KR100911249B1 - New chlorin e6-folic acid conjugate compound - Google Patents

New chlorin e6-folic acid conjugate compound Download PDF

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KR100911249B1
KR100911249B1 KR1020090037845A KR20090037845A KR100911249B1 KR 100911249 B1 KR100911249 B1 KR 100911249B1 KR 1020090037845 A KR1020090037845 A KR 1020090037845A KR 20090037845 A KR20090037845 A KR 20090037845A KR 100911249 B1 KR100911249 B1 KR 100911249B1
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folic acid
e6
chlorin e6
tumor
chlorin
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김효준
박계신
이은희
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다이아텍코리아 주식회사
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K31/00Medicinal preparations containing organic active ingredients
    • A61K31/33Heterocyclic compounds
    • A61K31/395Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins
    • A61K31/40Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins having five-membered rings with one nitrogen as the only ring hetero atom, e.g. sulpiride, succinimide, tolmetin, buflomedil
    • A61K31/409Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins having five-membered rings with one nitrogen as the only ring hetero atom, e.g. sulpiride, succinimide, tolmetin, buflomedil having four such rings, e.g. porphine derivatives, bilirubin, biliverdine
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07DHETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07D403/00Heterocyclic compounds containing two or more hetero rings, having nitrogen atoms as the only ring hetero atoms, not provided for by group C07D401/00
    • C07D403/02Heterocyclic compounds containing two or more hetero rings, having nitrogen atoms as the only ring hetero atoms, not provided for by group C07D401/00 containing two hetero rings
    • C07D403/12Heterocyclic compounds containing two or more hetero rings, having nitrogen atoms as the only ring hetero atoms, not provided for by group C07D401/00 containing two hetero rings linked by a chain containing hetero atoms as chain links
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C07ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
    • C07DHETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS
    • C07D487/00Heterocyclic compounds containing nitrogen atoms as the only ring hetero atoms in the condensed system, not provided for by C07D451/00 - C07D477/00
    • C07D487/22Heterocyclic compounds containing nitrogen atoms as the only ring hetero atoms in the condensed system, not provided for by C07D451/00 - C07D477/00 in which the condensed system contains four or more hetero rings

Abstract

A novel chlolin E6-folic acid conjugated compound is provided to produce singlet oxygen, have excellent tumor selectivity comparing a photosensitizer and photodynamically treat malignant tumor. A novel chlorine e6-folic acid conjugated compound of the chemical formula 1 or 2 or its pharmaceutically allowable salt has excellent tumor selectivity. The chlorine e6-folic acid conjugated compound is [gamma-(6-aminohexyl)folic acid]-chlorine e6 or gamma-{N-{2-[2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethoxy]ethyl}folic acid}}-chlorine e6. The chlorine e6-folic acid conjugated compound of the chemical formula 1 is produced by combining a chlorine e6(13-carboxy-17-[2-carboxyethyl]-15-carboxymethyl-17,18-trans-dihydro-3-vinyl-8-ethyl-2,7,12,18-tetramethylporphyrin) of the chemical formula 3 and folic acid (N-[4(2-Amino-4-hydroxy pteridin-6-ylmethylamino) benzoyl]-L(+)-glutamic acid) of the chemical formula 4.

Description

New chlorin e6-folic acid conjugate compound

The present invention relates to a novel chlorine e6-folic acid-binding compound, and more particularly, to a compound in the form of a combination of chlorine e6 and folic acid, which effectively produces singlet oxygen in various media and is remarkably superior to conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizers. By having tumor selectivity, the present invention relates to novel compounds having characteristics useful for photodynamic therapy for malignancies.

Photodynamic therapy for malignant tumors (PDT) is now widely applied in the clinic. One of the important factors defining the efficiency of PDT is its target or selectivity, indicating the extent of selective accumulation of photosensitizers only in tumor tissues in tumor tissues and normal tissues. Higher targeting can increase the effectiveness of PDT, shorten the treatment time, and reduce the side effects of drugs injected into the body. Activating the photosensitizer with light with a specific wavelength generates singlet oxygen and radical species, which is a kind of reactive oxygen species, which directly kills tumor cells and triggers an immunoinflammatory reaction. And damage the tumor microvascular system. Although most of the conventional photosensitizers accumulate selectively to some extent in tumors, they accumulate in normal tissues including skin.

Targeted delivery of photosensitizers may solve these problems. This may be possible by enhancing phototoxicity by improving the degree of selective accumulation of tumor cells. Targeting means binding the photoactivating material directly to a tumor tracking (specific) molecule or using a carrier. Several photosensitizers have already been combined with antibodies to tumor-associated antigens. Ligands such as low density lipoproteins, insulin, steroids, transferrins, epidermal growth factor (EGF), all have been discussed for the targeting of ligand-based photosensitizers to cells that overexpress receptors of these ligands.

In fact, in lesion cells, changes in receptor expression, increased concentrations of specific cell surface lipids and proteins, as well as changes in cellular microenvironment occur.

Among several delivery strategies using receptor mediated delivery, folic acid receptors are also useful targets for tumor specific drug delivery for the following reasons.

First, folic acid receptors are expressed on tumor cells in ovarian cancer, colon, mamma gland, lung, kidney-cell cancer, epithelial tumor metastasis to the brain and neuroendocrine cancer.

Second, the expression of folic acid receptors in normal tissues is severely restricted due to their position on the apical_membrane phase of epithelial cells, so access to folic acid receptors in normal breakfast is rare.

Third, polarized epithelial cells; Increased folic acid receptor density (polarized epithelial cells: increased density of folic acid receptors depending on the extent of cancer exacerbation).

Fourth, folic acid shows high affinity with its cell surface receptors. The binding of folic acid and macromolecules can improve their delivery to folate receptor-expressing cancer cells in vitro in almost all tested conditions.

Folic acid receptor (RFA) is an adjoint glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol glycoprotein that binds folate and absorbs it into cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis.

Although no precise mechanism of action for folate delivery into cells by folate receptors is established, it is clear that folates accumulate in mammalian cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis.

Physiological folic acid travels through the plasma membrane through specialized endocytosis mediated pathways and into the cytoplasm. After binding to folate receptors on the surface of cancer cells, folate bonds, regardless of size, have been shown to be absorbed into intracellular components called endosomes.

Generally, the degree of selectivity or target does not exceed the ratio of 10: 1 (cancer cells: normal cells). Therefore, a method of selectively delivering a photosensitive agent to a membrane receptor of a specific cell group by binding with a vector ligand characteristic on a cell surface such as an antibody, oligosaccharide, transferrin, and hormonal analogue has been developed. Many studies have shown that drugs used in chemotherapy, when combined with these vectors, are transported five to ten times more in modified cells than otherwise. The cells can bind the binding through receptor-mediated endocytosis without disruption.

Folic acid consists of three components and belongs to the vitamin group.

Living organic matter is mainly reduced to folates such as dihydrofolic acid, tetrahydrofolic acid and 5-metil-tetrahydrofolic acid, which are cofactors of enzymes that catalyze the transport of single carbon fragments. Folic acid-dependent enzymes participate in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and the metabolism of amino acids of methionine, histidine, serine and glycine. Because of this, folic acid is an essential ingredient for cell division and growth.

Folic acid is absorbed into the blood after it enters the living body and is transported to the tissue along with plasma and red blood cells.

Since animal cells are unable to synthesize folic acid, there is in fact a need for a special system in the plasma membrane that binds and absorbs folic acid.

Folic acid is difficult to pass through the plasma membrane of a cell with simple diffusion, as long as it is a divalent anion that exhibits distinct hydrophilic specific characteristics. Only at high pharmacological concentrations can folic acid be transported by passive diffusion.

Under natural physiological conditions, folic acid is found in nanomolar concentrations in tissues and serum, which is why cells that absorb and transport these vitamins have highly effective specific membrane systems.

There are mobile carriers that promote folic acid transport at high rates. It is present in the epithelial cells of the small intestine where folate absorption into the blood occurs. Catalytic transport is the main route of folic acid uptake in various cells. The substrate of such transport is folic acid in a restored form, which is why the carrier is called transporter of restored vectors (TRV). It is a 46-kD glycoprotein that forms a "channel" within the plasma membrane of the membrane through the membrane of hydrophilic molecules. The kinetics of TRV mediated transport are described as Michaelice-Menten dependent. The rate of action is rather high and the similarity with folic acid is relatively low, approximately 200 μM.

