JPH0716079A - Fermented gelatinized marine food and its production - Google Patents

Fermented gelatinized marine food and its production

Info

Publication number
JPH0716079A
JPH0716079A JP5189452A JP18945293A JPH0716079A JP H0716079 A JPH0716079 A JP H0716079A JP 5189452 A JP5189452 A JP 5189452A JP 18945293 A JP18945293 A JP 18945293A JP H0716079 A JPH0716079 A JP H0716079A
Authority
JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
fermented
starter
salmon
lactic acid
fish
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
JP5189452A
Other languages
Japanese (ja)
Other versions
JP2556813B2 (en
Inventor
Kozo Asano
Shuji Yoshikawa
修司 吉川
行蔵 浅野
Original Assignee
Kozo Asano
行蔵 浅野
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Kozo Asano, 行蔵 浅野 filed Critical Kozo Asano
Priority to JP5189452A priority Critical patent/JP2556813B2/en
Publication of JPH0716079A publication Critical patent/JPH0716079A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of JP2556813B2 publication Critical patent/JP2556813B2/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current

Links

Abstract

(57) [Summary] [Purpose] A lactic acid bacterium starter is used to produce fermented marine products with excellent gel strength, elasticity, and flavor. [Composition] A method for producing a marine fermented food in which sugar and lactic acid bacterium starter are added to a salmon surimi and fermentation, and a marine fermented food.

Description

Detailed Description of the Invention

[0001]

[Industrial application] The present invention relates to a fermented seafood product and a method for producing the same, and to impart elasticity and flavor by adding a lactic acid bacterium starter to fish meat, especially salmon ground meat, and fermenting it. Specifically, the present invention relates to a fermented gelled food such as kamaboko, which is made from salmon and trout, and is produced by fermentation with lactic acid bacteria.

[0002]

2. Description of the Related Art Generally, fish paste products are obtained by crushing fish meat together with salt, adding auxiliary ingredients such as seasonings, and heating. Kamaboko is a typical fish paste product. Kamaboko has a long history, and there are already records of its production around 1500. In addition, there are kamaboko, which is known as a local specialty, and is widely popular. Although the fish species as a material is not limited, it is preferable to use fish species that are rich in umami components, have high gel forming ability, and are inexpensive. Therefore, it is common to mix several types of fish. Walleye pollack surimi was developed in the 1955's, and due to the difficulty of securing raw material fish, dependence on walleye pollack surimi increased. As a material for kamaboko, Alaska pollack has a sufficient gel-forming ability, but has a drawback that it lacks umami taste.

[0003] In the conventional manufacturing method of kamaboko, ground fish meat is crushed, salt is added and salted. Next, seasoning such as sodium glutamate and starch as an elasticity enhancer are added and mixed, and then molded. Finally, a gel is formed by heating to obtain a product. Another common method is to leave the surimi to which salt has been added, and to slightly gel it to enhance the "feet" (elasticity, gel strength) and then heat it. Currently, when manufacturing Kamaboko made from Alaska pollack Heats the molded surimi after gelling it at a low temperature.

The salting step is a step performed to elute a sufficient amount of salt-soluble protein from the myofibrils to form a network gel. The salt added at the time of salting is at least 2.5% with respect to fish meat, and it is necessary to add 3 to 10% to increase elasticity (leg). Usually, 2.5 to 3.5% is added in relation to the taste. If the surimi to which salt is added is left to stand, the fibrous protein crosslinks and gels even without heating. This phenomenon is "sit"
It is called "sit" and the easiness of "sitting" varies depending on the fish species.
By heating, a gel of the eluted protein that is much harder than "sitting" is formed, but by heating the surimi once seated, a stronger gel can be formed.
Therefore, it is said that the fish species that are easy to sit on are suitable for the production of kamaboko, and the fish meat minced fish of Alaska pollack, which is currently widely used for the production of kamaboko, has the property of sitting well even at low temperatures.

