JP5515715B2 - Liquid ejector - Google Patents

Liquid ejector Download PDF

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Publication number
JP5515715B2
JP5515715B2 JP2009284876A JP2009284876A JP5515715B2 JP 5515715 B2 JP5515715 B2 JP 5515715B2 JP 2009284876 A JP2009284876 A JP 2009284876A JP 2009284876 A JP2009284876 A JP 2009284876A JP 5515715 B2 JP5515715 B2 JP 5515715B2
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ink
rotating roller
liquid
liquid ejecting
ejecting apparatus
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JP2011126062A (en
JP2011126062A5 (en
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裕和 大野
仁俊 木村
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セイコーエプソン株式会社
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Description

  The present invention relates to a liquid ejecting apparatus.

  The ink jet recording apparatus has the following problems in terms of printing by ejecting ink onto the printing paper as ink droplets from the nozzle openings of the recording head. That is, the increase in ink viscosity due to the evaporation of the ink solvent from the nozzle opening, the solidification of the ink on the nozzle forming surface, and the adhesion of dust cause clogging in the nozzle opening, and further bubbles are mixed in the recording head, This is a problem that causes printing defects.

  For this reason, in an ink jet recording apparatus, so-called flushing (empty) is achieved in which clogging of nozzle openings is eliminated by ejecting ink from the nozzle openings of the recording head at regular intervals in a non-printing area (flushing area). There are those that perform injection.

  In an ink jet recording apparatus that performs such flushing, for example, as disclosed in Japanese Patent Application Laid-Open No. 2004-228561, there is a printer that ejects ink to a rotating roller so that flushed ink does not accumulate. In the ink jet recording apparatus disclosed in Patent Document 1, the ink attached to the rotating roller by the rotational movement of the rotating roller is dropped in the direction of gravity, so that the ink attached to the peripheral surface of the rotating roller is dried and accumulated. To prevent that. Further, the ink attached to the rotating roller is scraped off by the scraper to prevent the ink from being dried and deposited on the peripheral surface of the rotating roller.

JP2003-320690A

  However, the ink may not fall from the rotating roller, or may not be scraped by the scraper, and the ink may solidify while adhering to the rotating roller, and may accumulate around the rotating roller. When ink is solidified and accumulated on the peripheral surface of the rotating roller, there is a problem that the nozzle forming surface of the recording head comes into contact with the deposited ink and damages or stains the nozzle forming surface.

  Therefore, the present invention effectively prevents the liquid adhering to the rotating roller from being dried by flushing, and effectively prevents the solute of the liquid from accumulating on the peripheral surface of the rotating roller, and damages or soils the nozzle forming surface of the liquid ejecting head. An object of the present invention is to provide a liquid ejecting apparatus that does not occur.

  In order to solve the above-described problem, a liquid ejecting apparatus capable of performing recording on a recording medium with a liquid ejecting head and performing flushing of the liquid ejecting head on a rotating roller, the liquid being flushed by the rotating roller A cleaning liquid storage tank is provided in which the cleaning liquid is stored so that at least a part of the part below the liquid receiving part that receives the liquid is immersed in the cleaning liquid.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, the portion of the rotating roller on which the ink is adhered can be moved while being immersed in the cleaning liquid, and the adhered ink can be removed from the circumferential surface. Therefore, it is difficult for the dried ink to be deposited on the circumferential surface of the rotating roller, and it is possible to prevent the nozzle forming surface of the liquid ejecting head from being damaged or soiled.

In addition to the above invention, the rotation rollers, and the generatrix of the rotating rollers are arranged along the nozzle rows of the liquid ejecting head.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, the distance (interval) between the nozzle row where flushing is performed and the circumferential surface of the rotating roller is constant regardless of the position of the nozzle constituting the nozzle row. can do. Thereby, the space | interval between a nozzle row and a circumferential surface can be narrowed, and it can prevent that the ink ejected from the nozzle row is mist-ized before reaching a circumferential surface and scattered around.

  In addition to the above invention, the liquid receiving portion of the rotating roller is disposed at a position deviated from a vertical plane including the rotating shaft of the rotating roller.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, it is possible to make it difficult for ink droplets ejected from the nozzle row and colliding (landing) on the circumferential surface located in the liquid receiving portion to rebound to the nozzle forming surface.