TRV also works in tumor cells. The binding force K M of restored folate is within 1-4 μM. The similarity of the carrier with methotrexate is slightly lower K M within 4-8 μM and its maximum transport rate is within 1-12 nmol / min per gram of cellular protein. TRV can perform transport through the membrane of folic acid, but its similarity to a given oxygenated folic acid is low (K M is within 100-200 μM).

There is a receptor-mediated system that works through membrane glycoproteins called folate receptors. Folic acid receptors are very similar to substrata in that the binding constant for folic acid is less than 1 nM.

Receptor-mediated transport of folic acid is carried out only in one direction, ie inside the cell. Normal tissue cells express only a very small amount of folic acid receptors on their surface with a few exceptions. However, in malignantly transformed cells, particularly tumor cells in the lungs, kidneys, brain, colon, ovaries and bone marrow blood cells in leukemia, the amount of receptors for folic acid increases on their surface. This quantitative increase in folate receptors allows for more efficient binding of folic acid in significant amounts (more than 610 7 molecules per cell). Such glycoproteins may be referred to as tumor markers, as long as the monoclonal antibodies used for the diagnosis of cancer cells appear to bind very specifically with folic acid.

Receptor-mediated transport of folic acid is carried out through endocytosis mechanisms. Receptors operate through a recirculatory mechanism. That is, the ligand repeatedly passes from the plasma membrane to the endosome and vice versa, binding and releasing the molecule. The efficiency of such function is defined by a variety of factors, including: the number of receptors on the cell surface, the concentration of extracellular folate-ligand, the similarity of folic acid to the receptor, the rate of energy-dependent endocytosis, from the endosome The rate of release of receptor molecules, the ability of the receptor to be made repeatedly within the membrane, and the like.

The portion associated with the folate receptor in the folate binding agent bound to the drug will enter the cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis, while the other portion will remain on the surface of the cell. Accordingly, two types of treatment strategies can be proposed. Drugs that need to reach intracellular targets can be transported to the cytosol by endocytosis, and drugs that can or should act in the extracellular domain will accumulate on the tumor cell surface while consuming folic acid receptors. .

The main feature is that the drug is delivered directly to pathologically modified cells. PDT using a variety of photosensitive agents with therapeutic effects is mediated by changing the physiological conditions of the pathological focus, not directly damaging the tumor cells. Thus, hydrophilic stains, especially Chlorin e6, are sensitive to light damage of the vascular system of tumor tissues (effects on the blood vessels of photodynamic therapy), which does not induce direct inactivation of transformed cells and thus tumor growth. Suppress Selective delivery of photosensitizers to tumors is clearly one way to significantly improve the anticancer effects of PDT.

Chlorine e6 is a natural component and is not toxic to normal cells of the organism. It also has high photochemical activity against malignant cells compared to other photoactive compounds used in tumor therapy.

Chlorine e6 quickly reaches tumor sites from blood and organs, and then accumulates in high concentrations in tumor cells.

Laser-activated chlorine E6 provides an anti-tumor immunomodulatory effect by indirectly attenuating cellular immunity as well as indirectly damaging to tumors. Accumulated chlorine in the inflamed areas and regenerated tissues can help to recover from wounds better after surgery and prevent reinfection.

In view of the above, the present inventors have prepared a new compound in the form of a combination of chlorine E6 and folic acid, and the compound has a significantly superior tumor selectivity compared to the conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizer, thereby providing photodynamic therapy for malignant tumors. The present invention has been completed by confirming its usefulness.

Accordingly, an object of the present invention is to provide a novel chlorine e6-folate binding compound having characteristics that are useful for photodynamic therapy for malignant tumors by having significantly superior tumor selectivity compared to conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizers.

In one embodiment, the present invention provides a novel γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -chlorine e6 or {γ- {N- {2, which is a novel chlorine e6-folate binding compound represented by the following general formula (1) or (2). -[2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl} folic acid}}-chlorine e6, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00001

Figure 112009026203398-pat00002

Hereinafter, the configuration of the present invention will be described in detail.

As used herein, the term "cancer" refers to a complex disease resulting from uncontrolled proliferation and disordered growth of transformed cells, and in the present invention refers to solid cancer for photodynamic therapy. Solid cancer refers to cancer composed of all masses except blood cancer. Solid tumors include brain tumor, low-grade astrocytoma, high-grade astrocytoma, pituitary adenoma, meningioma, cerebral lymphoma, CNS lymphoma, Oligodendroglioma, Craniopharyngioma, Ependymoma, Brain stem tumor, Head & Neck Tumor, Larygeal cancer, Oropharyngeal cancer, Nasal / Nasal cavity / PNS tumor, Nasopharyngeal tumor, Salivary gland tumor, Hypopharyngeal cancer, Thyroid cancer, Oral cavity tumor, Chest Tumor , Small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), thymic cancer (Thymoma), mediastinal tumor, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, male breast cancer ), Abdominal tumor (Abdomen-pelvis Tumor), Gastric cancer (Stomach cancer), Hepatoma, Gall bladder cancer, Biliary tract tumor, Pancreatic cancer, Small intestinal tumor, Large intestinal tumor, Anal cancer, Bladder cancer, Renal cell carcinoma, Prostatic cancer, Cervical cancer, Endometrial cancer, Ovarian cancer, Uterine sarcoma, Skin Cancer, and the like.

The compounds of formula 1 or formula 2 of the present invention may be prepared with pharmaceutically acceptable salts and solvates according to methods conventional in the art.

As salts are acid addition salts formed with pharmaceutically acceptable free acids. Acid addition salts are prepared by conventional methods, for example by dissolving a compound in an excess of aqueous acid solution and precipitating the salt using a water miscible organic solvent such as methanol, ethanol, acetone or acetonitrile. Equivalent molar amounts of the compound and acid or alcohol (eg, glycol monomethyl ether) in water can be heated and the mixture can then be evaporated to dryness or the precipitated salts can be suction filtered.

In this case, organic acids and inorganic acids may be used as the free acid, and hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid, tartaric acid, and the like may be used as the inorganic acid, and methanesulfonic acid, p -toluenesulfonic acid, acetic acid, trifluoroacetic acid, and maleic acid may be used as the organic acid. (maleic acid), succinic acid, oxalic acid, benzoic acid, tartaric acid, fumaric acid, manderic acid, propionic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, glycolic acid, gluconic acid (gluconic acid), galacturonic acid, glutamic acid, glutaric acid, glucuronic acid, glucuronic acid, aspartic acid, ascorbic acid, carbonic acid, vanic acid, hydroiodic acid, and the like can be used. It is not limited.

Bases can also be used to make pharmaceutically acceptable metal salts. Alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salts are obtained, for example, by dissolving a compound in an excess of alkali metal hydroxide or alkaline earth metal hydroxide solution, filtering the insoluble compound salt, and then evaporating and drying the filtrate. In this case, as the metal salt, it is particularly suitable to prepare sodium, potassium or calcium salt, but is not limited thereto. Corresponding silver salts may also be obtained by reacting alkali or alkaline earth metal salts with a suitable silver salt (eg, silver nitrate).

Pharmaceutically acceptable salts of the compounds of Formula 1 or Formula 2 include salts of acidic or basic groups which may be present in compounds of Formula 1 or Formula 2 unless otherwise indicated. For example, pharmaceutically acceptable salts may include sodium, calcium and potassium salts of the hydroxy group, and other pharmaceutically acceptable salts of the amino group include hydrobromide, sulfate, hydrogen sulfate, phosphate, hydrogen phosphate, Dihydrogen phosphate, acetate, succinate, citrate, tartrate, lactate, mandelate, methanesulfonate (mesylate) and p -toluenesulfonate (tosylate) salts, and the like. It can be prepared through.

In the present invention, in the binding of folic acid and chlorine e6, it binds to the peripheral portions of both linkers to increase the range of accessible receptor sites. In this case, hexane-1,6-diamine or 2,2 '-(ethylenedioxy) -bis-ethylamine is used for bonding between the two linkers.

