KR101622268B1 - Intelligent controllable lighting networks and schemata therefore - Google Patents

Intelligent controllable lighting networks and schemata therefore Download PDF

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KR101622268B1
KR101622268B1 KR1020117018218A KR20117018218A KR101622268B1 KR 101622268 B1 KR101622268 B1 KR 101622268B1 KR 1020117018218 A KR1020117018218 A KR 1020117018218A KR 20117018218 A KR20117018218 A KR 20117018218A KR 101622268 B1 KR101622268 B1 KR 101622268B1
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South Korea
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schema
user
execution module
lighting
system
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KR1020117018218A
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Korean (ko)
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KR20110118783A (en
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데미안 러브랜드
루이 케텔라르스
아데 페르묄렌
이안 애쉬다운
알렌 브렌트 요크
빈프리드 안토니우스 헨리퀴스 베르크펜스
룰 페테르 헤르트 쿠펜스
바르텔 마리뉘스 판 데 슬라위스
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코닌클리케 필립스 엔.브이.
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W64/00Locating users or terminals or network equipment for network management purposes, e.g. mobility management
    • H05B47/175
    • H05B45/10
    • H05B47/105
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies
    • Y02B20/40Control techniques providing energy savings
    • Y02B20/44Control techniques providing energy savings based on detection of the user
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies
    • Y02B20/40Control techniques providing energy savings
    • Y02B20/48Smart controllers

Abstract

Systems, networks, devices, and methods are disclosed for deploying, implementing, and sharing lighting schemes among controllable lighting networks. The network 101, 601, 701, 801, 808 according to the present invention stores the deployed illumination scheme for the network in the remote data storage device 802. [ Other networks 301 access the remote data storage device to select an existing schema for implementation. Systems, networks, devices and methods for sharing user preferences between controllable lighting networks are also disclosed. Networks in accordance with the present invention may access a shared remote data storage device 112 to determine user preferences upon detection of a user's presence by sensors in the network. As such, individual lighting networks can utilize known user preferences or learned behaviors and environmental conditions to more efficiently adapt themselves to these behaviors, preferences or conditions.

Description

[0001] INTELLIGENT CONTROLLABLE LIGHTING NETWORKS AND SCHEMATA THEREFORE [0002]

The present invention relates generally to lighting systems and networks. More specifically, the various inventive methods, systems, and apparatus described herein relate to developing schemas within controllable lighting networks and implementing and sharing schemas between controllable lighting networks. will be.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Digital illumination techniques, i.e., illumination based on semiconductor light sources such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), provide a viable alternative to traditional fluorescence, HID and incandescent lamps. The functional advantages and benefits of the LEDs include high energy conversion and optical efficiency, durability, low operating costs and many others. Recent advances in LED technology have provided efficient and robust full-spectrum light sources that enable a variety of lighting effects in a number of applications. Some of the facilities embodying these sources may be used to generate various colors and color change lighting effects, for example, as described in detail in U.S. Patent Nos. 6,016,038 and 6,211,626, which are incorporated herein by reference. For example, a lighting module comprising one or more LEDs capable of producing different colors such as red, green and blue, as well as a processor for independently controlling the output of the LEDs.

Providing personal lighting control to office workers has been shown to improve employee satisfaction while providing sufficient energy savings. Recent developments in digital lighting technologies such as LED based illumination systems have enabled precise control of digital or solid state lighting. Thus, light based systems that are programmed to respond to specific events or implement pre-entered preferences of the user are currently used.

From the user's perspective, the disclosed systems and techniques for implementing lighting control often provide slightly more lamp dimming depending on pre-entered preferences. For example, in the disclosed systems and techniques, the user's lighting preferences for a particular environment may be programmed by a building manager. The system can then control the lights in the environment to implement the user ' s preferred lighting arrangement. In this manner, an office worker who prefers that his or her workspace be illuminated brighter or alternatively dimmed may have a programmed system accordingly by an administrator. Similarly, administrators can schedule "on" and "off" time periods in accordance with a user's job schedule to conserve energy.

As a further example, one known system features a direct-indirect fluorescent lighting fixture having an integral occupancy and daylight sensor that communicates with a central controller via an RS-485 wired network. The central controller then communicates with the desktop computers via a local area network (LAN). The system allows office workers to dim their work (direct) and ambient (indirect) lighting through their workstations and turn on and turn off work and ambient lighting using personal lighting control software installed on their computers do. The system also allows an office manager to assign controls to individual lighting fixtures, groups, areas and entire lighting networks, enable and disable lighting fixture daylight sensors, enable lighting fixture sensors Enable and disable power shedding, allow occupancy sensor delay times to be specified, enable task and ambient lamp control to be independently specified, enable and disable power shedding, and enable detailed energy To generate consumption reports, and to schedule daily, weekly, monthly and yearly events. In this concept, this system and similar conventional products can also be considered as extensions of building management systems that manage HVAC and security subsystems.

Illumination systems are disclosed which allow illumination controllers to execute a set of instructions or instructions, often referred to as illumination scripts, in accordance with predetermined time sequences or upon detection of the occurrence of an event. For example, one disclosed system may include software that allows a lighting designer to create lighting scripts by specifying changes in color and intensity of a plurality of lighting fixtures over time, and memory that stores lighting scripts for subsequent execution . Lighting controllers for theaters and amusement facilities allow the lighting designer to record and edit time sequences for hundreds or thousands of lighting fixtures. Lighting systems are also disclosed that include the ability to execute pre-recorded lighting scripts in response to external events, such as, for example, switch closures, analog signals and network commands. The disclosed system activates or adjusts the illuminations upon receipt of an e-mail, reception of a telephone call or detection of an alarm occurrence. Other disclosed systems activate lights using voice or word recognition, and others implement a light pattern upon detection of a person performing an action. The lighting controller in such a system may include simple logic functions or conditions such as a logic function that executes the lighting script only when two events or conditions occur at the same time. For example, the illumination script may be executed if the proximity switch is triggered and the light sensor indicates that this is after sunset. However, these lighting scripts do not change after they are written unless the lighting designer manually changes them.

Illumination systems are also disclosed in which a person can enter his or her lighting preferences for a particular location and a central controller can command the LEDs or other light sources and execute the lighting script to implement the person's preferences. In one disclosed system, the illumination systems receive inputs identifying the presence of a person or the presence of a person, or identifying the presence of a particular person or persons present in the location, e.g., by self-read or biometric evaluation of a name tag can do. The disclosed systems can then implement different lighting scripts depending on whether or not a person is present, how long a person is present, and which person is present. These systems can also select different lighting scripts depending on the number of people in the room or the direction the person is heading. In one disclosed system, the lighting devices and other energy sources are turned on or off according to information in a person's electronic calendar.

Some disclosed lighting systems may receive information about the presence of a person or preferences of a person from a device carried by the user. For example, in some disclosed systems, the card reader may detect the presence of a card carried by the user, which then allows the system to turn on the light, for example, when the user enters the room, You can turn off the lights when you leave the room. In other disclosed lighting systems, user preferences are stored on a mobile device or card. As the user moves, the data may be transferred to the stored preferences (e.g., darken the lights or change their color) by inserting the card into the card reader through automatic detection of the card or in other systems under their control May be communicated to devices and systems capable of matching parameters.

However, in various disclosed systems that implement user preferences or implement lighting scripts at the time of the event, preferences or scripts are (1) specific to a particular location and not executable at a different location, or (2) Or transmitted by the user in order to be implemented in different networks. Thus, there are no systems that allow user preferences or lighting scripts to be implemented in systems other than those where user preferences are programmed, unless the user carries a device that stores his or her preferences.

Furthermore, illumination systems are disclosed that can monitor user activities and sensed environmental parameters to learn user preferences for a particular environment. For example, some systems may monitor how a user maintains or selects settings in a given environment for a period of time to create user preferences for that environment. In other known systems, the devices may follow the lighting script if no specific operation is detected. Other systems may monitor how the user responds to a given set of environmental conditions and generates rules for future implementations in that environment. The disclosed lighting control system has both automatic and event-based control. The system is disclosed as implementing a fuzzy control system, wherein rules in a rule-based determination system are output based on the occurrence of fuzzy inputs or events. However, there is currently no way to take advantage of the preferences learned by other systems, rather than by the users carrying the devices with their or her preferences at remote locations.

As such, there are drawbacks associated with known systems. For example, known systems generally relate to self-contained self-contained systems for controlling lighting or other devices. In order for the user's preferences to be implemented in different environments or to allow the learned parameters to be implemented in different environments, the user must carry a device that stores his or her preferences. As such, one disadvantage of these disclosed systems is that they are incapable of sharing learned parameters, including learned information, with other systems by monitoring individual and system operations.

Thus, systems that can integrate, learn, interpret, and share these preferences, rules, or schemas between controllable lighting networks, systems and users, system and user preferences, rules or schema Methods, and apparatus are desired in the art.

The present invention relates to inventive methods and apparatus for learning / learning or applying systems, groups and / or user preferences, rules or schema within controllable lighting networks. Such systems and methods may be referred to as interactive transformation immersion (IMI) systems and / or networks. The invention also relates to inventive methods and apparatus for sharing these preferences and rules or schemas between controllable lighting networks and systems.

In general, in one aspect, the present invention is directed to a lighting management system including a first memory and a network. The first memory stores personal preference data corresponding to a plurality of users, and the personal preference data corresponds to each of a plurality of users including at least one personalized illumination parameter for each user. Wherein the network is at a location spaced from the first memory and includes at least one light source having a controllable output setting and a second memory for storing a schema, the schema comprising at least one standard illumination parameter. The network also includes a sensor system for detecting the identity of the current user and an execution module in communication with the at least one light source, the second memory and the sensor system. The execution module includes a controller and receives the identity of the current user from the sensor system. The execution module communicates with the first memory to determine personal preference data corresponding to the current user.

In one embodiment, the execution module modifies the schema to conform to the current user's personalized illumination parameters, and the execution module transforms the modified schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the light source. In some versions of this embodiment, the executable module translates the modified schema into instructions by interpreting the modified schema in accordance with the output settings of the at least one light source. In some versions of this embodiment, the execution module stores the modified schema in the second memory. In another embodiment, the sensor system detects the absence of the current user, the execution module calibrates the modified schema to conform to the standard illumination parameters, and the execution module stores the calibrated schema in the second memory.

According to some embodiments, the sensor system detects an additional user's identity. The executive module receives additional user identities from the sensor system, communicates with the first memory to determine personal preference data corresponding to additional users, generates shared personalized illumination parameters, and generates shared personalized illumination parameters And translates the calibrated schema into commands for controlling the output settings of the light source. In some versions of this embodiment, the execution module generates a shared personalized illumination parameter by averaging the current user's personalized illumination parameters and the additional user's personalized illumination parameters. In other versions of this embodiment, the execution module generates a shared personalized illumination parameter by selecting one of the current user's personalized illumination parameters and the additional user's personalized illumination parameters.

The sensor system, in one embodiment, detects the identity of the current user by detecting the radio frequency identification card carried by the current user. In another embodiment, the sensor system detects the identity of the current user by detecting the biometric data corresponding to the current user.

In some embodiments, the sensor system detects environmental data and behavior data, and the execution module modifies the schema according to at least one of environmental data and behavior data.

In other embodiments, the second memory stores a plurality of schemas. The execution module selects one of a plurality of schemas depending on the current user's personal preference data, and the execution module converts the selected schema into commands for controlling the output setting of the light source. In other embodiments, the sensor system detects light source output data indicative of an operating error in at least one light source, and the execution module provides a correction signal to the light source to correct the operating error.

According to some embodiments, the network includes a schema schema for creating a schema. In other embodiments, the at least one light source is a lighting device. In other embodiments, the at least one light source includes a plurality of light sources that communicate with each other using at least one of a wired communication link, a wireless communication link, a radio frequency communication link, and an optical communication link. In some embodiments, the at least one light source comprises at least one illuminant source and at least one illuminant source. In other embodiments, the network also includes an agent module, which communicates with the second memory via communications with the agent module.

In another aspect, the invention is directed to a light management system including a sensor system for observing system parameters, at least one light source, and an execution module. At least one light source communicates with the sensor system via a network, and at least one light source has controllable output settings. The execution module communicates with a remote memory that communicates over the network with the sensor system and the at least one light source and stores at least one schema over the communication link. The execution module includes a controller, receives the system parameters observed from the sensors, sends a request for the schema to the remote memory, and the request includes information indicating at least one of the observed system parameters. The execution module receives the schema from the remote database and transforms the schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source.

In one embodiment, the at least one light source comprises at least one lighting device. In another embodiment, the observed system parameters are related to one or more people. In this embodiment, the observed system parameters include the presence of one or more people, the identity of one or more people, the location of one or more people, the time of one or more people's presence, the gestures of one or more people, At least one of the faces of one or more people, and the sound emitted by one or more people. In another embodiment, the observed system parameters include at least one of an output from at least one light source, a level of ambient illumination, a quantity of light per day, a temperature, a humidity level, weather and noise.

According to one embodiment of this aspect, the execution module is located in one of the at least one light sources. In a further embodiment, the execution module is distributed across a plurality of light sources. In versions of this embodiment, the plurality of light sources communicate with each other using at least one of a wired communication link, a wireless communication link, a radio frequency communication link, and an optical communication link.

According to other embodiments, an execution module includes an interface for facilitating communication with a controller, a memory, a light source and at least one of the sensors, and an interface for facilitating communication with the remote memory over a communication link . In another embodiment, the communication link is one of a wireless communication link and a wired communication link.

In some embodiments of the system, the execution module translates the schema into instructions by interpreting the schema in accordance with the output settings of the at least one light source.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for implementing a lighting management system. The method includes, in an execution module including a controller, receiving parameters observed from a sensor system. The method also includes sending a request for a schema to a data storage device, the request also including information indicating at least one of the observed system parameters, wherein the data storage device is located at a location spaced relative to the execution module . In addition, the method includes receiving a schema from a data storage device in an execution module, and transforming the schema into instructions for controlling, by the execution module, output settings of the at least one light source.

In some embodiments of the method, receiving the observed system parameters comprises receiving an identity of the current user. In this embodiment, the transmitted request includes information indicating the identity of the current user, and the received schema includes illumination parameters according to the current user's preferences. In other embodiments, the method includes storing the received schema in local memory. In another embodiment, the transforming step comprises interpreting the schema by an execution module in accordance with the output settings of the at least one light source.