  The rotating roller rotates so that a portion on the liquid ejecting head side with respect to the rotating shaft is directed to the opposite side of the printing region.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, an air flow from the printing area toward the non-recording area is easily generated between the rotating roller and the nozzle formation surface. Therefore, ink mist generated at the time of flushing is less likely to be scattered toward the print area.

  In addition to the above invention, a removing member for removing ink adhering to the rotating roller is provided.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this way, in addition to the removal of the adhering ink by the cleaning liquid, the ink adhering to the rotating roller can be removed by the removing member, and the degree of removal of the adhering ink is extremely high. Can be.

In addition to the above-described invention, the removing member is disposed so as to be able to remove the adhering ink in a portion that is higher toward the downstream side in the rotational direction than the portion immersed in the cleaning liquid of the rotating roller. Suppose that

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, it is possible to remove the adhered ink that has passed through the cleaning liquid and has a sufficiently low viscosity, and therefore, the adhered ink can be efficiently removed. .

  In addition to the above-described invention, the removing member is arranged so that the adhered ink can be removed at the portion where the rotating roller is immersed in the cleaning liquid.

  By configuring the liquid ejecting apparatus in this manner, the adhered ink that has been immersed in the cleaning liquid and has a reduced viscosity can be removed by the removing member, so that the adhered ink can be effectively removed.

1 is a perspective view showing an overall configuration of an ink jet printer according to a first embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2 is a schematic plan view illustrating a schematic configuration of the ink jet printer illustrated in FIG. 1. FIG. 2 is a schematic cross-sectional view illustrating a schematic configuration when the ink jet printer illustrated in FIG. 1 is viewed from the front. FIG. 2 is a schematic cross-sectional view showing a schematic configuration when the flushing box shown in FIG. 1 is viewed from the front.

(First embodiment)
(Overall configuration of inkjet recording apparatus 1)
Hereinafter, a first embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating an outline of the overall configuration of an ink jet recording apparatus (hereinafter referred to as a printer) 1 as a liquid ejecting apparatus according to a first embodiment of the invention. FIG. 2 is a schematic plan view illustrating a schematic configuration of the printer 1. FIG. 3 is a schematic cross-sectional view illustrating a schematic configuration when the printer 1 is viewed from the front (front). The following description will be made with the arrow X direction shown in FIG. 1 as the front, the arrow Y direction as the left, and the arrow Z direction as the upward.

  In FIG. 1, the carriage 2 is configured to be able to reciprocate in the axial direction (main scanning direction) of the platen 6 by being guided by a guide rod 5 via a timing belt 4 driven by a carriage motor 3. The guide rod 5 is attached to and supported by two left and right frames 7 and 8 facing each other. Both frames 7 and 8 are connected by a back plate 9 and a bottom plate 10.

  An ink jet recording head 11 is mounted on the lower surface of the carriage 2 as a liquid ejecting head. Further, a paper guide table 12 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) for supporting a printing paper P as a recording medium is provided below the recording head 11. The paper guide base 12 is a box whose lower side is open to the whole and has a rectangular parallelepiped shape as a whole. The upper surface of the paper guide table 12 is formed as a guide surface 13 that guides the printing paper P in the sub-scanning direction (a direction perpendicular to the main scanning direction).

  A black ink cartridge 14K and color ink cartridges 14Y, 14C, 14M for supplying ink to the recording head 11 are detachably held on the upper surface of the carriage 2. For example, yellow, cyan, and magenta inks are stored in the color ink cartridges 14Y, 14C, and 14M. The recording head 11 is provided with nozzle rows 15K, 15Y, 15C, and 15M (see FIG. 4) connected to the ink cartridges 14K, 14Y, 14C, and 14M, respectively. Accordingly, the ink of the color stored in the corresponding ink cartridge is ejected from each nozzle row 15K, 15Y, 15C, 15M. Each nozzle row 15K, 15Y, 15C, 15M is arranged in the left-right direction. One nozzle row is composed of a plurality of nozzles arranged in the front-rear direction.

  A cleaning mechanism 17 is disposed in a non-printing area 16 (home position) located on the right end side of the reciprocating movement of the carriage 2. Further, a flushing box 19 as a flushing receiving means is disposed in the non-printing region 18 located on the left end side of the reciprocating movement of the carriage 2. Between the non-printing area 16 and the non-printing area 18, a printing area 20 is set as an area where printing is performed on the printing paper P by the recording head 11.