On the other hand, although salmon has the property of returning when released, has an excellent color tone peculiar to salmon, and has a rich flavor, such as salmon, the surimi has a variety of excellent characteristics not obtained by Alaska pollack, but the surimi has a low temperature. Since it is said that it is difficult to sit in, it is not often used for manufacturing kamaboko. As described above, conventional fish gelled foods have a problem that it is difficult to use them as raw materials unless they are fish species that are comfortable to sit on.

As a gelling method of fish meat surimi other than heating, there are a method of denaturing the protein of surimi with acid to give elasticity and a method of fermenting the surimi with a microorganism to gel.

Kamaboko, which is obtained by acid-denaturing surimi protein by acid denaturation, is called "Shime Kamaboko" (Journal of Fisheries Products Technology, Vol. 6, No. 7, pages 311 to 314, No. 9).
Pages 406-409, No. 12, pages 547-550). However, there are two problems in the manufacturing method of "shimekaboko". One is the general method of making "shimekaboko" by dipping the shaped surimi in an acid solution, but "shimekaboko" gives good elasticity, but the taste of the surimi seasoned before soaking in the acid soaking process Is almost disappeared. In order to compensate for the disappearing taste, there is also a method of seasoning the soaking acid solution. Since the pH rises when the acid solution is seasoned, it is characteristic that the buffer capacity of the acid solution is increased.
The other problem is that "Shimekamaboko" does not penetrate into the central part when it is thick. This problem has not yet been overcome.

[0008] A report on a method for producing a fermented kamaboko which ferments surimi meat with microorganisms to impart gel strength, elasticity and flavor has been reported by Mie University and Sanei Saccharification Co., Ltd. using Lactobacillus plantarum as target fish species (Lactobacillus plantarum) and Lactobacillus casei (Lactobacillus casei) (Journal of Japanese Food Industry, Vol. 39, pp. 519-523, 1992), Pediococcus spp.・ Acid Lactiti (Pediococcus
Example using acidilactici (International Journal of Food Microbiology (Intern
ational Jounal of Food Microbiology) Volume 13, 143-1
(Page 56, 1991), there is an example of using Bifidobacterium as a target fish species of sardines and sea bream (Patent Publication No. Sho 61-35765). However, in these reports, walleye pollock, sardines, and hockey used as raw materials for kamaboko are easy-to-sit materials, but there are no reports of fish-fermented gelled foods made from salmon that are difficult to sit, and fish-fermented gelled foods are not reported. There are still restrictions on the raw fish species used to make food. In addition, the examples of Mie University and Sanei Saccharification Co., Ltd. only describe that the elasticity of the fermented kamaboko became lower than that before heating, but the physical properties of elasticity before heating were not shown. It is unclear to what extent the gel properties will change due to. The example of the University of New South Wales only describes changes in microbiota, and does not describe physical properties such as gel strength as food, taste, and aroma.

[0009]

[Problems to be Solved by the Invention] In the current method for producing gelled foods for fishery products, the production of non-fermented gelled foods such as kamaboko is limited to fish species where the material is easy to sit on. There is a limit to the thickness during the process, and the original flavor of the fish is lost during the acid immersion process. In addition, in the report that fermented conventional fish meat,
In many cases, the fish species used are those that are easy to sit on, and there is a problem that the restrictions on the ease of sitting of the target fish species have not been resolved. Furthermore, the previous report does not describe specific data on the physical properties of the gel after fermentation, so the involvement of fermentation is unclear.

[0010] Therefore, the problem to be solved by the present invention is to use salmon surimi as a raw material, which has been difficult to use because the surimi is difficult to sit despite having excellent characteristics such as scent, color tone and taste. The purpose of the present invention is to provide a fish-fermented gelled food product that makes use of the salmon's excellent characteristics by imparting a flavor due to fermentation of lactic acid bacteria as well as physical properties rich in gel strength and elasticity.