In another aspect, the invention relates to an execution module for use in a lighting management system. The execution module includes a sensor interface, a light source interface, a schema timer interface, a memory, and a controller. The sensor interface is for receiving the system parameters observed from the sensor system. The light source interface is for transmitting control parameters to at least one light source. The schema timer interface is for sending a request for a schema to a remote schema timer, wherein the request includes information indicating at least one of the observed system parameters. The schema timer interface is also for receiving schemas from a remote schema timer. The memory stores the observed system parameters and schema. The controller converts the schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source.

In one embodiment, the sensor interface is for receiving additional observed system parameters, and the processor is also for modifying the schema to compensate for additional observed system parameters. In another embodiment, the controller is also for interpreting the schema according to the output settings of the at least one light source.

In another aspect, the invention is directed to a lighting management system. The system includes a first memory and a network. The first memory stores personal preference data corresponding to a plurality of users, and the personal preference data corresponds to each of a plurality of users including at least one personalized illumination parameter for each user. The network includes at least one light source at a location spaced from the first memory and having a controllable output setting. The network also includes a sensor system for detecting the identity of the current user, and an execution module in communication with the at least one light source, the second memory and the sensor system. The execution module includes a controller and a second memory for storing at least one standard illumination parameter. The executive module receives the identity of the current user from the sensor system, communicates with the first memory to determine personal preference data corresponding to the current user, and modifies the standard illumination parameters to match the current user's personalized illumination parameters . The execution module converts the personalized illumination parameters into commands for controlling the output settings of the light source.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for implementing a lighting management system. The method includes receiving, in an execution module including a controller, system parameters observed from a sensor system indicating an identity of a current user. The method also includes sending a request to the data storage device for the personalized illumination preference data corresponding to the current user, wherein the data storage device is located in a spaced apart position relative to the execution module. The method includes the steps of: receiving, in an executive module, personal lighting preference data corresponding to a current user from a data storage device; converting the received personal lighting preference data into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one lighting fixture .

In another aspect, the invention is directed to a light management system including a sensor system for receiving an environmental input comprising at least one user identifier. The lighting management system also includes at least one light source having controllable output settings and a schema data storage device for storing the schema, wherein the schema includes at least one of a user specific schema, a group schema, a system specific schema, and a shared system schema . Each stored schema includes at least one rule for controlling the output settings of the light source. The illumination management system also includes a schema timer communicating with the sensor system and the schema data storage device, wherein the schema tier determines which schema in the schema data storage device is applicable in terms of environmental input and determines the output settings of the at least one light source Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > a < / RTI > The lighting management system also includes an execution module in communication with the at least one light source and the schema generator. The execution module includes a controller that receives a set of applicable rules from a schema timer and transforms at least one rule in a set of applicable rules with instructions to control an output setting of the light source.

In some embodiments, the schema data storage device is located in a spaced apart position from at least one light source. According to some embodiments, the schema tie continually monitors the environment input to determine which schema in the schema data store is applicable. In some embodiments, the schema tie may generate a set of applicable rules by averaging the output settings of the rules of the applicable schema, and in some embodiments the schema tie may be applied by prioritizing the rules of the applicable schema Lt; / RTI >

According to some embodiments, the set of applicable rules constitute a calibrated system specific schema. In another embodiment, the at least one light source comprises a plurality of light sources that communicate with each other using at least one of a wired communication link, a wireless communication link, a radio frequency communication link, and an optical communication link. In other embodiments, the execution module translates at least one rule into instructions by interpreting at least one rule in accordance with an output setting of the at least one light source.

In another aspect, the invention relates to a method for implementing a light management system. The method includes receiving an environment input that includes at least one user identifier and accessing a schema data storage device to retrieve at least one applicable schema from the perspective of the environment input, The schema includes rules for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source. The method includes arbitrating mismatch rules in at least one applicable schema to determine a set of work rules for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source and instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source And converting the working rules.

According to some embodiments, the schema data storage device is located in a spaced apart position from at least one light source. In some embodiments, the method further comprises continuously monitoring environmental data to determine which schema is applicable. In some embodiments, the arbitration step includes averaging output settings of rules of the applicable schema to determine a set of operational rules. In other embodiments, the arbitration step includes prioritizing the rules of the applicable schema to determine a set of work rules.

According to some embodiments of the method, the set of work rules constitute a calibrated system schema. In another embodiment, the transforming step includes interpreting the work rules according to the output settings of the at least one light source.

In another aspect, the invention is directed to a method for implementing a lighting management system. The method includes receiving, in an execution module including a controller, system parameters sensed from a sensor system indicating an identity of a current user, and sending a request for a schema corresponding to a current user to a data store , Wherein the data storage device is located at a location spaced from the execution module. The method also includes, in the execution module, receiving a schema corresponding to the current user from the data storage device and transforming the received schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one lighting device.

In some embodiments, the received schema is personalized for the current user. In some embodiments, the received schema is personalized for a group of users, and the group of users includes the current user. In other embodiments, the converting includes interpreting the received schema in accordance with the output settings of the at least one lighting fixture.

In another aspect, the invention is directed to a lighting management system comprising a memory storing a schema comprising at least one rule, respectively. The system also includes a network at a location remote from the memory. The network includes at least one light source having controllable output settings, a sensor system for detecting the identity of the current user, and an execution module. The execution module communicates with at least one light source and the sensor system. The execution module receives the identity of the current user from the sensor system, communicates with the memory to receive the schema corresponding to the current user, and transforms the received schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source.

In some embodiments, the received schema is personalized for the current user. In other embodiments, the received schema is personalized for a group of users, and the group of users includes the current user. In other embodiments, the execution module transforms the received schema by interpreting the received schema in accordance with the output settings of the at least one light source.

It is to be understood that all combinations of the above concepts and further concepts (which are not mutually inconsistent) described in more detail below are considered to be part of the gist of the invention disclosed herein. In particular, all combinations of the claimed subject matter appearing at the end of this specification are considered to be part of the subject matter of the invention disclosed herein. It is also to be understood that the terms explicitly used herein, which may also appear in any of the disclosures contained herein, are to be accorded the most consistent meaning as the specific concepts disclosed herein.

In the drawings, like reference numerals generally refer to like parts throughout the different views. In addition, the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale, but instead are made when emphasis generally indicates principles of the invention.

1 is a block diagram of an exemplary interactive variant immersion (IMI) system according to embodiments of the present invention in which user preference data, rules and / or schema are stored in a remote database.
Figure 2 is a block diagram of an illumination network in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which a schema is used.
3 is a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which user rules or user preference data may be shared between lighting networks.
4 is a block diagram of an exemplary personal identifier in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.
5 is a block diagram of an exemplary execution module in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.
Figure 6 is a block diagram of an exemplary lighting network in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which a schema is used.
Figure 7 is a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which a schema is used and user rules or preferences data can be shared.
8A is a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which schema and preference data may be shared.
8B is a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which schema and preference data can be shared and an agent is used to communicate with remote resources.
9A is a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which an execution module is part of a light source.
9B is a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which an execution module is distributed between light sources.
9C is a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention, wherein each light source comprises an execution module.
9D is a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which the light sources are in optical communication.
Figure 9E is a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which the light sources communicate using various protocols.
10 is a block diagram of a lighting network layout in accordance with embodiments of the present invention.
11 is a flow diagram illustrating a variation of a system schema in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.
Figure 12 is a flow diagram illustrating an implementation of user preferences or schema from a remote database in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention that consider preferences or schemas for more than one user.
Figure 13 is a flow diagram illustrating an implementation of user preferences or schema from a remote database in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

Reference will now be made in detail to exemplary embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

Various implementations of the inventive concepts and related inventive concepts, including specific implementations of interactive lighting networks that recognize these environments, are described below. These networks may include, among other applications, bars, restaurants, stadiums, exhibition halls, museums, shops, shopping centers, nightclubs, ballrooms, public transportation, , Especially for intelligent lighting in airports. It should be understood, however, that this disclosure is not intended to be limited to any particular implementation, and that the various embodiments explicitly described herein are for purposes of illustration only.

The techniques disclosed herein relate to lighting networks that can be operated independently of each other and have access to common data that defines personal lighting preferences. The illumination and / or luminance generated by these networks is controlled by an illumination scheme, which is one or more rules of operation of the sensors and the light sources specific to the user, a group of users, a system or a set of systems. The system according to the present invention can intelligently learn preferences, rules and schema and share them among lighting networks.

Previous lighting control systems are generally self-sustaining self-contained systems. In order for the user's preferences to be implemented in different environments or to allow the learned parameters to be implemented in different environments, the user will have to carry a device that stores his or her preferences. Previous systems and networks are also unable to effectively share learned parameters, including learned information, with other systems and networks by monitoring individual and system operations.

Applicants have recognized and appreciated that it may be advantageous to enable sharing of schemas based on preference data between lighting networks implementing the lighting control systems and methods. Accordingly, aspects of the present invention relate to the sharing of schemas or rules between areas of lighting networks and lighting networks. Individual lighting networks applying these aspects can then use pre-determined schemas or pre-determined rules to more effectively adapt themselves to behavior, preferences or conditions. Such systems and methods may be referred to as interactive transformation immersion (IMI) systems and / or networks. Individual IMI systems can also interpret schemas or rules according to system configuration, components and capabilities.

Figure 1 illustrates a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which user preference data, rules and / or schema are stored in preference data storage 112. [ 1, an IMI system includes an exemplary illumination network 101 that includes an illumination system 102, a sensor system 104, and an execution module 106. In one embodiment, The term "network" as used herein refers to any device capable of communicating information (e.g., for device control, data storage, data exchange, etc.) between any two or more devices and / Refers to any interconnection of two or more devices (including controllers or processors) that facilitates communication between the devices. As can be readily appreciated, various implementations of networks suitable for interconnecting multiple devices may include any of a variety of network topologies and may utilize any of a variety of communication protocols. In addition, in various networks according to the present invention, any one connection between two devices may represent a dedicated connection or alternatively an exclusive connection between the two systems. In addition to conveying the intended information for the two devices, this dedicated connection can carry information that is not necessarily intended for either of the two devices (e.g., an open network connection). Moreover, it should be readily appreciated that the various networks of devices as described herein can utilize one or more wireless, wired / cable and / or optical fiber links to facilitate the transmission of information throughout the lighting network 101 do.

The illumination system 102 may be any system that affects the environment of the space including the system for providing one or more of illumination, brightness or a combination of illumination and brightness. In one embodiment, the illumination system 102 is configured to be capable of influencing the environment of the space including, but not limited to, a system for providing one or more of direction, heating, ventilation, cooling, television, background music and / Additional systems can be included. The illumination system 102 may include one or more light sources, such as one or more LEDs or light fixtures, in communicating through the illumination network 101. In one embodiment, the illumination system 102 includes at least one light source having a controllable output setting. For example, the illumination system 102 may include a luminaire configured to change its luminosity output or a luminaire configured to provide light distribution patterns. One or more of the light sources of the illumination system may also have one or more manual controls, such as on / off switches or dimmers. Any adjustment of these manual controls by the user and the context for any such adjustments can be monitored by the execution module 106 and the user's patterns and preferences within the coverage area of the lighting network 101 Lt; / RTI >

The term "light source" includes but is not limited to LED based sources (including one or more LEDs as described above), incandescent sources (e.g., filament lamps, halogen lamps) Phosphorescent sources, high intensity discharge sources (e.g., sodium vapor, mercury vapor and metal halide lamps), lasers, other types of electroluminescent sources, pyro-luminescent sources Light sources (e.g., gas mantles, carbon arc radiation sources), photo-luminescent sources (e.g., gas discharge sources), cathode lines using electron saturation Light emitting sources, galvano-luminescent sources, crystallo-luminescent sources, kine-luminescent sources, thermoluminescence sources, triboluminescent sources, sound waves Sources of radiation, such as radiolumin escent < / RTI > sources and light emitting polymers.

A given light source may be configured to generate electromagnetic radiation in the visible light spectrum, outside the visible light spectrum, or in a combination of both. Thus, the terms "light" and "radiation" are used interchangeably herein. Additionally, the light source may include one or more filters (e.g., color filters), lenses or other optical components as integral components. It should also be understood that the light sources may be configured for various applications including, but not limited to, instructions, indications and / or illumination. "Illumination source" is a light source specifically configured to generate radiation having sufficient intensity to effectively illuminate the interior or exterior space. In this regard, the term "sufficient intensity" means that the ambient light (i.e., light that can be indirectly perceived, e.g., light that can be reflected from one or more of the various intervening surfaces before being wholly or partially perceived) Quot; lumen "is often used to express the total light output from the light source in all directions in terms of reflected power or" light flux ").

The term " lighting fixture "or" lighting fixture "is used herein to refer, in particular, to an implementation or arrangement of one or more lighting units in a form factor, assembly or package. The term "illumination unit" is used herein to refer to an apparatus that includes one or more light sources of the same or different types. A given lighting unit may have any one of a variety of mounting devices for light source (s), enclosure / housing devices and shapes and / or electrical and mechanical connection arrangements. Additionally, a given lighting unit may optionally be associated with various other components (e.g., control circuitry) associated with the operation of the light source (s) (e.g., including, Bonded or packaged together). An "LED-based illumination unit" refers to an illumination unit comprising one or more LED-based light sources as described above, either alone or in combination with other non-LED based light sources. A "multi-channel" lighting unit refers to an LED-based or non-LED-based lighting unit comprising at least two light sources each configured to produce different spectra of radiation, each source spectrum being referred to as a "channel" .

There are a number of known intelligent light sources and lighting devices that can be utilized as part of the illumination system 102 within the illumination network 101. [ In one embodiment, the illumination system 102 includes lighting fixtures including solid state light emitting elements. Any such luminaire may have one or more individually controllable illuminations of its component wavelengths, and a wide range of colors, brightness levels, and color temperatures may be generated. For example, an LED lighting fixture may include red, green, and blue LEDs. Other types of illumination, such as fluorescent or incandescent lighting, may also be integrated within the network. Some examples of these sources are Royal Philips Electronics. Lexel LED DLM system and COLORBLAST / iW blast lighting fixtures available from Royal Philips Electronics, N.V.

