JP5654645B1 - Engine lubrication equipment - Google Patents

Engine lubrication equipment Download PDF

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Publication number
JP5654645B1
JP5654645B1 JP2013153683A JP2013153683A JP5654645B1 JP 5654645 B1 JP5654645 B1 JP 5654645B1 JP 2013153683 A JP2013153683 A JP 2013153683A JP 2013153683 A JP2013153683 A JP 2013153683A JP 5654645 B1 JP5654645 B1 JP 5654645B1
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Prior art keywords
oil
chamber
pan
cover
engine
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JP2013153683A
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JP2015025372A (en
Inventor
岩田 恵一
恵一 岩田
洋志 奥井
洋志 奥井
進一 坂本
進一 坂本
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株式会社工進
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Abstract

An engine lubrication device that prevents backflow of oil with a simple configuration is provided. An oil pan 73 provided below a cylinder block 11 for storing oil, an oil chamber 21 provided above the cylinder block 11 into which oil sucked up from the oil pan 73 flows, and an oil chamber 21 In the lubricating device of the engine 1 that is lubricated with oil and includes the communication passage 42 that guides the oil in the tank to the oil pan 73, the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 that is located on the oil pan side of the communication passage 42 is the oil passage. It extends toward the bottom wall of the pan 73. [Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to an engine lubrication device used in a mower or the like.

  Patent Document 1 describes an engine lubrication device in which a spherical check valve is disposed in the middle of a return oil passage that communicates a valve chamber and an oil reservoir chamber. When this engine is laid down with the carburetor side down, the check valve moves by gravity to prevent the return oil path. As a result, the return oil passage located below the oil level is maintained in a state where communication between the oil reservoir chamber and the valve operating chamber is interrupted, so that backflow of oil from the oil reservoir chamber to the valve operating chamber is prevented. Is done.

  However, this engine lubrication device has a problem in that the configuration is complicated because a spherical check valve having a diameter larger than the inner diameter of the return oil passage is disposed in the middle of the return oil passage.

Japanese Patent Laid-Open No. 3626420

  The present invention has been made in view of the above-described conventional problems, and an object of the present invention is to provide an engine lubrication device that prevents backflow of oil with a simple configuration.

An engine lubrication apparatus according to the present invention is as follows.
An oil pan provided below the cylinder block for storing oil;
An oil chamber provided above the cylinder block and into which oil sucked up from the oil pan flows;
A head cover that closes the oil chamber and has a box shape with an opening facing the oil chamber;
A communication path for guiding oil in the oil chamber to the oil pan;
In a lubricating device for an oil lubricated engine with
The tip portion of the oil inflow hole located on the oil pan side of the communication path extends toward the bottom wall of the oil pan,
The head cover has a blow-by gas passage through which mist oil in the chamber passes,
The tip of the blow-by gas passage is located near the bottom wall of the oil chamber,
The blow-by gas passage is provided substantially at the center of the top wall of the head cover .

With the above configuration, for example, even if the engine is tilted so that the oil pan is located above and the oil chamber is located below, the tip of the oil inflow hole is located above the oil level in the oil pan. Therefore, it is possible to prevent oil from flowing into the communication path and backflowing through the communication path with a simple configuration by simply extending the tip of the oil inflow hole.
Also, since the head cover that closes the oil chamber has a box shape with an opening facing the oil chamber, the engine is overturned as described above, and a small amount of oil flows back through the communication path and flows into the oil chamber. In addition, oil can be stored inside the box-shaped head cover, preventing the oil from overflowing from the head cover.
Further, the head cover has a blow-by gas passage through which the misted oil in the chamber passes, and since the tip of the blow-by gas passage is located near the bottom wall of the oil chamber,
As described above, even if the engine is tilted and oil is accumulated in the head cover, the tip of the blow-by gas passage is located above the oil level of the oil. Therefore, it is possible to prevent oil from flowing back into the blow-by gas passage and backflow, and to accumulate more oil in the head cover.
Furthermore, since the blow-by gas passage is provided in the approximate center of the top wall of the head cover, the engine may be tilted sideways from the state where the engine is tilted and the oil is accumulated in the head cover as described above. Even if inclined, the oil in the head cover can be prevented from flowing into the blow-by gas passage and backflowing.