That is, the novel chlorine e6-folate binding compounds of the present invention or {γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl} folic acid}}-chlorine e6 pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof Chlorine e6 of formula 3 (13-carboxy-17- [2-carboxyethyl] -15-carboxymethyl-17,18-trans-dihydro-3-vinyl-8-ethyl-2,7,12,18-tetramethylporphyrin) Folic acid ( N- [4 (2-Amino-4-hydroxy pteridin-6-ylmethylamino) benzoyl] -L (+)-glutamic acid) of formula 4 is hexane-1,6-diamine (hexane-l, 6- diamine) to form the structure of Formula 1, or through 2,2 '-(ethylenedioxy) -bis-ethylamine (2,2'-ethylenedioxy) -bis-ethylamine) It can be.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00003

Figure 112009026203398-pat00004

In a preferred embodiment, [γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -chlorine E6, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, which is a novel chlorine E6-folate binding compound having the structure of Formula 1 of the present invention, comprises the following steps: It can be prepared by the method of:

Folic acid and [ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate are reacted at room temperature and under nitrogen atmosphere to form γ-{( tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid. Obtaining;

Obtaining γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid by reacting γ-{[ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid by adding trifluoro-acetic acid;

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, reacting chlorine E6 with the addition of N -hydroxysuccinimide and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to obtain chlorine E6 succinidyl ester; And

[Γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -chlorine E6 by reacting γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid prepared in the above step with chlorine E6 succinidyl ester in a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere. Manufacturing step.

As another preferred embodiment, {γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl} folic acid}}, which is a novel chlorine E6-folate binding compound having the structure of Chemical Formula 2 of the present invention -Chlorine e6 or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof can be prepared by a method comprising the following steps:

Folate and tert-butyl 2- (2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy) ethylcarbamate are reacted at room temperature and under nitrogen atmosphere to give γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl carbamate} folic acid} Obtaining;

Γ- {N- {2- [2- (2 by reacting γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl carbamate} folic acid with trifluoro-acetic acid -aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl}} folic acid;

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, reacting chlorine e6 with the addition of N -hydroxysuccinimide and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to obtain chlorine e6 succinidyl ester; And

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, by adding chlorine e6 succinidyl ester to γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl}} folic acid prepared in the above step { preparing γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl} folic acid}}-chlorine e6.

Specifically, the step of obtaining γ-{[ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid may be performed as follows.

Under normal temperature and nitrogen atmosphere, tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide are added to anhydrous DMSO and folic acid solution in pyridine, and the mixture is stirred for 10-30 hours. do. After filtration of the reaction mixture, the filtrate was slowly poured into a strongly stirred solution of anhydrous Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C., the resulting yellow precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with EtO to remove DMSO residue, Dry in vacuo.

Specifically, the step of obtaining γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl carbamate} folic acid may be performed as follows.

Under normal temperature and nitrogen atmosphere, 2,2 '-(ethylenedioxy) -bis-ethylamine and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide are added to anhydrous DMSO and folic acid solution in pyridine, and the mixture is stirred for 10-30 hours. . After filtration of the reaction mixture, the filtrate was slowly poured into a strongly stirred solution of anhydrous Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C., the resulting yellow precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with EtO to remove DMSO residue and vacuum It is dried in a state.

Specifically, the step of obtaining γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid or γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl}} folic acid may be performed as follows.

Γ-{[ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid or γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl carbamate} folic acid Is treated with trifluoro-acetic acid (TFA), stirred at ambient temperature for 1-5 hours and then the TFA is evaporated under vacuum. The residue is taken up in anhydrous DMF and then pyridine is added dropwise until a yellow precipitate is formed. The yellow precipitate is collected by filtration, washed with Et 2 O and dried under vacuum.

Specifically, obtaining the chlorine e6 succinidyl ester may be performed as follows.

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, N -hydroxysuccinimide and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide are added to a solution of chlorine e6 in anhydrous DMSO and the mixture is stirred at room temperature for 2-6 hours. The solvent is then evaporated and then purified by column chromatography using a 1: 9 (v / v) mixed solvent of acetone: CH 2 Cl 2 as the eluent. Fractions are tested by TLC to collect only those with only one spot and concentrate.

Specifically, the step of preparing [γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -chlorine e6 or {γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl} folic acid}}-chlorine e6 It may be performed as follows.

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid or γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl}} folic acid solution in anhydrous DMSO and pyridine Chlorine e6 succinidyl ester is added and stirred at room temperature for 12-48 hours, then the mixture is slowly poured into a vigorously stirred solution of Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C. The dark red precipitate is collected by filtration, washed with Et 2 O and CH 2 Cl 2 and dried under vacuum.

Electron absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra were performed to preliminarily confirm the preservation of receptor properties in the conjugates of the novel chlorine e6-folate binding compounds of the present invention. Specific maximums were observed, folic acid specific peaks were observed at 270 nm, folic acid specific shoulders were displayed at 360 nm, and chlorin-equivalent peaks were observed at 660 nm and 700 nm in the fluorescence spectrum of the target conjugate. At 445 nm, specific folate peaks were observed.

In addition, the investigation of the production efficiency of singlet oxygen in the homogeneous and heterogeneous systems of the novel chlorine e6-folate binding compounds of the present invention shows that the chlorine e6-folate binding compounds of the present invention are optimal for effectively producing singlet oxygen in various media. It was confirmed that the characteristics of the. In addition, considering the unique tropism of the chlorine e6-folate binding compound of the present invention on tumor cells and tissues, the chlorine e6-folate binding compound of the present invention is remarkably superior to other porphyrine-based photosensitive agents. It was found to have high photodynamic activity.

Furthermore, intracellular accumulation and targeted delivery of photoactive compounds using HeLa cells, one of many tumor cell types overexpressing folate receptors, to investigate the in vitro biological effects of the novel chlorine e6-folate binding compounds of the present invention As a result, after culturing for 24 hours, it was confirmed that chlorine e6-folate-binding compound accumulates intracellularly about 10 times more than chlorine e6.

Finally, the results of spectroscopic fluorescence analysis of the accumulation of chlorine e6 and chlorine e6-folate-binding compound using life laser fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the biological effects of the novel chlorine e6-folate-binding compound of the present invention. Shows that the maximum accumulation of chlorine e6 in tumor tissue of Sacoma M-1 rats is the first 5 hours after intravenous dose of 10.0 mg / kg, the maximum accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugate is 5.0 mg / kg. It was found to be 2-5 hours after dosing. After PDT using 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg doses of chlorine e6-folate binding compound, the antitumor effect was evaluated through necrosis areas formed in Sacoma M-1. When the binding compound was administered at a dose of 10.0 mg / kg, the necrosis rate was 66.16%. After PDT with chlorine e6-folic acid-binding compound, the rats were monitored for the volume growth inhibition effect of Sacoma M-1 compared to the control group for 24 days, showing an inhibition rate of 86.34% to 99.1%.

These experimental results comparing the degree of accumulation show that chlorine e6-folate binding compound has enhanced affinity for tumor cells and cell membranes. Accumulation in sacoma confirmed that the chlorine e6-folate binding compound was much more tumor-sensitive than chlorine e6. Therefore, it can be seen that the efficiency of phototherapy with the chlorine e6-folate binding compound is remarkably superior to chlorine e6.

Thus, the novel chlorine e6-folate binding compound of the present invention has a feature that is useful in photodynamic therapy for malignant tumors by having significantly superior tumor selectivity as compared to conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizers.

The present invention is a novel compound [γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -chlorine e6 in the form of a combination of chlorine e6 and folic acid, which effectively produces singlet oxygen in various media and is significantly superior to conventional porphyrin-based photosensitizers. Since tumor selectivity is highly efficient in photodynamic therapy for malignant tumors, it has a useful effect as a therapeutic agent for treating solid cancer photodynamically.

Hereinafter, the configuration and effects of the present invention will be described in more detail with reference to examples, but these examples are merely illustrative of the present invention, and the scope of the present invention is not limited only to these examples.

Example 1-1 (Compound I): γ-{[ tert -butyl- N Synthesis of-(6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid (I)

[ Tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate (= N-boc-1,6-hexanediamine) in a solution of folic acid (1615 mg, 3.66 mmol) in anhydrous DMSO and pyridine under ambient temperature and nitrogen atmosphere (871 mg, 4.03 mmol) and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) (1887 mg, 9.15 mmol) (or 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole) were added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 18 hours. After the reaction mixture was filtered, the filtrate was slowly poured into a strongly stirred solution of anhydrous Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C. The yellow precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with EtO to remove DMSO residue and dried in vacuo. 2132 mg were obtained, yielding 91.0%.

