray applicator or a film coater. The coupling agent 36 may be added to the fibrous web 22 in an amount up to approximately 1% by weight of the mat 22. The coupling agent may be any one or more coupling agents described in detail herein. Coupling agent (s) 36 may be in liquid, slurry, emulsion, or foam form. Preferably, coupling agent 36 is a liquid. 2 shows that the coupling agent 36 is added after the binder 24, the coupling agent 36 may be added prior to the application of the binder 24 (an embodiment not shown in FIG. 2). . In practice, the coupling agent 36 may be added to the web 22 at any position before the web 22 enters the oven 30. Once the binder 24 and coupling agent 36 are applied to the mat 22, the mat 22 is passed through a drying oven 30 to remove the remaining water and to cure the binder composition 24. The formed nonwoven chopped strand mat 32 exiting the oven 30 may be wound on a take-up roll 34 for later use as shown.

In one or more preferred embodiments of the present invention, the chopped strand mat 32 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 is used to form a coated single. To form a coated single, asphalt layers are arranged on both sides of the chopped strand mat 32 and the asphalt is sprayed on one or both sides of the mat so as to fill the gap between the individual glass filaments, or the mat is passed through the molten asphalt bath, etc. Asphalt is applied to the chopped strand mat 32. The hot asphalt coating mat can then pass under one or more particulate applicators applying protective surface particulates to portions of the asphalt coating mat prior to being cut into the desired shape. The coated mat is then cut into the appropriate shape and size to form a single. Applying the asphalt to the glass strand mat 32 may be performed in series with a wet mat forming process line or in a separate process line as shown in FIG. 1 or FIG. 2.

In a third embodiment of the invention, the coupling agent is added to the whitewater in a wet chopped strand mat processing line as shown in FIG. As such, whitewater (which may be included in the mixing tank 16 shown in FIG. 1) may be used as conventionally used in whitewater as well as one or more of the above coupling agents, as well as surfactants, viscosity modifiers, defoamers, And / or other chemical agents. The whitewater comprising the glass fibers and the coupling agent is stirred to form a glass fiber slurry. The coupling agent is deposited on the glass fibers in whitewater and incorporated into the glass mat formed through the glass fibers. The glass fiber slurry is then deposited on a conveying device, such as a wire screen or a porous conveyor, and a binder is applied. The binder is not particularly limited and includes any conventional binder suitable for use in a wet mat forming process. The binder is then cured in an oven or the like to form a chopped strand mat.

Including the coupling agent (s) in the whitewater results in the addition of the coupling agent to the chopped strand mat, while adding the coupling agent to the whitewater must be added to the whitewater for adhesion to the glass fibers. Large amounts of coupling agents and expensive coupling agents can be enormously expensive.

Coupling agents may be added to the chopped strand mat by one or more of the above embodiments. For example, in some cases it may be desirable to add the coupling agent to the chopped strand mat through the bipartite binder composition and to add the coupling agent to the same chopped strand mat independently of the binder composition with a separate applicator. Optionally, it may be desirable to add the coupling agent to the whitewater and further add the coupling agent through the two-part binder composition. Applying or including the coupling agent (s) to the chopped strand mat by any combination of the embodiments described herein is contemplated within the scope of the present invention.

As discussed above, applying or including one or more coupling agents to the chopped strand mat during the wet mat forming process enhances the hot wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat. If single has long term performance, the property of single resistant to water decomposition is a desirable property. Evaluation of the long term performance of a single is typically determined in the industry by obtaining the hot wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat forming the single. The hot wet tensile strength performance of the chopped strand mat is believed to be related to the performance of the single. For example, an increase or improvement in hot wet tensile strength results in an increase or improvement in the long term performance of a single, while a decrease in hot wet tensile strength results in a decrease in the performance of a single. Therefore, adding the coupling agent (s) to the chopped strand mat during the wet process as in the present invention which improves the hot wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat results in a single with improved service life performance.

Additionally, including one or more coupling agents in the chopped strand mat during the wet mat forming process increases the dry tensile strength of the single formed from the mat. This increase in tensile strength allows manufacturers to run their production lines at higher speeds with less tear or "break" of the chopped strand mat. As a result, an increase in productivity can be achieved by including the coupling agent (s) in the chopped strand mat during the wet process.