  The carriage 2 is guided by the guide rod 5 as described above, and is configured to reciprocate between the non-printing area 16 and the non-printing area 18 in parallel to the paper guide table 12. Printing by the recording head 11 is performed when the carriage 2 moves in the left-right direction, and an area on the paper guide table 12 where this printing is performed is a “printing area 20”. In contrast, areas that are arranged on the left and right of the print area 20 and are not printed are “non-print area 16 and non-print area 18”.

  The printer 1 is configured to perform flushing on the cleaning mechanism 17 and the flushing box 19. That is, the printer 1 can perform flushing on both sides of the printing area 20. Therefore, the printer 1 moves the recording head 11 to the side closer to the recording head 11 in the non-printing area 16 or the non-printing area 18 before performing the flushing, and moves the cleaning head 17 or the flushing box 19 to the cleaning mechanism 17 or the flushing box 19. On the other hand, flushing can be performed. Thereby, the moving amount of the recording head 11 at the time of flushing can be reduced, and the time until the flushing start can be shortened.

(Cleaning mechanism 17)
The cleaning mechanism 17 includes a cap 22 that can seal the nozzle forming surface 21 (see FIG. 3) of the recording head 11, a suction pump (tube pump) 23 as a pump unit, a wiper 24 as a wiping means, and the like. The flushing by the cleaning mechanism 17 is performed as follows.

  When the recording head 11 moves to the non-printing region 16 and is positioned immediately above the cap 22, the cap 22 rises, and the nozzle forming surface 21 of the recording head 11 is sealed by the cap 22. Then, a driving signal unrelated to printing is applied to the recording head 11 to perform flushing that ejects ink droplets idly. Thereby, the solidified ink in the nozzle can be discharged out of the nozzle. The discharged waste ink is discharged to the waste liquid tank 25 through the suction pump 23.

  In addition to the above flushing, the cleaning mechanism 17 is configured to perform cleaning for sucking ink in the nozzles and wiping for wiping the nozzle forming surface 21. In cleaning, with the nozzle forming surface 21 sealed with the cap 22, a negative pressure is generated inside the cap 22 by the suction pump 23, and the ink in the nozzle is sucked and discharged. Also by this cleaning, the solidified ink in the nozzle can be discharged out of the nozzle. In wiping, the wiper 24 wipes the ink adhering to the nozzle forming surface 21.

  The wiper 24 is disposed so as to be able to advance and retreat in a horizontal direction perpendicular to the moving path of the recording head 11. Therefore, the ink attached to the nozzle forming surface 21 can be wiped off by the wiper 24 by moving the recording head 11 in the main scanning direction in a state where the wiper 24 is advanced in the movement path of the recording head 11. it can.

  The suction operation of the suction pump 23 and the movement operation of the wiper 24 can be performed using the driving force of a paper feed motor (not shown) that transports the printing paper P. The cap 22 also has a function as a lid that prevents drying of the nozzle openings of the recording head 11 during the pause period of the printer 1.

(Configuration of flushing box 19)
A portion of the guide surface 13 of the paper guide table 12 that is located in the non-printing area 18 is provided with a flushing through hole 26 that is rectangular in a plan view. A flushing box 19 shown in FIG. 4 is provided below the through hole 26 in the paper guide base 12. FIG. 4 is a schematic cross-sectional view showing a schematic configuration when the flushing box 19 is viewed from the front. The flushing box 19 includes a storage tank 28 in which the cleaning liquid 27 is stored, a rotating roller 29, three scrapers 30, 31, 32 as removal members.

  The storage tank 28 has a rectangular parallelepiped shape as a whole, and a through hole 33 is formed on the upper surface thereof. The through hole 33 is formed in the same shape and size as the through hole 26, and is formed at a position that matches the through hole 26. Therefore, the upper part of the guide surface 13 and the inside of the storage tank 28 communicate with each other through the through hole 26 and the through hole 33. Moreover, the through-hole 26 and the through-hole 33 are formed longer than the length in the front-rear direction of the nozzle row 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M) in the front-rear direction.

