JP4939700B2 - Magnetic resonance imaging system for interventional MRI - Google Patents

Magnetic resonance imaging system for interventional MRI Download PDF

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Publication number
JP4939700B2
JP4939700B2 JP2001168809A JP2001168809A JP4939700B2 JP 4939700 B2 JP4939700 B2 JP 4939700B2 JP 2001168809 A JP2001168809 A JP 2001168809A JP 2001168809 A JP2001168809 A JP 2001168809A JP 4939700 B2 JP4939700 B2 JP 4939700B2
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Prior art keywords
magnetic resonance
resonance imaging
position
imaging apparatus
means
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JP2002058658A5 (en
JP2002058658A (en
Inventor
重英 久原
仁 山形
勉 星野
由守 葛西
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株式会社東芝
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Description

[0001]
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus for performing imaging called interventional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging).
[0002]
[Prior art]
Magnetic resonance imaging is an imaging method in which a nuclear spin of a subject placed in a uniform static magnetic field is magnetically excited with a high-frequency signal of its Larmor frequency, and an image is reconstructed from MR signals generated by the excitation. It is.
[0003]
In recent years, this magnetic resonance imaging method has been used in various medical fields. One of them is treatment for performing puncture with a puncture needle, operation of a catheter, surgery, etc. on a subject from outside the body while performing magnetic resonance imaging or in an environment capable of such magnetic resonance imaging. There is an inspection. Magnetic resonance imaging performed in such treatments and examinations is called interventional MRI and has attracted much attention in recent years.
[0004]
In this interventional MRI, it is important to accurately convey the position of a device such as a catheter inserted into a patient to an operator in real time, and a method for that purpose is currently under investigation. It is essential for the safety and speed of surgery that the surgeon knows the position of the device accurately in real time.
[0005]
As one method for grasping the position of a device such as a catheter, a method using a normal magnetic resonance imaging method is known. In other words, this is a technique in which normal magnetic resonance imaging is performed to directly image the position of the catheter and display the position to the operator. In this method, the catheter is directly imaged, but from a physical aspect, the influence on the magnetic field of the catheter is indirectly collected as a virtual image, and this is recognized on the image.
[0006]
As another method, a method of directly measuring the position of the catheter is known. In this case, a minute RF receiving (detecting) coil is provided at the distal end of the catheter. At the time of measurement, MR signals near the RF receiving coil accompanying RF excitation for imaging are detected while applying gradient magnetic fields in three axial directions, and the frequency of the signal is measured to calculate the catheter tip position three-dimensionally. The tip position is displayed on the display.
[0007]
The measurement method using this RF receiving coil is described in, for example, the document “1992 SMRM pp104,“ Tracking of an Invasive Device with MR imaging system ”, CL Dumoulin, S. p. Shown in “”.
[0008]
According to the measurement method described in this document, when a pulse sequence is executed, first, the entire diagnostic region is excited with an RF pulse, and then an echo signal is detected by changing the gradient magnetic field of the X channel. The echo signal is subjected to FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) processing, whereby the amount of deviation of the peak value of the frequency spectrum from the resonance frequency is calculated. The positional information of the RF detection coil (catheter tip) in the X-axis direction is obtained from the deviation amount and the gradient magnetic field strength. Subsequently, for the Y channel and the Z channel, after RF excitation is performed, the gradient magnetic field is changed to calculate the position information of the RF detection coil of each channel. Thereby, the three-dimensional position information of the catheter tip can be obtained.
[0009]
Furthermore, as another example of direct measurement using this RF receiving coil, a technique is known in which a plurality of RF receiving coils are attached to a catheter, and the position of the entire catheter is grasped and displayed.
[0010]
On the other hand, in interventional MRI, for example, a puncturing operation is performed in which a device such as a puncture needle is gradually inserted toward a target such as a tumor. In this case, it is necessary to sequentially check the puncture state such as whether the puncture needle has advanced in the planned direction and whether the puncture needle has reached the target.
[0011]
In order to confirm this puncture state, conventionally, an imaging cross section including a puncture start position and a target imaged before the start of puncture is used. In other words, during the puncture operation, the surface including the target and the puncture needle is continuously imaged, and the puncture state is monitored while referring to the imaging section that has already been imaged before the puncture is started as a reference plane. Yes.