Mass spectrometry of γ-{[ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid showed a molecular weight of 639.73 (FIG. 1).

Example 1-2 (Compound I-I):

γ- {N- {2- [2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy] ethyl carbamate} folic acid

Under normal temperature, nitrogen atmosphere, tert-butyl 2- (2- (2-aminoethoxy) ethoxy) ethylcarbamate (4.03 mmol) and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) (9.15) in anhydrous DMSO and folic acid (3.66 mmol) solution in pyridine. mmol) (or 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole) was added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 18 hours. After the reaction mixture was filtered, the filtrate was slowly poured into a strongly stirred solution of anhydrous Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C. The yellow precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with EtO to remove DMSO residue and dried in vacuo.

Example 2: Synthesis of γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid (II)

Compound I (2232 mg, 3.49 mmol) prepared in Example 1-1 or Compound II (3.49 mmol) prepared in Example 1-2 was treated with trifluoro-acetic acid (TFA), followed by 2 at atmospheric temperature. After stirring for hours the TFA was evaporated under vacuum. The residue was taken up in anhydrous DMF and then pyridine was added dropwise until a yellow precipitate formed. The yellow precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with Et 2 O and dried under vacuum to give either Product II or II-I, respectively. 1652 mg of the product (compound II) prepared with compound I as a starting material, yield 87.9%.

Mass spectrometry of the product (Compound II) γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid showed a molecular weight of 538.79 (FIG. 2). In Figure 2, A is a positive mode, B is a negative mode measurement results.

Example 3: Chlorin e 6  Synthesis of Succinidyl Ester (III)

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, N -hydroxysuccinimide (8.7 mg, 7.6 × 10 -2 mmol) and dicyclohex in a solution of Chlorin e6 (45.37 mg, 7.6 × 10 -2 mmol) in anhydrous DMSO Silkcarbodiimide (DCC) (8.7 mg, 7.6 × 10 −2 mmol) was added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4 hours. The solvent was evaporated and then purified by column chromatography using a 1: 9 (v / v) mixed solvent of acetone: CH 2 Cl 2 as eluent. Fractions were tested by TLC to collect only those with only one spot and then concentrated. 42 mg were obtained, yielding 79.7%.

Mass spectrometry of the chlorin e 6 succinidyl ester resulted in a molecular weight of 693.74 (FIG. 3). In FIG. 3, A is a positive mode and B is a negative mode measurement result.

Example 4: γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -Chlorin e 6  Synthesis of (IV)

In a light-blocked environment under a nitrogen atmosphere, N-hydroxysuccinate was dissolved in a solution of Compound II (29.3 mg, 5.45 × 10 -2 mmol) or Compound II-I (5.45 × 10 -2 mmol) in anhydrous DMSO and pyridine. Mid-treated Chlorin e 6 (Compound III) (37.7 mg, 5.45 × 10 −2 mmol) was added. After stirring for 24 hours at room temperature, the mixture was slowly poured into a vigorously stirred solution of Et 2 O cooled to 0 ° C. The dark red precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with Et 2 O and CH 2 Cl 2, and dried under vacuum to prepare a final product. 34 mg of the final product Compound IV was obtained using compound II and compound III as a starting material, and the yield was 55.8%.

Mass spectrometry of the final product compound γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -Chlorin e 6 showed a molecular weight of 1183.46 (FIG. 4).

NMR data of γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -Chlorin e 6, the final product compound IV, are shown in FIG. 5.

1 H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 12.2 (s, 1H, COOH), 11.68 (s, 1H, COOH), 10.37 (s, 1H, NH), 9.78 (s, 1H), 9.64 (s, 1H), 9.15 (s, 1H), 8.88 (s, 1H, NH), 8.8 (s, 1H), 8.20 (q, 1H), 7.56 (s, 2H), 7.15 (s, 2H), 6.89 (s , 2H, NH2), 6.38 (d, 1H), 6.15 (d, 1H), 5.80 (s, 1H), 5.40 (m, 1H), 4.59 (m, 2H), 4.22 (t.2H), 4.02 ( s, 2H), 3.59 (s, 3H), 3.43 (s, 3H), 3.20 (s, 3H), 3.7 (q, 1H), 2.65 (m, 1H), 2.08-2.41 (m, 8H), 1.89 (t, 2H), 1.52-1.78 (m, 12H), 1.28 (m, 4H), 1.08-1.10 (m, 7H), -1.72 (s, 1H, NH), -1.96 (s, 1H, NH)

Experimental Example 1 Preliminary Confirmation of Receptor Characterization in Folic Acid and Chlorin e6 Conjugates

Synthesis of the combination of folic acid and Chlorin e6 prepared in Example 4 is based on the method of conjugation through the initial component, ie, folate and the carboxyl group (-COOH) of Chlorin e6.

In order to confirm that the binding preserves the characteristics of the receptor, the electron absorption spectrum and the fluorescence spectrum were confirmed for the binding.

Electron absorption spectra showed specific peaks of chlorin at 400 and 650 nm, folic acid specific peaks at 270 nm, and folic acid specific shoulders at 360 nm. In addition, the fluorescence spectra of the target conjugates showed the maximum values corresponding to chlorin at 660 nm and 700 nm, and the specific maximum values of folic acid at 445 nm.

As a result of the above experiment, it was found that folic acid in the target binding completely preserved its receptor characteristics.

Comparative experiments on the photosensitive activity of free Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 in the conjugates confirmed that Chlorin e6 maintains the ability and ability to generate singlet oxygen in the excited state at 600-700 nm even in the conjugate. Could. Chlorin e6 in the binder showed the same result in both aqueous solution and hydrophobic environment, that is, when the binder was bound to the protein.

Experimental Example 2: Investigation of the Spectro-Energy Characteristics of Chlorin e6 Conjugates and the Production Efficiency of Singlet Oxygen in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Systems

Chlorin e6 can accumulate in tumor cells and tissues and destroy tumor cells. It is known that a major role in this process is the abnormal operation of the cell membrane. This abnormal behavior is due to the oxidation of protein and lipid components by highly reactive oxidants such as singlet oxygen. This singlet oxygen is formed during the interaction between the oxygen molecules in the body and the photosensitizer molecules under an activated triplet condition. 1 efficiency of 0 2 produced is determined by the following a number of factors, such as: absorption of the photosensitizer, the intensity and emission of triplet quantum conditions, the life of the above conditions, the present solubility and O 2 diffusion under the environment and the like. It should be noted here that the factors mentioned above can vary considerably during the transformation from homogeneous solutions of sensitizers to biological systems and their complexes that are characterized by significant heterogeneity. This is the reason for investigating the spectral-energy characteristics of Chlorin e6 conjugates in this experiment, and the efficiency of singlet oxygen production in various systems.

2-1 Experiment Method

Pigment protein complexes were formed by adding a certain amount of photosensitizer dissolved in the same buffer to human serum albumin (HAS) solution. In this experiment, the molar concentration of HAS and Chlorin e6 conjugate was 2.5: 1. In a similar manner, photosensitizers were included in detergent micelle (Triton Х-100, С = 10-3 М). A complex of lecithin-derived monolayer liposomes and chlorine conjugates was formed by gel filtration and pigment dispersion of lipids in eggs.

Electron absorption spectra of the solution under investigation were recorded on Specord UV-Vis. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence polarity (Р) values were recorded on an automated spectrofluorometer (Institute of Physics). The lifetime (t S ) of the photosensitive fluorescence was measured using an impulse fluorometer operating in the photon calculation method.

Based on the new Hamamatsu FEU with InP / InGaAsP semiconductor photocathodes, a highly sensitive laser fluorometer capable of recording luminescence signals in the range of 950-1400 nm with nanosecond time resolution was used.

2-2 Spectroscopic Parameters

In the weak alkali buffer at room temperature (рН 7.4-8.1), the electron absorption spectrum of the Chlorin e6 conjugate showed the specific structure of the porphyrin free base with hydrogenated double C = C bonds (FIG. 6). The main feature of the absorption spectrum was the strong (ε = 4.8 10 4 M -1 cm -1 ) Q x (0-0) band at 660 nm, which became the spectral window of most biological tissues. .

