KR101122826B1 - Method and system of radio communications of traffic with different characteristic - Google Patents

Method and system of radio communications of traffic with different characteristic Download PDF

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KR101122826B1
KR101122826B1 KR1020067012080A KR20067012080A KR101122826B1 KR 101122826 B1 KR101122826 B1 KR 101122826B1 KR 1020067012080 A KR1020067012080 A KR 1020067012080A KR 20067012080 A KR20067012080 A KR 20067012080A KR 101122826 B1 KR101122826 B1 KR 101122826B1
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traffic
communication
opportunistic
communications
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KR1020067012080A
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KR20060110327A (en
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에릭 달만
피터 라슨
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텔레폰악티에볼라겟엘엠에릭슨(펍)
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Priority to PCT/SE2003/002055 priority Critical patent/WO2005062504A1/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W40/00Communication routing or communication path finding
    • H04W40/02Communication route or path selection, e.g. power-based or shortest path routing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W28/00Network traffic or resource management
    • H04W28/16Central resource management; Negotiation of resources or communication parameters, e.g. negotiating bandwidth or QoS [Quality of Service]
    • H04W28/18Negotiating wireless communication parameters
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/10Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on priority criteria
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/02Hierarchically pre-organised networks, e.g. paging networks, cellular networks, WLAN [Wireless Local Area Network] or WLL [Wireless Local Loop]
    • H04W84/04Large scale networks; Deep hierarchical networks
    • H04W84/042Public Land Mobile systems, e.g. cellular systems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
    • Y02D70/12Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks
    • Y02D70/124Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks in 3rd generation [3G] networks
    • Y02D70/1242Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks in 3rd generation [3G] networks in Universal Mobile Telecommunications Systems [UMTS] networks
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/10Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT]
    • Y02D70/12Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks
    • Y02D70/124Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks in 3rd generation [3G] networks
    • Y02D70/1244Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks according to the Radio Access Technology [RAT] in 3rd Generation Partnership Project [3GPP] networks in 3rd generation [3G] networks in High-Speed Downlink Packet Access [HSDPA] networks
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02DCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES [ICT], I.E. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AIMING AT THE REDUCTION OF THIR OWN ENERGY USE
    • Y02D70/00Techniques for reducing energy consumption in wireless communication networks
    • Y02D70/30Power-based selection of communication route or path

Abstract

The present invention relates to communication. In particular, it relates to communication over an unreliable wireless link that suffers from fading or vice versa. In particular, it relates to high data rate communication over such a link.
Conventional communication, opportunistic communication, time slot, frequency, base station, wireless communication cell

Description

Method and system for wireless communication of traffic having different characteristics {METHOD AND SYSTEM OF RADIO COMMUNICATIONS OF TRAFFIC WITH DIFFERENT CHARACTERISTIC}

The present invention relates to communication. In particular, it relates to communication over an unreliable wireless link that suffers from fading or vice versa. In particular, it relates to high data rate communication over such a link.

High speed downlink packet access in a wireless communication system for communicating data from a wireless base station to a mobile telephone user device over a wireless link is already known. In high speed downlink packet access, data is typically buffered as needed and transmitted to the receiver at the highest possible rate, taking into account current channel quality estimates. During a strictly distributed channel period, the data rate is reduced to zero and no data is transmitted. In this respect, communication is an opportunity.

Exemplary prior art systems incorporating opportunistic communication include, at least in part, High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) (in UMTS), High Data Rate (HDR) (in CDMA 2000), Selective Diversity Forwarding ( SDF) and multiple user diversity forwarding (MDF). Selective diversity forwarding is a routing / channel access scheme for unreliable broadcast oriented media to determine the desired route of forwarding messages based on multicasting and, for example, the result of forward processing, cost processing, or queue status. . Multiple user diversity forwarding (MDF) is also a routing protocol. Selective diversity forwarding (SDF) and multiple user diversity forwarding (MDF) are described in US Patent No. 2002/0051425 and US Patent No. 60/461839.