[0012]
[Problems to be solved by the invention]
However, the above-described conventional technology has the following unsolved problems.
[0013]
First, there is a problem related to position detection of devices such as catheters.
[0014]
First, in the case of position detection based on the conventional normal imaging method, since it is a method of indirectly imaging the influence on the magnetic field of the device, the imaging method, the position and direction of the catheter, its material, and the imaging direction Accordingly, the shape, displacement, and / or brightness of the device on the image changes, and it is difficult to present the accurate tip position of the device to the operator. Further, since a pulse sequence for imaging is used, it takes time for one normal imaging to obtain a position at a certain time, and thus there is a problem that the display resolution of the tip position of the device is low.
[0015]
Secondly, in the case of the conventional method in which the RF receiving coil is attached to the tip of a device such as a catheter, only one point (point-like object) of only the coil position is displayed on the image. For this reason, there is a problem that it is difficult to grasp the position of the entire device, and it is difficult to grasp the current direction of the device and the direction of puncturing thereafter. Further, in this case, the position of the catheter cannot be accurately determined if it is slightly displaced spatially due to camera shake or the like.
[0016]
Third, in the case of a method of attaching a plurality of RF receiving coils to a device, it is necessary to detect the positions of the coils by the number of coils, so that there is a problem that the system becomes complicated and the position measurement takes time. .
[0017]
On the other hand, there are the following unresolved problems regarding monitoring of the puncture state of a device such as a puncture needle.
[0018]
First, in the conventional method for monitoring the puncture state, the reference plane (imaging cross section including the puncture start position and the target) obtained before the start of puncture is shifted due to patient respiration or body movement. It often ends up. For this reason, the puncture on the planned route cannot be performed smoothly, and the puncture work takes a lot of time and labor. In some cases, treatment and examination may be hindered.
[0019]
Second, if the surgeon advances the puncture needle in a direction different from the reference plane, the needle tip will be disengaged from the reference plane and will not appear in the image. For this reason, the conventional monitoring method is not suitable for puncture work involving fine work.
[0020]
Third, there is a problem with the gap between preoperative planning and actual treatment. Usually, before the puncture is started, a puncture plan (preoperative plan) such as a puncture start position and a puncture route is established based on a reference screen imaged in advance. However, the planned position and puncture route are merely on the screen, and there is a sense difference from the position on the patient body surface where the puncture is actually performed. For this reason, it takes more time than necessary for the surgeon to grasp the positional relationship such as the puncture start position and the puncture route, the patient throughput decreases, and the puncture state deviates from the planned puncture start position and route. Also occurred frequently.
[0021]
The present invention has been made in view of the above-described conventional problems. The following improvements have been made with respect to detection and presentation of a device in interventional MRI, confirmation of the puncture state of the device, and preoperative planning. The purpose is to do.
[0022]
  Specifically, the present inventionofThe object is to be able to detect the position of a device such as a catheter accurately and in a short time with a relatively simple configuration, and to easily grasp the position, orientation, and traveling direction of the entire device.
[0026]
[Means for Solving the Problems]
  According to one embodiment, in a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus for interventional MRI that involves operation of a device to be inserted into a subject, detection means for continuously detecting the position of the tip of the device as position data; Creation means for creating movement trajectory data indicating the movement state of the device based on the continuously detected position data, and the display mode is changed according to each time when the position of the tip is detected. Display means for displaying movement trajectory data.In this embodiment, the creation means attaches a mark to the continuously detected position data at an appropriate time, and groups the position data between the marks for each of the marks. Data is created as the movement trajectory data, and the display means displays the grouped data in a different manner for each group.
[0027]
Thereby, for example, since the position data of the tip of the device such as a catheter acquired in the past is redisplayed on the screen according to the acquired time, not only the tip position of the device but also the whole image is displayed. Displayed easily and almost in real time.
[0033]
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
Hereinafter, various embodiments according to the present invention will be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.
[0034]
(First embodiment)
A first embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS.
[0035]
The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparatus according to this embodiment is configured as a so-called open type system. This open system is suitable for interventional MRI because it allows easy access to the subject.