[0011]

[Means for Solving the Problems] According to the present invention, Leuconostoc spp.
Fermenting salmon surimi with lactic acid bacteria of the genus, Pediococcus, or Lactococcus as a starter, the breaking strain value increases with breaking strength, elastic gel is formed, and the salmon's unique flavor and color tone are impaired Therefore, the present invention has been completed, and it was found that a high-quality food product having a sourness or a flavor due to fermentation can be produced, and the present invention has been accomplished.

That is, even when the salmon surimi, which is said to be difficult to sit due to salting, is used as the raw material, the production method of the present invention allows the fermentation gelation having sufficient elasticity and gel strength as food and flavor by fermentation. It is possible to manufacture food. Salmon surimi may be frozen or non-frozen, with or without thickening agents such as starch, with or without salt, and with or without seasoning.
The salmon and trout are applicable to the surimi fish species. The fish-fermented gelled foods that are produced include kamaboko (including "special kamaboko" according to JAS standards), as well as surimi, fish ham, fish sausage, etc., using salmon as its material, and Leuconosto.
The genus c, Lactobacillus genus, Pediococcus genus, or Lactococcus genus, or one obtained by fermenting a plurality of species of microorganisms belonging to these genera as a lactic acid bacterium starter is applicable.

[0013]

[Action] Lactic acid bacteria have an action of producing an organic acid mainly of lactic acid in the fermentation process. It is considered that the generated organic acid causes mild acid denaturation of the protein of fish surimi, which improves elasticity and gel strength.
It is also possible that enzymes such as transglutaminase are produced by lactic acid bacteria during fermentation, which may affect gelation. Furthermore, it is assumed that various metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria in the fermentation process contribute to the improvement of flavor.

[0014]

[Examples] The following outlines a method for producing a salmon fermentation gelled food and a lactic acid bacterium starter used for production.

The lactic acid bacterium medium is inoculated with the lactic acid bacterium and statically cultured. The bacterial cells are collected from the culture solution, suspended in glycerol, and then frozen and stored to obtain a frozen lactic acid bacterium starter.

Salt is added to the salmon surimi and salted. Further, distilled water, lactic acid bacterium starter and sugar are added and mixed. After degassing the mixed surimi, it is filled in a casing and fermented at 15 to 20 ° C.

The method for producing the salmon-fermented gelled food and the method for measuring the physical properties will be described in detail below.

Preparation of Starter Leuconostoc mese which is a test strain in a medium for lactic acid bacteria (for example, MRS medium)
nteroides) JCM 6124, Lactobacillus plantarum JCM 1
149, Pediococcus acidilactici JCM 5885, Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris (La
ctococcus lactis subsp. cremoris) IFO 3427 is inoculated and statically cultured for 2 days at 30 ° C. The cells were collected from the culture solution by centrifugation, suspended in 20% glycerol,
Immediately freeze and store at -85 ° C.

Preparation of Fermented Salmon Fermented Food Thaw frozen salmon ground meat and dry it with a food cutter for 1 minute. Next, add 4.35% by weight of salt to the surimi,
Salt with a food cutter for 3 minutes. Further, 35% of the surimi weight distilled water, 10% lactic acid bacterium starter (distilled water in the lactic acid bacterium-free area), and 21.75% glucose are added and mixed with a food cutter for 5 minutes. The surimi thus produced was degassed twice using a vacuum packaging machine, then filled in a polyvinylidene chloride casing (diameter 30 mm) and added with L. plantarum JCM 1149 at 20 ° C. for 5 days. Lac. Lactis Fermented with subsp. cremoris IFO 3427 or P. acdilactici JCM 5885 at 20 ° C for 6 days, and with Leu. mesenteroides JCM 6124 at 15 ° C for 11 days.

Measuring Method A measuring method of breaking strength (g) and breaking strain (mm). Use Sun Scientific Rheometer, 10 mm diameter cylindrical plunger.
The rising speed of the sample table is 60 mm / min. Extruded water content (%)
Measurement method. Toyo Filter Paper No. 101, a sample (4 to 5 g) sliced between two layers having a diameter of 11 cm is loaded with about 500 g / g sample for 3 minutes to measure the water loss. Methods for measuring pH and lactic acid content. Add an equal amount of water to the sample, crush it using a homogenizer, and measure the pH of the crushed solution. Further, after centrifuging the disrupted liquid, the amount of D- and L-lactic acid in the supernatant is used for F kit D and L-lactic acid measurement (Boehringer Mannheim).
Is measured.