The present invention has been described in general and may be better understood by reference to certain specific examples below, which are provided for illustration only and are not intended to be included or limited to everything unless otherwise specified.

Example

Example  1: Code formed by the two-part binder composition of the present invention Strand  Maintain hot tensile strength of glass mat

The binder compositions described in Tables 2-6 were generally prepared in buckets as described below. Specifically, a urea formaldehyde resin (Bordon FG 472 from Bordon Chemical Co.), a latex binder (DL 490NA from Dow Reichhold), and water were mixed to prepare a control binder composition A (Table 2).

Urea formaldehyde resin (Bordon FG 472), latex binder (Dow Reichhold's DL 490NA), and water were mixed to prepare a binder premix for the binder compositions B-E (Tables 3-6) of the present invention. Acetic acid and water were mixed to form an acidic solution. Aminosilanes A-1100 and Y-9669 (GE silicone) were added to the acidic solution as defined in Tables 3-6 and stirred appropriately to hydrolyze. Hydrolyzed aminosilane (s) were then added to the binder premix with stirring to form binder compositions B-E. As soon as formed, the binder compositions B-E were diluted with water to achieve a target mixed solids of approximately 50.00%.

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00008

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00009

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00010

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00011

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00012

An E-type chopped strand glass fiber sized by a conventional sizing composition containing one or more film formers, one or more lubricants, and one or more coupling agents may be chopped strand glass mat in a sheet forming machine using binder compositions A-E. Formed. The chopped strand glass fibers had a length of 7/8 inch and a percentage moisture of 10.92%. The chopped strand mat using Binder Composition A (control) was replicated to confirm the reproducibility of the formation process, and the data for the mean of the two experiments were used as data in Tables 7 and 8 for Binder Composition A. Next, a 2-inch wide test specimen of chopped strand mat containing binder compositions A-E was evaluated for wet tensile strength in an Instron tensile test apparatus. Each chopped strand mat sample was immersed in 180 ° F. water for 10 minutes before testing for wet tensile strength. The experimental results are shown in Table 7.

Next, chopped strand mat samples using binder compositions A-E were formed into shinglets on an asphalt coating mimic line. Singlet samples were tested for tear strength in the machine transverse direction (CD) in an Elmendorf tear test apparatus according to the experimental procedure described in ASTM D3462. The results are shown in Table 8.

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00013

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00014

As shown in Table 7, the chopped strand mat formed by the binder compositions B-E of the present invention showed a significant improvement in wet tensile strength in the present state of the art. As mentioned above, the evaluation of the long term performance of a single is determined in the industry by determining the wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat forming the single. The high hot wet tensile strength performance of the chopped strand mat is believed to be related to the better long term performance of the single. The results described in Table 7 show that the chopped strand mat formed by the binder composition of the present invention has significant wet tensile strength compared to the current state of the art (binder composition A). As such, singles formed from chopped strand mats formed using the binder composition of the present invention are believed to have improved long term performance.

Furthermore, the improvement of the hot wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat is achieved without decreasing the single tear strength as shown in FIG. 8. This result is an unexpected feature since the step of adding or increasing the coupling agent to the size material for the chopped glass fibers generally results in a decrease in single tear strength.

Example  2: Code formed by the two-part binder composition of the present invention Strand  Hot Tensile Strength of Glass Mats and Singles

Type E chopped strand glass fibers sized by conventional sizing compositions containing one or more film formers, one or more lubricants, and coupling agents are described in Binder Compositions A, B, and Tables 2, 3, and 5, respectively. D is used to form chopped strand glass mats in a sheet former. The chopped strand fiberglass has a length of 1/4 inch and a percentage moisture of 13.22%. The chopped strand mat using Binder Composition A (control) was replicated to confirm the reproducibility of the formation process, and the data for the mean of the two experiments were used as the data in Table 9 and Table 10 for Binder Composition A. Next, a 2 inch wide test specimen of chopped strand mat containing binder compositions A, B and D was evaluated for wet tensile strength in an Instron tensile test apparatus. Each chopped strand mat sample was soaked in 180 ° F. water for 10 minutes prior to testing for wet tensile strength. The experimental results are shown in Table 9.

Next, chopped strand mat samples using binder compositions A, B and D were formed into singlets in an asphalt coating mimic line. Singlet samples were tested for tear strength in the machine transverse direction (CD) and machine direction (MD) in an Elmndorf tear test apparatus according to the test procedure described in ASTM D3462. Singlet samples were also tested for dry tensile strength in the machine direction (MD) in an Instron tensile test apparatus. The results are shown in Table 10.