Figure 7 shows the fluorescence spectrum and fluorescence excitation spectrum of Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 combination in the buffer. The fluorescence spectra of the two pigments did not depend on the excitation wavelength, and their fluorescence excitation spectrum was almost identical to the absorption spectrum of Chlorin e6. It should be noted, however, that the excitation spectrum of the Chlorin e6 conjugate differs from the absorption spectrum only in the “blue region” of the spectrum, ie 400-500 nm region of the spectrum. There was no absorption band corresponding to the absorption of the vectorial part (folic acid) in the excitation spectrum of the binding.

Complexation of chlorin e6 conjugates with HSA, liposomes, or detergent micelles results in a bathochromic shift in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the pigment. However, an increase in fluorescence photoreaction (B) was observed, which is associated with an increase in lifetime (t S ) without changing the Kravec integral value.

Fluorescence Parameters of Chlorin E6 Bonds in Different Systems System l 00 abs Nm l 00 fl nm t S ns B H 2 O, pH 8.1 657 664 4.3 0.16 Triton X-100, pH 8.1 665 670 5.7 0.19 HSA, pH 8.1 664 669 5.2 0.18 Liposomes, pH 8.1 665 670 5.4 0.21 Dimethyl sulfoxide 661 672 4.6 - Pyridine 666 673 5.0 0.18 Tetrahydrofuran 667 573 5.0 - Methanol 662 667 4.8 -

Similar changes in the spectral parameters of the Chlorin e6 conjugate were observed in organic solvents with decreasing polarity of the medium.

From the analysis of the results obtained, it can be concluded that the Chlorin e6 conjugates in all systems are in the monomeric state, and that spectral changes are mainly caused by orientational effects. The role of distinctive and oriented interactions in this experiment was small. Chlorin e6 conjugates in all complexes have a hydrophobic environment with the same polarity as pyridine.

2-3 Photophysical Parameters

The effective quantum efficiency of the intercombinative conversion of chlorin e6 conjugates was measured in a relative manner. According to this method, the following equation (1) holds in a low consumption state (≤ 10%) of the ground state.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00005

Where

Figure 112009026203398-pat00006
And
Figure 112009026203398-pat00007
Is the crosslinking conversion of Chlorin E6 conjugate and photoreaction of standard material,
Figure 112009026203398-pat00008
And
Figure 112009026203398-pat00009
Is the maximum deviations of the triplet-triplet absorption of the solution under investigation and the standard solution at the measurement wavelength, respectively.
Figure 112009026203398-pat00010
And
Figure 112009026203398-pat00011
Is the difference between the molar rates of singlet extinction and triplet to triplet absorption of CHLORIN and standard, respectively.
Figure 112009026203398-pat00012
And
Figure 112009026203398-pat00013
Are the shares of light correspondingly absorbed by CHLORIN and the reference material, respectively.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00014
And
Figure 112009026203398-pat00015
The value was measured after substantially transferring all the molecules to be investigated in the excited triplet state. Under these conditions, ΔD = C
Figure 112009026203398-pat00016
T l. Where C refers to the molarity of the material in solution and l refers to the length of the optical way. As standard material for measuring γ, Pd (II) -octa ethyl porphyn (Pd (II)-OEP), in which γ value in benzol is considered equal to 1, was selected.
Figure 112009026203398-pat00017
When measuring the parameters of T , the absorbance of the solution on the excitation wavelength did not exceed 0.2 when γ was 0.5, and the corresponding concentrations of the Chlorin E6 conjugates did not exceed 0.7 × 10 −6 and 1.75 × 10 −5 M.

Measured

Figure 112009026203398-pat00018
T and γ values are shown in Table 2 below.

Photophysical Parameters and 1 O 2 Formation Efficiency of Chlorin E6 Bonds in Various Systems System τ t 0 μs τ t μs

Figure 112009026203398-pat00019
T mol -1 · dm -1 · cm -1 γ φ Δ H 2 O, pH 8,1 170 2.5 278 0.8 0.70 Triton X-100 230 2.6 0.80 HSA, H 2 O, pH 8,1 700 14.7 798 0.82 0.63- Liposomes, H 2 O, pH 8,1 70 1.4 251 078 - Pyridine 140 0.3 94 0.81 0.68

The photophysical parameters of the Chlorin E6 conjugates presented in Table 2 above are characteristic for the monomer state of the pigment. B + γ for all systems

Figure 112009026203398-pat00020
Regardless of its environment, the primary route of electronic excitation energy reduction in the molecules of Chlorin E6 bonds is the crosslinking conversion. The photoreactivity of this process is high (γ
Figure 112009026203398-pat00021
0.7), appear substantially similar in all systems. However, the lifetime of the excited triplet state was markedly different in the oxygen-depleted solution (τ t 0 ) and in the oxygen-saturated solution (τ t ).

In the liposome form of the pigment, the value of τ t 0 is almost 2.5 times lower than that of the buffer solution. The high P value (P = 0.13) of the Chlorin e6 binding in liposomes is evidence of the presence of a rather rigid circle of pigments in the lipid bilayer. With this situation, taking into account the photophysical properties of the Chlorin e6 conjugate complexed with liposomes, it was observed that a decrease in the value of τ t 0 was probably due to the triplet of the pigment by the carbon-carbon double bond of the unsaturated fatty acid lipid chain. It can be inferred that this is due to quenching of the term state.

Quenching the excited triplet state of the Chlorin e6 conjugate by 2-4 oxygen molecules

The data presented in Table 2 above help to analyze the specific characteristics of the oxygen molecules in solution and the biological system quenching the excited triplet state of the Chlorin e6 conjugate. Consider the obtained values of τ t 0 and τ t , the concentration of O 2 in the aqueous solution (2.6 × 10 -4 M), the concentration of O 2 in the pyridine (8.3 × 10 -4 M), Considering that the distribution ratio between the membranes is equal to 3, the bimolecular rate constant for quenching the triplet state of the Chlorin e6 conjugate with oxygen can be measured using Equation 2 below.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00022

In this system,

Figure 112009026203398-pat00023
Values were 1.5 × 10 9 , 4.5 × 10 9 , and 9 × 10 9 M −1 c −1 for Chlorin e6 conjugates in buffer solution, pyridine and lipid bilayers, respectively. In pigment-protein and micelle complexes, the Chlorin e6 conjugate
Figure 112009026203398-pat00024
The values were 2.5 × 10 9 , and 1.5 × 10 9 M −1 c −1 , respectively. These values may be referred to as the correct value if different from the O 2 concentration of the protein matrix and If, at Trixon X-100 micelles within the O 2 concentration of the aqueous solution. Clearly, as long as the solubility of O 2 in a nonpolar medium is known to be several times higher than its solubility in H 2 O,
Figure 112009026203398-pat00025
The upper limit of the value. The peculiar features of excited triplet state quenching of Chlorin e6 conjugates by oxygen molecules in the pigment-protein complex were discussed. Fluorescence of protein tryptophaniles is effectively quenched by O 2 , and the bimolecular rate constants of corresponding quenching range from 2 × 10 9 M −1 c −1 to 5 × 10 9 M −1 c −1 . The point is known. On the other hand, X-ray structural analysis data of spherical proteins showed that their amino acid residues were closely packed. This caused significant steric hindrance to the diffusion of molecules such as O 2 .

2-5 Production of Singlet Oxygen

The photoreaction (φ Δ ) of this process was measured in a relative manner through the integration of singlet oxygen emission intensity at a wavelength of 1270 nm. The excited state was performed on a wavelength of 531 nm (pulse energy 4 microJ, frequency 1 kHz). The test was made in buffer saturated with air at room temperature. Tetra (n-sulfophenyl) porphyn (TSPP) was chosen as the standard for measuring φ Δ of CHLORIN E6 conjugates. Φ Δ in D 2 O was considered to be 0.7. In all cases the absorbance of the solutions at the excited wavelength did not exceed 0.1 (coating thickness: 10 mm).

The luminescence kinetics of the singlet oxygen photosensitized by the chlorin e6 conjugate is shown in FIG. 8.

The following function was used to analyze the kinetic curve of singlet oxygen emission.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00026

Where A is a coefficient depending on the initial concentration of the interacting reagent, and k 1 and k 2 represent the increasing and extinction constants of the luminescent signal, respectively.