As described above, the term "light emitting device" refers to a region of the electromagnetic spectrum, such as, for example, a visible light region, an infrared and / or ultraviolet region, when activated, for example by applying a potential difference across it or passing an electric current therethrough. Or any device that emits radiation in any area. Thus, the luminous means may have monochromatic, pseudo-monochromatic, pleochroic or broadband spectral emission characteristics. Examples of light emitting devices include semiconductor, organic or polymer / polymer light emitting diodes, blue or UV pumped phosphor coated light emitting diodes, optically pumped nanocrystalline light emitting diodes, laser diodes or those skilled in the art Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 > and / or < / RTI > Moreover, the term light emitting element is used to define a particular device emitting radiation, such as, for example, an LED die, and equally well defined as the combination of a particular device emitting radiation with a housing or package in which a particular device or devices are placed Can be used.

As used herein for purposes of the present invention, the term "LED" should be understood to include any electroluminescent diode or other type of carrier injection / junction based system capable of generating radiation in response to an electrical signal do. Thus, the term LED includes various semiconductor based structures that emit light in response to currents, light emitting polymers, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), electroluminescent strips, etc., but are not limited thereto. In particular, the term LED is intended to encompass all of the infrared spectra, ultraviolet spectra, and all that can be configured to produce radiation at one or more of various portions of the visible light spectrum (generally including radiation wavelengths from about 400 nanometers to about 700 nanometers) Refers to light emitting diodes of a type (including semiconductors and organic light emitting diodes). Some examples of LEDs include, but are not limited to, various types of infrared LEDs, ultraviolet LEDs, red LEDs, blue LEDs, green LEDs, amber LEDs, amber LEDs, (Described further below). LEDs may be configured and / or configured to generate radiation having a given spectrum (e.g., narrow bandwidth, wide bandwidth) and various bandwidths (e.g., half full widths or FWHM) for various dominant wavelengths within a given general color classification, Configured or controlled.

For example, one implementation of an LED (e.g., a white LED) that is essentially configured to produce white light can comprise a plurality of dies, each emitting different spectra of electroluminescence combined to form essentially white light have. In other implementations, a white light LED may be associated with a phosphorous material that converts electroluminescence having a first spectrum to a different second spectrum. In one example of this implementation, electroluminescence with a relatively short wavelength and narrow bandwidth spectrum "pumped " the phosphorus material, which then emits longer wavelength radiation with a somewhat broader spectrum.

It should also be understood that the term LED is not limited to the physical and / or electrical package type of the LED. For example, as described above, an LED may refer to a single light emitting device having multiple dice configured to emit different spectra of radiation (e.g., may be individually controllable or not controllable) have. Also, LEDs may be related to phosphorus, which is considered as an integral part of an LED (e.g., certain types of white LEDs). Generally, the term LED is used to refer to a variety of different types of LEDs, including packaged LEDs, unpackaged LEDs, surface mounted LEDs, chip-on-board LEDs, T- Package LEDs, certain types of boxes, and / or LEDs including optical elements (e.g., diffusion lenses).

The lighting system 102 may be controlled using communication protocols such as DALI, DMX or Zigbee, or using other lighting or device control protocols. As described above, the lighting network 101 may communicate via wireless and / or wired connections. The wireless connections may be, for example, radio frequency (RF) such as Bluetooth, or they may be modulated optical signals superimposed on the illumination light output of the illumination system 102. The illumination system 102 may be designed to provide illumination of the spaces, to provide architectural features with illumination, or a combination thereof.

In one embodiment, the illumination system 102 is connected to the sensor system 104 via the illumination network 101. The sensor system 104 may sense one or more system parameters including, for example, parameters relating to people for the illumination system 102, behavioral parameters or data, environmental parameters or data, and feedback parameters or data . Although not an exclusive list, the sensor system 104 may include one or more of the following parameters: the presence of one or more people, the identity of one or more people, the physical characteristics of one or more people such as a blood vessel pattern in a person's body, , The time of the presence of one or more people, the gestures of one or more people, the actions of one or more people, the faces of one or more people, the sounds emitted by one or more people or from other sources, An ambient light level, an amount of sunlight, a motion, a temperature, a humidity level, weather, and noise. The sensor system 104 may include, for example, a thermometer, a hygrometer for measuring humidity, a wind turbine for measuring air velocity, a side sounder for measuring noise levels, an illuminometer for measuring illuminance values, a CO 2 or CO concentration , A gas probe for measuring the concentration of certain chemicals such as, for example, water, a detector for detecting sunlight, and an external weather sensor, such as a non-detector.

In one embodiment, the sensor system 104 may detect the identity of the user by detecting biometric data, such as fingerprint data or iris data corresponding to the user 108. In another embodiment, the sensor system may include a video camera that uses face recognition software to identify facial features of the user 108. In another embodiment, the sensor system detects the identity of the user by detecting the personal identifier 110 carried by the user 108. In one embodiment, the personal identifier is a radio frequency identification (RFID) card, a device equipped with a badge or a barcode, or a portable device. In some embodiments, the personal identifier is not part of the network, but is detectable by the sensor system. In some embodiments, the personal identifier stores preference data, rules, and / or schema for the user. The sensor system 104 may also detect the presence and number of people whose personal identifiers 110 do not carry or whose ability to be detected by the lighting network 101 is switched off.

The execution module 106 or the execution unit 106 is connected to the illumination system 102 and the sensor system 104 through the illumination network 101 so that the execution module 106, the sensor system 104 and the illumination system 102 May be referred to as forming part of the illumination network 101. Execution module 106 may be implemented in a number of ways (e.g., with dedicated hardware) to perform the various functions described herein. In one example, the execution module includes one or more microprocessors that can be programmed using software (e.g., microcode) to perform the various functions described herein. In another example, an execution module includes a controller or processor (e.g., one or more programmed microprocessors and associated circuitry) for executing a combination of dedicated hardware and other functions to perform some functions. Examples of execution module 106 components that may be utilized in various embodiments of the present invention include, but are not limited to, conventional microprocessors, ASICs, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) ).

The execution module 106 operates one or more of the light sources of the illumination system 102 of the illumination network 101 in accordance with the schema in response to the conditions detected by the sensor system 104 in some embodiments. For example, the executive module may apply a first rule or group of rules in the schema when no person is present in the space covered by the lighting network 101, A second rule in the schema or a group of rules may be applied. In another example, the executive module may include a third rule or group of rules in a second schema to operate one or more of the light sources in the illumination system 102 in response to the personal identifier 110 detected in the scope of the lighting network 101 Can be applied. In another example, when the sensor system 104 senses that one or more light sources in the illumination system 102 are aging or not functioning properly, the execution module may be a light source that improperly functions to correct the inefficiency of the failed light source Lt; / RTI >

The execution module 106 may adjust the operation of the illumination system 102 in response to input from the sensor system 104. The execution module may be able to select or change the schema and thereby receive further input from the sensor system providing user interactivity. In one embodiment described in more detail below, execution module 106 may implement and update rules that comprise the schema or schema.

A schema is a set of one or more operating rules of light sources and sensors. As used herein, a rule may include a prerequisite declaration that allows for inference of other result information when satisfied. As such, execution module 106 may be considered as an expert system that includes or constitutes an inference engine, which may infer information based on sensed or determined conditions. The format for these rules may be as follows.

IF <premise> THEN <result>

The preconditions can be determined via the inputs provided by the sensor system 104. Execution module 106 may examine existing facts or conditions to infer new facts or result information, for example,

IF <non-detector detects .01 oz liquid rain> THEN <weather = rain>

to be.

The inference of the result information can satisfy different conditions depending on the user or system preferences, for example,

IF <weather = rain> THEN <background color = red>

IF <background color = red> THEN <highlight color = cyan>

to be.

These rules may trigger the execution module 106 to issue a command to the lighting system 102 to set the background color as red and set the highlight color as cyan when sensing that the sensor system 104 is raining .

The rules and / or schema may be set when multiple IMI users are present in the lighting network 101. For example, one such rule may be as follows.

IF <number of users> ≥ 2 THEN <highlight color = average user highlight color>

When more than one rule can be applied and an implementation of the applicable rules results in conflicting outcome information, the execution module 106 may execute a conflict resolution to determine which rule is implemented. Certain rules may be assigned a higher priority than others. For example, an IMI user may have his / her own schema, a group of IMI users may have a shared schema, and an IMI schema may have its own schema. The priority may be assigned so that the shared schema among the groups of IMI users takes precedence over the user's individual schema, but only when multiple members of the group are present in the lighting system 101.

As will be understood by those skilled in the art, rules may be constructed as requiring multiple conditions before inferring information, or requiring the satisfaction of one or more condition options, And to infer multiple portions of the information upon satisfaction. For example, exemplary rules may be described,

IF <Number of group members> ≥ 3 OR <No group leader> THEN <Highlight color = Average user highlight color>

IF <number of group members> ≥ 2 AND <background color = red> THEN <do nothing>

IF <number of users> ≥ (<number of group members> + 5)> THEN <background color = red> AND <highlight color = average user highlight color>

The lighting rules and / or schema may be modified, for example, by the execution module 106 or the user interface. The lighting rules and / or schema may be adaptive and thus may be modified by the execution module without further input from the user, the lighting designer or the external processing device. The term "user interface " as used herein refers to the interface between a human user or operator and one or more devices that enable communication between the user and the device (s). Examples of user interfaces that may be utilized in various implementations of the present invention include but are not limited to switches, potentiometers, buttons, dials, sliders, a mouse, a keyboard, a keypad, various types of game controllers (E.g., joysticks), track balls, display screens, various types of graphical user interfaces (GUIs), touch screens, microphones, and some form of human generated stimulus And other types of sensors that may be used.

The illumination scheme can cause the implementation of the lighting script to be detected upon detection of the condition. Those skilled in the art will understand that the rules may be defined and modified in many different ways.

One or more components of the illumination system 102 may be preprogrammed with a set of default rules defining the default behavior for one or more light sources. These default rules may be overridden or modified by rules indicated with a higher priority designated by the lighting designer. Default rules can also be modified or replaced by rules that the system develops itself as it learns about its environment and its users.

IMI system 100 itself may have its own schema, which may be developed or obtained from a schema data store or from another IMI system. The IMI system can often be influenced by rules for rules called meta rules, which determine whether the rules of certain classes have a limited priority or are not allowed in certain situations. For example, it is easy to say that "general rules are invalidated by emergency rules" rather than individually identifying each and every rule that should be invalidated during a fire evacuation. Those skilled in the art will understand that a schema may also be overridden or modified by a higher priority schema and governed by meta rules.

The aggregate rules of the schema may include a rulebase that the execution module 106 can consecutively access to determine which rules should be fired. In one embodiment, multiple execution modules can access the rulebase as IMI users move within and between buildings.

When the system is able to rewrite rules and schema according to past experience and current situation, programs can be generated that can check the current situation and generate appropriate new rules in terms of user's preference and history. The artificial intelligence inherent in these programs makes them much more valuable than simple rule sets.

The IMI system 100 is designed to synthesize new information from multiple, possibly heterogeneous, sensors within the sensor system 104. For example, data from the occupancy sensor may be combined with data from the RFID sensor to determine if a person previously identified via the personal identifier 110 enters a space with an occupancy sensor. In this example, if there is only one person in the building, that identity is detected upon entry. In different locations within the building, there may be occupancy sensors that do not detect an identity, but the execution module 106 checks the overall consistency of the signals from the sensors in the sensor system 104 to infer the sensed occupant's identity can do. Another example is that when two people are present in a building, the identities of both are detected by the system. If they are in different locations, the signals from neighboring, nonidentified occupancy sensors may be stringed together by the execution unit to keep track of the occupant's identity and thus provide preferences. Another example may be that one person leaves a common room, possibly from a group without a personal identifier 110. In this case, the system can gather clues about the identity of a person from the speed he is walking, the direction he travels, and the wall switches he can adjust.

The lighting network 101 communicates with a preference data store or memory 112 that is located in a spaced apart position from the lighting network 101 in one embodiment. In one embodiment, the preference data storage device 112 stores personal preference data corresponding to a plurality of users, and the personal preference data includes at least one personalized preference data for each of a plurality of users Respectively. The personal preference data stored in the preference data storage 112 may be encoded within the personal schema of the IMI user, within the schema of the group, and / or as one or more rules within the schema of the IMI system. As such, preference data storage 112 may be considered to be a rules database.

The preference data storage device 112 may be a database, a register, or other data storage device. The preference data storage device 112 may reside in a server connected to the Internet and may store a plurality of preferences and / or rules for a plurality of people. In one embodiment, the lighting network 101 is able to access, but not control, the preference data storage device. In one embodiment, the user 108 has access to the preference data storage 112 and can change the preference data and / or rules of the user including, for example, the user's personalized lighting parameters by the user interface have.

For example, the user 108 may access the preference data storage 112 over the Internet. Table 1 lists the personalized preference data that can be stored in the preference data storage device, including personalized illumination parameters that the user can enter. Exemplary personalized illumination parameters include, but are not limited to, the desired illumination color, the desired brightness level, or the preferred volume.

Figure 112011060276670-pct00001

In different embodiments, the user's preference data may range from a single parameter to multiple parameters. For example, in some embodiments, the user's preference data may be at an illumination level relative to the desired brightness of the lights, or the user specified by the identifier (ID) And a spectrum or color, wherein the preferred color is encoded as a hexadecimal number, the first two numbers corresponding to the red level, the second two numbers corresponding to the blue level, and the third pair &Lt; / RTI &gt; correspond to the green level. As shown in Table 1, the preference data may include start and stop times for the implementation of the preference parameters. This preference data may be considered to be a set of rules for a user to control the response or outputs of the system to a particular condition or system input. Execution module 106 may use rules to determine how to respond to a particular situation. For example, when the execution module 106 receives an instruction from the sensor system 104 to enter a user designated by ID 298 from the sensor system 104, the execution module 106 determines that the user 298 is at 06:00 To prefer lighting of color FF9966 at level 77 between times 17:00 and 17:00 and to prefer lighting of color EEEEFF at level 100 between times 17:00 and 21:00.

The term "spectrum" should be understood to refer to any one or more frequencies (or wavelengths) of radiation generated by one or more light sources. Thus, the term "spectrum" refers to frequencies (or wavelengths) in the visible light range as well as infrared, ultraviolet and other areas of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Further, a given spectrum may have a relatively narrow bandwidth (e.g., FWHM with essentially few frequencies or wavelength components) or a relatively wide bandwidth (multiple frequencies or wavelength components with various relative intensities). It should also be appreciated that a given spectrum may be the result of a mixture of two or more different spectra (e.g., a mixture of radiation emitted from multiple light sources, respectively).

