JP5118112B2 - Apparatus, system, and method for providing voicemail using a packet data messaging system - Google Patents

Apparatus, system, and method for providing voicemail using a packet data messaging system Download PDF

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JP5118112B2
JP5118112B2 JP2009235043A JP2009235043A JP5118112B2 JP 5118112 B2 JP5118112 B2 JP 5118112B2 JP 2009235043 A JP2009235043 A JP 2009235043A JP 2009235043 A JP2009235043 A JP 2009235043A JP 5118112 B2 JP5118112 B2 JP 5118112B2
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message
mobile station
packet data
messaging service
destination
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JP2010081615A (en
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アレクサンダー・ゴジック
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クゥアルコム・インコーポレイテッドQualcomm Incorporated
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Priority to US60/574,757 priority
Priority to US11/133,655 priority
Priority to US11/133,655 priority patent/US20050287993A1/en
Application filed by クゥアルコム・インコーポレイテッドQualcomm Incorporated filed Critical クゥアルコム・インコーポレイテッドQualcomm Incorporated
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72547With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages
    • H04M1/7255With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages for voice messaging, e.g. dictaphone
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/10Messages including multimedia information
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/64Automatic arrangements for answering calls; Automatic arrangements for recording messages for absent subscribers; Arrangements for recording conversations
    • H04M1/65Recording arrangements for recording a message from the calling party
    • H04M1/658Means for redirecting recorded messages to other extensions or equipment
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M1/00Substation equipment, e.g. for use by subscribers; Analogous equipment at exchanges
    • H04M1/72Substation extension arrangements; Cordless telephones, i.e. devices for establishing wireless links to base stations without route selecting
    • H04M1/725Cordless telephones
    • H04M1/72519Portable communication terminals with improved user interface to control a main telephone operation mode or to indicate the communication status
    • H04M1/72522With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality
    • H04M1/72547With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages
    • H04M1/72555With means for supporting locally a plurality of applications to increase the functionality with interactive input/output means for internally managing multimedia messages for still or moving picture messaging
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/42382Text-based messaging services in telephone networks such as PSTN/ISDN, e.g. User-to-User Signalling or Short Message Service for fixed networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2203/00Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M2203/20Aspects of automatic or semi-automatic exchanges related to features of supplementary services
    • H04M2203/2066Call type detection of indication, e.g. voice or fax, mobile of fixed, PSTN or IP
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M2207/00Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place
    • H04M2207/18Type of exchange or network, i.e. telephonic medium, in which the telephonic communication takes place wireless networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04MTELEPHONIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04M3/00Automatic or semi-automatic exchanges
    • H04M3/42Systems providing special services or facilities to subscribers
    • H04M3/50Centralised arrangements for answering calls; Centralised arrangements for recording messages for absent or busy subscribers ; Centralised arrangements for recording messages
    • H04M3/53Centralised arrangements for recording incoming messages, i.e. mailbox systems
    • H04M3/533Voice mail systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/12Messaging; Mailboxes; Announcements

Description

Related applications

Priority claim under 35 U.SC § 119 This patent application is filed on May 26, 2004, which is assigned to the assignee of this application and expressly incorporated herein by reference. Interworking between Wireless Voicemail and MMS to Achieve Efficient Uses of US Provisional Application No. 60 / 574,757 entitled Internetworking Between Wireless Voicemail and MMS to Achieve Efficient Use of Network Resources Claim priority.

  The present invention relates generally to voice mail systems, and more particularly to an apparatus, system and method for providing voice mail services via a packet data messaging system.

  The voice mail system provides a mechanism for the source party to record a voice message that can be retrieved by the destination party. Typically, a voice mail box associated with a destination party telephone number is used to store voice mail messages. The destination party retrieves the message by accessing the voicemail server that maintains the voicemail box and by entering the appropriate identification and security information. In conventional voice mail systems, real-time calls, such as circuit switched calls or virtual circuit switched calls, are maintained by a voice mail server, while voice mail messages are saved or retrieved. However, in an environment where communication resources are limited, conventional systems have inherent drawbacks. For example, in conventional wireless communication systems, bandwidth and communication channels are valuable resources that are often used to retrieve and save voicemail messages. At any particular time, low latency real-time communication links are not required because only one party is involved in forwarding voicemail messages. Delivering or retrieving voice mail messages using circuit switched calls within a circuit switched network or virtual circuit switched calls within a packet switched network results in inefficient use of radio resources. For example, in a system utilizing a packet switched network such as VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol), a voice quality call is established for a virtual circuit switched connection so that it is real-time for voice mail submission or retrieval. Establishing a call results in an inefficient use of resources. Data packets exchanged during a voice mail call are unnecessarily treated as high priority, low latency data packets required for real-time calls.

  Therefore, there is a need for an apparatus, system, and method that efficiently provides voicemail service in a wireless communication system.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a communication system according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an exemplary communication system in which the first mobile station is a transmission source device and the second mobile station is a destination device. FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a communication system according to an exemplary embodiment in which the destination device does not receive a packet data messaging service. FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a source mobile station according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method for providing a voice mail service using a packet data messaging service according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 6 is a flowchart of a method for providing a voice mail service using a packet data messaging service executed on a voice mail server.