In contrast to opportunistic communication, conventional wireless communication uses a set of one or more wireless channels, and the wireless communication system transmits over several channels by transmission power control to (at least) achieve minimum quality requirements. Adjust the power Conventional wireless communications have long-term records of voice traffic and real-time data traffic that carry efficiently. Reliability of a typical data channel can be increased, for example, by forward error control (FEC) and automatic repeat request (ARQ).

Examples of known channel quality measurements are channel signal to noise ratio (SNR), carrier to interference signal ratio (CIR), received power, received symbol energy, bit error rate (BER) and block error rate (BLER).

US patent US6097703 discloses a multi-hop packet radio communication system that uses opportunistic peak-mode transmission to transfer data through one or more intermediate stations between the starting station and the reaching station. Each station monitors the execution of other stations in the network and stores the reachability information for use in subsequent transmissions. Each station also sends a probe signal from time to time to set up another station range.

N. Souto , JC silva , A. Correia , F. Cercas , A. Rodrigues : The UMTS AWGN Simulation Results for Uplink , Downlink and HSDPA transmission, 2002, refer to the bit error rate of high-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA). ) And the simulation results for BLER (block error rate). Downlink rates up to 384 kbps and high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) 1600 kbps and 2352 kbps modes are also simulated. For downlink and high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA), interference is required to not affect the AWGN channel due to the orthogonal nature of the spreading code.

US patent US2002 / 0141367 discloses high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) and conventional asynchronous communication using different logical channels for control information related to high speed downlink packet access (HSDPA) and dedicated physical data channels (DPDCH), respectively. Post a wireless communication system that implements both.

3 rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP): In March 2001, France, Technical Specification Group Radio Access Network, Physical layer aspects of UTRA High Speed Downlink Packet Access (Release 4), 3GTS 25.848 V4.0.0 high-speed downlink packet access ( It describes the physical layer aspects of the technology behind the concept of HSDPA and includes an evaluation of the performance and complexity of High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA). Chapter 6 discusses HSDPA mapping for physical channels.

None of the above documents publish separating or orthogonalizing each physical traffic channel for opportunistic and conventional communications.

If a normal communication channel and a channel for orthogonal communication share the same communication resource, they may interfere. In particular, voltage control of conventional channels increases transmit power, for example, when the receiver senses an unfavorable signal to noise ratio due to signal fading. As a result, the transmit power is essentially controlled to change contrary to fading. This change in transmit power causes the users of the opportunistic communication to change the interference correspondingly between them. Such systems that allow for varying interference reduce the reliability of critical channel quality estimates for opportunistic communications. It also loads an overall reduced data rate on the system and opportunistic communication channels, including the need for additional frequency channel estimation.

As a result, there is a need to reduce or eliminate interference from channels for conventional communications on the channels for opportunistic communications.

As a result, it is an object of the present invention to achieve that the wireless communication system provides increased immunity to interference from conventional communication channels to opportunistic communication channels.

The aim is also to achieve a system that can utilize fading dips of interfering signals for opportunistic communication.

Another object is to achieve a system that can provide a transmission opportunity on an opportunistic communication channel for traffic typically transmitted on a conventional channel, such as voice.

After all, the goal is to improve system performance and to allow higher data rates overall.

This goal is met by channel assignment methods and systems operating in various domains.

1 illustrates two wireless communication cells including respective base stations for both conventional and opportunistic wireless communications in accordance with the present invention.

2 illustrates one-dimensional domain overlap in the time domain for TDM (Time Division Multiplex) in accordance with the present invention.

3 illustrates separation of conventional and opportunistic communications in the two-dimensional time-frequency domain according to the present invention.