The contents of the present invention will be described in detail below with reference to examples. However, the present invention is not limited to these examples.

[0022]

[Example 1] Method for producing salmon-fermented gelled food using L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter

[0023]

[Table 1] Box 01

The breaking strength of 21 specimens of salmon fermented gelled food fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 21 specimens of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured.
The breaking strength of the salmon-fermented gelled food product fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter was 1501 to 1700 g, which was about four times that of the control plot of 301 to 501 g. This indicates an increase in gel strength due to fermentation.
(Table 1)

[0025]

[Table 2] Frame 02

The breaking strain of 21 salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 21 strains of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. L.
The breaking strain of salmon fermented gelled food fermented with plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter is 17.0 to 18.9 mm, which is about 5 mm more than the control group 12.0 to 14.9 mm. did. This indicates an increase in elasticity due to fermentation. (Table 2)

[0027]

[Table 3] Box 03

The squeezed water content of 23 samples of the salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 23 samples of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The saliva fermented and gelled food product fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter had an extruded water content of 10.0%, which was slightly reduced as compared with the control group of 10.0 to 12.0%. This indicates a decrease in water separation rate due to fermentation. (Table 3)

[0029]

[Table 4] Frame 04

The pH of 20 salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 20 specimens of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. L. p
The pH of the salmon fermented gelled food fermented with lantarum JCM 1149 as a starter is 4.6, and the pH of the control group is 5.
The value was about 0.6 lower than that of 2. This indicates that more acid was produced by the added lactic acid bacteria. (Table 4)

[0031]

[Table 5] Frame 05

The amount of lactic acid was measured in 20 salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 20 specimens in a control group to which the starter was not added. L.
The salmon fermented gelled food fermented with plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter produced lactic acid of 4500-500.
The amount reached 0 mg / kg, which was about 1.5 times that of the control group of 3000 to 3500 mg / kg. This value explains the previous decrease in pH. (Table 5)

[0033]

[Table 6] Frame 06

The ratios of D and L-lactic acid of 20 samples of salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter and 20 samples of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The ratio of D and L-lactic acid in the control group was 2: 8, which was high in L-lactic acid.
The salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with ntarum JCM 1149 as a starter differed in the ratio of D and L-lactic acid to 6: 4. This means that the fermentation was performed by the added starter, not the bacteria mixed in the surimi. (Table 6)

The salmon-fermented gelled food product obtained by fermenting L. plantarum JCM 1149 as a starter was a food product with excellent gel strength and elasticity and chewy texture. In addition to the flavor of salmon itself, the flavor of fermentation was added.

[0036]

[Example 2] Method for producing salmon-fermented gelled food using Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter

[0037]

[Table 7] Frame 07

The breaking strength of 21 samples of salmon fermented gelled foods fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 21 samples of a control group to which no starter was added were measured. The breaking strength of salmon fermented gelled foods fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter is 881-9.
It was 10 g, which was a little more than 5 times that of 151 to 180 g in the control group. This indicates an increase in gel strength due to fermentation. (Table 7)

[0039]

[Table 8] Frame 08

The breaking strain of 21 salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 21 strains of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The breaking strain of salmon fermented gelled foods fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was 21.0-2.
The value was 4.9 mm, which was an increase of about 9 mm compared with 13.0 to 14.9 mm in the control group. This indicates an increase in elasticity due to fermentation. (Table 8)

[0041]

[Table 9] Frame 09

The extruded water content of 22 specimens of salmon fermented gelled food fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 22 specimens of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The water content of extruded salmon fermented gelled food fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was 22.
It was 0%, which was decreased by 4.0% as compared with 26.0% in the control group. This indicates a decrease in water separation rate due to fermentation. (Table 9)