  The apparatus, system, and method efficiently provide voicemail service in a wireless communication system. Voicemail messages are saved and retrieved using a packet data message communication system such as a multimedia message service (MMS) system. Resources in a wireless communication system are efficiently managed by minimizing the duration of real-time calls. Voice mail messages are exchanged using higher latency packet data transmission than required for voice quality calls. Voice mail messages saved by wireless users are recorded at the source mobile station and transmitted as packet data messages over a packet data communication link. Voice mail messages retrieved by wireless users are received at the destination mobile station via a packet data communication link and stored in memory at the mobile station. Voicemail clients that do not subscribe to packet data message services, or voicemail clients that do not otherwise use packet data services, use voice mail servers with common technology because voicemail messages are held by the voicemail server. You can search for messages. Employing a packet data messaging system maximizes the efficiency of using wireless communication resources for voicemail services. For example, a greater degree of latency can be allowed in the case of transmission of packet data messages, so packet data messages including voice mail messages can be transmitted by circuit switched calls in circuit switched networks or virtual circuit switched calls in packet switched networks. It can be transferred efficiently with a lower quality of service (QoS) level than required. Therefore, communication resources are efficiently allocated using QoS policies that may result in increased latency while employing channels with higher data transfer rates than circuit switched or virtual circuit switched calls.

  FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a communication system 100 according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention in which the destination network 102 includes a voice mail server 104. The source mobile station 106 communicates with the base station 108 of the source network 110 via the wireless communication channel 112. At least a portion of the source network 110 may be any cellular, wireless, optical system or other wireless system that facilitates wireless exchange of signals using at least one mobile unit 106. including. Examples of suitable wireless communication systems include cellular telephone systems that operate in accordance with Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) or Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standards. The wireless communication system of the source network 110 has one or more base stations 108 that exchange wireless signals with the mobile station 106 and establish communication with the mobile station 106. Base station 108 is connected to a real-time communication network for sending mobile station calls according to well-known techniques. The real-time communication network 114 includes routing and / or switching equipment, communication links, and other infrastructure suitable for establishing a real-time communication link between the base station 108 and the voice mail server 104 in the destination network 102. Including any combination. If the real-time communication network 114 is a circuit switched network, the real-time communication network 114 is a mobile switching center (MSC), switch, and hardware that facilitates the establishment of a dedicated communication link between the base station 108 and the voicemail server 104. In particular, it includes transmitters in software and software. However, in the exemplary embodiment, the real-time communication network 114 facilitates the exchange of data packets using Internet Protocol (IP) to establish a virtual circuit switched communication link between the base station 108 and the voicemail server 104. A packet switched network including one or more Internet Protocol (IP) routers. In accordance with well known techniques, real-time calls can establish real-time calls between the mobile station 106 and other devices, such as the voicemail server 104, by prioritizing and managing the transmission of data packets. . Real-time communication network 114 includes equipment for interfacing and managing communications with mobile station 106 via base station 108. For example, the real-time communication network 114 may optionally include a mobile switching center emulator (eMSC). The cloud representing the real-time communication network 114 in FIG. 1 is shown with the source network 110 and the destination network 102 superimposed, indicating that the components in the source network 110 and the destination network 102 are considered as part of the real-time communication network 114. Illustrate. In addition, some of the equipment and infrastructure used to establish communications over the real-time communication network 114 may be utilized by the packet data messaging system described below.

  A packet data messaging system transmits data packets over a packet switched network to exchange messages including voice mail messages. A packet data messaging system may be any type of packet data system that provides a mechanism for sending data packets that contain files or other information representing the contents of a voice mail message. An example of a suitable packet data messaging system includes an electronic mail (email) system that can send an email message with an attached audio file. In an exemplary embodiment, the packet data messaging system is a multimedia that facilitates the exchange of text, video, audio and image files between a suitably equipped mobile station 106 and other devices serviced by the MMS system. A messaging service (MMS) system. Other devices may be served by the same wireless network, different wireless networks, wired networks or computer networks. The packet data messaging service center stores and manages packet data messages exchanged at the mobile station 106. In the exemplary embodiment, the packet data message service center is a multimedia messaging service center (MMS-C) 116 that stores and manages multimedia messages exchanged at the mobile station 106. The MMS-C 116 includes an MMS server and an MMS relay (not shown in FIG. 1). Depending on the circumstances, other devices, servers, networks, and storage devices may be connected to the MMS-C 116. For example, temporary message storage and permanent message storage may be used to store MMS messages. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize implementations of the communication system 100, the source network 110, and the destination network 102 that can be used based on various topologies, protocols, architectures, and their disclosure applied to well-known techniques. Will. The functions and operations of the blocks described in FIG. 1 may be implemented in any number of devices, circuits, or infrastructure. Two or more functional blocks may be integrated within a single device, and functions described to be performed on any single device may be performed via several devices. For example, the communication link between base station 108 and MMS-C 116 may include other different source networks 110 not shown in FIG. 1, such as a base station controller (BSC) and a packet data access gateway switching node (PDSN). Including.

  In the exemplary embodiment, communication system 100 utilizes Internet Protocol (VoIP) technology over a packet switched network. Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) facilitates the establishment of a virtual circuit switched call between a calling party and a called party, such as between an initiating mobile station 106 and a destination device 118. Depending on the circumstances, the communication system 100 may include one or more circuit switched networks, such as a public switched telephone network (PSTN).

  Voicemail server 104 stores, generates, and plays greetings and voicemail messages, and provides voicemail services to voicemail clients. The voicemail server 104 communicates with switching or routing equipment in the real-time communication network 114 and, in some circumstances, communicates with the MMS-C 116 and within the same network (110) with the switching or routing equipment and the MMS-C 116. Or may be connected within another communication network (102).