Most wireless channels experience carrier-to-interference ratio (CIR) changes. Such changes may include, for example, changes in signal strength (of a desired signal) due to fading occurring in the channel, variable interference levels due to interference power control, changes in interference signal strength due to fading occurring in the channel, variable (related to traffic) It may be due to an interference change due to an adaptive antenna transmission interference signal (forming a beam) due to a number of interference signals or variable antenna radiation patterns.

Opportunistic communication relies heavily on scheduling and rate control, eg achieved by buffering and adaptive coding. In this way, a benefit can be achieved from statistical multiplexing a very large number of user channels, such that one or more users can use communication resources with good performance, at least intermittently. As a result, for a particular user, scheduling depends on the time and frequency change of the communication channel assigned to the user. Due to statistical multiplexing, overall performance can be enhanced, and high data rate communications can also be achieved for channels that are considered unreliably historically, for example due to carrier-to-interference ratio (CIR) changes.

However, if the conventional communication channels and the channels for opportunistic communication share the same communication resources, they can interfere. In particular, voltage control of conventional channels increases transmit power, for example, when the receiver senses an unfavorable signal to noise ratio due to signal fading. The transmit power is essentially controlled to change in contrast to fading. This change in transmit power causes the interference to change correspondingly among other users of opportunistic communication. Such systems that allow for varying interference reduce the reliability of critical channel quality estimates for opportunistic communications. It also loads an overall reduced data rate on the system and opportunistic communication channels, including the need for additional frequency channel estimation.

According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, conventional and opportunistic communications are divided into non-overlapping or minimally overlapping channels in the one-dimensional domain, as on the time-scale for TDM (Time Division Multiplex).

According to the second embodiment, different communications are divided into two-dimensional domains, which are equal to the time-frequency for OFDM (orthogonal frequency division multiplexing).

In additional embodiments, the channels are separated into code domains to be used as one-dimensional separations or to be combined with one-dimensional domain separation or multiple domain separations to minimize cross-characteristic interference. An example code is LAS (Wide Range Synchronization) spreading code. The invention is generally suitable for separating into any dimensional domain, where the multi-dimensional domain comprises time, frequency or code.

Preferably, interference by signal to interference ratio is minimized in accordance with the present invention. However, quality measures related to interference, such as those detailed on page 2, can be applied.

In the exemplary mode of the present invention, two or more traffic categories of the first communication are transmitted at transmit power levels of fixed or periodic characteristic with an assigned frequency.
In another example mode of the invention, the periodic characteristic transmit power level varies below the lowest rate of communication change in apprenticeship category 1 traffic.
In an additional exemplary mode of the invention, the time scale difference between at least two traffic categories is at least one order of magnitude.
Certain problems arise from neighboring cells, where normal communication of one cell may interfere due to opportunistic communication of another cell. In order to minimize the risk of interference between cells, the need for conventional and opportunistic communication is different between cells, so some overlap will occur if all channels are filled, and different modes of the present invention Consider a limited number of domain dimensions to allocate channels as minimizing the use of common resources.

Figure 1 shows two wireless communication cells (cell 1, cell 2), each comprising a base station (BS 1, BS 2) for both typical wireless and opportunistic wireless communications according to the present invention. Among other things, depending on the geographical distance and area between neighboring wireless communication cells (cell 1, cell 2), radio emissions from each base station antenna interfere with the (desired) communication of the neighboring cells.

2 illustrates one-dimensional domain time overlap for time division multiplex (TDM). In the first wireless communication cell (cell 1), three time slots (C11, C12, C13) out of eight time slots (C11, C12, C13, O11, O12, O13, O14, O15) are used for normal communication. Five slots (O11, O12, O13, O14, O15) are allocated for opportunistic communication. In the second cell (Cell 2), five slots (C21, C22, C23, C24, C25) are allocated for normal communication and three (021, 022, 023) are allocated for opportunistic communication. The fractional allocation of normal and opportunistic communication is different for cell (1,2), all time slots are allocated, and the opportunistic communication time-slot in cell (2) is a one-dimensional domain such as time-domain. It cannot be completely separated from the usual communication time-slot at. In this example assignment, interference is minimized when the number of overlapping time slots of different communications in the two cells is minimized. In the figure, two time-slots of opportunistic communication O11 and O12 of cell 1 overlap in time with two time-slots of normal communication C24 and C25 of cell 2.

