JP4993481B2 - Golf club - Google Patents

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JP4993481B2
JP4993481B2 JP2007084575A JP2007084575A JP4993481B2 JP 4993481 B2 JP4993481 B2 JP 4993481B2 JP 2007084575 A JP2007084575 A JP 2007084575A JP 2007084575 A JP2007084575 A JP 2007084575A JP 4993481 B2 JP4993481 B2 JP 4993481B2
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direction
restitution
coefficient
face portion
head
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JP2008237689A (en
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豊 奥
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グローブライド株式会社
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Description

  The present invention relates to a golf club, and more particularly, to a golf club characterized by changing a coefficient of restitution on a hitting surface of a face portion constituting a head.

  2. Description of the Related Art Conventionally, various contrivances have been made to improve the flight distance of a golf club equipped with a hollow structure head. In golf clubs, hitting a sweet spot, which is said to have the fastest initial ball speed when hitting a ball, is more likely to be a golfer who is skilled in golf, but less likely to be a less experienced amateur. Become. For this reason, when the ball is hit with an off-sweet spot (off-center hit), the face portion is made as thin as possible around the periphery so as not to reduce the initial ball speed as much as possible. In other words, the thickness of the face part constituting the head is related to the deflection when the ball is hit, and by reducing the thickness, the amount of deflection is increased, thereby reducing the energy loss of the ball at the time of hitting the ball. The fall of the flight distance can be suppressed.

For example, Patent Document 1 discloses a golf club head that focuses on the thickness of the face portion and suppresses a decrease in flight distance. In the golf club head having a hollow structure disclosed in this publication, the thickness distribution of the face portion is changed in an elliptical shape from the upper portion of the toe side to the lower portion of the heel side. Even if the position deviates from the sweet spot and shifts to the upper side of the toe side or the lower side of the heel side, it approaches the bending when hit at the center part, and the decrease in the flight distance is suppressed.
JP 2003-154040 A

  By the way, there are various habits of amateur golfers, and there is a problem that the hitting point does not match depending on the person. For example, as shown in FIGS. 1A to 1C, variations in hitting points due to human swing are likely to occur due to the angle between the arm and the shaft deviating. Specifically, when impacting the ball, it is ideal to always be in the state of FIG. 1B (a state where impact can be made in the sweet spot area), but the angle formed by the arm and shaft at the time of addressing On the other hand, when the angle increases at the time of impact, that is, when the wrist is bent downward, the hitting point tends to be higher on the toe side (see FIG. 1A). This is because the position of the head is close to the body and passes through a position close to the ground. On the contrary, when the angle formed by the arm and the shaft is reduced at the time of impact, that is, when the wrist is bent upward, the hitting point tends to be lower on the heel side (see FIG. 1C). This is because the head passes through a position away from the body and away from the ground.

  As a result, for golfers with a habit that the angle between the arm and the shaft tends to shift, the hit points tend to spread on the line from the upper side of the toe to the lower side of the heel, as shown by the hitting track in FIG. In a typical amateur golfer, there are many cases where such a variation in hit points occurs. In addition to the above cases, it is conceivable that the hit points vary in various directions depending on the golfer's heel. For example, FIG. 2B shows an example in which the center region of the face part varies along the crown / sole direction, and FIG. 2C shows a toe-heel direction and a little above the center region of the face part. Each example spreads slightly in the crown / sole direction.

  As described above, when the variation of the hit points of amateur golfers is seen, it can be seen that a certain degree of directionality occurs. That is, as shown in FIGS. 2 (a) to 2 (c), the scattered hit ball traces can be approximately enclosed in an approximately elliptical shape, and the major axis direction of such an elliptical shape is for the person. This can be thought of as a variable direction. Naturally, if the ball deviates from the sweet spot area at the time of hitting the ball, the flight distance is reduced, and the head tends to be shaken and the directionality tends to vary.