  Depending on the particular situation, the wireless communication system may include a voicemail source network 110, a voicemail destination network 102, or both. Thus, the mobile station 106 may be used to save voicemail for other parties, or may be used to retrieve voicemail saved by other parties. In this case, the communication device of the other party may be a mobile station 106 on the same wireless network, a mobile station 106 on a different wireless network, or a terrestrial communication line device connected to a wired communication network such as PSTN. In the exemplary system shown in FIG. 1, another party device (destination device 118) is illustrated as being connected to the source network 110 via the destination network 102. However, depending on the situation, the destination network 102 and the source network 110 may be the same network. The communication networks 102, 110 may include any number of wireless networks, wired networks, computer networks, Internet networks, or intranet networks.

  In accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, mobile station 106 exchanges MMS messages, including voice mail messages, with MMS-C 116. If the mobile station is a source device, the source party (calling party) records a voice mail message for the destination party (called party) at the source mobile station. The voice mail message is stored at least temporarily in the memory of the source mobile station and sent to the destination network 102 via the MMS-C 116. If the destination device is a landline device or other device without an MMS service, the MMS message is stored in the voice mail server 104 for the destination device 118. If the destination device 118 is a suitably equipped mobile station that supports MMS (destination mobile station), the voicemail message can be saved to the destination mobile station without storing the voicemail message on the voicemail server. . However, in the exemplary embodiment, when the destination device is not a competent MMS or is not configured to receive MMS, the voicemail message is voicemail for voicemail retrieval by the destination device 118 according to the prior art. Sent to the server 104. The voice mail message saved for the user of the destination mobile station (118) is transferred from the MMS-C 116 to the destination mobile station (118) as an MMS message. The MMS message is stored in the memory of the destination mobile station (118) and is played back locally when the user accesses the voicemail. Depending on the circumstances, the voicemail message may flow to the destination mobile station (118), allowing the voicemail message to be played before the entire message file is transferred. Therefore, packet data messages, such as MMS messages that include recorded voice mail messages, are transmitted to the destination network 102 via a packet data communication link, such as an MMS communication link.

  FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the exemplary communication system 100. In this case, the first mobile station 106 is a transmission source device (transmission source mobile station 202), and the second mobile station 106 is a destination device (destination mobile station). 204). In the exemplary situation discussed with reference to FIG. 2, the source mobile station 202 communicates via the source network 110 and the destination mobile station 204 communicates via the destination network 102, in this case the source network 110. The destination network 102 includes IP routers that each include an MMS-C 116, 208 and at least partially a real-time communication network 114. As described above, the real-time communication network 114 includes switching equipment including mobile switching centers (MSCs). In this case, the real-time communication network 114 is a circuit switching network. For clarity, base station 102 and other communication equipment are not shown in FIG. The voice mail server 104 in the destination network 104 provides a voice mail service for a destination device 118 such as the destination mobile station 204. Those skilled in the art will readily recognize various topologies, protocols, architectures and implementations of the communication network 100 that can be used based on these disclosures and well-known techniques. The functions and operations of the blocks described in FIG. 2 may be implemented in any number of devices, circuits, or infrastructure.

Two or more functional blocks may be integrated into a single device, and functions described to be performed on any single device may be performed via several devices. For example, the functionality of the voicemail server 104 may be implemented within the MMS-C 208.

  When the source mobile station 202 attempts to call the destination mobile station 204 and the call cannot be completed, the voicemail delivery procedure is exercised. In accordance with known techniques, the source mobile station 202 places a call to a communication device in the destination network 204 via a device in the source network of the real-time communication network 114. The real-time communication network 114 detects that the destination mobile station 204 is busy, within range of being unreceivable, not answering or otherwise unable to accept the call. In the exemplary embodiment, the VoIP device is not available to the destination mobile station 204 by determining that the page could not be answered or by determining that the call forwarding feature becomes active and sends the call to voicemail. Detect that. In response, the call is redirected to the voicemail server 104. In the example packet switching situation described with reference to FIG. 2, the voicemail server 104 sends a voicemail acknowledgment message to the source mobile station 202 using the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) used for VoIP signaling. . In the circuit switched network, the MSC detects the unavailability of the destination device, sends the call to the voice mail server 104, and the circuit switched call is temporarily completed at the source mobile station 202. A voicemail recognition message is sent to the source mobile station 202 to indicate that the voicemail server 104 has accepted the call.

  The source mobile station 202 responds to the voicemail acknowledgment message by sending an MMS called message indicating that the MMS system will be employed to submit the voicemail message. As explained above, VoIP and SIP are used in the exemplary embodiment. Voicemail acknowledgment messages and messages invoked by MMS are sent via the communication system 100 using the SIP extension. Therefore, in the exemplary embodiment, a message invoked by the MMS is carried using the SIP extension, indicating that a VoIP media connection will not be established. In embodiments utilizing a circuit switched network, messages invoked by MMS may include tone sequences, in-band as well as out-of-band, signaling techniques available in circuit-switched systems. After sending the called message to the MMS, the source mobile station 202 terminates the real-time call and continues to submit voicemail messages using the MMS. If the source mobile station does not send a message called by the MMS, the voicemail delivery procedure continues according to well-known techniques, allowing the source party to record a message at the voicemail server 104 for the destination party. .

  Depending on the circumstances, a greeting message associated with the destination mobile station 204 is stored in the voice mail server 104. In the exemplary embodiment, the greeting message is submitted by the voice mail server via the MMS system in an MMS message to the destination mobile station 202. The voice mail server 104 generates a file containing an MMS message that uses the addressing information of the source mobile station 202 and a greeting message. Although the greeting message file may have any number of formats, the greeting message file may be formatted according to the vocoder used by the source mobile station 202 in the exemplary embodiment. An example of a suitable vocoder format in a CDMA system includes Enhanced Variable Rate Coder (EVRC). The MMS message containing the greeting file is sent via the MMS system and saved and played back at the source mobile station 202 to the caller.