  It is preferable that a gap between the tip of the oil inflow hole and the bottom wall of the oil pan is 3 mm to 6 mm.

  If the clearance between the tip of the oil inlet and the bottom wall of the oil pan is less than 3 mm, it will be difficult for oil to flow into the oil pan from the tip of the oil inlet when using a normal engine. is there. On the other hand, if the clearance between the tip of the oil inflow hole and the bottom wall of the oil pan is larger than 6 mm, the tip of the oil inflow hole becomes oil oil when the amount of oil in the oil pan decreases. Located above the surface. Therefore, when the engine falls down, the amount of oil flowing back into the communication path from the tip of the oil inflow hole increases.

The gap between the blow-by gas passage and the bottom wall of the oil chamber is preferably 3 mm to 12 mm.
This is because when the gap is smaller than 3 mm, the blow-by gas hardly passes, and when the gap is larger than 12 mm, the amount of oil stored is reduced.

  According to the present invention, it is possible to prevent oil from flowing into the communication path and backflowing through the communication path with a simple configuration by simply extending the tip of the oil inflow hole.

Schematic which shows the path | route through which the mist-ized oil flows in the engine inside the engine which concerns on embodiment of this invention. Schematic which shows the path | route through which the oil which flowed out from the oil chamber flows in the engine in the engine which concerns on embodiment of this invention. The disassembled perspective view of the head cover which concerns on this invention. The disassembled perspective view which looked at the head cover of FIG. 3 from the downward direction. The exploded perspective view which looked at the head cover of Drawing 3 from a different direction. FIG. 6A is a schematic cross-sectional view showing a path of oil flowing inside the head cover, and FIG. 6B is a cross-sectional view taken along the line BB in FIG. 6A showing a gap formed between the curved portion of the outer cover and the inner cover. . Sectional drawing of the cylinder block which shows a 2nd communicating path. The lower perspective view of a cylinder block. Sectional drawing of the cylinder block which shows a 3rd communicating path. The upper perspective view of a crankcase. The lower perspective view of a crankcase. Sectional drawing of a crankcase. The partial expanded sectional view which shows the state which fell the engine upside down.

  Hereinafter, embodiments of the present invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

  As shown in FIG. 1, the engine 1 according to the present embodiment includes a cylinder block 11, a cylinder head 15 located above the cylinder block 11, a crank housing portion 45 located below the cylinder block 11, and the cylinder block 11. And a cam gear chamber 78 located on the side surface of the main body.

  A piston 13 is accommodated in the bore 12 in the cylinder block 11 so as to be able to reciprocate. The reciprocating motion of the piston 13 is converted into the rotational motion of the crankshaft 61 in the crank housing portion 45 by the connecting rod 14.

  Referring also to FIG. 2, the cylinder head 15 is provided with an intake valve 16 and an exhaust valve 17 that can reciprocate in the vertical direction. The passage in which the intake valve 16 is disposed communicates with an air cleaner 18 that takes air from outside into the engine 1 and purifies it. The passage in which the exhaust valve 17 is disposed communicates with a muffler 19 that discharges combustion air in the engine 1 to the outside.

  As shown in FIG. 3, a concave oil chamber 21 is provided on the upper portion of the cylinder block 11. The oil chamber 21 is closed by a two-layer head cover 22. The head cover 22 includes an inner cover 23, an outer cover 30, and a separation member 39 disposed between the inner cover 23 and the outer cover 30.

  The inner cover 23 is made of resin, and has a box shape with the lower end opened as shown in FIG. The inner cover 23 includes a blow-by gas passage 24, a return groove 25 (see FIG. 5), and a recess 27.