[0043]

[Table 10] Frame 10

The pH of 20 samples of salmon-fermented gelled food fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 20 samples of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The pH of the salmon-fermented gelled food that was fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was 4.7 to 4.9.
Which was about 0.5 lower than the pH of the control group, 5.3. This indicates that more acid was produced by the added lactic acid bacteria. (Table 10)

[0045]

[Table 11] Frame 11

The amount of lactic acid was measured in 20 samples of the salmon-fermented gelled food fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 20 samples of the control group to which the starter was not added. The amount of lactic acid in the salmon-fermented gelled food fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was 2700-3.
500 mg / kg, whereas the control group is 2300-31
The amount was 00 mg / kg, which slightly increased. In this way, the difference in the amount of lactic acid produced between the starter-added group and the control group is smaller than the difference in pH, which is why Leu.
It is considered that enteroides JCM 6124 produces a large amount of organic acids other than lactic acid. (Table 11)

[0047]

[Table 12] Frame 12

The ratio of D and L-lactic acid was measured in 20 salmon-fermented gelled foods that were fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter and 20 samples in a control group to which no starter was added. The ratio of D and L-lactic acid was 2: 8 in the control group, and the ratio of L-lactic acid was high.
The salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with u. mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter differed in the ratio of D and L-lactic acid from 4: 6 to 6: 4. This means that the fermentation was performed by the added starter, not the bacteria mixed in the surimi. In addition, the salmon-fermented gelled food that was fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter clearly showed an increase in D-lactic acid as compared to the control group. (Table 1
2)

The salmon-fermented gelled food obtained by fermenting Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was a food with excellent gel strength and elasticity and a good texture. In addition to the flavor of salmon itself, the flavor of fermentation was added.

[0050]

[Example 3] Method for producing salmon-fermented gelled food using Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter

[0051]

[Table 13] Frame 13

The breaking strength of 26 specimens of salmon-fermented gelled food that was fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and 26 specimens of a control group to which no starter was added were measured. Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 34
The breaking strength of the salmon fermented gelled food fermented with 27 as a starter was 1150 g, which was 4.6 times that of 250 g in the control group. This indicates an increase in gel strength due to fermentation. (Table 13)

[0053]

[Table 14] Frame 14

Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 26 strains of gelled foods fermented with salmon fermented as starters and 26 strains of control group to which starter was not added were measured for breaking strain. Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 Breaking strain of salmon fermented gelled food fermented as starter is 1
The value was 5.0 to 17.0 mm, which was an increase of about 5 (about 50% of the control group) compared with 11.0 mm of the control group. This indicates an increase in elasticity due to fermentation. (Table 1
4)

[0055]

[Table 15] Frame 15

The squeezed water content of 24 samples of salmon-fermented gelled food that was fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and 24 samples of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 34
The amount of water extruded from the salmon-fermented gelled food fermented with No. 27 as a starter was 8.0%, which was 12.0-18.
Compared with 0%, it decreased by 4.0 to 10.0%. This indicates a decrease in water separation rate due to fermentation. (Table 15)

[0057]

[Table 16] Frame 16

The pH of 22 samples of salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and 22 samples of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The pH of the salmon-fermented gelled food that was fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter was 4.5 to 4.6, which was about 0.4 to 0.5 lower than the pH of the control group, 5.0. showed that. This indicates that more acid was produced by the added lactic acid bacteria.
(Table 16)

[0059]

[Table 17] Frame 17

The amount of lactic acid was measured in 22 samples of salmon-fermented gelled foods fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and 22 samples in a control group to which the starter was not added. Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 was fermented as a starter and the salmon fermentation gelled food produced lactic acid amount reached to 6000-6500 mg / kg, which was about 1 in comparison with 3500-4000 mg / kg in the control group. .7 times. This value explains the previous decrease in pH. (Table 17)

[0070]