3 illustrates the separation of conventional and opportunistic communications in the two-dimensional time-frequency domain. In a first cell (Cell 1) of a cellular wireless communication system, multiple time-frequency slots 125 are allocated for conventional communication and multiple slots 134, 144, 152, 162 are allocated for opportunistic communication. In the second radio cell (Cell 2), the assignments are somewhat different due to different demands for the conventional and opportunistic communication channels. The time-frequency slot 225 in which the corresponding slot 125 in cell 1 is assigned for normal communication is allocated for opportunistic communication, and the slots 134,144,152,162 are allocated for opportunistic communication in cell 1. Four time-frequency slots 234, 244, 252 and 262 corresponding to < RTI ID = 0.0 > The time-frequency range is the same for both slot assignments in FIG. Obviously the five slots 225, 234, 244, 252, 262 of the cell 2 overlap in time and frequency with the slots 125, 134, 144, 152, 162 of the cell 1. The number of overlapping time-frequency slots can be reduced to three, for example, by swapping the allocation of two slots in cell 1 where cell 2 has a different assignment. For example, if slot 125 is allocated for opportunistic communication and slot 134 is assigned for normal communication, then the allocation is performed for all slots 144, 152, 162, 244, 252, 262 by three slots. ) Will be the same for both.

The two-dimensional example can be reduced by minimizing the number of overlapping slots, as well as by carefully choosing which communications will interfere from neighboring cell slots with communications having different characteristics. In addition, instead of reducing the number of overlapping slots, "sufficiently small" interference can be tolerated to a minimum when further minimization is achieved with no unexpected or slightly predicted quality improvement. As mentioned above, the criterion for minimization, for actual minimization or satisfaction, is any criterion such as, for example, the signal-to-interference signal ratio (SIR) or the carrier-to-interference ratio (CIR) described on page 2.

In one mode of the invention, it is adapted for incorporation with various well-known means of adjusting resource allocation in a dynamic way incorporating centralized, distributed / distributed resource allocation. The adaptation time schedule to which resources are allocated can be a long or short period. For short periods of time, resource allocation may change from call to call, or even adapt to simultaneous channel conditions, while for long periods, resource allocation may change on a continuous basis, for example between peak time and off-peak time. have. Resource allocation can also be of the static nature defined in system initiation.

In an additional example mode of the present invention, the category of communication is transmitted with channel adaptive data rate control.
4 shows statistically an equipment according to the invention. For example, a number of information sources (source 1, source 2, ..., source n) containing voice and data may be connected to a wireless device that is, for example, a device of a radio access network, or a device to which a mobile telephone device, such as a user device, can be fixed. Connection (1, 2, ..., n). For devices in a radio access network, the source may be connected through a gateway (not shown) or other network device, which is a non-negative integer (N, as described above with respect to FIGS. 2 and 3). For M, separate and transmit normal and opportunistic communication over N conventional slot channels and M opportunistic slot channels.

For a mobile telephone device, one or more sources (Source 1, Source 2, ..., Source n) of FIG. 4, such as stored data or applications, may be for example related to a device integrated within a mobile station or may interfere with an information transmitter. It can be connected to a mobile station which operates essentially as. In a preferred mode of the present invention, the mobile telephone device receives information from a network controller related to a specific assignment of traffic channels on a control channel (not shown).