  The rotating roller 29 is supported in the storage tank 28 so as to be rotatable by a rotating shaft 34. The rotating roller 29 has a cylindrical body in which the axial direction of the rotating shaft 34 is directed in the front-rear direction. The rotation roller 29 has an uppermost portion of the circumferential surface 35 positioned closer to the inside of the through holes 26 and 33 than the peripheral edges of the through hole 26 and the through hole 33, and ink from the recording head 11 to the rotation roller 29. It is arranged so that the drops can be flushed. Further, the rotating roller 29 is arranged so that the uppermost portion of the circumferential surface 35 has substantially the same height as the guide surface 13.

  The rotating roller 29 can be rotated by transmitting a driving force of a paper feed motor (not shown) for transporting the printing paper P to the rotating shaft 34, for example. In the printer 1, the rotation direction of the rotation roller 29 is a direction in which the uppermost part of the rotation roller 29 moves away from the printing region 20 (arrow M direction), and is counterclockwise when viewed from the front. That is, the rotation roller 29 is rotated in a direction in which the rotation direction in the portion closer to the recording head 11 than the rotation shaft 34 is directed to the opposite side with respect to the printing region 20.

  Furthermore, the rotating shaft 34 of the rotating roller 29 is disposed in parallel to the nozzle row 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M). Accordingly, the generatrix on the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 and the nozzle rows 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M) are arranged in parallel.

  A cleaning liquid 27 is stored in the storage tank 28 so that the rotating roller 29 can immerse, for example, about 1/3 of the lower side of the rotating roller 29. Therefore, when the rotating roller 29 rotates, the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 is sequentially immersed in the cleaning liquid 27.

  The scrapers 30, 31, and 32 are disposed inside the storage tank 28, and are in press contact with the rotating roller 29 so that ink (attached ink) attached to the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 can be scraped off. Yes. The scraper 30 is attached to the upper wall portion 36 of the storage tank 28 via a support portion 37. The scraper 30 is a portion protruding upward from the cleaning liquid 27 of the rotating roller 29, and is disposed on the side where the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 slides downward from above. That is, the scraper 30 is disposed on the left side of the rotating roller 29.

  The scraper 31 is attached to the bottom surface portion 38 of the storage tank 28 via a support portion 39. The scraper 31 is disposed so as to be able to press and contact the circumferential surface 35 at a portion where the rotating roller 29 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27.

  The scraper 32 is attached to the right side surface 40 of the storage tank 28 via a support portion 41. The scraper 32 is a portion protruding upward from the cleaning liquid 27 of the rotating roller 29, and is disposed on the side where the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 slides upward from below. That is, the scraper 32 is disposed on the right side of the rotating roller 29.

(Execution of flushing on flushing box 19)
Execution of flushing on the flushing box 19 configured as described above is performed as follows. Here, a case where flushing is performed for the nozzle row 15K among the nozzle rows 15K to 15M will be described.

  In performing the flushing, first, the printer 1 sets the nozzle row 15K, which is the nozzle row to be flushed by the recording head 11, directly above the ink receiving portion 42 as the liquid receiving portion on the rotating roller 29, that is, the ink. It arrange | positions on the perpendicular line of the receiving part 42. FIG. The ink receiving portion 42 is set at a position inside the through holes 26 and 33 with respect to the peripheral edges of the through holes 26 and 33 and at a position opposite to the printing region 20 with the rotation shaft 34 interposed therebetween. After the nozzle row 15K is disposed immediately above the ink receiving portion 42, a drive signal is applied to the recording head 11 so that ink unrelated to printing is ejected from the nozzle row 15K, and ink droplets are ejected from the nozzle row 15K. Flushed. Thereby, the ink solidified in the nozzles in the nozzle row 15K can be discharged out of the nozzles. The discharged ink droplets adhere to the ink receiving portion 42 of the rotating roller 29 disposed inside the through hole 26 and the through hole 33.

  The rotating roller 29 is rotated counterclockwise (arrow M direction) under the driving force of a paper feed motor (not shown). Accordingly, the rotating roller 29 rotates counterclockwise while ink droplets are attached to the ink receiving portion 42. Therefore, the ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 is removed from the circumferential surface 35 by the scrapers 30, 31, 32 and the cleaning liquid 27.

  Ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 in the ink receiving portion 42 is first removed from the circumferential surface 35 by the scraper 30. The scraping position of the scraper 30 is a position before the portion where the ink is attached in the ink receiving portion 42 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27, and the ink attached to the circumferential surface 35 in the ink receiving portion 42 is at a relatively early timing. It is scraped off by the scraper 30. For this reason, it is possible to effectively remove the adhered ink from the circumferential surface 35 before the viscosity of the ink adhered to the circumferential surface 35 in the ink receiving portion 42 increases.

  Then, the portion of the rotating roller 29 from which the adhered ink has been removed by the scraper 30 moves to a position where it is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 by the rotation of the rotating roller 29. The circumferential surface 35 to which the ink is attached is moved in the cleaning liquid 27 by the rotation of the rotating roller 29. Thus, the ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 is removed by the cleaning liquid 27 as the circumferential surface 35 to which the ink is attached moves in the cleaning liquid 27.

  A scraper 31 is disposed in the cleaning liquid 27. Therefore, the ink attached to the circumferential surface 35 can also be removed by the scraper 31. The circumferential surface 35 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 until it moves to the position of the scraper 31. Therefore, the adhering ink is in a state where the viscosity is lowered, and the adhering ink can be effectively removed from the circumferential surface 35 by the scraper 31. Further, the portion of the circumferential surface 35 that is in contact with the scraper 31 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27. Therefore, the adhering ink removed by the scraper 31 is removed while melting to the cleaning liquid 27 side, and the adhering ink is efficiently removed.

  Then, the portion of the rotating roller 29 from which the ink has been removed by the scraper 31 is further moved while being immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 by the rotation of the rotating roller 29. The ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 is removed from the circumferential surface 35 by the cleaning liquid 27 while moving in the cleaning liquid 27.

  A scraper 32 is disposed above the liquid surface of the cleaning liquid 27. The scraper 32 can also remove ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35. In the scraper 32, the ink that has not been completely removed by the scraper 30, the scraper 31, and the cleaning liquid 27 is removed. In the portion where the scraper 32 is pressed and contacted, the adhering ink is passed through the cleaning liquid 27 and has a sufficiently reduced viscosity. For this reason, the adhered ink can be efficiently removed.

  The rotation of the rotation roller 29 is performed while the flushing from the nozzle row 15K is performed, and after the flushing of the nozzle row 15K is finished, at least the circumferential surface 35 positioned at the ink receiving portion 42 at the end of the flushing. This is performed until it passes through the scraper 32. As a result, the attached ink can be removed by the three scrapers 30, 31, 32 and the cleaning liquid 27 on the circumferential surface 35 located on the ink receiving portion 42 at the end of the flushing. It is possible to reliably remove the ink adhering to the ink.

  In the above-described example, about 1/3 of the lower side of the rotating roller 29 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27, but the portion where the rotating roller 29 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 is below the ink receiving portion 42. If it is the part of this, it may be more and less than 1/3 of the lower side of the rotation roller 29. That is, the rotating roller 29 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 in at least a part of the lower portion from the ink receiving portion 42, so that the ink attached to the rotating roller 29 can be removed by the cleaning liquid 27.

  As described above, with the three scrapers 30, 31, 32 and the cleaning liquid 27, the degree of removal of the ink attached to the rotating roller 29 can be made extremely high. Therefore, it is possible to effectively prevent the dried ink from accumulating on the peripheral surface of the rotating roller 29, and it is possible to prevent the nozzle forming surface 21 of the recording head 11 from being damaged or soiled.

  As described above, in the printer 1, the rotating shaft 34 of the rotating roller 29 is arranged in parallel to the nozzle row 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M). Accordingly, the generatrix on the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 and the nozzle rows 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M) are arranged in parallel. Therefore, the distance (interval) between the nozzle row 15K where the flushing is performed and the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 is constant regardless of the position of the nozzle row 15K in the front-rear direction. As a result, the interval between the nozzle row 15K and the circumferential surface 35 can be narrowed, and the ink ejected from the nozzle row 15K is misted and scattered around before reaching the circumferential surface 35. Can be prevented.

  For example, when the rotation shaft 34 of the rotation roller 29 is arranged in the left-right direction, the row direction of the nozzle row 15K becomes the circumferential direction of the rotation roller 29. Therefore, in the central portion of the nozzle row 15K, the distance from the circumferential surface 35 becomes narrower, but the distance from the circumferential surface 35 becomes wider in the front-rear direction. As a result, there arises a problem that the mist of the ink ejected from the nozzles in the front-rear direction is easily scattered. On the other hand, the rotation shaft 34 of the rotating roller 29 is arranged in parallel to the nozzle row 15K (15Y, 15C, 15M), so that the above-described problem can be prevented from occurring.