  If communication system 100 includes a circuit switched network, other mechanisms may be used to present the greeting message to the caller. One technique involves sending sender ID information from the voicemail server 104 to the MMS-C 208 to provide addressing information. An MMS greeting message is generated at MMS-C 208 based on the source address associated with the caller ID number. In some cases, the greeting message may be played by the voice mail server 104 via a virtual circuit switched call or a circuit switched call before the end of the real-time call using the voice mail server 104.

  The source mobile station 202 records a voicemail message by capturing an audio signal via a video signal via a microphone and / or camera and stores a digital representation of the signal in memory. Examples of suitable audio formats include WAV files, EVRC files and AMR files. An example of a suitable format for storing video files or multimedia files includes the MPEG4 format. Those skilled in the art will recognize a variety of other formats that can be used to store and transmit audio files, video files, and multimedia files.

  After appropriate processing of the voice mail message file, the source mobile station 202 generates an MMS message that is addressed to the destination mobile station 204 using the destination mobile address. Examples of suitable destination addresses include email addresses or any address that can be sent using the Internet Protocol (IP). In the example embodiment, since the call is a VoIP call, the addressing information for the destination mobile station 204 is established at the time of the session start of the virtual circuit switched call (VoIP call). Thus, addressing information that can be sent over the Internet is available via a network resident proxy device such as source mobile station 202 or SIP signaling controller, and any MMS from source mobile station 202 to destination mobile station 204. The message can be sent using the destination address used for the source VoIP call. However, if the call is a circuit-switched call, the MMS message transmitted from the source mobile station 202 must be related to the destination mobile station 204. An example of a suitable method for establishing addressing information in a circuit switched system is the use of an address translation database such as telephone number mapping (ENUM) or other suitable mechanism between the source mobile station 202 and the voicemail server 104. Including sending a destination address associated with the destination telephone number to the destination mobile station 202 via in-band or out-of-band signaling during a circuit-switched call between. In some cases, the destination address may be stored in the source mobile station 202 or may be associated with the telephone number of the destination mobile station 204. For example, a destination address that can be sent over the Internet, such as an e-mail address, may be stored in the address book of the source mobile station 202.

  The destination mobile station 202 generates a multimedia messaging service (MMS) message that includes a file or other data representing the voicemail message.

In the exemplary embodiment, the MMS message includes the voice mail message as an attached digital file and includes the destination address of the destination mobile station. The MMS message is sent to the MMS-C 116 according to a well-known MMS technique, and is sent to the MMS-C 208 of the destination network 102 via the communication system. In general, MMS messages are sent to a multimedia server in MMS-C 208 based on the destination address and stored in memory at MMS-C 208.

  The MMS server in MMS-C 208 saves the voice mail message in the destination mobile station 204. For example, according to MMS technology, MMS-C 208 stores the contents of the MMS message and makes it available as a dynamically generated URL link to a local data file. In the exemplary embodiment, a data file, such as a WAV audio file that represents a voicemail message, is associated with the MMS message. If the audio file cannot be saved at the destination mobile station 204, a notification is sent to the destination mobile station 204 indicating that a message has arrived and the download is available. Depending on the specific configuration of the destination mobile station 204, the MMS message may be retrieved with or without user intervention. Depending on the circumstances, the message may flow to the destination mobile station 204, and the voice mail message can be played before the entire file is transferred to the memory of the destination mobile station 204.

  Although various protocols, signaling schemes, and formats can be used to save the MMS message to the destination mobile station 204, the MMS technology established in the exemplary embodiment is used. For example, the MMS-C 208 generates an MMS notification message using the wireless application protocol (WAP) “Push” procedure via the short message service (SMS) and transmits it to the destination mobile station 204. The MMS notification message includes a URL pointer to a dynamically generated MMS message that includes an audio file representing the voicemail message. After receiving the MMS notification message, the mobile station initiates a data connection that provides TCP / IP network connectivity. The destination mobile station 204 retrieves the MMS message from the MMS-C by executing an HTTP (or WSP) “get” procedure. In the exemplary embodiment, the MMS message is transmitted using any of several protocols utilized in mobile communication systems. Examples of suitable protocols include M-IMAP, OMA-MMI, and SIP-based MMI. Furthermore, email protocols such as IMAP and POP can be used depending on the situation.

  In the exemplary embodiment, a warning message is sent to the destination mobile station 204 after the voice mail message is received at the voice mail server 104. The warning message notifies the destination mobile station 204 that the voice mail message is available at the voice mail server 104. Warning messages allow notification and recovery of voice mail messages. In this case, an error occurred with the MMS message. The alert message is transmitted to the destination mobile station 204 according to well-known techniques and protocols. An example of a suitable method for alerting the destination mobile station 204 includes sending an alert message using a short message service (SMS) message.

  The above discussion focuses on voice mail submission by a source device that subscribes to packet data message services such as MMS. However, in the exemplary embodiment, the destination mobile station 204 can be used to retrieve voice mail messages stored on the voice mail server 104. Such a situation may occur when the voicemail server 104 uses a common technique to record a voicemail message left by the source party, or the MMS message cannot be saved to the destination device 204 and instead voicemail May happen if sent to server 104 for storage. Other situations may occur when the source party accesses the destination voice mailbox directly through the voice mail system to leave a message for the voice mail subscriber associated with the voice mailbox.