When the deactivation rate constant K τ of the photosensitizer triplet state exceeds the deactivation constant K Δ of the oxygen molecule triplet state, the increasing constant k 1 corresponds to K τ and the extinction constant k 2 corresponds to K Δ . When K τ <K Δ , the dynamics of singlet oxygen emission are reversed. In this case, k 2 = K τ and k 1 = K Δ . The first case was realized in an air saturated solution without extinguishers. Therefore, the lifetime of singlet oxygen and the lifetime of triplet state can be calculated based on the kinetic data.

Therefore, based on the kinetic curves, the values of τ t and τ Δ of the Chlorin e6 conjugate were obtained as follows: 2.0 ± 0.2 microsec. And 3.6 ± 0.2 microsec. The stated values of the lifetime of the triplet state of chlorin e6 conjugates correlate with τ t obtained through the method of flesh-photolysis and τ Δ , a known value from the literature. The photosensitizing form of singlet oxygen of chlorin e6 conjugates decreased with decreasing the рH of the solution from 0.7 (рH 8.1) to 0.52 (рH 6.0). This is related to the aggregation of chlorin e6 conjugates as the pH is lowered.

As can be clearly seen in Table 2, the molecules of the Chlorin conjugate in pyridine and buffer solution produced 10 O very efficiently. The presence of protein in the solution is τ Δ Decreases to approximately 1.1, which means the bimolecular quenching constant,

Figure 112009026203398-pat00027
= 1.5 × 10 8 M −1 c −1 . Pigment concentration in solution (3.1 × 10 -6 M) and protein concentration (C σ = 9.3 × 10 -6 M), constant value (κ CB = 1.2 × 10 6 M -1 ) and Chlorin e6 conjugate (n = Since the number of positions to bind with 1) is known, Equation 3 can be used to determine the occupancy of the sensitizer molecule included in the pigment-protein complex.

Figure 112009026203398-pat00028

Wherein r and C are the concentrations of bound protein pigments and the concentrations of unbound protein pigments,

Figure 112009026203398-pat00029
to be. In this experiment it is equal to 90%. This is why the corresponding F value can be regarded as the production efficiency of Chlorin E6 conjugate molecules bound in the protein sphere. This is also applicable to pigment molecules contained within micelles of Triton Х-100. Unfortunately, F-values could not be determined due to several methodological problems in dealing with complex formation of monolayer membranes and chlorin e6 conjugates. However, lipid bi-layers, considering my Chlorin e6 combined water optical physics parameters, all within the complex 1 O 2 generation efficiency of different studies could be argued that you should not at least more low.

Considering the experimental results, it can be seen that the Chlorin e6 complex has the optimal properties for effectively generating singlet oxygen in various media. In addition, considering the unique tropism of the Chlorin e6 conjugates of the present invention on tumor cells and tissues, the photodynamic activity of the Chlorin e6 conjugates of the present invention is significantly higher than that of other porphyrine-based photosensitive agents. It can be seen that.

Experimental Example 3 In Vitro Investigation of Biological Effects of Inventive CHLORIN E6 Binding

3.1 Accumulation and Competition Analysis

Intracellular accumulation and targeted delivery of photoactive compounds were investigated using HeLa cells, one of many tumor cell types that overexpress folate receptors.

Cells were cultured in medium 199 for 3 days and transplanted into Hank's solution / medium 199 (9/1). After 3 hours cells were collected from the substrate using trypsin and transferred to Hank's solution (10 5

Figure 112009026203398-pat00030
Figure 112009026203398-pat00031
/ ml). Chlorin e6 conjugate was added to the cell suspension at a concentration of 2 × 10 −7 M / l and incubated at 37 ° C. After 1 hour and 5, 10, 15, 24 hours, the samples were centrifuged and the precipitate washed in cold Hank's solution, after which the precipitate was placed in Hank's solution to the cell concentration in the initial suspension. The relative concentrations of Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates in the sample obtained
Figure 112009026203398-pat00032
The fluorescence intensity of the suspension at was measured.

Table 3 shows the concentrations (relative values of units / 10 4 cl.) Of Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates in HeLa cells.

Incubation hours Chlorin e6 Chlorin e6 binder  One 0,86 0,40  5 1,45 1,80 10 1,72 2,50 15 0,81 12,5 24 0,40 15,0

Through Table 3, it can be seen that both Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugated with folic acid are accumulated in the cells. However, the kinetics of accumulation appear differently. While most free Chlorin e6 accumulates in the cells within 5 hours, the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates is increasing linearly over 20 hours.

After 6 hours of incubation, the accumulation level of Chlorin e6 conjugates was clearly higher than that of free Chlorin e6 (FIG. 9).

After 24 hours of exposure, the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates was on average 8-10 times higher than that of free Chlorin e6. Accumulation levels of chlorin e6 conjugates increased continuously over 24 hours, suggesting that active transport through receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs rather than nonspecific cell uptake.

In order to investigate the effect of the presence of exogenous folic acid on HeLa cell accumulation of free Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates, folic acid was added to the cell suspension at a concentration of 4 μM / l before the addition of free Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates. Incubated with free Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 combination for 24 hours. The sample was then centrifuged, the supernatant was collected and the precipitate was washed again in cold Hank's solution. The second precipitate obtained was put back into Hank's solution.

Fluorescence intensity was measured to compare the accumulation of free chlorin e6 and chlorin e6 conjugates in HeLa cells.

After 24 hours of exposure, the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates was greater than that of free Chlorin e6. FIG. 10 shows that 4 μM / l of free folic acid significantly reduced the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates in HeLa cells ( p < 0.05). On the other hand, the presence of folic acid did not affect the accumulation of free Chlorin e6. In fact, intracellular accumulation of Chlorin e6 was not affected by the presence of antagonistic concentrations of folic acid in the culture medium. However, even though the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates decreased in the presence of antagonistic folic acid, it was still shown to be superior to free Chlorin e6. This suggests that the presence of folic acid can also increase nonspecific accumulation.

3.2 Cytotoxicity (Antiproliferative Assay)

Cytotoxicity was investigated in consideration of cell proliferation intensity, photosensitizer concentration, and optical power . Three flasks containing a single layer of cell were used for this.

As a cell, a monolayer culture of HeLa tumor cells was used.

Cultures of Hela tumor cells were grown in nutrient medium containing nutrient medium 199, or 10% fetal calf serum and 100 mg / ml kanamycin.

On day 4 after inoculating the cell cultures (100,000 cells per 2.0 ml of nutrient medium), photosensitizers were added at 1, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 30.0 mg / ml, respectively.

Flasks with dark cytotoxicity were incubated at 37.5 ° C. for 1 hour. The cells were washed four times using Hank's solution. Add 2.0 ml of fresh nutrient medium and use a "METALAZ" laser medical instrument (wavelength 627.8 nm, 578.2 or 510.6 nm) or "LD 680-2000" (wavelength 670-690 nm) (spectroscopic maximum absorption wavelength of the photosensitive agent to be investigated. Irradiated with a light flux of 40 J / cm 2 at an ice melting temperature for 5, 10, 15 or 20 minutes. After 20-24 hours tumor cells were counted in a Goriaev's chamber.

Table 4 shows the number of HeLa cells after incubation for 24 hours as a ratio to the control.

Photosensitizer concentration (μm) Chlorin e6 Chlorin e6 binder One 101.3 102.1 2.5 99.1 95.6 5.0 98.4 94.1 10.0 95.5 95.9 20.0 90.0 89.0 30.0 89.7 86.6

As can be seen from Table 4, even when the HeLa cells and the photoactive compounds Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates were incubated for 24 hours through experiments showing a survival rate of about 90%, there was no cytotoxicity in the absence of light exposure. It was confirmed that it does not (Fig. 11). In addition, the addition of folic acid did not modify the properties of cytotoxicity in Chlorin e6.