[0036]
A schematic configuration of this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus is shown in FIG. This magnetic resonance imaging apparatus includes an open gantry GN for placing a patient as a subject in a static magnetic field. The gantry GN has a static magnetic field magnet 1 composed of, for example, superconducting magnets in a horizontal magnet arrangement, and has a structure in which the magnet 1 is supported by four pillars. The static magnetic field magnet 1 has a pair of opposing disk-shaped magnets in its upper and lower structures, respectively, and is driven by receiving power from the static magnetic field power source 2 in a diagnostic space between them to have a uniform strength. Generate a static magnetic field. A patient who is laid on the top plate 16A of the bed 16 is inserted into this diagnostic space.
[0037]
A gradient magnetic field coil 3 and a transmission RF coil 7T are installed at the wall position of the magnet 1 on the diagnostic space side. In addition, a reception RF coil 7R is disposed in the vicinity of the diagnostic region of the subject P on the top 16A. The RF coil attached to the wall position on the diagnostic space side of the magnet 1 may be configured to serve both as transmission and reception.
[0038]
The gradient coil 3 is composed of x, y, and z coils (not shown) that generate gradient magnetic field pulses in the slice direction, phase encoding direction, and readout direction that are superimposed on the static magnetic field based on a given pulse sequence. . This gradient coil 3 is connected to a gradient amplifier 4. The gradient magnetic field amplifier 4 receives a control signal for the gradient magnetic field in the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis (physical axes set in the gantry GN) given from the sequencer (sequence controller) 5 and supplies it to the x, y, and z coils. Control the application of pulse current. As a result, the gradient magnetic fields in the slice direction, the phase encoding direction, and the readout direction are controlled.
[0039]
The transmission RF coil 7T and the reception RF coil 7R are connected to the transmitter 8T and the receiver 8R, respectively. The transmitter 8T and the receiver 8R are also connected to the sequencer 5. The transmitter 8T receives the control signal sent from the sequencer 5, and sends a transmission current pulse to the transmission RF coil 7T in response thereto. As a result, an RF magnetic field pulse is generated from the RF coil 7T and applied to, for example, the whole body region including the diagnosis site of the patient.
[0040]
The MR signal generated in response to the application of the RF magnetic field pulse is received by the reception RF coil 7R and sent to the receiver 8R as a corresponding RF current. The receiver 8R performs predetermined reception processing such as amplification, detection, and digitization on the reception RF current, and sends it to the arithmetic unit 10 via the sequencer 5 as digital MR data.
[0041]
The sequencer 5 includes a CPU and a memory, and controls scanning of the gradient magnetic field amplifier 5 and the transmitter 8T based on the pulse sequence information passed from the host computer 6 at the time of scanning.
[0042]
The host computer 6 includes a CPU and a memory, and executes processing such as drive timing control of the entire apparatus and scan control for imaging. A storage device 11, a display device 12, and an input device 13 are connected to the host computer 6. The host computer 6 calculates pulse sequence information and sends it to the sequencer 5 as scan control.
[0043]
A computing unit 10 is also connected to the host computer 6 and the sequencer 5. The computing unit 10 performs image reconstruction processing and catheter movement trajectory display processing described later. As a reconstruction process, the arithmetic unit 10 takes in the received MR data via the sequencer 5 and arranges it in a two-dimensional or three-dimensional k space (Fourier space or frequency space), and then performs a two-dimensional or three-dimensional Fourier transform. To reconstruct the image data in real space. The computing unit also performs catheter movement trajectory display processing. That is, received MR data is input via the sequencer 5 and processing for displaying the entire image of the catheter is performed based on this data.
[0044]
On the other hand, since the gantry GN of this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus is an open type as described above, it is convenient to perform interventional MRI. In this embodiment, an aspect of performing a necessary treatment by inserting the catheter 17 into the subject P will be described as interventional MRI.
[0045]
A minute RF detection coil 18 is attached to the distal end of the catheter 17. The RF detection coil 18 functions as a reception coil with respect to the transmission RF coil 7T. The reception signal of the RF detection coil 18 is sent to the receiver 8R via a thin cable 19.
[0046]
An input device 20 is attached to the proximal portion of the catheter 17 in order to mark the time data. For this reason, when the operator operates the input device 20, the operation signal is sent to the computing unit 10 via the sequencer 5.
[0047]
The catheter 17 is described as a representative example of an interventional device, and other interventional devices may be, for example, a puncture needle, a guide wire, an endoscope scope, and the like.