  In a situation where the source device is not an MMS compliant device and is attempting to complete a call to the destination mobile station 204 and the destination mobile station 204 is busy, out of range or not available, the call Redirected to the mail server 104. After the source device establishes a call with a voicemail server, the voicemail server 104 may play a greeting and provide an indicator, such as a beep when recording has begun. The recorded message is stored in the voice mail server 104.

  Voicemail messages are sent to the MMS server using the appropriate interface and protocol. In the exemplary embodiment, the voice mail message is sent as a file using Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP). The SMTP includes a destination address field that allows the SMTP message to be sent to the appropriate MMS server and the destination mobile station 204. In the exemplary embodiment, voicemail server 104 includes an address correlation table that associates telephone numbers with the email addresses of mobile stations having MMS services. In some cases, a domain name server (DNS) may be required to translate domain names into IP addresses. In accordance with well-known techniques, messages including voice mail messages are sent to the MMS server via the communication system 100 to provide service to the destination mobile station 204.

  The MMS-C 208 saves the voice mail message in the destination mobile station 204. MMS-C 208 generates an MMS message to include a file or other data representing the voice mail message. The MMS message including the header information and the attached voice mail file is stored in the memory of the MMS server. In accordance with MMS technology, MMS-C 208 stores the contents of the MMS message and makes it available as a dynamically generated URL link. In the exemplary embodiment, a data file, such as a WAV audio file that represents a voicemail message, is associated with an MMS message. A notification is sent to the destination mobile station 204 indicating that the message has arrived and is available for download. Depending on the situation, saving the MMS message constitutes a new message notification. Depending on the specific configuration of the destination mobile station 204, the MMS message may be retrieved with or without user intervention. As discussed above, the message may flow to the destination mobile station 204, allowing the voice mail message to be played before the entire file is transferred to the destination mobile station 204 memory.

  Therefore, the voice mail message may be sent directly to the destination mobile station 204 from the source device (202) accessing the packet data messaging service or from the voice mail server 104. In the exemplary embodiment described above, focused on the source device (202) compliant with MMS, the message is recorded in the source mobile station 202, and the MMS message including the voicemail message is generated as an attached file; A voice mail message is submitted using the MMS system by sending a message to the destination mobile station 204 based on the destination address of the destination mobile station 203. After the attached call to the destination mobile station 204 is redirected to the voicemail server 104, the source mobile station 202 receives a voicemail acknowledgment indicating that the voicemail server 104 has received the call. The call between source mobile station 202 and voicemail server 104 is terminated and the voicemail message is recorded by source mobile station 204. As the MMS message, an MMS message including a voice mail message file and header information is generated based on the destination address of the destination mobile station 204. As described in further detail below, in situations where the destination device cannot receive a packet data messaging service, the source mobile station 202 may submit a voice mail message using the packet data messaging system. Thus, the advantage of utilizing a high data rate packet data link to relatively high latency or low real time low latency circuit switched or virtual circuit switched calls is that the source device, destination device, or both are MMS. Messages can be exchanged using a simple packet data messaging system.

  FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a communication system 100 according to an exemplary embodiment in which the destination device 302 does not receive an MMS service. The destination device 302 is the landline telephone of the exemplary embodiment described with reference to FIG. 3 and a call switch such as a PSTN switch or a PBX (Private Branch Exchange) switch 304 that is part of the real-time communication network 114. It is connected to the communication system 100 via 304.

  When call switch 304 detects that destination device 302 is busy or otherwise unavailable, call switch 304 redirects the call placed to destination device 302 to voicemail server 104 by source mobile station 202. . After receiving the call, the voice mail server 104 transmits a voice mail acknowledgment signal to the source mobile station 202 indicating that the voice mail server 104 has received the call. In the illustrated embodiment, the voice mail server 104 sends a destination address corresponding to the voice mailbox of the destination device 302, and the SIP extension provides a mechanism for sending the destination address and voice mail acknowledgment. As noted above, the destination address and acknowledgement may be transmitted using in-band or out-of-band signaling within the circuit switched system.

  In the exemplary embodiment, after the greeting is played via source mobile station 202, source mobile station 202 ends the session with voicemail server 104. Depending on the circumstances, the source mobile station 202 may terminate the call immediately after receiving the voicemail acknowledgment. In such a situation, the voicemail server 104 sends an MMS greeting message to the source mobile station 202 that plays the greeting for the calling party.

  The source mobile station 202 records the voice mail message according to the technique described above with reference to FIG. Using the destination address, the source mobile station 202 sends an MMS message containing a voice mail message to the voice mail server 104 via the MMS system. The message is sent to the destination address in the voice mail server 104 via the MMS-C 116. The voicemail server 104 stores the voicemail file attached to a location associated with the voicemail box of the destination device 302 and voices it to the destination device 302 that activates message waiting, a unique dial tone, or other notification mechanism. Send email notifications. The destination party retrieves the voice mail message by accessing the voice mail server according to known techniques. Depending on the format of the stored voicemail message, the voicemail server 104 may need to convert the voicemail message before playing the message for the destination party.