3.3 Phototoxicity (photodynamic activity) analysis of Chlorin e6 vs. Chlorin e6 conjugates

To investigate the photodynamic effects of photosensitizers on HeLa cell cultures, on day 3 after the cell cultures were implanted in the flask, the photosensitizer solution to be examined of the nutrient medium was 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0 or Add to 10 mcg / ml. The flasks were wrapped with a light protective cover and incubated at 37 ° C. for 3.5 hours. It was then washed with Hank's solution and irradiated on ice with a dose of 3.3 joule / cm 2 using a laser medical device "LD 680-2000" (wavelength 670-690 nm). After 20-24 hours effective cell monolayers were dispersed with 0.02% Versene solution and tumor cells were counted in Goriaev's chamber. Three flasks were used for this.

Table 5 shows incubation with photosensitizer for 3.5 hours, additional photoexposure (PhE) at a dose of 3.3 joule / cm 2, and the number of HeLa cells in percentage relative to the control.

Photosensitizer concentration (mcg / ml) Chlorin e6 Chlorin e6 binder 0,1 87,1 65,1 0,5 83,6 42,3 1,0 64,7 12,6 5,0 19 0,1 10,0 3,8 -

Analysis of photodynamic activity confirmed its high efficiency. Chlorin e6 conjugates completely inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells at a concentration of 5-10 mcg / ml (FIG. 12).

In another experiment, cells were incubated with a photosensitizer at 37 ° C. for 24 hours and then subjected to 1.5-15 joule / cm 2 of ice using the same laser device “LD 680-2000” (wavelength 670-690 nm) on ice. Irradiation was investigated.

Figure 13 shows that Chlorin e6 control photosensitizer showed little phototoxicity under the present experimental conditions. On the other hand, survival measurement tests showed that the use of Chlorin e6 conjugates resulted in improved photosensitivity compared to Chlorin e6 mediated photosensitivity.

This experiment showed that the photobiological activity of Chlorin e6 was enhanced through folate binding.

Therefore, after 24 hours of incubation using HeLa cells overexpressing folate receptors, Chlorin e6 conjugates accumulated on average 10 times higher than Chlorin e6.

Tumor cells differ significantly in the number and type of receptors that overexpress compared to normal cells. Overexpression of certain receptors is often used for oncoselective delivery of photosensitizers. In HeLa cells that overexpress folate receptors, folate-targeting ligands are used.

It can be concluded that the accumulation of chlorin e6 conjugates in HeLa cells is folate specific and much greater than that of unbound chlorin e6.

Experimental Example 4: In vivo biological effect of the present invention Chlorin e6 conjugate

4-1 Accumulation Kinetics of Photosensitive Agents on Light Exposure to Sacoma M-1 Rats

First, the accumulation kinetics of photosensitizers upon light exposure to Sacoma M-1 rats were investigated.

The photosensitizers were compared with Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 combinations. The photosensitizers were administered intravenously in Sacoma M-1 rats in the amounts of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg. Accumulation kinetics was analyzed.

This experiment was performed on rats 7-9 days post-tumor, using 100 two-crossed white rats subcutaneously implanted with Sacoma M-1. The photosensitizers were administered once intravenously to each group of rats in low light rooms in amounts of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg, respectively. Sterile natural isotonic solution of sodium chloride was used as solvent. Accumulation kinetics of photosensitive agents in tumor and normal tissues was performed over 30 minutes, 1-5 hours, and 1-6 days after the administration of the photosensitizers.

Accumulation kinetics of the photosensitizer in rats Sacoma M-1 and normal tissues (buttock skin tissues) was performed by lifetime measurement using a computerized fluorescence spectrometer. For this purpose, a laser-fiber spectrum analyzer "LESA-6" was used together with a helium-neon diagnostic laser "LHN 633-25". This allowed local evaluation of the degree of accumulation of photosensitizers in any organ or tissue that the optical fiber probe could reach.

For real-time monitoring, the catheter tip was placed on tumor tissue and normal tissue every hour after drug administration and the intensity of drug accumulation was recorded at the wavelength corresponding to maximum fluorescence.

Obtained digital values of the indexes considered were processed using generally accepted statistical techniques using the computer program Origin 6.1. The significance level was 0.05.

Fluorescence intensity data in Sacoma M-1 and normal tissues of rats for the first 5 hours and 1-6 days after administration of Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates are shown in FIGS. 14 and 15. Up to 4-5 hours after administration, the difference in the accumulation of two photosensitizers was 2-3 times higher in tumor tissues than in normal tissues.

The selectivity (mean accumulation in tumors / average accumulation in normal tissues) measured the highest accumulation of Chlorin e6 in rat tumor tissues the first 5 hours after intravenous administration at a dose of 10.0 mg / kg. Showed. For chlorin e6 conjugates, the maximum accumulation was recorded 2-5 hours after intravenous administration at a dose of 5.0 mg / kg.

4-2 Anti-Tumor Effects of Photosensitive Agents on Light Exposure to Sacoma M-1 Rats

Chlorin e6 conjugates were administered intravenously in amounts of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg, followed by light exposure at a dose of 100 J / cm 2 followed by measurement of necrotic areas in Sacoma M-1 rats.

Antitumor effect of PDT using chlorin e6 conjugate was measured by light exposure at 100 J / cm 2 using LD 680-2000 laser device. Monitoring was performed by quantitatively assessing the necrotic area formed in the tumor by biostaining with 0.6% Ivan Blue for 24 hours (1 ml per 100 g body weight). The necrosis area is 2 hours after biostaining, the mice were killed with chloroform, the tumor was removed, fixed on the 10% -HOM formalin for 1 hour, and the largest diameter cross-section was taken from the tumor mass and photographed with a camera connected to a computer. Dipping and measuring.

To quantitatively measure the necrotic areas formed by PDT, a method was used to analyze the color tint of tissue-terrained tumor slides using special programs and computers.

The program includes an algorithm that can identify Evans blue, which stains the observable area of the tumor. Tumor sites destroyed by direct toxic effects or structural and functional disturbances of microcirculation do not turn blue. The ratio of the total number of uncolored dots to the total number of dots in the area of the tumor slide was considered the destruction efficiency.

Based on data obtained through spectroscopic-fluorescence monitoring of the accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugates in Sacoma M-1, light irradiation on tumors was performed 1 and 4 hours after intravenous administration of Chlorin e6 conjugates. It became.

Laser medical device for this "

Figure 112009026203398-pat00033
"(BIOSPEC, Moscow) was used to irradiate with an exposure wavelength of 670 nm at an irradiation dose of 100 J / cm 2. The output density was 0.51 W / cm 2 , the output power was 0.4 W, and the irradiation light diameter was 1 cm. The irradiation time was 3.27 seconds.
Figure 112009026203398-pat00034
"This was done by a built-in common power meter.

Tables 6-10 show data for necrotic areas in 75 tissue-terrain slides of subject mice implanted with Sacoma M-1. Necrosis is formed by administering Chlorin e6 conjugates at doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg, irradiating at a dose of 100 J / cm 2 and then performing PDT.

PDT administered 2.5 mg / kg of chlorin e6 conjugate showed 25.56 ± 1.65% of necrosis and necrosis increased to 34.16 ± 2.16% when administered 5.0 mg / kg. The necrosis rate of 66.16 ± 3.83% was recorded for 4 hours of irradiation with 10.0 mg / kg. The most significant anti-tumor effect was recorded when Chlorin e6 conjugate was administered in an amount of 10.0 mg / kg and irradiated for 1 hour.