  The blow-by gas passage 24 sucks the mist-like oil staying in the oil chamber 21 and guides it to the separation member 39. The blow-by gas passage 24 hangs down from an opening 23 a formed substantially at the center of the top wall and extends into the inner cover 23. When the oil chamber 21 is closed by the head cover 22, the blow-by gas passage 24 communicates the space closed by the oil chamber 21 and the inner cover 23 and the space closed by the inner cover 23 and the outer cover 30. The tip of the blow-by gas passage 24 is located near the bottom wall of the oil chamber 21 with a gap L1 (see FIG. 6A). Specifically, the gap L1 is 3 mm to 12 mm. This is because when the gap L1 is smaller than 3 mm, the blow-by gas hardly passes, and when the gap L1 is larger than 12 mm, the amount of oil stored is reduced.

  The return groove 25 returns the oil separated by the separation member 39 to the oil chamber 21. The return groove 25 is formed on the outer surface of the side wall of the inner cover 23 from the upper end to the lower end of the side wall. The return groove 25 extends to the lower end of the protruding portion 28 that protrudes downward from the lower end of the side wall of the inner cover 23. A pair of first ribs 26 provided on the top wall of the inner cover 23 are formed at the upper end of the return groove 25. The first rib 26, the return groove 25, and the protrusion 28 constitute an oil return channel.

  The recessed portion 27 constitutes a part of the air intake path separated by the separating member 39. The recessed portion 27 is a recess formed on the outer surface of the side wall facing the side wall provided with the return groove 25. The recessed portion 27 is provided at a position corresponding to a breather passage 35 described later in a state where the outer cover 30 is mounted on the inner cover 23.

  As shown in FIG. 4, the outer cover 30 is made of metal and has a box shape having an inner dimension larger than that of the inner cover 23 having an open lower end. The outer cover 30 has a second rib 31 and a third rib 33 provided on the inner surface of the top wall, and a breather passage 35 provided on the side wall.

  The second rib 31 and the third rib 33 extend in parallel to the side wall provided with the breather passage 35 and are formed at a predetermined interval. The second rib 31 and the third rib 33 extend linearly from one side wall orthogonal to the side wall provided with the breather passage 35 to the other side wall. A separation member 39 is disposed between the second rib 31 and the third rib 33. Accordingly, the separation member 39 can be reliably fixed between the inner cover 23 and the outer cover 30 by the second rib 31 and the third rib 33. The bottom surfaces of the second rib 31 and the third rib 33 come into contact with the upper surface of the inner cover 23 when the outer cover 30 is attached to the inner cover 23.

  The second rib 31 has a notch 32 formed in the middle. When the outer cover 30 is attached to the inner cover 23 via the separating member 39, the notch portion 32 coincides with the end portion of the first rib 26 of the inner cover 23, so that the first rib 26 and the notch portion 32 are interposed. The separation member 39 and the return groove 25 are communicated with each other.

  The third rib 33 is provided between the second rib 31 and the breather passage 35, and curved portions 34 are formed at both ends. When the outer cover 30 is attached to the inner cover 23 via the separation member 39, a gap 38 (see FIG. 6B) is generated between the curved portion 34 and the inner cover 23, and the separation member 39 is interposed via the gap 38. And the recess 27 are communicated with each other.

  The breather passage 35 is provided on the side wall facing the third rib 33 and extends in the horizontal direction toward the outside. A fourth rib 36 hanging from the inner surface of the top wall of the outer cover 30 is formed inside the outer cover 30 so as to face the inner end of the breather passage 35. Further, a vent pipe 37 (see FIG. 2) communicating with the air cleaner 18 is connected to the breather passage 35. Therefore, when the outer cover 30 is attached to the inner cover 23, the breather passage 35 communicates the recessed portion 27 and the air cleaner 18. The breather passage 35, the vent pipe 37 and the air cleaner 18 constitute an air suction flow path.