For purposes of the present invention, the term "color" is used interchangeably with the term "spectrum ". However, the term "color" is generally used to refer primarily to the characteristics of radiation perceptible by the observer (this use is not intended to limit the scope of this term). Thus, the term "different colors " implicitly refers to a plurality of spectra having different wavelength components and / or bandwidths. It should also be appreciated that the term "color" can be used in conjunction with both white and non-white light.

The term "color temperature" is generally used herein in connection with white light, but its use is not intended to limit the scope of this term. The color temperature essentially refers to a particular color content or shade of white light (e.g., reddish, bluish). The color temperature of a given radiation sample is typically characterized by a temperature in Kelvin (K) units of a black body radiator that emits essentially the same spectrum as the radiation sample of interest. The black body emitter color temperature is typically in the range of about 700 K (typically considered visible to the human eye first) to over 10,000 K, and white light is typically perceived at color temperatures of more than 1500 to 2000 K .

Lower color temperatures generally indicate a more significant red component or a white light with a "warmer feel" whereas higher color temperatures generally indicate a more significant blue component or white light with a "cooler feel ". As an example, the flame has a color temperature of approximately 1,800 K, a conventional incandescent bulb has a color temperature of approximately 2848 K, the early morning sunlight has a color temperature of approximately 3,000 K, the cloudy noon sky is approximately 10,000 K Lt; / RTI &gt; A color image viewed under white light with a color temperature of approximately 3,000 K has a relatively reddish hue whereas a same color image viewed under white light with a color temperature of approximately 10,000 K has a relatively bluish hue.

Annex A is an example of an example that includes personalized illumination parameters that can be entered by the user and stored in the preference data storage 112 or in the personal identifier 110 and that can be encoded as one or more rules in the user's personal schema List personal preference data. As shown in Appendix A, exemplary personal preference data may include personalized parameters for environmental control of devices other than light sources. For example, preference data may include preferences for devices that provide environmental effects such as, but not limited to, heating, ventilation, cooling, television, background music and direction. The preference data includes the following non-limiting list: preferred temperatures, desired percentages of daylight, preferences for opening or closing windows, degrees at which the internal temperature must track the external temperature, desirable aromas, The desired audio level of the sound systems playing the music in the environment, the desired humidity, the desired genre of background music, the type of desired television channel or program for use in hotels, waiting rooms or bars, a list of preferred songs or audio clips A list of preferred musicians, singers or groups, preferred languages, a set of keywords that may relate to YouTube or other video playlists, YouTube or similar video clips or song themes, List, good radio presenter List, like the list of those things you do not like and can include one or more of the products that do not interest or concern.

The preferences and / or rules may be linked to a specific time, a specific type of place, specific places or general geographical locations. They may be linked to a particular type of weather or any other sensed parameter. For example, bright cheerful music may be desirable for rainy days, whilst any choice may be acceptable on a clear day.

As shown in Appendix A, the user preference data may include data other than data relating to environmental control of the environment. This information can facilitate the user experience at various locations. For example, a preferred type of room may be stored so that guests arriving at the hotel may be aware that the receiving party is notified by the network when the guest enters the hotel. These preferences may include preferred exercise equipment in a gym for automated scheduling, preferred or favorite food or meal, favorite beverage, and the like. The user preference data may also include personal data such as, but not limited to, age, gender, and weight. In one embodiment, the data stored in the data storage device 112 may be stored in the following categories: preferences, which are things that the user enjoys or are desirable representations of, activities that are data on actual activities, It can be considered to fall to one or more of the biometric data that is data or the abilities data which is data on the abilities of the user and the user.

The user's preference data, rules, or personal schema may also be more abstract than listed in Table 1 and Appendix A. For example, rather than a particular color or brightness or a combination thereof, preferences, rules, or schema may be used to indicate a preference, rule or schema, for example, "bright", "animate", "subtle" Quot; may be selected as one or more of " random, "" economical," It is up to the lighting designer to define certain color / brightness / timing responses and / or constraints that can be triggered by the detection of a user defining one of the above as preference. This may simplify the data entry required of the user defining his preferences and allow the administrator or designer in the illuminated space to interpret preferences, rules, or schemas over the illuminated space specified (by a certain degree) by the affinity owner . Sometimes, preferences, rules, or schema can be changed to allow different lighting managers or designers' tasks and interpretations to appear.

In addition, individual IMI systems may interpret the schema or rules according to the configuration, components, and capabilities of the system. For example, if the user's preferences indicate that the user's favorite colors are red and yellow, the IMI system of white light sources can deduce that the user prefers "warm" colors, Can be adjusted.

Although Table 1 and Appendix A show exemplary user preference data stored in the tables, user preference data may be stored in different formats to improve efficiency and facilitate programming and access to preference data. In one embodiment, the preference data is divided into a plurality of tables in the relationship database.

Users who set their preferences can be set to turn on certain desk lights from time to time. In one embodiment, the user can set user preferences in terms of zones that may be individual body zones (e.g., above head, eye level, lower level, floor, front and rear zones) May or may not be time-dependent or time-dependent. In one embodiment, a user may define intermediate distance zones and distant zones that execute light sources located at predefined distances away from the user 108 and / or the user &apos; s personal identifier 110. In one embodiment, the user can set room areas where the illumination is not sensitive to the precise location of the user in the room. The preference zones are then mapped to the defined zones within the network and algorithms are used to best provide the desired illumination according to preferences. The algorithm solves the inverse problem of determining the lighting settings to match the user preference, finds a suitable or optimal one in the case of multiple solutions, and finds a solution that can be satisfied if there is no suitable solution Lt; / RTI &gt; If the solution can not be found quickly, the solution can be implemented incrementally. In one embodiment, IMI system 100 may choose to implement user preferences incrementally and intentionally. In determining the lighting settings that match the user preference, a corresponding rule for implementing the lighting settings at the satisfaction of the condition may be encoded.

In one embodiment, when an individual detects a change in preference in preference data storage 112 via, for example, a manual control, preference and any corresponding schema or rule may be automatically updated within the database And may be intelligently updated taking into account the pattern of time, frequency, and similar requests, may be stored for approval by the affinity owner, or ignored. In some embodiments, multiple individuals may store preference data in preference data storage 112, and intelligent updaters may be attracted from similar changes requested by selection of other users, or possibly other similar users . IMI system 100 recognizes the environment because its ability to sense large amounts of data intelligently responds to data, updates and implements schemas, and incorporates user preference data.

Figure 2 shows a block diagram of a lighting network 101 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention in which a schema is used. 2, in addition to the illumination system 102, the sensor system 104 and the execution module 106, the lighting network 101 may include a local data storage device (e.g., 202). These user preferences and / or schema may be downloaded from any storage medium, such as the preference data storage 112, prior to being stored in the local data storage 202. In one embodiment, the lighting network 101 may also include a schema tizer 204 configured to convey schema or schema files stored within the schema data storage device 206. In one embodiment, user preferences and / or user schemas may be stored in the storage 208 (in the schema data storage 206) accessed by the schema tidewater 204, in place of or in addition to the local data storage 202. [ .

In one embodiment, the schema is considered to be a list of constraints on what the lighting system 102 is capable of, how it must respond to certain inputs from the sensor system 104, And adapt the illumination system 102 to operate in that environment. For example, the schema may cause the executable module 106 to operate using the default lighting script, but to escape from the script when appropriate. In one embodiment, the illumination scheme is a set of rules that can be modified to incorporate personal preferences when presence and identity of the preference owner is detected. Generally, the less the constraints of the schema are provided, the higher the likelihood that the illumination system 102, the sensor system 104 and the execution module 106 can be adapted to operate in that environment. The lighting network 101 may continue to track past events including past sensor data and past output from the lighting system 102 to determine appropriate responses to specific events or scenarios. Moreover, the illumination network 101 can detect conditions using the sensor system 104. The administrator of the lighting network 101 may specify which schema the lighting network 101 is implementing.

In one embodiment, a markup language such as XML or a similar language may be used to generate the schema. The language used to create the schema may incorporate SQL commands for accessing the preference data store 112 that stores user preferences. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that other programming languages may be used to generate schemas such as, but not limited to, Visual Basic, C ++, and the like.

In one embodiment, the schema tizer 204 determines which schemas or schemas are currently active and organizes a working set of rules in which the execution module 106 is accessed and implemented. Schema schema 204 can determine which schemas or schemas are active by receiving an indication of which IMI users are in the space. The schemaizer 204 may wirelessly connect to the execution module 106 to upload a set of work rules in memory within the execution module 106. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the schema tizer 204 may also be connected to the execution module 106 via a wired or other communication link. In one embodiment, the schema tizer 204 is a hardware module, and in another embodiment, the schema tizer 204 is an executable program. Alternatively, or in addition to the schema tizer 204, the lighting network 101 may include a schema data storage 206 for storing the schema. The schema data store 206 communicates with the schema tizger 204 and the schema tizger 204 may store a schema that creates or modifies the schema data store 206. The execution module 106 may also or alternatively be capable of downloading or receiving a schema from another remote source, such as from another network or server that may be accessed over the Internet, and storing the schema within the schema data storage 206 . Schema data store 206 may also store a schema that has been modified to incorporate users' personal preferences. In addition, the schema data store 206 may store a plurality of schemas from which the execution module 106 may select a schema to implement. Execution module 106 may select a particular schema for implementation according to the personal preferences of user 108 or other system parameters observed by sensor system 104. [

Execution module 106 may arbitrate inputs received from sensor system 104, arbitrate user preference data stored in local data storage 202, select a schema from schema data store 206, A set of task rules can be provided from the schema tier and a set or schema of task rules can be transformed into control commands that enable the lighting system 102 to implement schema and / or task rules .

The schemaizer 204 enables the lighting designer, administrator or other person to set device defaults, such as the default lighting for the lighting fixture and the interactive behavior for the lighting network 101. For example, a schema may define limits that a device (e.g., a lighting fixture) output can vary (e.g., in terms of chromaticity, intensity, or a sequence of different outputs). The schema may operate with user preferences and / or may be modified to implement user preferences. For example, the schema may define limits on which the device output may be changed, but the device output may be identified by the user in the coverage area of the lighting network 101 and, for example, by detection of the personal identifier 110 May be set within the limits set by the schema according to the preferences of the user 108 when they are present and preferences of the user may be retrieved from the preference data storage 112 or from the personal identifier 110, for example. Scheduleizer 204 may be used to define and / or to tolerate constraints on which execution module 106 and lighting system 102 may operate.

In some embodiments, the schema tizer 204 is a laptop, palmtop, or other computer with a Bluetooth output or other suitable protocol. The schema tie may be temporarily or permanently connected to the lighting network 101. In one embodiment, the schema tizer 204 may be located remotely from the lighting network 101. In this embodiment, the schema timers are connected to the lighting network 101 via the Internet or via a telecommunication network. In one embodiment, the lighting network 101 may include one or more schema tiers 202 and / or may communicate with one or more remote schema tiers via the Internet or via a telecommunication network.

Schema schema 204 and / or schema data store 206 may be used by user 180 having previously stored preference data corresponding to the schema, for example, within the coverage area of the lighting network 101 implementing this schema And may store a plurality of schemas that are uploaded to the lighting network 101 upon request. As such, schema schema 204 and / or schema data storage 206 may be considered to be rule databases.

In one embodiment, one or more of schema schema 204, schema data storage device 206, and execution module 106 may be combined into identical components. In one embodiment, schema timer 204 and execution module 106 may reside in software, hardware, firmware, or a combination thereof, of a personal computer. The schemaizer 204 may be a pop-up utility program. In one embodiment, the schema tidier 204 identifies the presence of the IMI system 100 and the lighting network 101 and determines that they can control the lighting system 102, and by querying the remote database, Which dynamically generates code in a compatible programming language to determine the appropriate communication protocol to communicate with the lighting system 102 and to display the control for the lighting system 102. [ For example, a number of computers have sensors that can be programmed with JavaScript TM , and after detecting the lighting fixtures in the lighting system 102, the schematizer 204 controls the lighting fixtures in the lighting system 102 A Javascript TM code can be generated to display a dimmer control for the user. As described above, the schema tizer 204 may be located on a remote server connected to the network 101 via the Internet, and the browser may provide any environment control opportunities available through its current wired or wireless connection Can be programmed to find out.

As such, in one embodiment, the schema tizger 204 is one or more physical hardware devices, and in another embodiment, the schema tizier 204 is one or more software programs. In another embodiment, the schema tie may be considered to be a service available to a user having components that are distributed throughout the World Wide Web. In addition to creating the schema, the schema tizer 204 may be used by the user 108 to set personal preferences of the user.

In one embodiment, the schema tizer 204 may be implemented within the lighting network 101 or the lighting system 102, such as, for example, luminance and luminance systems that include data on types and layouts of light sources within the lighting network 101 Quot;). In another embodiment, the layout of the light sources is created in the schema timer, and the CAD file is sent to the building architect, lighting designer, and / or device installer. The lighting designer or others can create scenarios for the operation of the light sources. For example, the lighting designer may create scenarios that outline one or more of dim level, chromaticity settings, and beam angle for each light source within the illumination network 101 that varies with time or is constant. The schema may be considered a combination of scenarios for the illumination system 102, but the schema may be a scenario for a single light source in the illumination system 102. [ Moreover, the scenarios for one or more light sources in the illumination system 102 may themselves be governed by a schema that may include a plurality of auxiliary schemas.

Different schemas may be generated for different conditions or predefined events. For example, a particular schema may be generated for celebrity entry into the hotel lobby, or if the Down Jones Index falls below a certain threshold. In one embodiment, the schema may be used to indicate a condition intended for "Dow-Jones drop" for the schema for, for example, a celebrity for the schema created for the position of the celebrity, Can be represented and referred to using meaningful words or words. These schema names may be downloaded when the relevant schema is downloaded to the execution module 106 and stored in the schema data storage device 206. [

One feature of the IMI system is the translation into words or signals that may be associated with schema names of signals from sensor system 104, such as sensors that monitor the Internet. For example, the sensor system 104 may include an Internet detection module 106 that has an analysis option that can monitor the value of the Dow Jones index and send a meaning word "dow-jones drop & . &Lt; / RTI &gt; Upon receipt of a meaningful word, execution module 106 begins executing a "dow-jones_down" stored in schema data store 206. [

In a similar manner, the sensor that detects the individual identifier 110 may include a unit that delivers a meaningful word to a receiver (e.g., WLAN or RFID), an interpretation unit, and an execution module. Upon receipt of the RFID-signal from the celebrity's personal identifier, the sensor for detecting the personal identifier delivers a meaningful word "celebrity" to the execution module, Begin to run the schema "celebrity". If another schema is applicable, execution module 106 may arbitrate between schemas and / or schema schema 204 may provide a set of task rules to execution module 106 that takes into account both schemas.