[Table 18] Frame 18

The ratios of D and L-lactic acid of 22 samples of salmon fermentation gelled foods fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and 22 samples of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. Regarding the ratio of D and L-lactic acid, L-lactic acid accounted for a large ratio of 2: 8 in both the salmon-fermented gelled food product fermented with Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter and the control group. Lac. Lactis
It is known that subsp. cremoris produces only L-lactic acid, and in consideration of this, the previous measurement result of the amount of lactic acid produced and the measurement result of the ratio of D and L-lactic acid were mixed in the surimi. It indicates that the fermentation is performed by the added starter, not by the bacteria. (Table 18)

The salmon-fermented gelled food product obtained by fermenting Lac. Lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 as a starter was a food product with excellent gel strength and elasticity and chewy texture. In addition to the flavor of salmon itself, the flavor of fermentation was added.

[0073]

[Example 4] Method for producing salmon-fermented gelled food using P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter

[Table 19] Frame 19

The breaking strength of 26 specimens of salmon fermentation gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter and 26 specimens of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. The breaking strength of salmon fermented gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter is 1150-135.
It was 0 g, which was about 5 times that of the control group, 250 g. This indicates an increase in gel strength due to fermentation.
(Table 19)

[0075]

[Table 20] Frame 20

26 salmon-fermented gelled foods that were fermented by adding a starter and control group 2 in which a starter was not added
The breaking strain of 6 samples was measured. P. acdilactici JCM 5885
The breaking strain of the salmon-fermented gelled food fermented as a starter was 18.0 mm, which was increased by about 6 mm (about 50% of the control group) compared with 12.0 mm of the control group. This indicates an increase in elasticity due to fermentation. (Table 2
0)

[0077]

[Table 21] Frame 21

The amount of water to be squeezed out was measured from 24 specimens of salmon-fermented gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter and 24 specimens of the control group to which the starter was not added. The saliva fermented gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter had a squeezed water content of 10.0%, which was 2.0 to 16.0% compared to 12.0 to 16.0% in the control group.
It decreased by 6.0%. This indicates a decrease in water separation rate due to fermentation. (Table 21)

[0079]

[Table 22] Frame 22

The pH of 22 samples of salmon fermentation gelled foods fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter and 22 samples of a control group to which the starter was not added were measured. P.
The pH of the salmon fermented gelled food fermented with acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter is 4.6, which is the pH of the control group.
The value was 0.4 lower than 5.0. This indicates that more acid was produced by the added lactic acid bacteria. (Table 22)

[0081]

[Table 23] Frame 23

The breaking strength of 22 specimens of salmon fermented gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter and 22 specimens of the control group to which the starter was not added were measured. Salmon fermented gelled food fermented with P.acdilactici JCM 5885 as a starter produces lactic acid of 6000
~ 7,000 mg / kg, 3000 ~ 4000 in control group
Compared with mg / kg, it was about 1.8 times. This value explains the previous decrease in pH. (Table 23)

[0083]

[Table 24] Frame 24

22 Salmon Fermented Gelled Foods Fermented with Starter and Control Group 2 without Starter
The breaking strength of two specimens was measured. The ratio of D and L-lactic acid was 2: 8 in the control group, and L-lactic acid accounted for a large ratio, while the salmon fermented gelled food fermented with P. acdilactici JCM5885 as the starter was D and L-lactic acid. The ratio of lactic acid was different from 5: 5. This result indicates that the fermentation was performed by the added starter, not the bacteria mixed in the surimi. (Table 24)

The salmon-fermented gelled food obtained by fermenting P. acidilactici JCM 5885 as a starter was a food with excellent gel strength and elasticity and a good chewy texture. In addition to the flavor of salmon itself, the flavor of fermentation was added.

L. plantarum JCM 1149, Leu. Mesentero
ides JCM 6124, Pediococcus acidilactici JCM 588
5 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 strains were able to produce salmon fermented gelled foods with excellent gel strength and elasticity and chewy texture.