  FIG. 4 is a block diagram of source mobile station 202 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. A transceiver 402 including a transmitter 410 and a receiver 412 exchanges radio signals with the base station 108 and exchanges information including voice, data, video, graphics and audio. The processor 404 facilitates performing various functions of the source mobile station 202 as well as facilitating the overall functionality of the mobile station 202. The processor 404 includes a microprocessor, computer, or other processor configuration suitable for processing computer code to facilitate the execution of the functions described herein. The processor 404 may include other circuitry and audio processors, such as analog-to-digital (AD) converters, depending on the circumstances. Memory 406 is any memory module, integrated circuit (IC) or other device for storing digital data such as audio files representing voice mail messages and greeting messages. An input device 408 connected to the processor 404 captures any combination of audio and video. In the exemplary embodiment, input device 408 is a microphone and the voicemail message is an audio message. Examples of other suitable input devices 408 include video cameras and digital cameras. Greeting messages and other received communications are played via an output device 414 such as an audio speaker.

  A voice mail server acknowledgment message is received via the receiver 412 indicating that an attempted call initiated by the destination mobile station 202 has been redirected to the voice mail server 104. The processor converts the signal received by the input device 408 into a digital file representing the input signal and records a voice mail message. The file is stored in memory 404 at least temporarily before being included in the MMS message generated by processor 404. The message is sent by transmitter 410 to base station 108 and the MMS message is sent to MMS-C 116.

  FIG. 5 is a flowchart of a method for providing a voicemail service using a packet data messaging service such as MMS according to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

This method is performed at the source mobile device 202 in the exemplary embodiment and is described in the context of an MMS system. Those skilled in the art will readily apply the discussed techniques to other types of packet data messaging systems based on these disclosures.

  In step 502, the source mobile station 202 attempts to call a destination device such as the destination mobile station 204. In the exemplary embodiment, source mobile station 202 attempts to complete the VoIP call with the destination device by establishing a session according to the SIP protocol.

  In step 504, the greeting message is played to the source party. In the exemplary embodiment, the greeting message is received as an audio file in the MMS message. Depending on the circumstances, a VoIP session or circuit switched call is established between the source mobile station 202 and the voice mail server 104, and the voice mail server 104 plays the greeting message over the virtual circuit switched connection or the circuit switched connection. Enable.

  At step 506, a voice mail acknowledgment indicating that the call has been redirected to the voice mail server 104 is received. In the exemplary embodiment, a message is sent using a SIP extension to notify source mobile station 202 that the call has been redirected to voice mail server 104. In a circuit switched network, the voice mail acknowledgment may be transmitted over a circuit switched connection using in-band signaling technology or out-of-band signaling technology.

  In step 508, the source mobile station 202 sends a message called by the MMS to the voice mail server 104, indicating that the source mobile station 202 is submitting a voice mail message using the MMS. In the exemplary embodiment, messages invoked by MMS are sent using a SIP extension. In a system using a circuit switched network, a message called to MMS is transmitted using in-band or out-of-band signaling. After the message is sent, the circuit switched call is terminated. Depending on the circumstances, the call may be terminated after the greeting message is played. The steps shown in FIG. 5 may be performed in any order. For example, the greeting message may be played after a message called by MMS is sent.

  At step 510, a voice mail message is recorded. In the exemplary embodiment, the voice mail message is an audio message recorded by a processor in the source mobile station 202 by capturing the source party's voice via the microphone 408. However, the voicemail message may be any combination of audio, video, text, graphics, or other multimedia information.

For example, other devices such as cameras may be used to capture information for voice mail messages. The voice mail message is stored in the memory 406 of the destination mobile station 202 as a digital file.

  In step 512, the MMS message is generated by the source mobile station 202. Using the destination address (address to which IP can be sent) of the destination mobile station 204, the source mobile station 202 generates an MMS message and attaches a voice mail message file. In the exemplary embodiment, the IP address of the destination mobile station 204 used for the attempted VoIP call is used as the destination address. In a circuit switched network, the destination address is stored in a local database in memory 406 or received from voice mail server 104. For example, the destination address may be entered by the source party and may be associated with the telephone number of the destination device 204, 302. If the voice mail server 104 provides a destination address, a message containing the destination address may be sent via a circuit switched call or sent to the destination mobile station 202 using MMS. When the destination device 302 does not reserve the MMS, the destination address is a destination address related to the voice mail box of the destination device 302. Depending on the circumstances, the voice mail message file may be formatted according to the CODEC of the destination mobile station 204.

  In step 514, the MMS message including the voice mail message file is sent to the destination device 204, 302. The MMS message is sent to MMS-C 116 according to well-known techniques.

  FIG. 6 is a flowchart of a method for providing voicemail service using a packet data messaging system such as MMS running on the voicemail server 104. The method described with reference to FIG. 6 may be performed in a single device or by distributed equipment, and is not limited to being performed only by the exemplary embodiments described herein. Those skilled in the art will readily apply the discussed techniques to other types of packet data messaging systems based on these disclosures.

  In step 602, the voice mail server 104 transmits a voice mail acknowledgment message to the source mobile station 202. After the attempted call from the source mobile station 202 is redirected to the voicemail server, the voicemail server 104 indicates that the call has been redirected. As explained above, the voicemail acknowledgment message is sent using the SIP extension in the exemplary embodiment.

  In step 604, the voice mail server 104 provides a greeting message associated with the destination device 204, 302. In the exemplary embodiment, the greeting message is an audio file that represents the recorded speech that is sent to the source mobile station 202 as an MMS message. The source address of the source mobile station 202 is used to create the appropriate header in the message, and the greeting message is attached as an audio file to create the MMS message. Depending on the circumstances, the greeting message may be played by the voicemail server 104.

  In step 606, the voice mail server 104 receives the MMS called message indicating that the source mobile station 202 will submit the voice mail message using MMS. In the exemplary embodiment, messages invoked by MMS are received using a SIP extension. As mentioned above, other techniques may be used to convey the called message to the MMS.