In another embodiment, the sensor system 104 may include a rain sensor and an extension that translates the detected ratio into a meaningful word "rain ". Upon receipt of a meaningful word "ratio ", the execution module 106 may retrieve, from the schema data storage 206 that allows specific light sources within the illumination system 102 to be turned on or off, Quot; non-schema " In one embodiment, the execution module may also control other devices in the lighting system 102 that provide audio effects within the network, for example, and executing the schema "rain" To emit sounds such as simulated sounds. As such, occupants in the lighting network 101 located within a room without a window can be aware that it is raining externally, and occupants can experience simulated non-experience.

Figure 3 shows a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which user rules or user preference data may be shared between networks. The lighting network 101 and the lighting network 301 may implement the same or different schemas. 3, the illumination network 301 includes an illumination system 302, a sensor system 304, and an execution module 306. [ In one embodiment, the lighting network may comprise a set of sub-networks such as lighting networks 101, 301 in the same or different buildings. For example, a company with a geographically distributed set of offices may have each of the connected lighting networks for centralized control or monitoring.

In some embodiments, both the lighting network 101 and the lighting network 301 have access to data in the preference data store 112, which may be part of a remote data store for the schema. As such, when the user 108 is moved to a location served by the lighting network 301, the executive module 306 may provide access to the preferences data storage device &lt; RTI ID = 0.0 &gt; 112). In these embodiments, the user 108 may enter user preferences into the preference data storage 112, and then multiple networks may access the preference data storage 112 to obtain user preferences . For example, the user 108 may set preferences and / or personal schemas of the user in the preference data storage 112 and may set preferences of the user, including the user &apos; s personalized lighting parameters, The user can enter the coverage area of the mobile terminal 101. The user 108 can then move to the coverage area of the lighting network 301, where preferences and / or schema of the user including the user's personalized lighting parameters can also be considered. As such, the user 108 may only need to enter preference data and / or illuminate the personalized lighting parameters once and may thus do so before entering the coverage area of the particular network. Thus, regardless of whether the lighting network 101 and the lighting network 301 implement different system schemas, user preferences and personal schemas can be considered in each lighting network. In some embodiments, only the selected networks will recognize the user or user &apos; s personal identifier.

In addition to storing preferences in the preference data storage 112, in some embodiments, a user may store lighting preferences and / or the user's personal schema in the personal identifier 110. [ In these embodiments, each user that interacts effectively with the network has its own mini-data storage device. The collection of mini-data storage devices is effectively equivalent to a remote distribution database, such as data storage device 112. In this embodiment, the lighting network 301 may obtain user preference data that includes the user's personalized lighting parameters and / or the user's personal schema from the personal identifier (110). In another embodiment, the lighting network 301 may obtain the user's preference data or schema from the previous network visited by the user 108, such as the lighting network 101.

4 illustrates a block diagram of an exemplary personal identifier 110 in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention. In one embodiment, the personal identifier may be a mobile phone, a satellite phone, a BlackBerry,

Figure 112011060276670-pct00002
, An iPhone, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a pager, a laptop, a smart phone, or any other electronic device capable of processing and communicating power. 4, the personal identifier may include a controller, or microcontroller, or processor 402, position recognition circuitry 404, interface 406, memory 408, preference data memory 410, and RFID tag (s) 412). The user may enter his or her personal device preferences, such as the user's lighting preferences, via the interface 406, where the user, such as the user 108, may be a user interface.

The location recognition circuit 404 in the personal identifier 110 may be a global positioning service (GPS) circuit. The location determination circuit 404 may be operated using a secondary GPS and the triangulation from WiFi or other RF signals or the location within the individual identifier 110 may be calculated from the signals from the accelerometers, The position of the first electrode 110 may be determined based on a combination of these methods.

In some embodiments, the preference data and / or the user's schema are stored in memory 408, and preferences, such as when the user 108 enters a location with the IMI system 100, And is loaded into the data memory 410. The RFID tag 412 may be detected by the sensor system 104 and / or may broadcast an identification signal in response to the network 101 or not required. The RFID tag 412 can communicate with the preference data memory 410 to access preference data and / or schema stored in the preference data memory and the RFID tag 412 can send preference data to the network 101 have. In some embodiments, the personal identifier 110 is configured to transmit preference data to the network even when the personal identifier 110 is turned off by the user. In one embodiment, preference data 410 and / or preference data stored in memory 408 can not be changed by the lighting network 101. [

The RFID tag 412 or alternatively the personal identifier 110 may be a centralized (or possibly distributed) device that communicates with a building management system for HVAC control and power averaging information (obtained from a local power utility company) Data and event logging systems. &Lt; RTI ID = 0.0 &gt; IMI &lt; / RTI &gt; The IMI system communicates with, but does not directly control, each light source within the illumination system 102, which may each have their own sensors and dimming / switching controls. Judgments of how each device is controlled in some way are then shared responsibilities as the device responds to the sensor system 104, but can be overridden by the event logging system when power average distribution is desired. Similarly, the security system may invalidate all other commands during emergencies.

In some embodiments, a user may have preferences and / or schema for use only in certain environments. For example, a user may not have any device preferences during working days or during shopping, but may have preferences such as lighting preferences when visiting a nightclub. For this user, the personal identifier 110 is programmed such that the preference data memory 410 does not retain any data when the location recognition circuit 404 detects that the personal identifier 110 is located at work or at the shopping mall . When the position recognition circuit 404 determines that the personal identifier 110 is in the nightclub, the preference data memory 410 connected to the RFID tag 412 is occupied by the person's lighting preference data. Similarly, when user preferences are stored in data storage 112, data storage 112 may include only preference data only when user 108 is located in a particular environment.

In one embodiment, the user's preference data may be separated into different permission levels so that different networks can only access certain preference parameters. For example, the lighting network 101 may be allowed to access only certain aspects of the user 108's preference data, and the lighting network 301 may be allowed to access preference data of all the users 108 have. As another example, the user's lighting preferences may include color and brightness. A wider permission level may be provided for the brightness data, which may be appropriate for some people, for example, in a business, shopping or museum environment. A narrower permission level can be applied to the color preference data so that only night clubs, bars and restaurants have access to it. Upon querying the data storage device 112, the network itself identifies its type, and the data storage device 112 only provides preference data that is allowed to be accessed by this network.

FIG. 5 illustrates a block diagram of an exemplary execution module 106 in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention. In one embodiment, execution module 106 includes a controller or microprocessor or processor 502, memory 504, and interfaces 506A, 506B, and 506C. In one embodiment, the memory 504 controls the output of one or more of the light sources in the illumination system 102 in response to user preference, one or more schemas, an illumination script, or a parameter detected by the sensor system 104 Readable instructions for the controller 502 to process the data. For example, the executive module 106 may control the output of light sources according to preference data such as the user's personalized schema stored within the preference data storage 112. In one embodiment, execution module 106 mediates between different inputs, e.g., different inputs from various sensors within sensor system 104. [ In another embodiment, the memory 504 may function as a temporary or long-term storage device for one or more of the following default parameters, learned behavior, user preferences, and one or more schemas. As shown in FIG. 5, the execution module 106 has three interfaces, interfaces 506A and 506B, shown as wired interfaces, and interface 506C, shown as a wireless interface.

Execution module 106 may be implemented via a personal or laptop computer, or it may be a standalone electronic module. In one embodiment, execution module 106 is distributed across multiple devices.

Figure 6 shows a block diagram of an exemplary lighting network 601 in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which a schema is used. As shown in FIG. 6, the illumination system 102 may include one or more light sources 603 connected to a power line 605 for their power source. In one embodiment, one or more of the light sources 603 may be powered individually, such as by a separate solar panel or by a battery. Light sources 603 may also be connected to network control line 607 and may communicate with execution module 606 via interface 506B. The light sources 603 may include drivers for converting the power input into a format suitable for supplying current to the light emitting elements. The sensor system 104 may include one or more sensors 610 connected to the execution module 606 via a network control line 612 and an interface 506A. The sensor system 604 and the illumination system 602 may share an interface with the execution module 606, although the sensor system 604 is shown as using an individual interface from the illumination system 602. Moreover, although the network control lines 607 and 612 to the light sources 603 and the sensors 610 are shown as being wired, they may be wireless. FIG. 6 shows an execution module 606 that connects to schema timer 204 over a wireless communication link via interface 506C. However, those skilled in the art will appreciate that other communication links, such as a wired communication link, may be used to communicate with the schema tizer 204.

Figure 7 illustrates a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system 700 in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which a schema may be used and shared. 7, the user and / or system schema may be remotely stored (stored) on a server or data storage device 112 that may be connected to the execution module 706 via the Internet 702 via the interface 704 . The execution module 706 within the network 701 is typically able to execute the system schema but upon accessing the user's personal schema stored within the data storage device 112 upon detection of the presence of the individual identifier 110 in its coverage area And uses the identity of the individual identifier 110 to retrieve it. The schema of the user, such as a particular network or more than one schema, is downloaded from the data storage 112, in accordance with the schema available to the IMI system 701, may be used in different ranges.

7, components of the sensor system 104, such as sensors 705, may share a control line 607 with components of the illumination system 102, such as light sources 603 have.

8A shows a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system 800 in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which schema and preference data may be shared. As shown in FIG. 8A, a schema may be generated or stored in the schema tizger 204 connected to the execution module 706. In addition, the schema may be remotely stored in the remote schema storage device 802, which may be accessible to the lighting network 801 via the Internet 702 and centrally accessible to the one or more networks. The remote data schema storage device 802 may be considered to be a rules database. In one embodiment, the remote schema storage device is a schema timer. In some embodiments, the execution module 706 downloads the schema from the remote schema storage device 802 for implementation in the IMI system 800. Execution module 706 may download the schema from remote schema storage device 802 in the direction of an administrator, lighting designer, or operator of network 801. The schema may then be downloaded into the schema data storage 206. Although shown in FIG. 8 as being stored in separate data storage devices, the user &apos; s personal schema and system schema may be stored in the same server, in separate servers, or in distributed servers. In one embodiment, charges may be collected from the downloading of the schema to compensate for the owner or constructor of the schema. The schemas may be written so that they are independent of, or automatically adaptable to, the size and number of sensors in the sensor system 104 in the lighting system 801 and the devices in the illumination system &lt; RTI ID = 0.0 &gt;

In one embodiment, the schema may be passed to the remote schema storage device 802 after proceeding through the learning process to adapt to the preferences of the occupants of the lighting network 801 and / or buildings within the IMI system 800 located in a particular building Can be uploaded. By making this schema available to other networks in similar buildings, initial parameters are better suited to the occupants than are simply set by the off-the-shelf schema or building manager, by occupants performing similar kinds of work There is a lot more potential to become.

In addition, the IMI system 800 may find that the behavior of occupants within a building has changed or has gone beyond what is conventional. The IMI system 800 can then proceed through this change and can be switched to a new schema or be stored in a remote schema store that can be negotiated with its existing schema to obtain a set of operational rules for the new schema via data fusion May be stored in the device 802. In one embodiment, privacy concerns are considered when the schema is shared so that user preferences and / or schema may not be shared, or may be shared only to an extent determined by the permission level.

3, illumination networks 101,301 may be located in similar buildings, and illumination systems 102,230 may be located within daylight sensors within sensor systems 104,304, Light control systems that are designed to minimize annual energy consumption by changing the light output of the light sources within the lighting systems 102, Although a number of parameters typically need to consider generating control signals for the illumination systems 102, 302 to implement these daylight control systems, they use IMI techniques to learn the best lighting solution through trial and error May be possible. Moreover, they may be able to communicate with other networks in different buildings and to see their solutions. In this embodiment, the schema may be referred to as corresponding to the buildings on which they are learned.

8B shows a block diagram of an exemplary IMI system 803 in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which schema and preference data can be shared and agents used to communicate with remote resources. 8B, the illumination system 102 includes two types of lights, illumination sources 804 and luminance light sources 806. As shown in FIG. The illumination system 102 may include one or more illumination sources 804 and one or more luminance sources 806. Execution module 106 may receive schema identifier 204 (e.g., based on input from personality identifier 110 or sensor system 104) or based on input from preference data storage 112 via internet 702 ). &Lt; / RTI &gt;

The network 808 includes an agent 810. In one embodiment, agent 810 acts instead of a monitoring center having a central database of schemas, such as, for example, remote schema storage device 802. [ The agent 810 monitors the network 808 and passes the behavior or the newly developed schema to the remote schema storage device 802. The agent can operate automatically and send information only when there is something to send, or it can be triggered by a request from schema schema 204 or remote schema storage device 802. The agent may be written to be installed in new networks as part of the software or firmware, or may be written to be installed in existing networks as software or firmware upgrades. One or more agents 810 may be controlled by a central monitoring center to download a more appropriate and efficient lighting schema from the remote schema storage device 802 in accordance with comprehensively obtained knowledge when installed in a plurality of independent networks have.

9A shows a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention where the execution module is part of a light source. The light sources 902A and 902B also include sensors for use in the illumination network 101. [ As such, the light sources 902A, 902B are part of the illumination system 102 and also part of the sensor system 104. Light sources 902A and 902B each include a sensor 904 and communicate over a network line 906. In one embodiment, the light source 902A includes an execution module 908. [ As a rough network such as the lighting network 101 evolves or as more and more complex optical schemes are implemented and / or more users with personal preferences are within the coverage area of the lighting network 101, May be required or advantageous. Thus, in one embodiment, the light sources 902B include memory modules 910, respectively. Memory modules 910 may be of different sizes or capacities to optimize the manufacturing process and supply chain of light sources 902B.