  Further, in the printer 1, the ink receiving portion 42 is set at a position deviated (shifted) to the left side of the rotating shaft 34 of the rotating roller 29, that is, to the left side of the vertical plane including the rotating shaft 34. That is, the circumferential surface 35 positioned in the ink receiving portion 42 is a surface whose normal line H is inclined to the left side of the state perpendicular to the nozzle forming surface 21. Therefore, the ink droplets that are ejected from the nozzle row 15K and collide (land) with the circumferential surface 35 located in the ink receiving portion 42 are easily reflected to the left and do not easily bounce off the nozzle forming surface 21.

  In the printer 1, the rotation direction of the rotation roller 29 is a direction in which the uppermost part of the rotation roller 29 moves away from the printing area 20 (arrow M direction), and is counterclockwise when viewed from the front. That is, the rotation roller 29 is rotated in a direction in which the rotation direction in the portion closer to the recording head 11 than the rotation shaft 34 is directed to the opposite side with respect to the printing region 20. Thereby, an air flow from the printing area 20 toward the non-recording area 18 is easily generated between the rotating roller 29 and the nozzle forming surface 21. Therefore, the ink mist generated during the flushing is less likely to scatter to the printing area 20 side, and adhesion of the mist to the guide surface 13 and the printing paper P can be prevented.

  After the flushing of the nozzle row 15K is finished, the carriage 2 is sequentially moved so that the other nozzle rows are arranged immediately above the ink receiving portion 42, and the above-described flushing is performed also for the other nozzle rows. . The flushing may be performed only on one, two, or three selected nozzle rows from the four ink rows 15K, 15Y, 15C, and 15M. Further, the ink row may have a configuration of one row or five or more rows.

  The rotating roller 29 is formed of an ink non-absorbing body made of a plastic material such as polypropylene (PP) resin or polyacetal (POM) resin. Thereby, even if the ink ejected from the recording head 11 adheres to the circumferential surface 35, the ink is not absorbed by the rotating roller 29. Therefore, ink removal (scraping) by the scrapers 30, 31, and 32 and cleaning with the cleaning liquid 27 can be easily performed.

  Further, the scrapers 30, 31, and 32 are formed of a material having flexibility and non-ink-absorbing property such as butyl rubber and fluorine rubber. It is configured such that the ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 can be removed (scraped) by pressing and contacting the tip with the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29. The removing member may be configured to remove the adhered ink by wiping the adhered ink with a sponge or the like instead of the scraper.

  A flow path 43 connected to the waste liquid tank 25 provided with the ink absorption holding material 25A is connected to the lower portion of the storage tank 28, and the dirty cleaning liquid 27 is discharged to the waste liquid tank 25 by opening the valve 44. Can do. A replenishment tank 45 is connected to the upper part of the storage tank 28. Therefore, the cleaning liquid 27 can be replenished from the replenishing tank 45 to the storage tank 28 after the cleaning liquid 27 is discharged to the waste liquid tank 25 or when the cleaning liquid 27 in the storage tank 28 is reduced by evaporation or the like.

(Modification)
In the printer 1 described above, the ink adhering to the circumferential surface 35 is removed by the three scrapers 30, 31, 32 and the cleaning liquid 27, but the rotation is performed in the cleaning liquid 27 without using the scrapers 30, 31, 32. It is good also as a structure which only rotates the roller 29. FIG. By moving the circumferential surface 35 to which the ink is adhered in the cleaning liquid 27, the adhered ink can be removed while being dissolved by the cleaning liquid. Therefore, the attached ink can be removed more efficiently than the configuration in which the ink attached to the circumferential surface 35 is removed only by the scraper described in the background art section. Further, in addition to the removal of the ink by the cleaning liquid 27, the adhered ink may be removed by using one or two of the scrapers 30, 31, 32.