[0048]
Next, the operation of this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus will be described with a focus on the display process of the movement locus of the catheter shown in FIG. 2 executed in cooperation with the host computer 6, the sequencer 5, and the computing unit 10.
[0049]
First, under the control of the host computer 6, a reference image for displaying the position of the catheter 17 is subjected to normal MR imaging, that is, imaging using the transmission RF coil 7T and the reception RF coil 7R (step S1). .
[0050]
Next, the three-dimensional position data of the distal end position of the catheter 17 is detected together with the sequencer 5 and the computing unit 10 under the control of the host computer 6 (step S2). As shown in FIG. 4, this three-dimensional position detection is performed for each of the X channel, Y channel, and Z channel by RF excitation, application of gradient magnetic field pulses (generation of gradient echo), collection of echo signals, and Fourier of echo signals. This is performed by performing conversion processing (shift amount calculation from resonance frequency) and conversion into position data in each axial direction (step S2).
[0051]
Next, the computing unit 10 determines whether or not to mark the time data by determining the input of the operation signal from the input device 20 located at the proximal portion of the catheter 17 (step S3). If this determination is YES, a mark is attached to the data at that time by setting a flag, for example (step S4). This mark processing is performed at appropriate timing when the operator operates the input device 20. The operator operates the input device 20 at an appropriate timing while viewing the catheter monitor screen displayed on the display 12.
[0052]
Next, the computing unit 10 sets the three-dimensional position data of the tip of the catheter 17 collected between the previous mark and the current mark in the time series as one group data (grouping) (step S5).
[0053]
Thereafter, the arithmetic unit 10 stores the grouped three-dimensional position data in the storage device 11 (step S6). Note that the collected three-dimensional position data is also stored in the storage device 11 (step S6) even when there is no operation signal for marking in the above-described step S3 (in the case of NO).
[0054]
Further, the arithmetic unit 10 updates the time data (recalculates the time) (step S7), then calculates a value for the data display attribute (luminance, color, etc.) (step S8), and the data display attribute. Is updated (step S9).
[0055]
This attribute update of the data display is performed to change the display state for each group of position data to make the position of the distal end portion of the catheter 17 stand out and to display the whole image. For example, the luminance that is inversely proportional to the time required from collection of position data to display is calculated, and this luminance value is assigned to each group of position data. As a result, the highest brightness is assigned to the position data of the newest group in time series, and the next highest brightness is assigned to the position data of the next new group. That is, the older the collected time, the lower the brightness of the position data for each group.
[0056]
Thus, when the display information of the three-dimensional position data representing the distal end position of the catheter 17 is obtained, this position data is displayed superimposed on the reference image (step S10). Thereafter, the process returns to step S2 again to detect the position of the catheter tip. Thereafter, the above-described position detection and display processing is repeated.
[0057]
By repeating this process, for example, the catheter image shown in FIG. 3 is displayed on the display 12 as a monitor image. With the reference image IMref as a background, the trajectory of the catheter 17 is superimposed on this. The trajectory of the catheter 17 is displayed as a collection of position data acquired by tip position detection processing (FIG. 2, step S2) that is periodically executed every minute time. The trajectory images are grouped (G1, G2, G3) at appropriate timings in response to an operation signal output by operating the input device 20 by the operator. The display state is different for each group. Here, the brightness of the locus of the newest group G1 in time series is the highest, the next new group G2 has the next highest brightness, and the oldest group G3 has the lowest brightness.
[0058]
Thereby, not only the distal end position of the catheter 17 but also the whole image can be easily grasped.
[0059]
In the above embodiment, for the position data grouped by the time mark process, in addition to the brightness adjustment described above or separately from the brightness adjustment described above, a non-display process, a redisplay process, a new In addition, a process for adjusting the brightness, a process for adjusting the hue, and a process for correcting the position may be performed. As a result, even when the catheter is pulled back or advanced, the distal end position of the catheter and the entirety thereof can be reliably observed. Further, in the grouped display by the above-described mark processing, both the hue and the luminance may be changed instead of the luminance adjustment.
[0060]
In the above-described embodiment, the position data is grouped and displayed by the time mark process, but this grouping is not essential. That is, as in the above-described embodiment, the position data of the catheter tip is continuously detected and stored in time series, and the stored position data is modulated in a predetermined display mode based on the latest time. Also, the locus of the catheter tip can be displayed.