  The separating member 39 is a demister made of a stainless steel wire mesh, and captures mist contained in mist-like oil and separates it into oil and air. Thus, manufacturing cost can be reduced by comprising the separating member 39 from a simple material.

  A first communication path 41 (see FIG. 1) is provided in the cylinder block 11 between the oil chamber 21 closed by the head cover 22 having the above-described configuration and the cam gear chamber 78. The first communication path 41 has an upper end communicating with the oil chamber 21 via the opening 41a and a lower end communicating with the cam gear chamber 78 via the opening 41b. As shown in FIG. 7, a second communication path 42 is provided in the cylinder block 11 between the oil chamber 21 and the crank housing portion 45. The second communication path 42 has an upper end communicating with the oil chamber 21 through the opening 42a and a lower end communicating with the crank housing portion 45 through the opening 42b. The opening 42 a includes an inclined surface 43 that is inclined downward from the bottom surface of the chamber 21 and is connected to the second communication path 42, and a vertical groove 44 that extends vertically downward from the bottom surface of the chamber 21.

  The crank housing portion 45 includes a bearing case 46 (see FIG. 8) formed at the lower end of the cylinder block 11 and a crankcase 53 (see FIG. 10) coupled to the bearing case 46. An oil pan 73 that collects oil is attached to the lower side of the crankcase 53.

  The bearing case 46 is formed with an exposure hole 47 that communicates with the lower portion of the cam gear chamber 78 and exposes a part of the cam gear 79 that meshes with the crankshaft 61.

  A branch groove 48 is formed at the lower end of the bearing case 46 and the upper end of the crankcase 53. The central portion in the longitudinal direction of the branch groove 48 communicates with the lower end of the second communication path 42. One end of the branch groove 48 communicates with the third communication passage 51 of the bearing case 46, and the other end communicates with the oil inflow hole 54 of the crankcase 53. As shown in FIG. 9, the third communication passage 51 is provided in the bearing case 46, the upper end communicates with the side surface of the bore 12 of the cylinder block 11, and the lower end communicates with the branch groove 48.

  As shown in FIG. 10, the oil inflow hole 54 is provided in the crankcase 53 and communicates the branch groove 48 and the oil pan 73. As shown in FIG. 11, the oil inflow hole 54 is formed in an oil inflow nozzle 55 that extends downward from the branch groove 48 toward the bottom wall of the oil pan 73. As shown in FIG. 12, the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 is immersed in the oil in the oil pan 73, and is located with a gap L2 from the bottom wall of the oil pan 73. Specifically, the gap L2 is 3 mm to 6 mm. If the gap L2 is smaller than 3 mm, it is difficult for oil to flow into the oil pan 73 from the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 when the engine is used. Accordingly, the gap L2 is preferably 3 mm or more. On the other hand, the reason why the gap L2 is not made larger than 6 mm will be described later.

  A bearing groove 58 having a semicircular cross section and a plurality of semicircular grooves 59, 59 having different diameters are formed at the lower end of the bearing case 46 and the upper end of the crankcase 53, and the crankshaft is formed in the bearing groove 58. 61 is rotatably supported. As shown in FIG. 1, the inside of the crankshaft 61 communicates with an oil outflow hole 64 described later provided in a semicircular groove 59, and the mist-ized oil inflow described later provided in the crankcase 53 at the other end. An oil feed passage 62 communicating with the hole 68 is formed.

  As shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, the crankcase 53 is formed with an oil outflow hole 64, a misted oil inflow hole 68, and a misted oil outflow hole 69.

  The oil outflow hole 64 sucks up the oil stored in the oil pan 73 and guides it to the oil feed passage 62 of the crankshaft 61. The oil outflow hole 64 is provided at the bottom of the bearing groove 58 and is a circular hole in a plan view that penetrates the crankcase 53 in the vertical direction. A pipe 66 (see FIG. 1) for sucking up oil stored in the oil pan 73 is connected to the tip of the oil outflow hole 64.