  In step 608, the voicemail message in the MMS message is received at the voicemail server 104. In the exemplary embodiment, if the destination device is a destination device 302 without MMS, the steps are performed. The destination address provided by the voice mail server 104 to the source mobile station 202 allows the MMS message to be sent to the appropriate location corresponding to the destination device 302. Depending on the circumstances, the MMS message sent to the destination mobile station 204 may also be sent to the voicemail server 104.

  In step 610, the voice mail message is sent from MMS-C and stored in voice mail server 104. The voice mail message is stored at a position corresponding to the voice mail box of the destination device 302.

  Therefore, the exemplary embodiment efficiently provides voicemail service using MMS.

Voicemail messages are saved and retrieved using MMS that minimizes the duration of real-time calls within the communication system 100. Voicemail messages saved by wireless users are recorded at the source mobile station 202 and transmitted as MMS messages over the MMS communication link. Voice mail messages retrieved by a wireless user are received at the destination mobile station 204 via the MMS communication link and stored in memory at the destination mobile station 204. Since voicemail messages are maintained by the voicemail server 104, voicemail clients that do not reserve MMS or otherwise do not use MMS can retrieve voicemail messages using common techniques. . Employing an MMS system maximizes the efficiency of using voice communication service radio communication resources. Since the transmission of MMS messages can tolerate a greater degree of latency, the voicemail message can have a lower QoS (than that required by a circuit switched call in a circuit switched network or a virtual circuit switched call in a packet switched network. Quality of service) can be transferred efficiently. In a system utilizing VoIP, the efficiency can be observed by utilizing a spectrally efficient 3G high speed wireless link. Delivery can be scheduled to remove the load on the communication networks 102, 110 during busy traffic periods. Furthermore, since the possibility of frame errors and transcoding has been eliminated, the delivery of voice mail messages using MMS minimizes inaccuracies and errors during delivery and maximizes voice quality. For example, in conventional systems, voicemail messages are converted from wireless to PCM, from PCM to specific voicemail, from specific voicemail to PCM, and from PCM to wireless format during the submission period. May be delivered. Also, the features during the message creation period can be implemented without consuming broadcast time. In addition, voice mail messages may include multimedia components such as photos, graphics, and video clips.

  Obviously, other embodiments and modifications of the invention will readily occur to those skilled in the art in view of these teachings. The above description is illustrative and not restrictive. The invention should be limited only by the following claims, including all such embodiments and variations, when viewed in conjunction with the above specification and accompanying drawings. Therefore, the scope of the invention should be determined without reference to the above description, but instead should be determined with reference to the appended claims along with the full scope of equivalents.

Claims (19)