Figure 9b shows a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention in which an execution module is distributed between light sources. 9B, exemplary light sources 902C and 902B include sensors 904 for use in the network 101, and the execution module is distributed across a plurality of light sources. For example, light source 902C in Fig. 9B includes a controller or microcontroller 901, and light sources 902B include memory modules 910. Fig. Although this embodiment is not required, it may be used in systems where the user's schema is stored in the personal identifier 110. [ Light source 902C may be considered to be part of illumination system 102 and also part of sensor system 104. [

9C shows a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system according to embodiments of the present invention, wherein each light source comprises an execution module. The light sources 914A to 914C are the same and can communicate wirelessly, for example, via RF. Light sources 914 include execution modules 908 and sensors 904. Light sources 914 may be considered to be part of the illumination system 102 and also part of the sensor system 104. This embodiment can simplify the supply chain for the light sources 902A because the light sources 902A shown in Fig. 9C can be the same. In one embodiment, one of the light sources 914, such as light source 914A, may be designed as having a master execution module and may be configured to have a processing power of the other light sources 914B, 914C in the network, And memories. In a large network, where there are a number of zones to be controlled with different lighting effects, a number of master execution modules may be designed that are all aided to the grandmaster controlling the entire lighting effects in space. For example, people in different groups within a bar or restaurant may have very different colors of illumination through their own personal preferences settings. Due to energy conservation challenges, situations that arise due to the need to signal the proximity of the VIP's entry or closing time, the overall lighting level can be darkened or brightened while still retaining the color preferences of individuals and groups. This embodiment may utilize a fixed layer of dedicated illumination controllers. Since the light sources 914 include sensors 904, the light sources 914 may be considered to be part of the illumination system 102 and also part of the sensor system 104.

Figure 9d shows a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which the light sources are in optical communication. Light sources 916 may be lighting devices in which light emitted from one light source 916 is modulated by communication signals. This light is detected by adjacent light sources configured to be reflected from the surface 918 in the environment and to extract the communication signal from the entire detected optical signal. Since light sources 916 include sensors 904, such as light sources 914, 902A through 902C, light sources 916 may be used to illuminate portions of illumination system 102 and also portions of sensor system 104 . &Lt; / RTI &gt;

Figure 9E illustrates a block diagram of light sources for use in an exemplary IMI system in accordance with embodiments of the present invention in which the light sources 920A through 920D communicate using various protocols. For example, light source 920A can optically communicate with light source 920B through reflection from surface 918, light source 920B can communicate wirelessly with light source 920C, and light source 920C May communicate with light source 920D via a wired connection.

In one embodiment, the light sources 902A, 902B, 914A through 914C, 916A, 920A through 920D may be wired to the power supply line and in other embodiments, the light sources 902A, 902B, 914A through 914C, To 920D are individually powered via individual solar panels or via a battery.

Figure 10 shows a block diagram of a network layout in accordance with embodiments of the present invention. The network 1002 includes a plurality of regions 1004A through 1004D having a plurality of light sources 1008 controlled by a distributed arrangement of controllers 1006A through 1006E that may reside within the light sources 1008 do. For example, area 1004A may represent an office, area 1004B may represent a corridor, area 1004C may represent a waiting room, and area 1004D may represent a reception area. In one embodiment, each of the regions 1004A through 1004D may constitute a separate network.

The term "controller" is used herein to describe various devices generally associated with the operation of one or more lights. The controller may be implemented in a number of ways (e.g., having dedicated hardware) to perform the various functions described herein. A "processor" is an example of a controller that utilizes one or more microprocessors that can be programmed using software (e.g., microcode) to perform the various functions described herein. A controller may be implemented with or without a processor, or may be implemented as a combination of a processor (e.g., one or more programmed microprocessors and associated circuitry) for executing dedicated functions and other functions for performing some functions . Examples of controller components that may be used in various embodiments of the present invention include, but are not limited to, conventional microprocessors, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs).

In one network implementation, one or more devices coupled to the network (e.g., a light or a light source, a lighting unit or facility, a controller or processor associated with one or more light sources or lighting units, other non-lighting related devices, etc.) May function as a controller for one or more other devices coupled to the network (e.g., in a master / slave relationship). In other implementations, the networked environment may include one or more dedicated controllers configured to control one or more of the devices coupled to the network. In general, a plurality of devices coupled to a network may each have access to data residing on a communication medium or media, but a given device may include, for example, one or more specific identifiers (e.g., Addressable "in that it is configured to selectively exchange (i.e., receive and / or transmit data to and from it) data with the network based on the address (e.g.," addresses ").

The term "addressable" is used herein to refer to a device configured to receive information (e.g., data) intended for a plurality of devices including itself and to selectively respond to specific information intended for it. The term "addressable" is often used in conjunction with a networked environment in which a plurality of devices are coupled together via some communication medium or medium.

In various implementations, a processor or controller may be coupled to one or more storage media (e.g., volatile and nonvolatile computer memory such as RAM, PROM, EPROM, and EEPROM, floppy disks, compact disks, optical disks, Generally referred to herein as "memory"). In some implementations, the storage medium may be encoded with one or more programs that execute at least a portion of the functions described herein when executed on one or more processors and / or controllers. Various storage media may be fixed or transportable within the processor or controller so that one or more programs stored thereon may be loaded into the processor or controller to implement various aspects of the invention described herein. The term "program" or "computer program" is used herein to refer to any type of computer code (e.g., software or microcode) that can be used to program one or more processors or controllers .

Each of the regions 1004A through 1004D includes light sources 1008, which in one embodiment may be light sources 902A, 902B, 914A through 914C, 916, 920A through 920D. Region 1004A is shown having twelve light sources 1008 and region 1004B is shown having four light sources 1008 and region 1004C is illustrated as having eight light sources 1008, And region 1004D is shown as having six light sources 1008, the region may have only one light source. Light sources 1008 may communicate with each other via a number of control paths including optical, wired, or wireless communication paths.

One or more of the light sources 1008 may have a processor and / or memory. In some embodiments, light sources 1008 with a processor such as controllers 1006A-1006D operate a schema for light sources 1008 in a given area. For example, the controller 1006C may operate a schema for the waiting room area 1004C. In one embodiment, one of the light sources with a processor may be designed as a "master" processor or controller that monitors signals from other processors to ensure proper system operation. The master processor may also operate a schema for a particular area 1004A through 1004D. For example, controller 1006D may operate a schema for area 1004D and may also act as a master processor for network 1002. [ When the master processor detects a problem in the processor within the light source, the master processor may designate a spare processor in the network to take charge of executing the schema for the area. If the master controller 1006D detects a problem in the processor in the light source, such as, for example, the controller 1006A, the master controller 1006D may, for example, For example, controller 1006E may specify a preliminary process within the network. Memory modules 1012 may store information such as schema and user preferences. In one embodiment, memory modules 1012 each store the same information. If the controller can not retrieve information from one memory module, it may retrieve the same information from another memory module that can communicate with it. In another embodiment, one or more of the memory modules 1012 stores different information from the other memory modules.

In one embodiment, if one or more of the regions 1004A through 1004D or sections of regions do not have a controller 1006, the devices in regions 1004A through 1004D may receive commands therefrom, 0.0 &gt; 1004D &lt; / RTI &gt;

In the embodiment shown in FIG. 10, the memory modules 1012 are distributed across the network. In this embodiment, subsystems or areas within the network may submit data to other subsystems or areas that use the information to modify the localized databases. For example, a particular set of behaviors may be set in area 1004A, and preferences are stored locally in memory module 1012 located within area 1004A. The controller 1006D may poll the memory modules 1012 in the network and the area 1004D may be set to 1004D if the sensors detect some kind of different behavior there, &Lt; / RTI &gt; may find the closest matching and copy over preferences or schema parameters to the local database / memory in the database. In one embodiment, controller 1006D may also poll remote data storage devices to find closest matches and copies across preferences or schema parameters. The principle of transmitting or radiating illumination behavior from one area of the network to another may also be done using a database that is central to the network.

In one embodiment, the illumination system 102 is an existing device such as a Color Kinetics iPlayer or illumivision Pharos. These lighting systems rely on standard lighting network communication protocols such as Dali, DMX, and ZigBee. As such, the illumination system 102 enables these protocols or other open standards to be used and thus enables the illumination network 101 to communicate using existing lighting protocols.

11 is a flow diagram illustrating a variation of a system schema in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention. In step 1102, an initial device output is set in the schema stored in the schema data storage device 206. [ In one exemplary embodiment, the initial illumination level may be set to 10% when the room is not occupied. In step 1104, the sensor system 102 in the illumination network 101 detects the presence of the user 108 in the illumination network 101, for example, by detecting the presence of a personal identifier 110 or by detecting biometric data. And the execution module 106 retrieves the preferences associated with the user 108 (or the user's personal schema, if any) from the data storage 112. In step 1106, If the retrieved personal preferences indicate that the user prefers to change the light source output, e.g., if the user indicates that they prefer the 80% illumination level, then at step 1108 the execution module 106 sets a new light source output , For example, the illumination level can be set to 80%. In this manner, the executive module 106 modifies the system schema to conform to personal preferences including the current user &apos; s personalized device parameters, and commands to control the output settings of one or more light sources within the lighting system 102 And interprets the modified schema. When interpreting the schema with commands, the execution module 106 and / or its controller may interpret instructions in accordance with the configuration of the illumination network 101. [ For example, the execution module 106 may interpret the schema to "back up" according to the capabilities of the lighting system 102. For example, rules in the schema may suggest that light of a particular color be emitted, but the lighting system 102 may not have the ability to output this color. In this situation, the execution module 106 may command the lighting system 102 to emit light of a similar color. The modified schema may be stored in the schema data storage 206. At step 1110, when the sensor system 102 no longer detects the presence of the user 108 in the illumination network 101, the execution module 106 determines at step 1102 that the user Sets the light source output in the illumination system 102 within the schema again and stores the calibrated schema in the schema data storage 206. [

12 is a flow diagram illustrating an implementation of user preferences or schema from a remote database in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention in which preferences or schemas for more than one user are considered. In step 1202, an initial device output is set. In step 1204, the sensor system 102 detects the presence of the user, for example by detecting the user's personal identifier 110, and in step 1206 the execution module 106 retrieves the data stored in the data storage device 112, To search for preferences associated with the user. If the retrieved personal preferences or the user's personal schema indicates that the user may prefer to change the device output, then in step 1208 execution module 106 sets a new device output. At step 1210, the sensor system 104 detects an additional user 116 (see FIG. 3), for example, by detecting a personal identifier 114 in the presence of the network 101. In step 1212, the execution module 106 retrieves the preferences or schema associated with the second individual identifier 114 from the data storage device 112. In one embodiment, instead of or in addition to receiving preferences from the data storage device 112, the execution module 106 may use a user such as the user 108 and the user 116 to obtain the user's current preference data Lt; / RTI &gt; Each user may enter his or her current preferences into his or her personal identifier, which in turn provides this information to the execution module 106. [

At step 1214 execution module 106 determines an average or combination, level using preferences from additional user 116 and user 108 having second personal identifier 114. Such a combination may be, but is not limited to, a mix of preferences of two users, an average of users 'preferences, and a sequence of users' preferences. The preference data of one of the users may include registration data indicating that one of the users has a priority status relative to the other user, in which case the combination of the preferences of the two users is the preference data of the higher priority user Or a weighted average of a user's preferences that provides a higher weight to a user's preference level with a higher priority, or a weighted average weighted average according to a time length of the user &lt; RTI ID = 0.0 &gt; . In step 1216, the execution module 106 sets a new level of light output for the light sources of the illumination system 102 as determined in step 1214. [

The transition from one output setting to another setting may be immediate or fast, or it may be delayed or progressive in order not to facilitate users present in the environment into new settings. The transition time can vary over a few seconds or minutes, and this transition time can be included in the user's preference data.

Figure 13 is a flow diagram illustrating an implementation of user preferences or schema from remote databases in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention. In Figure 13, at step 1302, the execution module 106 receives data indicative of the time from the sensor system 104 or from an internal timing mechanism within the execution module 106. At step 1304, the sensor system 104 retrieves ambient sensor inputs such as, but not limited to, weather input, temperature input, and daylight level. At step 1306, the sensor system 104 detects one or more users, for example, by detecting the individual identifiers 110, and at step 1308 the execution module 106 retrieves the data from the data storage device 112 Search for preferences associated with users, such as users' group sharing schemes. In step 1310, the execution module 106 adds the retrieved affinity data to the local data storage 202. [ At step 1312, execution module 106 inserts shared preferences, time, and other data retrieved from sensor system 104 into the system schema. At step 1314, using the modified system schema, execution module 106 determines the control signals to be sent to lighting system 104 for implementation of the schema. In step 1316, the execution module 106 sets a new output for the light sources in the illumination system 104.

In one embodiment, the network 101 may provide the user with a tailored experience (e. G., A tailored music experience) as the user visits various different places throughout the day. For example, a train station may have a video screen that can be controlled in accordance with user preferences in the vicinity. Those looking for a job can upload a short video clip that introduces the type of job they are looking for and their skills, and can optionally include a phone number. This clip can be automatically displayed on the screen so that potential employees in the vicinity can see it, facilitating encounters between them. People who sell cars privately can do the same even if they sell other items. The advertisement may be linked to the detected keywords.

While a number of embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated herein, those of skill in the art will appreciate that various implementations may be made to perform and / or execute the functions described herein, or to obtain one or more of the results and / Examples can be considered immediately.

For example, significant energy savings can be achieved in large office buildings by controlling lighting and HVAC facilities for conference rooms. That is, the light sources can be darkened or turned off when the room is not occupied, and air conditioning can be reduced. An exemplary schema for a conference room includes the following rules: (1) if the conference room is empty, all devices containing the lights should be turned off; (2) If a moving occupant is present in the room, the room must be illuminated according to the occupant's preference data, but the occupants' preferences should be scaled within a small, concentrated area of white; (3) If one occupant sitting at the table is present in the room, the system must illuminate the occupant's desk area according to the occupant's preference data and, for example, at a reduced level, such as brightness of 30% Illuminate the rest of the room; (4) If there are multiple occupants in the conference room and all occupants are standing, the light level of the conference room should be set as the average of the occupants' preferences; (5) If there are a number of occupants in the conference room and one occupant is sitting at the table, the lights projected on the occupant's sitting table should be set to the occupant's preference and the other room lights should be darkened by 5%; (6) If all the occupants are sitting on one or more tables, the table lights should be set to the occupants' preferences around the table or within specific areas within the room as possible, and the room lights not directed to the tables should be set to 30 % Brightness level; (7) If all the occupants are seated and one or more occupants become impatient after a certain time has passed since the occupant sits, add a light blue tint to the lights; (8) may include one or more of the rules for brightening the room according to occupants' preferences when the occupant begins to occur, but scaling the light output within a small range focused on white. This schema can be shared with other networks with conference rooms.