  As disclosed in the above-mentioned Patent Document 1, it is considered preferable to change the thickness distribution of the face portion to suppress the decrease in the coefficient of restitution even if it is outside the sweet spot region. The technique disclosed in No. 1 merely gives a feature to the thickness distribution of the face member, and does not sufficiently consider various characteristics of the golfer as described above and the moment of inertia of the head. Limiting the decrease in the distance and stabilizing the directivity is limited. In other words, simply matching the deflection amount distribution in the face portion with the golfer hitting point distribution cannot sufficiently suppress the flight distance reduction and cannot stabilize the direction.

  The present invention has been made on the basis of the above-described problems, and in consideration of the moment of inertia and the characteristics of the face portion, even if the sweet spot is removed at the time of hitting the ball, the decrease in the ball flight distance is suppressed, and the directionality is stabilized. An object of the present invention is to provide a golf club that can be converted into a golf club.

  In order to achieve the above-described object, the present invention provides a shaft and a face provided with a ball striking face for hitting a ball, which is fixed to one end of the shaft at a predetermined lie angle and loft angle with respect to a reference horizontal plane. A hitting surface of the face portion is formed such that a coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side of the sweet spot decreases continuously or in a stepwise manner. The direction in which the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution on the ball striking surface is the same as the direction Im of the maximum moment of inertia when the head is viewed from the front.

  According to the golf club having the above-described configuration, the hitting surface of the face portion of the golf club head is formed such that the coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side of the sweet spot is continuously or stepwise reduced. When it is removed and hit, the ball is hit at a portion where the coefficient of restitution is low, so the speed of the ball decreases.

  On the other hand, since the direction Im of the maximum moment of inertia is the direction in which the head hardly shakes when the ball is hit with the sweet spot removed, the directionality can be stabilized. Therefore, by making the direction in which the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution becomes the minimum substantially equal to the direction Im of the maximum moment of inertia when the head is viewed from the front, the directionality can be stabilized and the flight distance can be stabilized. It is possible to suppress the decrease as much as possible. That is, the direction of the maximum moment of inertia of the head is such that when the ball is hit in that direction, the head is most difficult to shake, so that the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is further minimized in that direction. By forming the face portion, it is possible to suppress a decrease in the flight distance when the ball is hit with the sweet spot removed as much as possible, and to realize a stable directionality.

  In this case, as described above, when the hit ball trace is verified for each golfer, the direction of variation of the person can be specified to some extent. For this reason, the directionality of the maximum moment of inertia is matched with the directionality of variation, and the direction in which the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is substantially the same is the most directional for the golfer. Can be achieved, and a golf club with little reduction in flight distance can be obtained. The maximum moment of inertia here is, as will be described later, a straight line passing through the center of gravity of the head as a rotation axis.

  In order to achieve the above-described object, the present invention includes a shaft and a ball striking surface that is fixedly attached to one end of the shaft at a specified lie angle and loft angle with respect to a reference horizontal plane and that hits a ball. A hitting surface of the face portion is formed such that the coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side of the sweet spot increases continuously or stepwise. The direction in which the increase rate per unit length of the coefficient of restitution on the hitting surface of the face portion is maximized is substantially matched with the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im when the head is viewed from the front.

  As the characteristics of the face portion, for example, the surface material is changed, heat treatment is performed, the face material and thickness are changed, and the sweet spot restitution coefficient is lowered (for example, from the sole side to the sweet spot). For example, by attaching an arm for lowering the restitution coefficient, or by combining these, it is possible to form the restitution coefficient on the peripheral side higher than hitting with a sweet spot. In such a configuration as well as the above-described configuration, the direction in which the increase rate per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is maximized is approximately matched with the direction Im of the maximum moment of inertia when the head is viewed from the front. And a decrease in flight distance can be suppressed as much as possible.

  According to the present invention, it is possible to obtain a golf club that can suppress a decrease in ball flight distance and stabilize the direction even if the sweet spot is removed at the time of hitting.

Hereinafter, embodiments of a golf club according to the present invention will be described.
3 and 4 are views showing a first embodiment of a golf club according to the present invention, FIG. 3 is a front view of the golf club, and FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along line AA of FIG. is there.