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00015

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00016

As shown in Tables 9 and 10, the inclusion of the coupling agent in the binder compositions B and D improved the hot wet tensile retention of the chopped strand mat with a small impact on tear strength. Furthermore, as shown in Table 10, the step of incorporating the coupling agent into the binder composition of the present invention used to form the chopped strand mat provides a single dry tensile strength (MD) with minimal and statistically minimal change in total tear strength. ) Showed a positive and significant effect. This improvement in dry tensile strength allows manufacturers to run the single production line at higher speeds with less tear or "breakage" of the single. As a result, an increase in productivity can be achieved by including the coupling agent (s) in the chopped strand mat during the wet process.

Example  3: Code formed by the two-part binder composition of the present invention Strand  Hot tensile strength of mats and singles

Type E chopped strand glass fibers sized by conventional sizing compositions containing one or more film formers, one or more lubricants, and one or more coupling agents are described in Binder Composition A, respectively, described in Tables 2, 3, and 5. , B and D were used to form chopped strand glass mats in a sheet former. The chopped strand fiberglass had a length of 1/4 inch and a percentage moisture of 13.69%. The chopped strand mat using binder composition A (control) was replicated to confirm the reproducibility of the formation process, and the data for the average of the two experiments were used as the data in Table 11 and Table 12 for binder composition A. The wet tensile strength of the chopped strand mat was determined according to the procedure described in Example 2 above. The experimental results are shown in Table 11. A singlet sample was then formed and tested for tear strength in both directions of machine direction (MD) and machine transverse direction (CD) as described in Example 2 above. The results are shown in Table 12.

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00017

Figure 112008012404980-PCT00018

As shown in Tables 11 and 12, the step of including the coupling agent in the binder composition of the present invention improved the hot wet tensile retention of the chopped strand mat while giving a minor impact (minimal effect) on tear strength. Furthermore, as shown in Table 12, incorporating the coupling agent into the binder compositions B and D used to form the chopped strand mat showed a substantially improved effect on singlet dry tensile strength (MD). As discussed above in Example 2, the improvement in tensile strength of a single enables the manufacturer to run the single production line at a faster rate with less tear or "breakage" of the single. As a result, an increase in productivity can be achieved by including a coupling agent in the chopped strand mat during the wet process.

The present invention in this application has been described in connection with general and specific embodiments. Although the present invention has been described in what is considered to be the preferred embodiment, those skilled in the art will appreciate, for example, using the present invention in the process of forming a continuous filament mat, a dry mat, or any other fiber mat having a similar binder system. Various alternatives known to the art can be selected. The invention is not otherwise limited except as described in the following claims.

Claims (38)