In one embodiment, the building management system may control lighting and HVAC facilities, but may alternatively only have knowledge of meeting schedules. The IMI system can support residents by monitoring when they enter or leave the room and notify the building management system how many people are in the room. Because each person typically generates 100 watts of heat, a collection of 20 or more people can have a significant impact on meeting room HVAC requirements.

Lighting requirements in conference rooms often change as meeting activities change. For example, participants can change between video presentations and whiteboard discussions. Devices such as video projectors may or may not be connected to the device management system and it may be confusing for users to manually control the light sources if general lighting is required during the video presentation. However, the IMI system can determine who is in the meeting from their personal identifiers. Their collective illumination schemes and locations can then be used to determine their most likely lighting preferences for a particular conference room based on past history.

In another example, a network whose coverage area includes a common room may generate and / or implement the following schema to respond to identified and unidentified persons. The relaxation room schema may include a default mode in which no occupants are detected in the coverage area of the network. In the default mode, the space is illuminated at a low level with slow or continuously varying color or brightness. Every time a person enters the rest room, a different color is introduced. The break room schema may also include a mode for when a person is near the entrance of the break room but outside of the break room. In this mode, as a person approaches the entrance, the light level slightly increases or changes color as a type of invitation to the entry. In one embodiment, any one of the doors to the rest room is transparent or there are windows near the door so that the occupant can see the change in illumination level or illumination color. The break room schema can include a mode for when the occupant just enters the break room and looks around. In this mode, the brightness in a particular or randomly selected area is increased or there is a color change in this area. As the occupant's focus shifts to the area, the system keeps track of the occupant's gaze. The brightness or color change is then further enhanced. In one embodiment, the bright or colored area then begins to move slowly around the room, and the system can keep track of the occupant's gaze. If the occupant follows a bright or colored area, enhanced brightness or color may continue. Otherwise, the bright or colored area may be restarted from the initial area, possibly attempting to induce the occupant to follow the area with his or her gaze at a slower or faster rate. If the occupant sees another place, the area the occupant strikes may become lighter or tinted, and the process may be retried from this new starting point. In one embodiment, if the occupant starts laughing or verbally acknowledges a bright or colored area, the entire room can respond to instantaneous enhancement of color. In this mode, the room only tries to show the user what he can do as long as the occupant responds positively to it. In one mode, if the occupant points to a particular area within the rest room, for example, if the occupant points to a bright or colored area in the guest with him or her, the area indicated by the occupant may be lightened or the color enhanced, Once the occupant enables them or retrieves from the customer 's preferences or schema, the color used may be retrieved from the occupant' s preferences or schema if the customer enables preferences or schema. In one embodiment, if the occupant admires and redirects to the rest room, the occupant may return with a warm incandescent light around her in the color selected from the occupant's preferences. If people are in the break room in advance, lighting enhancement, color and movement can be minimized in the vicinity of these people in order not to disturb them. Illumination around these people who are already in the system may be determined by some implementation of a combination of their preferences restricted by the full range defined within the schema. Such a combination may include, but is not limited to, a mix of occupants 'preferences, an average of occupants' preferences, a preference of selected prioritized occupants, a weighted average of occupant preferences based on occupant priorities, and a preference of different occupants Sequence.

In the break room example, if the occupant is not interested in seeing the occupant at any point when entering the break room and heading to a position in the break room, for example, the occupant may just sit down and read the newspaper or move to a location (e.g., , A bar, a reception desk). On going straight, the lighting system provides reading, etc. according to the user's preference, and by proceeding to the static lighting mode according to the user's preference, or by attempting to determine the user's walking position, Thus responding by providing extra lighting for this. If there are two or three possible destinations, all are illuminated until the system makes a more precise decision as to where the occupant proceeds. As the occupant walks toward the destination, a warmer glow can surround the occupant. This may be related to the weather, or it may be contrary to the weather, the dominant color or complementary color of the garment, or it may depend on the occupier's seniority or level of priorities. In addition, the color or brightness of the light following the occupant can be determined by the occupant's preference data. The break room also has a mode for when the occupant enters the break room and finds activities to be performed. In this mode, the local illumination is adjusted by the occupant's activity and the occupant's lighting preference for this activity. The rest of the illumination gradually diminishes the brightness to conserve energy, but it is still slightly different each time the occupant's gaze is turned away from the activity by gradually changing the color. Once the occupant begins to look further, the lighting can begin to change gradually or quickly.

In another example, a schema may be generated for a private office for a user. The schemas may include, but are not limited to, switchable and / or dimmable light sources and personal identifier locations such as occupancy sensors, motion sensors, personal identifier sensors such as RFID tag sensors, and RFID tag position sensors May be implemented within a network having a sensor system with one or more of the identification sensors. The network may further include one or more of software modules embodied on a computer readable medium, such as a timer or event scheduling module, a behavior learning capability module, and an energy usage logging and reporting capabilities module. The network can communicate with the building management system.

For example, a user can work in a private office without any windows, use an RFID key holder to receive access to a private office building upon arrival at the office, and typically use an RFID key holder from the front door of the building You can go directly to your private office. During the day, the user can typically stay in the user's office, but sometimes leaves for scheduled meetings for a long time and leaves the private office with an empty sieve. Users can sometimes work late at night and on weekends, and these can happen regularly or randomly. The IMI system may receive notification from the security system that a user enters the building, which may then turn on the lighting fixtures of the private office. If the user arrives early and the building lighting fixtures are separately turned off from the security lighting, the IMI system can turn on only those lighting fixtures needed to illuminate the route to the user's private office. The sensor system may also query the user &apos; s RFID tag on a regular basis to determine the user's location within a predetermined distance, e.g., 1 meter. If the user is in a meeting at a location in the building, the sensor system can detect it and the execution module can turn off the user's office lights according to a predetermined preset delay and turn them on upon user return.

The IMI system can also control the strength of the user's office lighting throughout the day to mimic the change in intensity of natural daylight. In addition, if the private office has solid state lighting (SSL) lighting fixtures, the system can also control the color temperature and spectral content to signal the user's 24-hour cycle rhythm. Studies by night shift workers (and submarine crews) indicate that changing this type of illumination reduces the stress levels of employees.

The IMI system also recognizes from the user's preferences that the user prefers a fairly high level of ambient lighting while a person in an adjacent office may prefer much lower levels of ambient lighting. When this person visits the user's office, the IMI system can choose to darken the user's office lighting as a compromise. As a principal resident of a private office, the user may be entitled to void this behavior. If the user often negates the darkening of the lights, the IMI system will learn the user's preference without being explicitly notified of this preference.

The IMI system also has access to a supersonic or ultrasonic occupancy sensor within the user's office. If it is detected that the user's personal identifier is in the user's private office but reporting that there is no detected movement for a long period of time, the IMI system assumes that the user left the office but left a personal identifier on the user's desk or is asleep The lighting system can be dimmed or turned off. Once again, the user can override this behavior and, if sufficiently disabled often enough, the IMI system can be learned to extend the occupancy sensor latency and eventually ignore it entirely.

The IMI system can also be connected to the user's personal schedule and other devices so that if the user detects that he is asleep when the appointment time approaches, it will sound an alarm, play the user's favorite music / I will increase the brightness.

In one embodiment, the building manager has access to the user's daily activities, but these activities can be provided to the building manager anonymously for personal reasons. This can provide the building manager with records of the user's monthly energy consumption. If the user makes an effort to allow the IMI system to conserve energy (allowing the lights in the private office to be turned off when not occupied), the user can receive a small but noticeable amount on his or her salary, Other incentives may be offered.

The IMI system can also query the building management system to determine the electrical energy cost per hour from the utility company and to perform the power averaging by darkening the lighting fixtures when needed or required.

Other exemplary schemas may be generated for a private office for the user. This scheme includes, but is not limited to, an illumination system including switchable and / or dimmable illuminators, a programmable desk lamp with an optical receiver, motorized blinks and / or electrochromic windows, Personal identifier sensors such as motion sensors, personal identifier positioning sensors such as RFID tag sensors and RFID tag position sensors, luminaire or ceiling mounted daylight sensors, external light sensors, imaging sensors, And may be implemented in a network having a sensor system with one or more of color temperature sensors. The network may further include one or more of software modules embodied on a computer readable medium, such as a timer or event scheduling module, a behavior learning capability module, an energy usage logging and reporting capabilities module, and an image processing and analysis capability module . The network may communicate with the building management system and / or the office computer system.

In this embodiment, the user may have a private office with western windows. The user may prefer that the luminaire be excited during the morning hours, but in the afternoon there may be sufficient daylight entry generally to dim the luminaire or turn them completely off. However, the sun may be a flash source during the late afternoon in the summer, so the user can occasionally close the blinds and turn on the lights. The user may also prefer to dim the luminaire when the user is working with his computer with a desk lamp for the work lamp, but the user may need more light in the office when the user is holding conferences have.

The IMI system can monitor in-room lighting fixtures or ceiling mounted daylight sensors, or it can monitor roof mounted daylight sensors. In the first case, the IMI system may operate the luminaire in closed loop feedback mode to maintain constant desktop lighting in the room. In the second case, the IMI system may operate the luminaire in open-loop mode to achieve the same goal, but it should be assumed that the blinds are open.

As such, ceiling mounted optical sensors can only determine the average amount of reflected light in that field of view. However, in one embodiment, the IMI system can determine from the time and date that the sun is likely to be a potential flash source, and shut down the blinds if they are motorized or equally dark.

Further, in one embodiment, if the ceiling mounted optical sensor is an imaging device, the IMI system may be configured to: a) determine the current desktop illumination; b) detect whether the room is occupied; c) determine the occupants' , And d) performing security functions when the room is not occupied or after work hours. The IMI system is possibly capable of monitoring a computer-equipped webcam.

In another embodiment, if the user regularly closes the blinds on sunny days during the summer, the IMI system can learn this behavior and automatically perform this function when appropriate. If this action is not required, a simple "no final event" command entered via a desktop computer or cellular phone is sufficient to maintain IMI.

Although a number of daylight control systems can be easily confused by external events such as clouds passing on a clear day or reflections from delivery vehicles (real life foresight), in one embodiment the IMI system determines the more appropriate responses The output of the optical sensor can be compared to those of other optical sensors in other buildings in or near the Weihai building.

The ability to monitor and share information from multiple sensors may be valuable for security in some embodiments. For example, in one embodiment, if the imaging device detects movement in the room at night, it may be an intruder or a simple light from a passing vehicle. However, if this subsequently detects movement outside the room, this is likely to be an intruder and therefore an alarm event is generated in the building management system.

In one embodiment, if the IMI system detects that the user is in the room according to the location of his personal identifier, then the overhead lighting fixtures should be darkened and the desk lamp should be turned on, You can query the office computer system for.

In some embodiments, mounting a desk lamp and other light sources with a photodetector having its own IP address and capable of receiving commands generated by overhead lighting fixtures instead of connecting a desk lamp to the lighting network It can be more economical. The light output of the fluorescent or SSL lamps can be modulated by digital instructions (similar to an infrared remote control) that are not visually perceptible by users.

In some embodiments, the IMI system may also refer to or be notified to the user's conference scheduler, and may change the room lighting in preparation for scheduled meetings so that the meeting is about to begin, Provide a queue.

With multicolor SSL lighting fixtures, the IMI system also has the opportunity to monitor the color temperature of the daylight entering the room and adjust the fixture color temperature accordingly.

According to the embodiments described herein, once the schema for the user's private office is established, the schema adapted for the user's preferences can be shared with other networks. For example, the schema may be accessed by a network operating within the user's home office, or when the user is working from a satellite office outside of the normal office.

Other exemplary schemas may be created for a workspace for a user rather than a private office such as an open office personal space. Such workspaces may have, for example, direct-indirect fluorescent lighting and under-cabinet working lighting.

The IMI system can provide user work on the desk directly overhead lighting fixtures and workspace independent control of the ambient lighting. The IMI system can also be aware of the distribution of illumination throughout the office space in which the workspace is located and can therefore ensure that these luminaries do not adversely affect the work and ambient lighting of neighboring workspaces or private spaces . For example, the IMI system can quickly learn operator preferences by recording worker responses to changes in work and ambient lighting initiated by their partners. You can not guarantee complete satisfaction for everyone, but you can quickly set an optimal balance. In one embodiment, office workers can be polled at the implementation of the environmental change by the business partner, and in another embodiment, office worker preferences are learned based on environmental manual modifications of the workers in response to the partner changes.

In the schema according to this embodiment, the IMI system can save energy by monitoring daylight entry and dimming overhead lighting fixtures as appropriate. It can also operate electrochromic windows or motorized blinds to minimize visual flashes. In some embodiments, the IMI system may have access to multiple sensors and thus may form a better understanding of the distribution of both electric light and daylight throughout the space. Even if the individuals in the space can not be tracked in real time, it is possible to examine the output from the plurality of light sensors and imaging sensors to distinguish between light level changes due to moving people and changing sunlight conditions have.

However, if the IMI system tracks individuals, it can respond to emergencies that require building evacuations by calculating optimal exit routes without the risk of congested outlets and can direct them via flashing overhead lighting fixtures have. It can also be ensured that everyone is evacuating the building and guiding those who are unable to do so.

In the schema for the workspace, an imaging sensor mounted on the ceiling or overhead luminaire can monitor the position of the user and thereby control the under-cabinet working light. Alternatively, a flush-mounted superelevation motion sensor located within the display monitor can be monitored by the IMI system to control both the computer power saving mode and the working light of the personal space.

According to the embodiments described herein, this schema may be shared with other buildings, networks and IMI systems. For example, an IMI system whose coverage area has workspaces may want to use a predetermined schema to operate within workspaces.