Network allocation control can be centralized, distributed, or distributed. With centralized control, the network controller can be reliable in a wide range of channel assignments, such as for a switching center or access point to the Internet, with multiple base stations BS1, BS2. In a distributed implementation, local network controllers are integrated between neighboring ranges, although local network controllers may be trusted for channel assignment. In a distributed system, local controllers have been proposed for reliability and help one or more central controllers achieve final assignment. Distributed or distributed allocation control may include, but is not limited to, wireless network controllers.

The invention is not limited to the embodiment described above. Changes and variations can be made without departing from the invention. It covers all modifications within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (51)

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  48. In a cellular wireless communication system,
    A first wireless communication device for communicating traffic having different characteristics, located within a first cell, wherein the traffic is divided into two or more categories including conventional and opportunistic communications transmitting with different characteristics. Conventional communications include communications where the transmit power for several channels is coordinated to achieve at least minimum quality requirements, and opportunistic communications employ scheduling and rate control to transmit traffic, and wherein the first wireless The communication device assigns traffic transmission using conventional communication to physically whole or partially separate channels for traffic transmission using opportunistic communication;
     A second wireless communication device for communicating traffic having different characteristics located within a second cell, the traffic being divided into two or more categories including conventional communications and opportunistic communications transmitting with different characteristics. Conventional communications include communications where the transmit power for several channels is coordinated to achieve at least minimum quality requirements, and opportunistic communications employ scheduling and rate control to transmit traffic, and wherein the second radio The communication device assigns traffic transmission using conventional communication to physically whole or partially separate channels for traffic transmission using opportunistic communication;
    Processing circuitry for allocating traffic of different characteristics of different cells such that interference between differently characterized communications of neighboring cells is minimized, wherein the processing circuitry is adapted from the first and second wireless communication devices in different cells; Cellular radios comprising the processing circuitry for allocating traffic of different characteristics of different cells by minimizing the number of time slots, frequency slots or time-frequency slots containing and overlapping different types of communication transmitted Communication system.
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  50. The method of claim 48,
    And to maximize the signal-to-interference ratio or the carrier-to-interference ratio of time slots, frequency slots or time-frequency slots of communication having different characteristics in the different cells.
  51. A controller arranged to interface with a first wireless communication device and a second wireless communication device, the controller comprising:
    The first wireless communication device is located in a first cell to communicate traffic having different characteristics, and the traffic is divided into two or more categories including conventional communication and opportunistic communication transmitting with different characteristics. Conventional communications include communications where the transmit power for several channels is coordinated to achieve at least minimum quality requirements, and opportunistic communications employ scheduling and rate control to transmit traffic, and wherein the first wireless The communication device assigns traffic transmission using conventional communication to physically whole or partially separated channels for traffic transmission using opportunistic communication,
     The second wireless communication device is located in a second cell to communicate traffic having different characteristics, and the traffic is divided into two or more categories including conventional communication and opportunistic communication transmitting with different characteristics. Conventional communications include communications where the transmit power for several channels is coordinated to achieve at least minimum quality requirements, and opportunistic communications employ scheduling and rate control to transmit traffic, and wherein the second radio The communication device assigns traffic transmission using conventional communication to physically whole or partially separated channels for traffic transmission using opportunistic communication,
    The controller includes processing circuitry for allocating traffic of different characteristics of different cells such that interference between differently characterized communications of neighboring cells is minimized, the processing circuitry comprising first and first signals in different cells. A first radio, which allocates traffic of different characteristics of different cells by minimizing the number of time slots, frequency slots or time-frequency slots containing and overlapping different types of communication transmitted from a wireless communication device A controller arranged to interface with the communication device and the second wireless communication device.
KR1020067012080A 2003-12-22 2003-12-22 Method and system of radio communications of traffic with different characteristic KR101122826B1 (en)

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PCT/SE2003/002055 WO2005062504A1 (en) 2003-12-22 2003-12-22 Method and system of radio communications of traffic with different characteristic

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EP (1) EP1698076B1 (en)
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US7873009B2 (en) 2011-01-18
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