L. plantarum JCM 1149, Leu. Mesentero
ides JCM 6124, Pediococcus acidilactici JCM 588
No. 5, Lactococcus lactis subsp. Cremoris IFO 3427 strains were used to impart aroma by fermentation. In particular, the salmon fermented gelled food that was fermented with Leu. Mesenteroides JCM 6124 as a starter was L. plantarum JCM 1149.
It was possible to produce salmon-fermented gelled foods with a complex, rich and strong aroma than the aroma imparted to fermented salmon-fermented gelled foods using as a starter. Generally Leuconost
It is known that the oc genus produces various aroma components, and is effective in imparting flavor.

Evaluation of salmon fermented gelled food The improvement of gel strength and the impartation of sourness are as described above. It was also shown that fermentation was controlled by the difference in the D and L-lactic acid ratios and the amount of lactic acid produced. These materials demonstrated the effectiveness of the present invention.

[0089]

EFFECTS OF THE INVENTION By applying the method for gelling fish meat surimi using lactic acid bacteria according to the present invention, even if salmon surimi, which is a material that is difficult to sit on, is used, it does not impair the excellent color tone and flavor of salmon and It is possible to produce a salmon-fermented gelled food product like kamaboko, which is imparted with various elasticity and flavor by fermentation.

Claims (7)

[Claims]
1. A fish-fermented gelled food characterized by adding lactic acid bacteria to fish meat surimi or frozen surimi using salmon as a raw material to improve the gel strength by imparting elasticity and flavor. The manufacturing method.
2. The fish-fermented gelled food is kamaboko (JA
The fish-fermented gelled food according to claim 1, which corresponds to fish meat paste products such as "special kamaboko" according to S standard), surimi, fish ham, and fish sausage.
3. Leuco stock as a lactic acid bacterium
The marine fermented gelled food according to claim 1 or 2, and a method for producing the same.
4. Lactobacillus as a lactic acid bacterium
The fish-fermented gelled food according to claim 1 or 2, and a method for producing the same.
5. A lactic acid bacterium, Pediococcus (Pediococcus)
The fish-fermented gelled food according to claim 1 or 2, and a method for producing the same, using a microorganism of the genus Coccus.
6. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus (Lactoco)
The marine fermented gelled food product according to claim 1 and a method for producing the same, which uses a microorganism of the genus ccus).
7. A lactic acid bacterium belonging to the genus Leuconostoc, Lactobac
The fish-fermented gelled food according to claim 1, wherein a plurality of microorganisms belonging to the genus illus, the genus Pediococcus, or the genus Lactococcus are used and the method for producing the same.
JP5189452A 1993-06-30 1993-06-30 Marine fermented gelled food and its manufacturing method Expired - Fee Related JP2556813B2 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP5189452A JP2556813B2 (en) 1993-06-30 1993-06-30 Marine fermented gelled food and its manufacturing method

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP5189452A JP2556813B2 (en) 1993-06-30 1993-06-30 Marine fermented gelled food and its manufacturing method

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
JPH0716079A true JPH0716079A (en) 1995-01-20
JP2556813B2 JP2556813B2 (en) 1996-11-27

Family

ID=16241494

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
JP5189452A Expired - Fee Related JP2556813B2 (en) 1993-06-30 1993-06-30 Marine fermented gelled food and its manufacturing method

Country Status (1)

Country Link
JP (1) JP2556813B2 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2003013281A1 (en) * 2001-08-06 2003-02-20 Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. Process for producing fermented fish food
EP1676489A3 (en) * 2004-12-16 2006-07-12 Shonan Pure Co. Ltd. Method of producing food and food produced by the method
JP2008133251A (en) * 2006-02-16 2008-06-12 Hayashikane Sangyo Kk Lactic acid fermentation product of fish meat or fish meat-originated protein, method for producing the same and food and health food containing the lactic acid fermentation product
CN104432228A (en) * 2014-11-13 2015-03-25 福建农林大学 Processing method for improving gelation ability of shrimp flesh balls