[0061]
Examples of this display are shown in FIGS. FIG. 5 shows an example in which the locus of the catheter tip is displayed in such a manner that the luminance is modulated according to time. In the case of this display example, as an example, the position data detected at the present time (latest time) is modulated to the maximum luminance, and the position data detected at an earlier time is a little lower than the maximum luminance at once. Modulated with brightness. Note that even position data detected at such an old time may be modulated so that the luminance is gradually lowered according to the old time.
[0062]
FIG. 6 shows an example in which the trajectory of the catheter tip is displayed in such a manner that the hue is modulated according to time. In the case of this display example, as an example, the position data detected at the present time (latest time) is modulated to a predetermined hue (for example, red), and the position data detected at an earlier time is collectively changed to another one. Modulated with hue (eg blue). Also in this case, even the position data detected at the old time may be modulated so that the hue is gradually changed from the red color to the blue color according to the old time.
[0063]
FIG. 7 shows an example in which the locus of the catheter tip is displayed as a dotted line by thinning out the position data. In the case of this display example, as an example, as the detection time goes back in the past, the thinning rate of the position data is set larger. As a result, the closer to the current tip position, the higher the density of points in the dotted line display, and the locus becomes clearer.
[0064]
In the processing of the display modes shown in FIGS. 5 to 7, the advance direction of the catheter is calculated from the time difference of the position data, and when the direction moves in the direction of pulling back the catheter, the display up to the corresponding position is deleted. Alternatively, the display mode may be changed.
[0065]
According to the display examples of FIGS. 5 to 7 described above, the current position of the catheter tip is differentiated from the previous tip position by changing the luminance, hue, or thinning rate of the position data according to the time. And the trajectory information of the tip position up to that point is also presented.
[0066]
For this reason, it is not displayed in the same state from the past to the present, the current position of the catheter tip and the past position can be easily determined, and the catheter can be operated easily and more accurately. When operating a catheter, the tip of the catheter is often moved little by little forward, backward, left and right at a certain position. In addition, due to camera shake or the like, the tip of the catheter often moves like that. In such a situation, even if the previous tip position of the catheter and the current tip position overlap, the operator can immediately and accurately determine which display position represents the current catheter tip.
[0067]
Further, as a configuration for detecting the position of the distal end portion of the catheter, a plurality of minute RF detection coils may be provided at the distal end portion. On the other hand, as another example of such a detection configuration, the tip position may be obtained by image processing from the image value of the MR image of normal imaging. As a position detection sensor suitable for performing this image processing, a marker body containing a substance (water, PVA, oil, etc.) that can be an NMR signal source may be attached to the tip.
[0068]
In addition, the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to the present invention can be implemented even if the gantry is a cylindrical type.
[0069]
(Second Embodiment)
A second embodiment will be described with reference to FIG. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus used in this embodiment is also applied to interventional MRI. Since the components of this apparatus are the same as or similar to those of the first embodiment, they are described using the same reference numerals and description thereof is omitted.
[0070]
The processing executed in this embodiment relates to tracking of a catheter when a catheter is used as a device and the catheter is inserted into a subject and operated.
[0071]
As described in the first embodiment, when a distal end of a catheter being operated is tracked using a minute RF detection coil (microcoil), a small region (point) processed from a signal from the RF detection coil is used. Only) is displayed as a tracking locus. However, the display of such a small area alone does not reveal the positional relationship with the tissue and blood vessels around the catheter tip, and it may be difficult to determine the subsequent position and direction in which the catheter should be operated.
[0072]
Therefore, in the present embodiment, the host computer 6, the sequencer 5, the arithmetic unit 10, the storage device 11, and the display unit 12 perform the following processing in cooperation. First, as a preliminary preparation, an MR image (for example, a coronal image) of a cross section (slice) including a path for operating the catheter is captured and stored in advance as a reference image. Next, when performing the interventional MRI, the position data of the catheter tip detected as described above is displayed superimposed on the read reference image.
[0073]
FIG. 8 shows an example of this display. In the same figure, the code | symbol G shows the reference image containing the blood vessel B, and code | symbol CT shows the catheter front-end | tip.