  Note that at least one of the scraper 30 and the scraper 31 may be provided, and the scraper 32 may not be provided. In such a configuration, the cleaning liquid 27 adhering to the circumferential surface 35 escaped from the cleaning liquid 27 can be prevented from being removed by the scraper 32. As a result, the circumferential surface 35 with the cleaning liquid 27 attached thereto can be positioned on the ink receiving portion 42, and the ink attached to the circumferential surface 35 can be prevented from coagulating. In particular, when the amount of evaporation or the amount of volatilization of the cleaning liquid 27 is large, the circumferential surface 35 can be made wet in the ink receiving portion 42 by not providing the scraper 32.

(Main effects of the embodiment)
As described above, the printer 1 as the liquid ejecting apparatus according to the present embodiment performs recording (printing) on the printing paper P as the recording medium by the recording head 11 as the ejecting liquid ejecting head. The flushing can be performed on the rotating roller 29, and the cleaning liquid is provided so that at least a part of the portion below the ink receiving part 42 as the liquid receiving part of the rotating roller 29 can be immersed in the cleaning liquid 27. A cleaning liquid storage tank 28 in which 27 is stored is provided.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this way, the portion of the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 to which the ink adheres can be moved while being immersed in the cleaning liquid 27. The viscosity of the adhering ink is lowered by being immersed in the cleaning liquid 27. Furthermore, the rotation of the rotating roller 29 moves the portion where the ink is attached, and thus a flow of the cleaning liquid 27 is generated with respect to the attached ink. Therefore, the adhered ink can be efficiently removed from the circumferential surface 35. That is, it is possible to effectively prevent the dried ink from accumulating on the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 and to prevent the nozzle forming surface 21 of the recording head 11 from being damaged or soiled.

  In the printer 1, the bus bar of the rotary roller 29 and the nozzle row 15 </ b> K of the recording head 11 are parallel.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this way, the distance (interval) between the nozzle row 15K where the flushing is performed and the circumferential surface 35 of the rotating roller 29 is set regardless of the position of the nozzle row 15K in the front-rear direction. Can be constant. As a result, the interval between the nozzle row 15K and the circumferential surface 35 can be narrowed, and the ink ejected from the nozzle row 15K is misted and scattered around before reaching the circumferential surface 35. Can be prevented.

  In the printer 1, the ink receiving portion 42 of the rotating roller 29 is disposed at a position off the vertical plane including the rotating shaft 34 of the rotating roller 29.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this way, the normal line H in the ink receiving portion 42 of the circumferential surface 35 is inclined to the left from the state orthogonal to the nozzle forming surface 21. That is, the tangential plane of the circumferential surface 35 in the ink receiving portion 42 is inclined to the lower left. Therefore, the ink droplets that are ejected from the nozzle row 15K and collide (land) with the circumferential surface 35 located in the ink receiving portion 42 are easily reflected to the left and do not easily bounce off the nozzle forming surface 21.

  Further, in the printer 1, the rotation roller 29 rotates so that a portion on the recording head 11 side with respect to the rotation shaft 34 is directed to the opposite side of the printing region 20.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this manner, an airflow from the printing area 20 toward the non-recording area 18 is easily generated between the rotating roller 29 and the nozzle forming surface 21. Therefore, the ink mist generated during the flushing is less likely to scatter to the printing area 20 side, and adhesion of the mist to the guide surface 13 and the printing paper P can be prevented.

  The printer 1 also includes scrapers 30, 31, and 32 as removal members that remove ink attached to the rotating roller 29.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this way, in addition to the removal of the adhering ink by the cleaning liquid 27, the ink adhering to the rotating roller 29 can be removed also by the three scrapers 30, 31, 32. The degree of removal can be made extremely high.

  In addition, the printer 1 removes the adhering ink by the scraper 32 in a portion that is higher in the rotation direction than the portion immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 of the rotating roller 29.

  By configuring the printer 1 in this way, the scraper 30, the scraper 31, and the attached ink that could not be removed even by the cleaning liquid 27 can be removed by the scraper 32. Further, in the portion where the scraper 32 is pressed and contacted, the adhered ink is passed through the cleaning liquid 27 and has a sufficiently reduced viscosity. For this reason, the adhered ink can be efficiently removed.

  Further, in the printer 1, the adhered ink is removed by the scraper 31 in the portion where the rotating roller 29 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27.

  The circumferential surface 35 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27 until it moves to the position of the scraper 31. For this reason, the viscosity of the attached ink is lowered, and the attached ink can be effectively removed from the circumferential surface 35 by the scraper 31. Further, the portion of the circumferential surface 35 that is in contact with the scraper 31 is immersed in the cleaning liquid 27. Therefore, the adhering ink removed by the scraper 31 is removed while dissolving on the cleaning liquid 27 side, and the adhering ink can be efficiently removed.