  The mist oil inflow hole 68 is a hole through which the mist oil discharged from the oil feed passage 62 of the crankshaft 61 flows into the oil pan 73. The mist-ized oil inflow hole 68 is an opening formed at the bottom of the semicircular groove 59 and communicates the semicircular groove 59 with the inside of the oil pan 73.

  The misted oil outflow hole 69 is a hole through which the misted oil flowing in the oil pan 73 flows out of the oil pan 73. The mist oil discharge hole 69 is formed inside a hollow rectangular column 65 extending downward from the bottom of the semicircular groove 59, and the upper end communicates with the exposure hole 47 via the semicircular groove 59. The lower end communicates with a later-described flow path 75 of the oil pan 73.

  As shown in FIG. 1, the oil pan 73 has a box shape with an upper end opened, and stores oil therein. A partition member 74 is disposed on the oil pan 73. In a state where the oil pan 73 is mounted on the crankcase 53, a flow path 75 is formed between the crankcase 53 and the partition member 74 so that the mist of oil flows inside the oil pan 73. One end of the flow path 75 communicates with the misted oil inflow hole 68 and the other end communicates with the misted oil outflow hole 69.

  The lower part of the cam gear chamber 78 communicates with the oil pan 73 through the exposure hole 47, and the upper part communicates with the oil chamber 21 through the first communication path 41. A cam gear 79 is rotatably accommodated in the cam gear chamber 78. When the cam gear 79 rotates, the intake valve 16 and the exhaust valve 17 are operated via a cam lifter (not shown) connected to the cam gear 79. When the intake valve 16 operates, the air taken from the air cleaner 18 is sent into the bore 12. When the exhaust valve 17 is operated, combustion air flows out from the bore 12 and is discharged from the muffler 19.

  The piston 13 and the crankshaft 61 are lubricated by oil that flows inside the engine 1. The oil flows inside the engine 1 by a lubricating device including a plurality of communication passages 41, 42, 51 provided in the cylinder block 11.

  As shown in FIG. 1, the oil stored in the oil pan 73 is sucked up above the oil outflow hole 64 through the pipe 66. The oil that has flowed into the oil feed passage 62 of the crankshaft 61 from the upper end of the oil outflow hole 64 is made mist by the centrifugal force of the rotating crankshaft 61 when discharged from the discharge hole 63. The misted oil moves downward from the discharge hole 63, flows into the oil pan 73 from the misted oil inflow hole 68, and moves along the partition member 74. The misted oil moves upward through the misted oil outflow hole 69 and flows into the cam gear chamber 78 through the exposure hole 47. Thereafter, the misted oil moves upward in the cam gear chamber 78 and flows into the oil chamber 21 via the first communication passage 41 and stays there.

  As shown in FIG. 6 (A), the misted oil in the oil chamber 21 is sucked into the blow-by gas passage 24 of the inner cover 23 by the negative pressure in the air cleaner 18 and passes through the separation member 39. Separated into oil and air. Thus, the separation member 39 is provided on the head cover 22 that closes the oil chamber 21, and the separation member 39 separates the misted oil into oil and air. Therefore, it is possible to reliably separate the misted oil into oil and air with a simple configuration. In addition, since the separation member 39 is disposed so as to cover the upper end opening of the blow-by gas passage 24, the mist of oil passing through the blow-by gas passage 24 surely passes through the separation member 39, and the oil and air And separated.

  The air separated by the separation member 39 flows out from the separation member 39 through a gap 38 between the curved portion 34 of the third rib 33 and the surface of the inner cover 23. The air flows between the inner cover 23 and the outer cover 30 in the direction of arrow A in FIG. 6A and reaches the breather passage 35 via the fourth rib 36. Thereafter, the air moves from the breather passage 35 to the air cleaner 18 via the vent pipe 37 and is released in the air cleaner 18.