  The golf club 1 according to the present embodiment is configured by fixing a head 7 set to a specified lie angle and loft angle with respect to a reference horizontal plane P at the tip of a shaft 5 made of metal or FRP. ing. In this case, the head body 7A constituting the head 7 includes a face portion 7a having a hitting surface, a crown portion 7b extending rearward from the upper edge of the face portion 7a, and extending rearward from the lower edge of the face portion 7a. And a sole portion 7c that extends from the toe side edge of the face portion to the heel side edge of the face portion, and connects the edge portions of the crown portion 7b and the sole portion 7c. It is formed in the hollow structure provided with the side part 7d. In the drawings, the toe portion, the back portion, and the heel portion constituting such a side portion 7d are indicated by reference numerals 7e, 7f, and 7g, respectively.

  The face portion 7a includes a face surface 8 on which a hit ball is actually formed. In this case, the face portion 7a may be formed of a plate-like member that closes the front opening of the crown portion 7b, the sole portion 7c, and the side portion 7d (the entire face portion is a plate-like face member). It may be formed in a so-called cup shape and may constitute a part of the crown portion 7b, the sole portion 7c, and the side portion 7d. Alternatively, an opening having a predetermined size may be formed in the face portion 7a, and a plate-like face member may be fitted into the opening.

  The constituent material of the head main body 7A is not particularly limited, and can be integrally formed of, for example, titanium, a titanium alloy, an iron alloy, or the like. Alternatively, each member (face part, crown part, sole part, side part; outer shell member) constituting the head main body 7A is individually formed and fixed by welding, bonding or the like to form the head main body. May be.

  The face portion 7a is formed such that the coefficient of restitution of the face surface (ball striking surface) 8 changes in the surface portion. In the present embodiment, the change in the coefficient of restitution is realized by changing the thickness of the face portion 7a. The change in the thickness is performed in the direction of the moment of inertia of the head body 7A as follows. In relation to.

  Here, the moment of inertia is a value defined by the following expression based on the sum of the square of the distance and the minute mass around the center of gravity G of the head body 7A.

In the head main body 7A, a direction having the largest moment of inertia (maximum moment of inertia direction) occurs through the center of gravity G. The direction in which the moment of inertia is maximum coincides with the direction in which the head main body 7A is most difficult to shake at the time of hitting, and if the ball is hit in that direction, the directionality can be stabilized. Therefore, by minimizing the rate at which the coefficient of restitution decreases so as to suppress the decrease in initial velocity at the time of hitting in that direction, the directionality can be stabilized and the decrease in flight distance can be suppressed as much as possible. Is possible.

  In FIG. 3, the direction in which the moment of inertia when the head 7 is viewed from the front is indicated by Im. The direction in which the moment of inertia is maximum passes through the center of gravity G of the head main body 7A. In the present invention, however, the relationship between the directionality and the coefficient of restitution of the face portion is characteristic. Im shown is parallel to the direction of the maximum moment of inertia passing through the center of gravity G and passing through a sweet spot S (defined by a point perpendicular to the face portion from the center of gravity G).

  As described above, in the present embodiment, the coefficient of restitution of the face surface 8 is changed by changing the thickness of the face portion 7a. Specifically, the thickness of the sweet spot S is gradually reduced as it moves to the outside, and in FIG. 3, the thickness of the central region A1 is T1, and the thickness of the outer region A2 thereof. Is T2, the thickness of the outer region A3 is T3, the thickness of the outer region A4 is T4, and the thickness of the outer region A5 is T5, so that T1> T2> T3> T4> T5. (The dotted line that is the boundary between these areas A1 to A5 is a uniform distribution line).

  As described above, when the thickness of the face portion 7a is changed with the sweet spot S as the center, the direction in which the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution on the hitting surface of the face portion 7a is minimized is determined so that the head is It is made to substantially coincide with the direction of the maximum moment of inertia when viewed. In the present embodiment, since the above-described stepwise change in thickness is formed by a concentric elliptical shape with the sweet spot S as the center, the minor axis direction is made to coincide with Im.