[0074]
By displaying in this way, the surgeon can easily grasp the positional relationship with the tissue and blood vessels around the catheter tip CT, which is difficult to understand with only the signal from the small RF detection coil, and for more accurate catheter operation. Can be connected. For example, the catheter can be operated using the traveling direction of the blood vessel as a guide.
[0075]
In the method of displaying the catheter tip position using this reference image, the reference image may be updated and displayed intermittently (for example, once every second). In this case, the sequencer 5 and the arithmetic unit 10 may perform the reference image imaging process by the interrupt method during the catheter tip position detection process. Thereby, for example, the position information of the catheter tip is updated at 20 frames per second, while the reference image (for example, coronal image) is updated once per second. As a result, even when the catheter is actually operated or during operation, for example, when the patient moves, the surrounding tissue displayed in the reference image is automatically and periodically changed to the surrounding tissue at the newly moved position. Updated to
[0076]
Further, in this updated display of the reference image, it is desirable to capture the cross section used for the update by a so-called cross section tracking method. That is, using the signal from the small RF detection coil, the position of this RF detection coil (that is, the catheter tip position) (x, y, z) is calculated as described above, and the updated cross section is always at this position (x , Y, z), imaging parameters are set by a known method. Thereby, the distal end position of the catheter is tracked almost in real time, and the reference image on the display screen is always updated with an image including the distal end of the catheter. Therefore, the situation that the tip position of the catheter cannot be seen from the reference image on the screen can be solved, and the ease and accuracy of device operation can be further improved.
[0077]
Further, the reference image used in the second embodiment is not necessarily limited to a coronal image, and may be an axial image or a sagittal image. In addition, as this reference image, an image of an arbitrary oblique surface including the target and the catheter tip, or an arbitrary oblique surface including the target and the past catheter path may be displayed.
[0078]
Further, the number of cross-sections to be imaged as a reference image is not necessarily limited to one surface, and although the image update rate decreases according to the number of cross-sectional surfaces to be imaged, the surface including the catheter tip and the target and the surface orthogonal to this surface. It is also possible to set two cross sections or three orthogonal cross sections including the catheter tip.
[0079]
(Third embodiment)
A third embodiment will be described with reference to FIGS.
[0080]
The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to this embodiment is characterized in that, in interventional MRI, an imaging cross section is automatically tracked by a puncture needle as a device.
[0081]
FIG. 9 shows a schematic configuration of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparatus according to this embodiment.
[0082]
This magnetic resonance imaging apparatus includes a gantry 51 for placing a patient as a subject in a static magnetic field. The gantry 51 has a static magnetic field magnet 52 composed of, for example, a superconducting magnet. In a part of the space created by the magnet 52, a static magnetic field diagnostic space having a uniform strength is formed. When the magnet 52 is substantially cylindrical, the patient is positioned such that at least a part of the body enters the diagnostic space in a state where the patient is laid on a bed (not shown). When the magnet 52 is an open type, the patient is positioned so that at least a part of the body enters the diagnostic space, for example, in a sitting position or a standing position.
[0083]
A gradient coil 53 is installed in the wall of the magnet 52, and an imaging RF coil 54 is installed in the inner space of the magnet 52. The gradient coil 53 is made up of x, y, and z coils that generate gradient magnetic field pulses in the slice direction, phase encoding direction, and readout direction that are superimposed on the static magnetic field based on a given pulse sequence. The unit of the gradient magnetic field coil 53 is connected to the gradient magnetic field amplifier 55. The gradient magnetic field amplifier 55 receives control signals SGx, SGy, and SGz for gradient magnetic fields in the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis (physical axes set in the gantry 52) provided from the sequencer 56 and converts them into x, y, and z coils. Controls the application of the pulse current to be supplied. As a result, the gradient magnetic fields in the slice direction, the phase encoding direction, and the readout direction are controlled.
[0084]
The RF coil 14 has a structure that serves as both a transmission coil and a reception coil, for example, and is connected to the transmitter 57 and the receiver 58. The transmitter 57 and the receiver 58 are also connected to the sequencer 56. The transmitter 57 receives the control signal Sf sent from the sequencer, and sends a transmission current pulse to the RF coil 54 in response thereto. As a result, an RF magnetic field pulse is generated from the RF coil 54 and applied to the diagnosis site (for example, the head) of the patient. In the case of two-dimensional imaging, since a gradient magnetic field for slice is also applied in parallel with this application, a desired slice at the diagnostic site is selectively excited, and an MR signal due to the magnetic resonance phenomenon is generated from this slice.