In some embodiments, the illumination system includes SSL-based illumination devices capable of free-space visible light communications. SSL-based lighting fixtures do not require any low-voltage wiring or conduits for communication cables, which may be beneficial to embodiments where the IMI system is retrofitted in offices where the installation of new communication wiring and conduits is prohibitively expensive have. Systems using SSL-based lighting devices can also be inherently fault-tolerant. It is possible for all luminaire within each other's line of sight to communicate with any other luminaire in the group. If the daylight device or its embedded process fails for any reason, the rest of the network is unaffected. Moreover, the luminaire that is not in line of sight of one another can still communicate via one or more luminaire in the line of sight of both luminaire. Moreover, systems using SSL-based lighting devices can utilize visible light communications without regard to radio frequency interference or channel capacity limitations as may occur with wireless communication technologies such as ZigBee or Bluetooth. In addition, no additional power electronic devices, such as those required by some infrared LEDs or radio frequency transceivers, are required for SSL-based luminaire, for example. The visible light modulators are an integral component of the LED drivers.

Other exemplary schemas may be generated for use in a hotel. For example, a hotel may implement a schema to use spotlights or month washers to indicate that an employee is available to serve the next guest. A network within the hotel with a sensor system that can identify guests can guide customers through the light cues to staff who are ready to handle their registration.

Lighting and especially color can also be used to identify tourist group members who need to be gathered in a large hotel lobby or restaurant. Here, RFID-equipped hotel room key cards can serve to guide and guide customers in an inconspicuous manner.

In a similar manner, color illumination can be used to assist two people in positioning each other in a large lobby, for example, by changing intensity or color when they are in close proximity. In a similar manner, the IMI system can guide new arriving guests to their rooms by tracking their RFID-equipped hotel room keys and by increasing the lighting level next to their doors in long corridors, When they exit the elevator, they will flash the lighting fixtures if they make the wrong turn.

The lighting management system may be perceived by customers as a system that responds to and supports them instead of or in addition to systems controlled by the hotel.

In the hotel's swimming pool or exercise room, guests can find themselves alone late at night or early in the morning. In this situation, the IMI system can use a camera to track the position of a person in the pool and follow them with color lights (such as LEDs embedded at the edge of the swimming pool) or based on their physical activity level, The intensity of the color accent illumination can be changed.

In hotel rooms, the IMI system provides a body with natural illumination cues that simulate a sunrise, which can gradually increase the illumination level 10 minutes in the morning or before the alarm sounds. Similarly, bathroom lights can be automatically turned on if guests leave the bed at night. In hotel grounds and gardens at night, the IMI system can guide guests along paths by tracking guests' locations and controlling landscape lighting accordingly.

According to the embodiments described herein, once a schema for a hotel has been created, the schema can be used, for example, in other hotels with similar entertainment facilities and lighting systems, motels, May be shared with other networks and IMI systems, such as buildings and apartment complexes.

Other exemplary schemas may be created for use in a shopping mall or for individual stores in a shopping mall. Shoppers with personal identifiers indicating membership in the compensation program may be notified by changing the colors of the store front if they are interested or as sales of certain events as they approach the store. For other shoppers, changing the colors may represent a pleasant window display, but for members the change may serve as a notification.

Storefront lighting can also instantly change color (only if they enable this functionality) as a compensation program when a member enters the store, thereby acknowledging their presence and welcoming them. It can also act as an incentive for other customers to consider reward program membership, especially if they shop with friends.

In its most general concept, the IMI environment described herein is related to systems that can be combined to perform IMI related functions, and thus networks that do not need to be fixed. For example, sensors in a sensor system, e.g., computers hosting ambient light and occupancy sensors, may not be aware that they are being used for IMI purposes. If they do so, the computers can affect their operation without the IMI system being programmed to monitor and control them. From an IMI standpoint, computers are simply data sources.

While a number of embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated herein, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various other means for obtaining and / or performing one or more of the advantages described herein and / And / or structures, and each of these variations and / or modifications are considered within the scope of the embodiments of the invention described herein. More generally, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that all parameters, dimensions, materials, and configurations described herein are intended to be exemplary and that actual parameters, dimensions, materials, and / Quot; will &lt; / RTI &gt; depend upon the particular use or use in which the teachings of the present invention are employed. Those skilled in the art will be able, or will be able, to ascertain using no more than routine experimentation numerous equivalents to the specific embodiments of the invention described herein. It is, therefore, to be understood that the foregoing embodiments are presented by way of example only, and that the embodiments of the invention may be practiced other than as specifically described and claimed within the scope of the appended claims and equivalents thereof. Embodiments of the invention relate to each individual feature, system, article, material, kit and / or method described herein. In addition, any combination of two or more such features, systems, articles, materials, kits and / or methods is intended to cover such features, systems, articles, materials, kits, and / If they do not match, they are included in the inventive scope of the present invention.

All provisions, as defined and used herein, are to be understood as governed by the prior art provisions, the provisions of the documents contained by reference and / or the general meaning of the specified terms.

It should be understood that, as used in this specification and in the claims, "a" and "an" are used to mean "at least one" unless expressly indicated to the contrary.

The phrase "and / or" when used in this specification in the specification and claims should not be interpreted as referring to such combined elements, that is, Quot; both "and " both ". A number of elements associated with "and / or" should be interpreted in the same manner, i.e., "one or more" Elements other than those specifically identified by the "and / or" clause may optionally be present, whether or not related to these specifically identified elements. Thus, by way of non-limiting example, reference to "A and / or B" when used in combination with an open language, such as "comprising" In other embodiments, only B (optionally including elements other than A) may be referred to, and in another embodiment all of A and B (optionally including other elements) may be referred to.

As used herein in the specification and claims, "or" should be understood to have the same meaning as "and / or" For example, when separating items in a list, "or" or " and / or "is intended to be inclusive, i.e. including at least one inclusion, as well as one or more of multiple elements or lists, Should be interpreted as including items that are not. Or " consisting of "when used in the claims shall refer to the inclusion of exactly one element of a plurality of elements or a list, as opposed to just" just one of "or & . In general, the term "or" when used herein should be preceded by exclusionary terms such as "only one," "one of," "just one of," or "exactly one of. Should be interpreted only as indicating exclusionary alternatives (ie, "not both, but one and the other"). "Consisting essentially of" when used in the claims may have its ordinary meaning as used in the field of patent law.

As used herein in the specification and claims, the phrase "at least one" refers to at least one element selected from any one or more of the elements of the list of elements when referring to the list of one or more elements, It should be understood that it does not necessarily include at least one of every element listed specifically within the list of elements and does not exclude any combination of elements of the list of elements. This definition also allows elements other than specifically identified elements to be optionally present in the list of elements that the phrase "at least one" refers to, whether or not related to those elements being specifically identified. Thus, as a non-limiting example, "at least one of A and B" (or equivalently, "at least one of A or B," or equivalently "at least one of A and / or B" (Optionally including elements other than B), optionally in excess of one non-existent A, and in another embodiment may be referred to at least one B (optionally A At least one, optionally including more than one A, alternatively at least one, optionally including at least one B (alternatively, including other elements) At least one, etc.).

Unless expressly stated to the contrary, in any of the methods claimed herein that involve more than one step or operation, the order of steps or acts of the method is necessarily limited to the order in which the steps or acts of the method are mentioned It should also be understood that this is not the case.

It is to be understood that in the claims, as well as in the foregoing description, the terms "comprising", "having", "having", "having", "having", "storing", "accompanying", "retaining", " All such transitional phrases are to be understood as being open, i.e., &quot; including, but not limited to. &Quot; Only the transition phrases "consisting of" and "consisting essentially of" may be closed or semi-closed transition phrases, respectively, as described in Section 2111.03 of the United States Patent and Trademark Office Patent Examination Procedures.

Appendix A: Exemplary Registration and Affinity Data

Figure 112011060276670-pct00003

Figure 112011060276670-pct00004

Figure 112011060276670-pct00005

Figure 112011060276670-pct00006

101, 301, 701, 601, 801, 808: Network 102: Light source
104: Sensor system 106: Execution module
112: first memory 204: schema timer
502: Controller 706: Execution module
802: remote memory 810: agent module

Claims (48)

  1. A lighting management system comprising:
    1. A first memory for storing personal preference data corresponding to a plurality of users, wherein the personal preference data is associated with each of a plurality of users including at least one personalized illumination parameter for each user, Memory; And
    A network at a location spaced from the first memory,
    The network comprising:
    At least one light source having controllable output settings,
    A second memory for storing a schema containing at least one standard illumination parameter,
    A sensor system for detecting the identity of the current user, and
    And an execution module in communication with the at least one light source, the second memory and the sensor system, wherein the execution module includes a controller, the execution module receives an identity of the current user from the sensor system, And communicates with the first memory to determine personal preference data corresponding to the personal preference data.
  2. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the executable module modifies the schema to conform to a current personalized illumination parameter of the user and the executable module translates the modified schema into instructions for controlling output settings of the at least one light source, .
  3. 3. The method of claim 2,
    Wherein the executable module translates the modified schema into instructions by interpreting the modified schema in accordance with an output setting of the at least one light source.
  4. 3. The method of claim 2,
    Wherein the executable module stores the modified schema in the second memory.
  5. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects an absence of a current user and the execution module calibrates the modified schema to conform to the standard illumination parameter and the execution module stores the calibrated schema in the second memory , Lighting management system.
  6. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects an identity of a further user and the execution module receives an identity of an additional user from the sensor system and communicates with the first memory to store personal preference data corresponding to an additional user And to convert the calibrated schema into instructions for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source, and for generating the shared personalized illumination parameters, , Lighting management system.
  7. The method according to claim 6,
    Wherein the executive module generates a shared personalized illumination parameter by averaging the current user's personalized illumination parameters and the additional user's personalized illumination parameters.
  8. The method according to claim 6,
    Wherein the execution module generates a shared personalized illumination parameter by selecting one of the current user's personalized illumination parameters and the additional user's personalized illumination parameters.
  9. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects an identity of a current user by detecting a radio frequency identification card carried by a current user.
  10. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects an identity of a current user by detecting biometric data corresponding to a current user.
  11. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects environmental data and behavior data, and the execution module modifies the schema according to at least one of the environmental data and the behavior data.
  12. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the second memory stores a plurality of schemas and the execution module selects one of the plurality of schemas depending on personal preference data of the current user and the execution module controls the output settings of the at least one light source And converting the selected schema into commands for the selected illumination.
  13. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the sensor system detects light source output data indicative of an operating error in the at least one light source and the executive module provides a correction signal to the at least one light source to correct the operating error.
  14. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the network further comprises a schema schema for creating the schema.
  15. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the at least one light source comprises a plurality of light sources communicating with each other using at least one of a wired communication link, a wireless communication link, a radio frequency communication link and an optical communication link.
  16. The method according to claim 1,
    Wherein the network further comprises an agent module, wherein the execution module communicates with the second memory via communications with the agent module.
  17. A lighting management system comprising:
    A sensor system for observing system parameters;
    At least one light source communicating with the sensor system via a network and having controllable output settings; And
    An execution module in communication with the sensor system and the remote memory communicating with the sensor system and the at least one light source over the network and storing at least one schema over a communication link, the execution module comprising a controller, Receiving the observed system parameters, sending a request for a schema containing information indicating at least one of the observed system parameters to the remote memory, receiving a schema from a remote database, And transforms the schema into commands for controlling output settings.
  18. 18. The method of claim 17,
    Wherein the at least one light source comprises at least one lighting device.
  19. 18. The method of claim 17,
    Wherein the observed system parameters are related to one or more people and include at least one of the presence of one or more people, an identity of one or more people, a location of one or more people, a time of one or more people's presence, gestures of one or more people, Actions, faces of one or more people, and sound emitted by one or more people.
  20. 18. The method of claim 17,
    Wherein the observed system parameters include at least one of an output from the at least one light source, a level of ambient illumination, a quantity of light, a movement, a temperature, a humidity level, weather and noise.
  21. 18. The method of claim 17,
    Wherein the execution module is distributed across a plurality of light sources that are located within the at least one light source or communicate with each other using at least one of a wired communication link, a wireless communication link, a radio frequency communication link, and an optical communication link.
  22. 18. The method of claim 17,
    The execution module includes a memory, a first interface for facilitating communication with the at least one light source and at least one of the sensors, and a second interface for facilitating communication with the remote memory via a communication link Lighting management system.
  23. 18. The method of claim 17,
    Wherein the executable module translates the schema into instructions by interpreting the schema in accordance with an output setting of the at least one light source.
  24. A method for implementing a lighting management system comprising:
    In an execution module including a controller, receiving parameters observed from a sensor system;
    Sending a request for a schema to a data storage device, the request including information indicating at least one of the observed system parameters, the data storage device being located at a location spaced relative to the execution module A request transmission step for the schema;
    In the execution module, receiving a schema from the data storage device;
    And transforming the schema with instructions for controlling, by the execution module, output settings of the at least one light source.
  25. 25. The method of claim 24,
    Wherein receiving the observed system parameters comprises receiving an identity of a current user, wherein the transmitted request includes information indicating an identity of a current user, and wherein the received schema is based on current user preferences &Lt; / RTI &gt; wherein the illumination parameters include illumination parameters.
  26. 25. The method of claim 24,
    &Lt; / RTI &gt; further comprising storing the received schema in local memory.
  27. 25. The method of claim 24,
    Wherein the converting includes interpreting the schema by the execution module in accordance with the output settings of the at least one light source.
  28. delete
  29. delete
  30. A lighting management system comprising:
    1. A first memory for storing personal preference data corresponding to a plurality of users, the personal preference data comprising a plurality of user preference data corresponding to each of a plurality of users including at least one personalized illumination parameter for each user, Memory; And
    A network at a location spaced from the first memory,
    The network comprising:
    At least one light source having controllable output settings,
    A sensor system for detecting the identity of the current user, and
    Wherein the execution module comprises a controller and a second memory for storing at least one standard illumination parameter, the execution module comprising: a sensor for receiving a signal from the sensor, the at least one light source; a second memory; and an execution module in communication with the sensor system, Communicating with the first memory to determine the personal preference data corresponding to the current user, modifying the standard illumination parameter to match the current user &apos; s personalized illumination parameters, Wherein the execution module converts the personalized illumination parameters into commands for controlling the output settings of the at least one light source.
  31. delete
  32. delete
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  35. delete
  36. delete
  37. delete
  38. delete
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KR1020117018218A 2009-01-07 2009-06-29 Intelligent controllable lighting networks and schemata therefore KR101622268B1 (en)

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