Here, the relationship between the thickness of the face portion 7a and the coefficient of restitution will be described.
Normally, when the thickness of the face portion of the head body is made uniform, the coefficient of restitution is the highest in the central region, and as it moves to the periphery (as it approaches the connecting portion with the crown portion, side portion, and sole portion) ), The coefficient of restitution is low. For this reason, by reducing the thickness of the peripheral region of the face portion, it is possible to reduce the rate at which the coefficient of restitution with respect to the sweet spot S decreases. That is, by reducing the thickness of the peripheral side, it is possible to suppress the rate of decrease in the coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side with respect to the sweet spot S, and to suppress the decrease in speed at the time of ball impact.

  By the way, since the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im described above is the direction in which the head 7 is hardly shaken at the time of hitting, the directionality can be stabilized even if the sweet spot S is removed and hit. However, by removing the sweet spot, it is impossible to avoid the decrease in the initial velocity due to the decrease in the coefficient of restitution, which causes a decrease in the initial velocity with respect to the ball, which leads to a decrease in the flight distance. For this reason, the direction in which the rate of change (decrease rate) per unit length of the coefficient of restitution becomes the minimum (here, the short axis direction where the thickness change per unit length is large) is substantially in the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im. By making them coincide with each other, a decrease in flight distance is suppressed as much as possible. That is, in the direction of Im, when the ball is impacted, the head 7 is most difficult to shake, the directionality is stabilized, and the rate of decrease in the coefficient of restitution in the direction of Im is the lowest. By setting to, it becomes possible to stabilize the directivity and suppress the decrease in the flight distance as much as possible.

  Actually, the direction of variation is grasped in advance for each golfer, the above-mentioned Im direction is made to coincide with the variation direction, and the rate of change (reduction rate) per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is minimum. By making the directions substantially coincide with each other, it becomes possible for the golfer to obtain a golf club that suppresses a decrease in flight distance and has a stable directionality.

  As shown in FIG. 3, it is preferable to design the head body 7 so that the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im extends from above the head toe portion to below the heel portion. This is because, in general amateur golfers, it is considered that there are many cases where the hit balls vary with the tendency shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 (a), so the direction of the maximum moment of inertia should be set as such. Thus, for many amateur golfers, it is possible to obtain a golf club that suppresses a decrease in flight distance and has a stable direction.

  Of course, depending on the golfer's habit, the direction of the maximum moment of inertia can be appropriately changed, and the rate of change (reduction rate) per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is minimized by making it approximately coincide with the direction. The thickness of the face portion 7a may be changed so that For example, in the case of FIG. 2B, the direction of the maximum inertia moment Im is set to the crown / sole direction. In the case of FIG. 2C, the maximum inertia moment Im is set at a position above the sweet spot S. It is possible to set the direction as appropriate, such as setting the direction to the toe / heel direction.

  In the configuration described above, the direction in which the rate of change (reduction rate) per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is the minimum (here, the minor axis direction in which the wall thickness change per unit length is large) is the maximum moment of inertia Im. It is preferable that the direction coincides exactly with this direction, but a slight deviation (within ± 15 ° range) may occur between the two directions. That is, if the deviation is within the range of this angle, it is possible to suppress a decrease in the flight distance within an allowable range.

  Further, in the above-described embodiment, the change in the coefficient of restitution on the hitting surface of the face portion 7a is performed by the change in the wall thickness. The face portion 7a can be formed separately from the crown portion, the side portion, and the sole portion. For example, a metal material such as titanium, a titanium-based alloy, or an iron-based alloy has the above-described thickness distribution. It can be easily formed integrally by pressing or forging. That is, the integrally formed face portion (face member) may be fixed to the head body 7A by welding, brazing, or the like. Of course, the face portion 7a may be integrally formed with the head body instead of fixing a face member as a separate member.