[0085]
The generated MR signal is received by the RF coil 54 and sent to the receiver 58 as a corresponding RF current signal. The receiver 58 performs predetermined reception processing such as amplification, detection, and digitization on the received RF current signal, and sends it to the host computer 57 via the sequencer 54 as digital amount MR data.
[0086]
The sequencer 56 includes a CPU and a memory, and controls the control signals SGx, SGy, SGz, Sf to be given to the gradient magnetic field amplifier 55 and the transmitter 57 based on the pulse sequence information passed from the host computer 57 at the time of scanning. Further, the sequencer 56 causes the gradient magnetic field amplifier 55 to adjust the gradient magnetic fields Gx, Gy, Gz in the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis directions by ΔGx, ΔGy, ΔGz based on information passed from the host computer 59, The frequency f of the transmission RF signal can be adjusted by Δf to the transmitter 57 and the control signal Sφ can be sent to the receiver 58 to adjust the reference phase φ of the phase detection in the receiver by Δφ.
[0087]
The host computer 59 is configured to include a CPU and a memory, and performs drive timing control of the entire apparatus, scan control for imaging, image reconstruction processing, control for tracking an imaging section to a device such as a puncture needle, and the like. Note that a configuration in which the image reconstruction process is left to a dedicated processor may be employed. An input device 60, a display device 61, and a storage device 62 are connected to the host computer 59. The host computer 59 calculates pulse sequence information and sends it to the sequencer 56 as scan control. Further, as image reconstruction processing, the received MR data is once arranged in a two-dimensional or three-dimensional k-space (Fourier space or frequency space), and then subjected to a two-dimensional or three-dimensional Fourier transform to obtain a real-space image. Reconstruct into data.
[0088]
Next, the unit for automatically tracking the imaging cross section with the puncture needle in the block configuration of FIG. 9 will be described.
[0089]
It is assumed that treatment such as puncture and examination is performed using the puncture needle 70 on the patient P placed in the diagnostic space of the static magnetic field magnet 52 or laid down. The puncture needle 70 has a thin needle body made of a hard material. Position sensors 71a and 71b for detecting the position of the needle body are provided at two predetermined positions of the needle body.
[0090]
The position sensors 71a and 71b are, for example, a minute RF detection coil (microcoil), a magnetic sensor, or a passive element or an active element that is an optical sensor, and are magnetic during puncturing (that is, during imaging). Alternatively, an optical position signal is generated, or an electrical signal is generated by receiving a magnetic or optical position signal.
[0091]
As this position sensor, a receiving element in which an NMR signal source (water, PVA, oil, etc.) and a minute RF detection coil are integrated may be used. When the magnetization spin of the NMR signal source of this receiving element is excited by the RF signal, an MR signal is generated, and this signal is detected as a current pulse (position detection signal) by the RF detection coil. The sensitivity region of the RF detection coil itself is set to be very narrow, but the NMR signal source is always located within the sensitivity region, so compared to a conventional position detection coil that uses only a small RF detection coil. A position detection signal with extremely high intensity can be obtained. In addition, with this integration, the sensitivity region of the RF detection coil can still be set narrow, so that high position detection capability is maintained.
[0092]
The position detection signals of the position sensors 71a and 71b are sent to the position information calculation circuits 78a and 78b, respectively. The position information calculation circuits 78a and 78b have a dedicated CPU as an example, and each of the input position detection signals is subjected to a one-dimensional Fourier transform in, for example, the X-axis direction, the Y-axis direction, and the Z-axis direction. The spatial position information of the needle body, that is, the puncture needle 70 is calculated. These pieces of position information are sent to the host computer 59 and used for processing for automatically tracking the imaging area.
[0093]
The host computer 59 calculates the position of the imaging cross section including the puncture needle 70 from the position information of two points on the puncture needle 70. Thereby, even when the puncture needle 70 moves from the imaging section, the position of the imaging section that always includes the puncture needle is calculated. The host computer 59 further adjusts imaging parameters (imaging conditions) to be sent to the gradient magnetic field amplifier 55, the transmitter 57, and the receiver 58 in accordance with the calculated imaging sectional position. The imaging parameters include the carrier frequency of the RF excitation pulse, the gradient magnetic field components of the X axis, the Y axis, and the Z axis, and the frequency and phase of the reference signal for reception phase detection.