Necrosis area of tissue-terrain slides in Sacoma M-1 rats after administration of Chlorin e6 conjugates in an amount of 2.5 mg / kg and PDT at a dose of 100 J / cm 2 4 hours after drug administration Slide number Sakoma M-1 slide area, cm2 Necrosis area, ㎠ Necrosis area to total area,% One 2.409 0.568 24 2 2.209 0.378 17 3 2.457 0.460 19 4 2.735 0.409 15 5 2.687 0.488 18 6 2.761 0.864 31 7 2.635 0.832 32 8 2.611 0.858 33 9 2.394 1.038 43 10 2.519 0.899 36 11 2.190 0.498 23 12 2.348 0.579 25 13 2.394 0.754 32 14 2.571 0.778 30 15 2.780 0.996 36 16 2.363 0.661 28 17 2.093 0.565 27 18 2.212 0.795 36 19 2.636 0.627 24 20 2.805 0.808 29 21 2.587 0.414 16 22 2.504 0.357 14 23 2.942 0.394 13 24 2.471 0.369 15 25 2.377 0.547 23 X ± 2.508 0.637 25.56 Sd 0.042 0.041 1.651

Necrosis area of tissue-terrained slides in Sacoma M-1 rats after administration of Chlorin e6 conjugate in an amount of 5.0 mg / kg and PDT at a dose of 100 J / cm 2 4 hours after drug administration Slide number Sakoma M-1 slide area, cm2 Necrosis area, ㎠ Necrosis area to total area,% One 2.149 0.433 20 2 2.412 0.668 28 3 2.640 0.691 26 4 1.886 0.521 28 5 2.664 0.792 30 6 2.450 0.732 30 7 2.913 0.837 29 8 2.845 0.994 35 9 2.409 0.931 39 10 2.510 0.998 40 11 1.937 0.474 24 12 1.374 0.602 44 13 1.598 0.901 56 14 1.412 0.642 46 15 1.663 0.947 57 16 1.814 0.978 54 17 2.226 0.548 25 18 1.813 0.531 29 19 2.292 0.489 21 20 3.105 0.927 30 21 2.227 0.647 29 22 3.117 0.841 27 23 2.835 0.810 29 24 2.172 0.662 30 25 1.924 0.932 48 X ± 2,255 0.741 34.16 Sd 0.100 0.036 2.163

Necrosis area of tissue-terrained slides of Sacoma M-1 rats after administration of Chlorin e6 conjugate in an amount of 10.0 mg / kg and PDT at a dose of 100 J / cm 2 4 hours after drug administration Slide number Sakoma M-1 slide area, cm2 Necrosis area, ㎠ Necrosis area to total area,% One 1.399 0.913 65 2 1.368 0.908 66 3 1.422 1.026 72 4 1.533 1.196 78 5 1.734 1.606 93 6 1.672 1.539 92 7 1.724 1.473 85 8 1.574 1.423 90 9 2.207 0.720 33 10 2.503 0.860 32 11 1.961 1.009 51 12 2.105 1.231 58 13 1.891 1.690 89 14 2.007 1.803 90 15 1.719 1.346 78 16 1.460 0.988 68 17 2.613 0.762 29 18 1.655 1.313 79 19 2.124 1.075 51 20 2.414 1.279 53 21 2.034 1.405 69 22 2.357 1.165 49 23 2.451 1.297 53 24 1.668 1.199 72 25 1.557 0.919 59 X ± 1.886 1.205 66.16 Sd 0.075 0.058 3.828

Growth kinetics of Sacoma M-1 in rats after PDT with Chlorin e6 conjugate, expressed in cm 3 over days after tumor transplantation 7 10 12 14 17 19 21 24 Control 0.46 ± 0.03 1.36 ± 0.09 2.75 ± 0.34 4.03 ± 0.43 8.87 ± 0.66 11.53 ± 0.6 16.61 ± 0.59 18.61 ± 0.78 2,5 mg / kg + 100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 0.25 ± 0.03 0.28 ± 0.03 0.34 ± 0.06 0.41 ± 0.09 0.46 ± 0.11 0.69 ± 0.27 0.96 ± 0.38 1.19 ± 0.48 5 mg / kg + 100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 0.29 ± 0.02 0.300 ± .03 0.30 ± 0.03 0.30 ± 0.03 0.37 ± 0.05 0.47 ± 0.11 0.50 ± 0.14 0.54 ± 0.17 10 mg / kg + 100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 0.20 ± 0.03 0.19 ± 0.04 0.17 ± 0.03 0.17 ± 0.03 0.17 ± 0.03 0.17 ± 0.03 0.20 ± 0.03 0.20 ± 0.03

Volume Growth Inhibition Ratio of Sacoma M-1 in Rats after PDT with Chlorin e6 Binding Dosage Inhibition of volume growth of Sacoma M-1 in rats over time (days) 7 10 12 14 17 19 21 24 2,5 mg / 100 g +100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 47,5 79,4 87,6 89,8 94,8 94,1 94,2 93,6 5 mg / 100 g +100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 36,9 77,9 89,1 92,6 95,8 95,9 96,9 97,1 10 mg / 100 g +100 J / ㎠ for 1 h 56,5 86,0 93,8 95,8 98,1 95,2 98,8 98,9

Spectroscopic fluorescence analysis of the accumulation of Chlorin e6 and Chlorin e6 conjugates using lifetime laser fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the maximum accumulation of Chlorin e6 in tumor tissues of Sacoma M-1 rats was increased to 10.0 mg / kg. It was shown for the first 5 hours after dosing. In addition, the maximum accumulation of Chlorin e6 conjugate was recorded as 2-5 hours after the dose of 5.0 mg / kg.

After PDT using 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg doses of Chlorin e6 conjugates, antitumor effects were assessed through necrosis areas formed in Sacoma M-1. When administered at a dose of mg / kg, the necrosis rate was 66.16%.

After PDT with chlorin e6 conjugates, the rats monitored the growth inhibition of sacoma M-1 in rats for 24 days compared to the control, showing 86.34% to 99.1% inhibition.

Comparing the degree of accumulation, the Chlorin e6 conjugate showed enhanced affinity for tumor cells and cell membranes. Comparing the accumulation in the induced sacoma, it was confirmed that the Chlorin e6 conjugate was much more tumor-oriented than Chlorin e6. Therefore, it can be seen that the efficiency of phototherapy with Chlorin e6 combination is significantly superior to Chlorin e6.

Considering the results of this experiment, it can be concluded that the Chlorin e6 combination has the optimal properties for the efficient production of singlet oxygen in various media. Also, considering the unique tropism of the Chlorin e6 binding to tumor cells and tissues, it can be seen that the Chlorin e6 binding has a high photodynamic activity that exceeds all other porphyrin-based photosensitive agents currently known. .

1 is a result of mass spectrometry of γ-{[ tert -butyl- N- (6-aminohexyl)] carbamate} folic acid (negative mode).

2 is a mass spectrometry result of γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid. Here, A is a positive mode, B is a negative mode measurement results.

Figure 3 is the mass spectrometry results of Chlorin e 6 succinidyl ester. Here, A is a positive mode, B is a negative mode measurement results.

4 is a mass spectrometry (Positive mode) result of γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -Chlorin e 6 .

5 shows NMR measurement results of γ- (6-aminohexyl) folic acid] -Chlorin e 6 .

6 is an electron absorption spectrum of chlorine E6 conjugate.

7 shows the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence excitation spectra of chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 combinations.

8 is a result of luminescence kinetics measurement of singlet oxygen photosensitized by chlorine E6 conjugate.

9 is a graph comparing the accumulation of free chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 conjugates in HeLa cells over time.

10 is a graph comparing the accumulation of free chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 conjugates in HeLa cells over time when exogenous folic acid was added.

FIG. 11 is a graph showing cytotoxicity according to the concentration of free chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 conjugates in HeLa cells in the absence of light exposure.

12 is a graph showing the photodynamic activity of the concentrations of free chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 conjugates.

FIG. 13 is a graph showing photophotodynamic activity of free chlorine E6 and chlorine E6 conjugates in HeLa cells when irradiated at a dose of 3.3 J / cm 2.

14 is a graph showing the results of measuring chlorine E6 accumulation kinetics in Sacoma M-1 in rats and normal tissues when chlorine E6 was administered at doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg.

FIG. 15 is a graph showing the results of measuring the accumulation kinetics of chlorine E6 conjugates in Sacoma M-1 in rats and normal tissues when chlorine E6 conjugates were administered at doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg / kg. .

Claims (1)

  1. Novel chlorine e6-folate binding compounds represented by the following formula (1) or formula (2) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof:
    [Formula 1]
    Figure 112009026203398-pat00035
    [Formula 2]
    Figure 112009026203398-pat00036
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Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4692527A (en) 1984-09-15 1987-09-08 Basf Aktiengesellschaft 2-amino-3,5-di-(halomethyl)-pyrazines and their preparation
WO2006128121A2 (en) 2005-05-27 2006-11-30 The University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill Nitric oxide-releasing particles for nitric oxide therapeutics and biomedical applications

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4692527A (en) 1984-09-15 1987-09-08 Basf Aktiengesellschaft 2-amino-3,5-di-(halomethyl)-pyrazines and their preparation
WO2006128121A2 (en) 2005-05-27 2006-11-30 The University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill Nitric oxide-releasing particles for nitric oxide therapeutics and biomedical applications

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