  Furthermore, in the above-described embodiment, the face portion 7a is formed so that the rate of change per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is minimized due to the change in the thickness of the face portion. Heat treatment, changing the material and thickness of the face, and lowering the coefficient of restitution of the sweet spot (for example, attaching an arm to lower the coefficient of restitution of the sweet spot from the sole side), or By combining these, the rebound coefficient on the peripheral side around the sweet spot S is not lowered, but can be formed so as to be increased conversely. In such a configuration, as in the configuration described above, the direction in which the increase rate per unit length of the coefficient of restitution is maximized is substantially matched with the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im when the head is viewed from the front. It is possible to stabilize the directivity by suppressing the decrease in the flight distance as much as possible.

  FIG. 5 is a diagram showing a second embodiment of the present invention.

  In the above-described embodiment, the thickness change (stepwise change in the coefficient of restitution) is concentrically elliptical with the sweet spot S as the center, but the configuration for changing the coefficient of restitution in steps is modified as appropriate. It is possible.

  In the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the face portion 7a is arranged substantially parallel to the center line C passing through the sweet spot S, with regions A11 and A12 in which the coefficient of restitution changes stepwise and substantially parallel to the center line C. The line C is characterized by being substantially coincident with the direction of the main axis X of the maximum moment of inertia Im when the head is viewed from the front.

  As means for changing the coefficient of restitution in a stepwise manner, in the configuration shown in FIG. 5, the thicknesses T11 and T12 in the regions A11 and A12 are changed stepwise relative to the thickness T10 in the region A10 that coincides with the center line C. It is formed to be thin (T10> T11> T12). That is, regions A11, A12... Where the coefficient of restitution decreases stepwise are formed in a direction substantially orthogonal to the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im when the head 7 is viewed from the front.

  Also in the face portion 7a having such a configuration, the rate of change of the coefficient of restitution (the rate of decrease of the coefficient of restitution per unit length from the sweet spot S) in the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im is the minimum in other directions. It is possible to stabilize the direction by suppressing as much as possible a decrease in flight distance when the sweet spot S is removed and the ball is hit.

  Of course, it is possible to form the face portion 7a so that the restitution coefficient increases with distance from the center line C in the regions A11, A12. In such a face portion structure, the rate of change in which the repulsion rate increases in the direction of the maximum moment of inertia Im is maximized, so that a decrease in flight distance when a ball is hit with the sweet spot removed is suppressed as much as possible. It is possible to stabilize the direction.

  As mentioned above, although embodiment of this invention was described, this invention is not limited to above-described embodiment, It can change variously. For example, the change in thickness at the face portion as means for changing the coefficient of restitution may be realized by forming a rib on the back surface of the face portion. In addition, the coefficient of restitution of each of the above-described embodiments can be arbitrarily adjusted by the thickness, the rib, the material, or any combination thereof. In the above-described embodiment, the restitution coefficient is changed stepwise, but the restitution coefficient may be changed continuously around the sweet spot S. For example, the thickness change may be reduced in a tapered shape as the thickness changes around the sweet spot S. Even in such a configuration, the direction in which the reduction rate of the restitution coefficient is minimized with the sweet spot S as the center is substantially matched with the direction of the maximum inertia moment Im of the head, or the increase rate of the restitution coefficient is maximized. It is only necessary that the direction to be made substantially coincides with the direction of the maximum inertia moment Im of the head.

  Furthermore, in the head main body of the above-described embodiment, the sweet spot S is configured with dots, but may be configured as an area. Further, as shown in FIG. 3, the center position of the thickness distribution preferably coincides with the sweet spot S, but both may be slightly shifted. The deviation in this case is desirably within 10 mm.

The figure which includes (a)-(c) and shows the example from which the impact of a ball | bowl differs according to the wrinkle at the time of an amateur golfer hitting a ball. The figure which contains (a)-(c) and shows the dispersion | variation in a hit ball at the time of an impact, respectively. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS It is a figure which shows 1st Embodiment of the golf club which concerns on this invention, and is a front view of a head part. Sectional drawing along the AA line of FIG. It is a figure which shows 2nd Embodiment of the golf club which concerns on this invention, and is a front view of a head part.