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS5359068A (en) * 1976-11-06 1978-05-27 Nihon Nosan Kogyo Method of producing fermented egg yolk liquid
JPS5655180A (en) * 1979-10-09 1981-05-15 Horikawa Kamaboko Kogyo Kk Preparation of boiled salmon paste
JPS5739760A (en) * 1980-08-21 1982-03-05 Reiko Amaya Production of food material
JPS6062962A (en) * 1983-09-14 1985-04-11 Taiyo Fishery Co Ltd Economical utilization of fish meat
JPH03280862A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-12-11 Sanei Touka Kk Fish paste product and its production

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS5359068A (en) * 1976-11-06 1978-05-27 Nihon Nosan Kogyo Method of producing fermented egg yolk liquid
JPS5655180A (en) * 1979-10-09 1981-05-15 Horikawa Kamaboko Kogyo Kk Preparation of boiled salmon paste
JPS5739760A (en) * 1980-08-21 1982-03-05 Reiko Amaya Production of food material
JPS6062962A (en) * 1983-09-14 1985-04-11 Taiyo Fishery Co Ltd Economical utilization of fish meat
JPH03280862A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-12-11 Sanei Touka Kk Fish paste product and its production

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2003013281A1 (en) * 2001-08-06 2003-02-20 Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. Process for producing fermented fish food
US6884455B2 (en) 2001-08-06 2005-04-26 Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd. Process for producing fermented fish food
EP1415547A4 (en) * 2001-08-06 2005-10-26 Nippon Suisan Kaisha Ltd Process for producing fermented fish food
EP1676489A3 (en) * 2004-12-16 2006-07-12 Shonan Pure Co. Ltd. Method of producing food and food produced by the method
JP2008133251A (en) * 2006-02-16 2008-06-12 Hayashikane Sangyo Kk Lactic acid fermentation product of fish meat or fish meat-originated protein, method for producing the same and food and health food containing the lactic acid fermentation product
CN104432228A (en) * 2014-11-13 2015-03-25 福建农林大学 Processing method for improving gelation ability of shrimp flesh balls

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP2556813B2 (en) 1996-11-27

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Ramírez et al. Food hydrocolloids as additives to improve the mechanical and functional properties of fish products: A review
SHELEF et al. Growth suppression of Listeria monocytogenes by lactates in broth, chicken, and beef
EP0379606B2 (en) Novel transglutaminase
Cunningham et al. Egg-white lysozyme as a food preservative: an overview
Leistner Shelf-stable products and intermediate moisture foods based on meat
US3822250A (en) Thermo-gelable polysaccharide
AU2008261710B2 (en) Method and composition for preparing cured meat products
Abbas et al. The relationship between water activity and fish spoilage during cold storage: A review
ES2263615T3 (en) Gelified and gelificable compositions for food products.
Sikora et al. Sauces and dressings: a review of properties and applications
Leistner Hurdle technology applied to meat products of the shelf stable product and intermediate moisture food types
Skåra et al. Fermented and ripened fish products in the northern European countries
US5186962A (en) Composition and method for inhibiting pathogens and spoilage organisms in foods
Ohshima et al. High-pressure processing of fish and fish products
CA1133318A (en) Process for handling and processing fish meat
Cooke et al. Lactic-acid fermentation as a low-cost means of food preservation in tropical countries
Xu et al. Physical and chemical changes of silver carp sausages during fermentation with Pediococcus pentosaceus
Bover-Cid et al. Effectiveness of a Lactobacillus sakei starter culture in the reduction of biogenic amine accumulation as a function of the raw material quality
FI119220B (en) Fermented foodstuffs for animals
ES2246228T3 (en) Mixing for the rubefaction of meat products.
US4013797A (en) Bacterial compositions and process for fermentation of meat therewith
US4886673A (en) Method of preserving meat products and microorganisms for the stabilization of meat products
Hu et al. Effect of mixed starter cultures fermentation on the characteristics of silver carp sausages
JPH02308754A (en) Preparation of lactic fermentation food
Roca et al. Fermented sausages

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
LAPS Cancellation because of no payment of annual fees