  1. In a method performed in a packet data messaging service center,
    Receiving a packet data message including a voice mail message for the destination mobile station;
    If the destination mobile station is configured to receive a packet data message, transmitting the packet data message including the voice mail message to the destination mobile station via a packet switched network; , Wherein transmitting the packet data message to the destination mobile station dynamically generates a uniform resource locator link to the packet data message and to the dynamically generated uniform resource locator link. Generating a notification message comprising a pointer of: and transmitting the notification message to the destination mobile station.
    And it is busy traffic periods to schedule to manage (during a busy traffic period) the delivery of the packet data message as the packet data message is not delivered to the destination mobile station time with respect to said packet switched network,
    Sending the packet data message comprising the voice mail message from the packet data message service center to a voice mail server if the destination mobile station is not configured to receive the packet data message ;
    With a method.
  2.   The method of claim 1, wherein the packet data message is a multimedia messaging service (MMS) message and the packet data messaging service center is a multimedia messaging service center (MMS-C).
  3.   The method of claim 1, wherein the voice mail message comprises an audio message.
  4.   The method of claim 1, wherein the voice mail message is a multimedia message.
  5.   The method of claim 1, wherein the voice mail message is an attached file in the packet data message.
  6.   The method of claim 1, wherein the destination address of the voice mail message is an electronic mail (email) address of the destination mobile station.
  7.   The method of claim 6, wherein the email address is an Internet routable address.
  8.   The method of claim 1, wherein the destination address of the voice mail message is associated with a telephone number of the destination mobile station.
  9. In the packet data messaging service center,
    A receiver configured to receive a packet data message including a voice mail message destined for the destination mobile station;
    If the destination mobile station is configured to receive a packet data message, the packet data message including the voice mail message is transmitted to the destination mobile station via a packet switched network. During the busy traffic period with respect to the packet switched network, the packet data message is scheduled to be time-managed so that the packet data message is not delivered to the destination mobile station, and the destination mobile station receives the packet data message. If not configured to, the said packet data message having a voicemail message is configured to transmit from the packet data messaging service center to the voice mail server Pro And Tsu support,
    A transmitter configured to communicate to the voicemail server or the destination mobile station;
    Equipped with a,
    Sending the packet data message comprising the voice mail message to the destination mobile station via the packet switched network dynamically generates a uniform resource locator link to the packet data message; A packet data messaging service center comprising: generating a notification message comprising a pointer to a generated uniform resource locator link; and transmitting the notification message to the destination mobile station .
  10.   The packet data messaging service center of claim 9, wherein the packet data message is a multimedia messaging service (MMS) message and the packet data messaging service center is a multimedia messaging service center (MMS-C).
  11. The packet data messaging service center of claim 9, wherein the voice mail message comprises an audio message .
  12.   The packet data messaging service center of claim 9, wherein the voice mail message is a multimedia message.
  13.   The packet data messaging service center according to claim 9, wherein the destination address of the voice mail message is an electronic mail (e-mail) address of a destination mobile station.
  14.   14. The packet data messaging service center according to claim 13, wherein the e-mail address is an Internet routable address.
  15. Means for receiving a packet data message including a voice mail message directed to the destination mobile station;
    Means for transmitting said packet data message including said voice mail message to said destination mobile station via a packet switched network if said destination mobile station is configured to receive a packet data message; And transmitting the packet data message to the destination mobile station dynamically generates a uniform resource locator link to the packet data message, and the dynamically generated uniform resource locator link. Generating a notification message comprising a pointer to and transmitting the notification message to the destination mobile station,
    Means for scheduling the delivery of the packet data message to be time managed so that the packet data message is not delivered to the destination mobile station during a busy traffic period with respect to the packet switched network ;
    Means for transmitting the packet data message comprising the voice mail message from the packet data messaging service center to a voice mail server if the destination mobile station is not configured to receive the packet data message ;
    A packet data messaging service center.
  16. To the processor in the packet data messaging service center,
    Receive a packet data message including a voice mail message for the destination mobile station,
    If the destination mobile station is configured to receive a packet data message, the packet data message including the voice mail message is sent via the packet switched network to the destination via the packet switched network. Transmitting the packet data message to the destination mobile station dynamically generating a uniform resource locator link to the packet data message, and transmitting the packet data message to the destination mobile station. Generating a notification message comprising a pointer to a uniform resource locator link; and transmitting the notification message to the destination mobile station;
    Scheduling the delivery of the packet data message to be time managed so that the packet data message is not delivered to the destination mobile station during a busy traffic period with respect to the packet switched network ;
    If the destination mobile station is not configured to receive a packet data message, the packet data message comprising the voice mail message is transmitted from the packet data messaging service center to a voice mail server;
    A non-transitory computer readable storage medium having instructions for:
  17.   The method of claim 1, further comprising determining whether the destination mobile station is configured to receive a packet data message.
  18.   The packet data message, including the voice mail message, has a lower quality of service (QoS) than is required for a circuit switched call or virtual circuit switched call to the destination device. The method of claim 1, wherein the method is transmitted to the destination mobile station at a level.
  19. In a method for providing voicemail service using a multimedia messaging service (MMS) system,
    Attempting to call the destination device via the real-time communication network by the source mobile station;
    That the page has not been answered, that the call forwarding feature has been activated to forward the call to voicemail, and that the destination device is busy due to a telephone switch. Detecting that the destination device is unavailable to receive the call by performing at least one of:
    By establishing a virtual circuit switched communication link between the source mobile station and the destination mobile station via a packet switched network or between the source mobile station and the voice mail server via a circuit switched network Changing the destination of the call to a voicemail server by establishing a circuit-switched communication link between;
    Sending a voice acknowledgment message from the voicemail server to the source mobile station, wherein the voicemail acknowledgment message indicates that the voicemail server has received the call;
    Responding to the voicemail acknowledgment message by sending a message initiating a multimedia messaging service by the source mobile station;
    Terminating the call with the voicemail server after transmitting a message that activated the multimedia messaging service by the source mobile station;
    If the call is terminated before a greeting message associated with the destination device is played by the voicemail server, a file comprising the greeting message is sent to the voicemail server in a first multimedia messaging service message. To the source mobile station, wherein the greeting message file is formatted according to a vocoder used by the source mobile station, and the calling party identification information is first received from the voice mail server. Sending to the multimedia messaging service center and generating at least one of the greeting message based on an address associated with the caller identification information by the first multimedia messaging service center. ,
    Recording a voicemail message by the source mobile station;
    Storing the voice mail message in a memory of the source mobile station;
    Generating a second multimedia messaging service message by the source mobile station, wherein the second multimedia messaging service message comprises the voice mail message as an attachment;
    Determining a destination address for the second multimedia messaging service message, wherein the destination address is internet routable of the destination device if the destination device supports the multimedia message service; An address, and if the destination device does not support the multimedia messaging service, the address of the destination device's voice mailbox.
    Sending the second multimedia messaging service message by the source mobile station to a first multimedia messaging service center;
    If the destination address for the second multimedia messaging service message comprises an internet routable address of the destination device;
    Routing the second multimedia messaging service message to a second multimedia messaging service center;
    Storing the second multimedia messaging service message in the second multimedia messaging service center;
    Dynamically generating a uniform resource locator link to the second multimedia messaging service message by the second multimedia messaging service center;
    Generating a multimedia messaging service notification message comprising a pointer to the dynamically generated uniform resource locator link by the second multimedia messaging service center;
    Sending the multimedia messaging service notification message to the destination device by the second multimedia messaging service center;
    Initiating a procedure by the destination device to retrieve the second multimedia messaging service message from the second multimedia messaging service center;
    Sending the second multimedia messaging service message to the destination device by the second multimedia messaging service center;
    If the destination address for the second multimedia messaging service message comprises the address of the destination device's voice mailbox;
    Routing the second multimedia messaging service message to the voicemail server;
    Storing the file containing the voice mail message in a location associated with the voice mailbox of the destination device;
    Sending a voicemail notification to the destination device by the voicemail server;
    A method of activating a notification mechanism by the destination device to notify the destination party about the voice mail message.
JP2009235043A 2004-05-26 2009-10-09 Apparatus, system, and method for providing voicemail using a packet data messaging system Expired - Fee Related JP5118112B2 (en)

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US20050287993A1 (en) 2005-12-29

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