  On the other hand, the oil separated by the separation member 39 flows out from the separation member 39 through the notch 32 of the second rib 31. Then, the oil moves between the inner cover 23 and the outer cover 30 in the direction of arrow C in FIG. Next, the oil flows between the return groove 25 and the outer cover 30, moves along the return groove 25, and accumulates in the oil chamber 21. Further, as shown in FIG. 2, the oil moves downward in the second communication passage 42 and reaches the branch groove 48, and is supplied to the oil supplied into the bore 12 and the oil returned to the oil pan 73. Divided.

  The oil supplied to the inside of the bore 12 moves from the branch groove 48 to the inside of the bore 12 through the third communication passage 51 of the cylinder block 11 and lubricates each component such as the piston 13. Thereafter, the oil is returned to the oil pan 73 through the misted oil inflow hole 68. The oil returned directly from the branch groove 48 to the oil pan 73 is returned via the oil inflow hole 54 of the crankcase 53.

  For example, when the engine 1 having the above-described configuration is used in a mower, as shown in FIG. 13, the oil pan 73 may be positioned upward and the oil chamber 21 may be positioned downward. However, the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 is located above the oil level in the oil pan 73. Accordingly, it is possible to prevent the oil from flowing into the oil inflow hole 54 and backflowing through the second communication passage 42 via the branch groove 48 with a simple configuration in which only the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 is extended.

  As described above, the front end of the oil inflow hole 54 is located with a gap L2 of 3 mm to 6 mm from the bottom wall of the oil pan 73. If the gap L2 is larger than 6 mm, when the amount of oil in the oil pan 73 is reduced during normal use of the engine 1, the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 is positioned above the oil level of the oil. When the engine 1 falls down, the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 is easily immersed in the oil in the oil pan 73. Therefore, when the engine 1 falls down, the oil flows from the tip of the oil inflow hole 54 and the amount of oil that flows back through the second communication path 42 via the branch groove 48 increases. In order to prevent this, the gap L2 is preferably 6 mm or less.

  The head cover 22 has a box shape with an opening facing the oil chamber 21. Therefore, even if the engine 1 is turned down as described above and oil flows into the oil inflow hole 54 and flows back through the branch groove 48 and the second communication path 42 and flows into the oil chamber 21 from the opening 42a, Oil can be stored inside the shaped head cover 22 (inner cover 23), and oil can be prevented from overflowing from the head cover 22 through the blow-by gas passage 24.

  Furthermore, since the tip of the blow-by gas passage 24 is located near the bottom of the oil chamber 21, even if oil has accumulated inside the head cover 22, the tip of the blow-by gas passage 24 is closer to the oil surface of the oil. Is also located above. Therefore, oil can be prevented from flowing into the blowby gas passage 24 and backflowing, and more oil can be stored in the head cover 22.

  The blow-by gas passage 24 is provided substantially at the center of the top wall of the head cover 22. Therefore, even if the engine 1 is tilted sideways or tilted in any direction from the state in which the engine 1 is tilted and the oil is accumulated in the head cover 22, the oil in the head cover 22 is blown by the blow-by gas passage 24. Can be prevented from flowing into and backflowing.

In addition, this invention is not limited to the said embodiment, A various deformation | transformation is possible.
The shape of the oil inflow hole 54 is not particularly limited as long as the tip extends to the vicinity of the bottom wall of the oil pan 73. A tube may be attached to the oil inflow hole 54 to extend to the vicinity of the bottom wall of the oil pan 73. .

1 Engine 21 Oil chamber 22 Head cover 24 Blow-by gas passage 42 Second communication passage 48 Branch groove (communication passage)
54 Oil inflow hole 73 Oil pan

Claims (3)