  In the above-described embodiment, the liquid ejecting apparatus has been described as the printer (inkjet printer) 1 that ejects ink. The present invention can also be embodied as a fluid ejecting apparatus capable of ejecting a solid body that can be ejected as a fluid from a recording head (liquid ejecting head).

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 ... Printer (liquid ejecting apparatus) 11 ... Recording head (jetting liquid ejecting head) 15K, 15Y, 15C, 15M ... Nozzle row 20 ... Printing area 29, 53 ... Rotating roller 28 ... Cleaning liquid 28 ... Reservoir 30, 31, 32 ... Scraper (removal member) 34 ... Rotating shaft 42 ... Ink receiving part (liquid receiving part) P ... Printing paper (recording medium)

Claims (7)

  1. Recording is performed on a recording medium with an ejecting liquid ejecting head,
    A liquid ejecting apparatus capable of performing flushing of the liquid ejecting head on a rotating roller,
    A cleaning liquid storage tank in which the cleaning liquid is stored so that at least a part of a portion below the liquid receiving part that receives the flushed liquid of the rotating roller is immersed in the cleaning liquid;
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  2. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to claim 1,
    The rotating roller is disposed such that a bus line of the rotating roller is along a nozzle row of the liquid jet head.
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  3. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to claim 1 or 2,
    The liquid receiving portion is disposed at a position deviating from a vertical plane including a rotation axis of the rotating roller.
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  4. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 3,
    The rotating roller rotates so that a portion on the liquid ejecting head side with respect to the rotating shaft is directed to the opposite side of the printing region.
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  5. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 4,
    A removal member for removing ink adhering to the rotating roller;
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  6. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to claim 5,
    The removing member is disposed so that the attached ink can be removed in a portion that is located upward in the rotational direction downstream side of the portion immersed in the cleaning liquid of the rotating roller.
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
  7. The liquid ejecting apparatus according to claim 5,
    The removing member is disposed so that the attached ink can be removed in a portion where the rotating roller is immersed in the cleaning liquid.
    A liquid ejecting apparatus.
JP2009284876A 2009-12-16 2009-12-16 Liquid ejector Active JP5515715B2 (en)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP5919744B2 (en) 2010-11-26 2016-05-18 株式会社リコー Inkjet recording device
JP2013215901A (en) * 2012-04-04 2013-10-24 Mimaki Engineering Co Ltd Cleaning method, cleaning device, and ink-jet recording device
JP6255666B2 (en) * 2012-12-27 2018-01-10 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejector
US9144982B2 (en) * 2012-12-27 2015-09-29 Seiko Epson Corporation Liquid ejecting apparatus
JP6163792B2 (en) * 2013-03-04 2017-07-19 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejector
JP6244683B2 (en) * 2013-06-24 2017-12-13 株式会社リコー Image forming apparatus
JP6142738B2 (en) * 2013-08-28 2017-06-07 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejector
JP5979171B2 (en) * 2014-04-01 2016-08-24 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejecting apparatus and maintenance method for liquid ejecting apparatus
US9840078B2 (en) * 2016-01-18 2017-12-12 Seiko Epson Corporation Waste liquid reservoir and liquid ejecting apparatus
JP6642129B2 (en) 2016-03-08 2020-02-05 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejection device
JP2018140502A (en) 2017-02-27 2018-09-13 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Liquid ejecting apparatus

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JP4020126B2 (en) * 1998-03-24 2007-12-12 コニカミノルタホールディングス株式会社 Liquid ejection device
JP2002019131A (en) * 2000-07-06 2002-01-23 Mimaki Engineering Co Ltd Ink jet head-cleaning mechanism of plotter
JP4442306B2 (en) * 2004-05-07 2010-03-31 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Droplet ejection device and cartridge
JP2007163751A (en) * 2005-12-13 2007-06-28 Seiko Epson Corp Wiping device, droplet discharging device, method for manufacturing electrooptical device, electrooptical device, and electronic device
JP2008229919A (en) * 2007-03-17 2008-10-02 Ricoh Co Ltd Image forming apparatus and idle ejection receiving apparatus

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