Explanation of symbols

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 Golf club 5 Shaft 7 Head 7A Head main body 7a Face part 7b Crown part 8 Face surface P Reference | standard horizontal surface S Sweet spot

Claims (4)

  1. A golf club having a shaft, and a head including a face portion having a ball striking surface for hitting a ball, which is fixed to one end of the shaft at a specified lie angle and loft angle with respect to a reference horizontal plane,
    The hitting surface of the face portion is formed so that the coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side of the sweet spot decreases continuously or stepwise.
    A golf club characterized in that a direction in which a rate of change per unit length of a coefficient of restitution on a hitting surface of the face portion is minimized is substantially coincident with a direction Im of a maximum moment of inertia when the head is viewed from the front.
  2. A golf club having a shaft, and a head including a face portion having a ball striking surface for hitting a ball, which is fixed to one end of the shaft at a specified lie angle and loft angle with respect to a reference horizontal plane,
    The hitting surface of the face part is formed such that the coefficient of restitution on the peripheral side from the sweet spot increases continuously or stepwise.
    A golf club characterized in that the direction in which the increase rate per unit length of the coefficient of restitution on the hitting surface of the face portion is maximized substantially coincides with the direction Im of the maximum moment of inertia when the head is viewed from the front.
  3.   The golf club according to claim 1, wherein the direction Im extends from above the toe portion of the head to below the heel portion.
  4.   4. The golf club according to claim 1, wherein the change in the coefficient of restitution on the hitting surface of the face portion is made by a change in the thickness of the face portion. 5.
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US7993216B2 (en) 2008-11-17 2011-08-09 Nike, Inc. Golf club head or other ball striking device having multi-piece construction
US8845454B2 (en) 2008-11-21 2014-09-30 Nike, Inc. Golf club or other ball striking device having stiffened face portion
US9192831B2 (en) 2009-01-20 2015-11-24 Nike, Inc. Golf club and golf club head structures
US9795845B2 (en) 2009-01-20 2017-10-24 Karsten Manufacturing Corporation Golf club and golf club head structures
US9149693B2 (en) 2009-01-20 2015-10-06 Nike, Inc. Golf club and golf club head structures
EP2646122B1 (en) 2010-11-30 2015-03-18 NIKE Innovate C.V. Golf club heads or other ball striking devices having distributed impact response and a stiffened face plate
US9687705B2 (en) 2010-11-30 2017-06-27 Nike, Inc. Golf club head or other ball striking device having impact-influencing body features
US9101808B2 (en) 2011-01-27 2015-08-11 Nike, Inc. Golf club head or other ball striking device having impact-influencing body features
EP2747852B1 (en) 2011-08-23 2017-12-13 NIKE Innovate C.V. Golf club head with a void and a cover
US9433845B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2016-09-06 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US9409076B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2016-08-09 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US9375624B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2016-06-28 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US9409073B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2016-08-09 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US8668595B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2014-03-11 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US9433844B2 (en) 2011-04-28 2016-09-06 Nike, Inc. Golf clubs and golf club heads
US9776050B2 (en) 2014-06-20 2017-10-03 Karsten Manufacturing Corporation Golf club head or other ball striking device having impact-influencing body features

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JP2002315854A (en) * 2001-02-14 2002-10-29 Kasco Corp Wood type golf club head
JP2003019230A (en) * 2001-07-05 2003-01-21 Sumitomo Rubber Ind Ltd Wood type golf club head
JP2003154040A (en) * 2001-11-20 2003-05-27 Kasco Corp Golf club head
JP4365676B2 (en) * 2003-12-19 2009-11-18 Sriスポーツ株式会社 Wood type golf club head
JP4762172B2 (en) * 2007-01-23 2011-08-31 Jx日鉱日石金属株式会社 Furnace body water cooling structure of flash furnace
JP4993471B2 (en) * 2007-02-28 2012-08-08 グローブライド株式会社 Golf club

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