  1. A method of forming chopped strand glass mats used in coating applications,
    Applying one or more coupling agents to a member selected from the group consisting of fibrous webs and glass fibers during the wet mat forming process,
    The wet mat forming process,
    Dispersing the chopped glass fibers in an aqueous medium to form a glass fiber slurry;
    Depositing the glass fiber slurry on a conveying device to form a fibrous web;
    Adding a binder to the fibrous web; And
    Curing the binder to form a chopped strand glass mat.
  2. The method of claim 1 wherein the applying step comprises adding the one or more coupling agents to the aqueous medium, wherein the one or more coupling agents are deposited on the chopped glass fibers of the aqueous medium.
  3. The method of claim 1, wherein the applying step comprises adding the one or more coupling agents to the binder to form a binder composition comprising the binder and the one or more coupling agents prior to adding the binder to the fibrous web. Method comprising a.
  4. The method of claim 1, wherein said applying step comprises depositing said at least one coupling agent on said fibrous web prior to said curing step.
  5. 5. The method of claim 4, wherein said applying step comprises depositing said at least one coupling agent on said fibrous web prior to adding said binder to said fibrous web.
  6. 5. The method of claim 4, wherein said applying step comprises depositing at least one coupling agent on said fibrous web after adding said binder to said fibrous web.
  7. The binder composition of claim 1, wherein the at least one coupling agent is selected from the group consisting of a silane coupling agent, a functionalized organic substrate, a silicone-containing coupling agent functionalized by a polymer, a reactive siloxane, and combinations thereof, wherein the binder composition is A method characterized in that it is selected from the group consisting of a modified formaldehyde binder, an unmodified formaldehyde binder, a modified urea formaldehyde binder, an unmodified urea formaldehyde binder, a formaldehyde free binder and combinations thereof .
  8. The method of claim 7, wherein the functionalized organic substrate is alcohol, amine, ester, ether, hydrocarbon, siloxane, silazane, silane, silano, lactam, lactone, anhydride, carbine, nitrene, orthoester, And is selected from the group consisting of imides, enamines, imines, amides, imides and olefins.
  9. 2. The hot wet tensile retention of the chopped strand mat of claim 1, wherein the chopped strand mat has a dry tensile strength, a hot wet tensile strength, and a synthetic hot wet tensile retention percentage of the dry tensile strength. The percentage is at least 5 percent greater than other identical chopped strand mats having no coupling agent.
  10. 10. The method of claim 9 wherein the percentage of hot wet tension retention of the chopped strand mat with the coupling agent is greater than 50 percent (50%), and other identical chopped strand mats without the coupling agent are 50 percent (50%). And a percentage of hot wet tension retention of less than).
  11. The method of claim 10, wherein applying the one or more coupling agents comprises adding the coupling agent to the binder to form a binder composition, wherein the coupling agent is 0.1 to 1.0 weight based on active solids. Added to the binder composition in an amount of%.
  12. The method of claim 10, wherein applying the one or more coupling agents comprises adding the coupling agent to the fibrous web in an amount up to 1 weight percent of the fibrous web.
  13. As a two-part binder composition used in a wet mat forming process for forming a glass mat useful as a reinforcement in coating applications,
    A binder dictionary comprising a binder selected from the group consisting of modified formaldehyde binders, unmodified formaldehyde binders, modified urea formaldehyde binders, unmodified urea formaldehyde binders, formaldehyde free binders, and combinations thereof mixture; And
    A two-part binder composition comprising at least one coupling agent.
  14. The method of claim 13, wherein the one or more coupling agents are selected from the group consisting of silane coupling agents, functionalized organic substrates, silicon-containing coupling agents functionalized by polymers, reactive siloxanes, and combinations thereof. Partial Binder Composition.
  15. The method of claim 14, wherein the at least one coupling agent is a silane coupling agent selected from the group consisting of aminosilane, silane ester, vinylsilane, methacryloxysilane, epoxysilane, sulfur silane, ureidosilane and isocyanatosilane. Two-part binder composition, characterized in that.
  16. 15. The two-part binder composition of claim 14, further comprising at least one organic acid selected from the group consisting of acetic acid, formic acid, succinic acid and citric acid.
  17. 15. The two-part binder composition of claim 14, wherein the binder is a urea formaldehyde binder modified with a styrene butadiene louver latex modifier and the one or more coupling agents is one or more aminosilane coupling agents.
  18. The modified urea formaldehyde binder and the modified formaldehyde binder according to claim 13, wherein the modified urea formaldehyde binder and the modified formaldehyde binder are latex, styrene butadiene latex, styrene / maleic anhydride copolymer, polyvinyl acetate, vinyl acrylic copolymer, melamine, melamine derivatives and The binder, bottled by a member selected from the group consisting of combinations thereof, wherein the binder without formaldehyde is an acrylic binder, a styrene acrylonitrile binder, a styrene butadiene louver binder, a polyvinyl acetate binder, a vinyl acrylic binder, a polyurethane binder, and Two-part binder composition, characterized in that it is selected from the member selected from the group consisting of combinations thereof.