  1. An oil pan provided below the cylinder block for storing oil;
    An oil chamber provided above the cylinder block and into which oil sucked up from the oil pan flows;
    A head cover that closes the oil chamber and has a box shape with an opening facing the oil chamber;
    A communication path for guiding oil in the oil chamber to the oil pan;
    In a lubricating device for an oil lubricated engine with
    The tip portion of the oil inflow hole located on the oil pan side of the communication path extends toward the bottom wall of the oil pan,
    The head cover has a blow-by gas passage through which mist oil in the chamber passes,
    The tip of the blow-by gas passage is located near the bottom wall of the oil chamber,
    The engine lubrication device according to claim 1, wherein the blow-by gas passage is provided at substantially the center of the top wall of the head cover .
  2.   2. The engine lubrication device according to claim 1, wherein a gap between a tip portion of the oil inflow hole and a bottom wall of the oil pan is 3 mm to 6 mm.
  3. The engine lubricating device according to claim 1 or 2 , wherein a gap between the blow-by gas passage and a bottom wall of the oil chamber is 3 mm to 12 mm.
JP2013153683A 2013-07-24 2013-07-24 Engine lubrication equipment Expired - Fee Related JP5654645B1 (en)

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JP2013153683A JP5654645B1 (en) 2013-07-24 2013-07-24 Engine lubrication equipment

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Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH06299830A (en) * 1993-02-17 1994-10-25 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Lubricating device of four-cycle engine
JPH09170420A (en) * 1995-12-20 1997-06-30 Honda Motor Co Ltd Lubricating device for four-cycle engine
JPH09177528A (en) * 1995-12-26 1997-07-08 Honda Motor Co Ltd Lubricating device for four cycle engine
JPH10115208A (en) * 1996-10-09 1998-05-06 Honda Motor Co Ltd Oil mist generation for lubrication in engine
JPH1113444A (en) * 1997-06-26 1999-01-19 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd 4 cycle engine
JPH1181953A (en) * 1997-09-11 1999-03-26 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Oil supplying device for four-cycle engine
JPH11200830A (en) * 1998-01-08 1999-07-27 Fuji Heavy Ind Ltd Breather mechanism
JP2002089281A (en) * 2000-09-12 2002-03-27 Honda Motor Co Ltd Four-cycle engine
JP2002349227A (en) * 2001-05-25 2002-12-04 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Four cycle engine
JP2007016732A (en) * 2005-07-08 2007-01-25 Toyota Motor Corp Gas-liquid separation oil return passage
JP2007032506A (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-08 Toyota Industries Corp Lubricating oil return structure for exhaust turbocharger
JP2012117427A (en) * 2010-11-30 2012-06-21 Makita Corp Lubricating device for four-cycle engine
JP2013130182A (en) * 2011-12-22 2013-07-04 Makita Corp Four-stroke engine

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH06299830A (en) * 1993-02-17 1994-10-25 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Lubricating device of four-cycle engine
JPH09170420A (en) * 1995-12-20 1997-06-30 Honda Motor Co Ltd Lubricating device for four-cycle engine
JPH09177528A (en) * 1995-12-26 1997-07-08 Honda Motor Co Ltd Lubricating device for four cycle engine
JPH10115208A (en) * 1996-10-09 1998-05-06 Honda Motor Co Ltd Oil mist generation for lubrication in engine
JPH1113444A (en) * 1997-06-26 1999-01-19 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd 4 cycle engine
JPH1181953A (en) * 1997-09-11 1999-03-26 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Oil supplying device for four-cycle engine
JPH11200830A (en) * 1998-01-08 1999-07-27 Fuji Heavy Ind Ltd Breather mechanism
JP2002089281A (en) * 2000-09-12 2002-03-27 Honda Motor Co Ltd Four-cycle engine
JP2002349227A (en) * 2001-05-25 2002-12-04 Ishikawajima Shibaura Mach Co Ltd Four cycle engine
JP2007016732A (en) * 2005-07-08 2007-01-25 Toyota Motor Corp Gas-liquid separation oil return passage
JP2007032506A (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-08 Toyota Industries Corp Lubricating oil return structure for exhaust turbocharger
JP2012117427A (en) * 2010-11-30 2012-06-21 Makita Corp Lubricating device for four-cycle engine
JP2013130182A (en) * 2011-12-22 2013-07-04 Makita Corp Four-stroke engine

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