  19. A method of forming a nonwoven chopped strand mat for use in coating applications,
    Depositing a glass fiber slurry on a conveying device to form a fibrous web of glass fibers bonded to each other;
    Applying a binder to the fibrous web;
    Applying at least one coupling agent to the fibrous web; And
    Curing the binder.
  20. 20. The method of claim 19, wherein the binder and the one or more coupling agents are applied simultaneously to the fibrous web as a two-part binder composition.
  21. 20. The method of claim 19 wherein the step of applying the binder to the fibrous web and the step of applying the one or more coupling agents occur continuously.
  22. 22. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of applying the binder to the fibrous web occurs before the step of applying the one or more coupling agents to the fibrous web.
  23. 22. The method of claim 21 wherein the step of applying the binder to the fibrous web occurs after the step of applying the one or more coupling agents to the fibrous web.
  24. 20. The method of claim 19, further comprising dispersing the glass fibers in an aqueous medium to form the glass fiber slurry prior to the deposition step.
  25. 20. The binder of claim 19 wherein the binder consists of a modified formaldehyde binder, an unmodified formaldehyde binder, a modified urea formaldehyde binder, an unmodified urea formaldehyde binder, a formaldehyde-free binder and combinations thereof. And at least one coupling agent is selected from the group consisting of a silane coupling agent, a functionalized organic substrate, a silicone-containing coupling agent functionalized by a polymer, a reactive siloxane, and combinations thereof. .
  26. A plurality of glass fibers combined in sheet form; And
    A glass mat used as a reinforcing material comprising a binder for bonding the glass fibers together and at least one coupling agent.
  27. 27. The component of claim 26, wherein the one or more coupling agents are selected from the group consisting of silane coupling agents, functionalized organic substrates, silicon-containing coupling agents functionalized by polymers, reactive siloxanes, and combinations thereof. Nonwoven chopped strand glass mat.
  28. 28. The silane coupling of claim 27 wherein said at least one coupling agent is selected from the group consisting of aminosilane, silane ester, vinyl silane, methacryloxy silane, epoxy silane, sulfur silane, ureido silane and isocyanato silane. Non-woven chopped strand glass mat, characterized in that the Jane.
  29. 27. The method of claim 26, wherein the binder consists of a modified formaldehyde binder, an unmodified formaldehyde binder, a modified urea formaldehyde binder, an unmodified urea formaldehyde binder, a formaldehyde free binder, and combinations thereof. Non-woven chopped strand glass mat selected from the group.
  30. 27. The nonwoven chopped strand glass mat according to claim 26, further comprising reinforcing fibers selected from the group consisting of mineral fibers, carbon fibers, ceramic fibers, natural fibers and synthetic fibers.
  31. 27. The percentage of hot wet tensile retention of the chopped strand mat having the coupling agent according to claim 26, wherein the chopped strand mat has a synthetic hot wet tensile retention percentage of dry tensile strength, hot wet tensile strength and dry tensile strength. Non-woven chopped strand glass mat, characterized in that it is at least 5 percent larger than other identical chopped strand mats having no coupling agent.
  32. 32. The method of claim 31 wherein the percentage of hot wet tension retention of the chopped strand mat with the coupling agent is greater than 50 percent (50%), and the other same chopped strand mat without the coupling agent is 50 percent (50%). Non-woven chopped strand glass mat, having a hot wet tensile retention percentage of less than).
  33. 33. The nonwoven chopped strand glass mat of claim 32, wherein the coupling agent is present in the binder composition in an amount of 0.1 to 1.0 weight percent based on the active solids of the binder composition.
  34. A method of forming a nonwoven chopped strand mat for use in coating applications,
    Incorporating the chopped glass fibers into an aqueous medium comprising one or more coupling agents;
    Stirring the aqueous medium to disperse the chopped glass fibers in the aqueous medium to form a fibrous slurry and to deposit one or more coupling agents on the chopped glass fibers;
    Depositing the fibrous slurry on a conveying device to form a web of chopped glass fibers bonded to each other;
    Applying a binder to the web; And
    Curing the binder to form a chopped strand glass mat.
  35. 35. The method of claim 34, wherein said at least one coupling agent is selected from the group consisting of a silane coupling agent, a functionalized organic substrate, a silicone-containing coupling agent functionalized by a polymer, and a reactive siloxane.
  36. 36. The silane coupling agent of claim 35, wherein the coupling agent is a silane coupling agent selected from the group consisting of aminosilane, silane ester, vinyl silane, methacryloxy silane, epoxy silane, sulfur silane, ureido silane and isocyanato silane. Characterized in that the method.
  37. 37. The binder of claim 36, wherein the binder consists of a modified formaldehyde binder, an unmodified formaldehyde binder, a modified urea formaldehyde binder, an unmodified urea formaldehyde binder, a formaldehyde free binder, and combinations thereof. And selected from the group.
  38. 35. The method of claim 34, further comprising adding to said aqueous medium a reinforcing fiber selected from the group consisting of mineral fiber, carbon fiber, ceramic fiber, natural fiber and synthetic fiber prior to said stirring step. .
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