[0094]
The adjustment of the imaging parameters is executed based on a so-called fluoro imaging / display method in which the same imaging section is repeatedly imaged and displayed at high speed. Thereby, scan control in which the imaging section automatically tracks the puncture needle 70 is executed, and the spatial position of the puncture needle 70 is monitored.
[0095]
In this automatic tracking of the imaging cross section, since the number of position sensors is two, another position information is required to determine the imaging cross section. In this embodiment, the host computer 59 uses the position sensor. Three orthogonal sections including two points 71a and 71b are displayed, or at least one of them is automatically selected and displayed on the display 61.
[0096]
Therefore, according to the present embodiment, the imaging cross section may be relatively displaced in the body due to the movement of the patient under treatment in the environment of interventional MRI, or the operator may make his own intention. Even when the puncture needle is moved in an arbitrary direction, the puncture needle 70 is always shown in the monitored cross-sectional image. This makes it possible to easily and reliably perform a puncturing operation that requires a very fine needle operation.
[0097]
The position sensor and its mounting structure according to the above-described embodiment may be further modified into various forms.
[0098]
To explain this, for example, as shown in FIG. 11, the position sensor does not necessarily have to be installed on the needle body. According to the example of the figure, two position sensors 71a and 71b are mounted on a grip part (gripping part) 70A that is attached so that the puncture needle 70 can be easily held and is fixed in a fixed positional relationship with the needle body itself. Is installed.
[0099]
In the case of the mounting structure shown in FIG. 12, a support (support) 72 that supports the puncture needle 70 so as to be movable within a certain range along the two-dimensional plane is attached to the puncture needle 70. . A position sensor is also attached to the support 72. In the example of FIG. 12, a total of three sensor structures are formed in which two position sensors 71 a and 71 b are mounted on the needle body of the puncture needle 70 and one position sensor 71 c is mounted on the support 72. . Thereby, not only the two points A and B of the two position sensors 71a and 71b but also the position information of one point C of the position sensor 71c on the support 72 is taken into consideration, so that the support A cross section including 72 can be imaged. Therefore, the surgeon can operate the puncture needle 70 more intuitively. As shown in this example, the position sensor may be attached to the needle body, grip portion, or support of the puncture needle, or may be a combination of these attachment positions.
[0100]
In addition, the indicator 72 which consists of operation buttons is provided in the support tool 72 of FIG. 12 mentioned above. The indicator 73 is used by an operator to start, stop, and give other instructions to the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus. Thereby, a necessary MR scan instruction such as fluoro imaging can be issued while performing a puncturing operation. Instead of the indicator 73, a foot switch or a voice controller can be used.
[0101]
Furthermore, as described above, the position sensor does not necessarily have to be an active element that outputs a position signal by itself. For example, as shown in FIG. 13, at least two markers 81 (81a, 81b) containing a substance serving as an NMR signal source are attached on the needle body of the puncture needle 70 as in the above-described embodiment. Also good. In this case, a cross section including a target such as a tumor and a puncture start position (a central cross section 82 shown in FIG. 14) is determined in advance, and at least two markers 81a and 81b are always present in the cross section 82. As included, the operator manually controls the position of the puncture needle while looking at the imaging section. At this time, as shown in FIG. 14, a plurality of multi-slice imaging may be performed.
[0102]
  (Fourth embodiment)
  Then, based on FIGS. 15-16, the magnetism which concerns on the 4th Embodiment of this invention.CompassionA sound imaging apparatus will be described. In this embodiment, the same or equivalent components as those in the MRI apparatus of the third embodiment are denoted by the same reference numerals, and the description thereof is omitted or simplified.
[0103]
This magnetic resonance imaging apparatus is characterized by having a preoperative planning function for allowing the operator to easily grasp the spatial positional relationship between a target such as a tumor and the puncture start position.
[0104]
The overall configuration of this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus is generally the same as that described above, but as shown in FIG. 15, a projector 85a, which automatically performs a projection operation in response to a control signal from the host computer 59, 85b is further provided. Each of the projectors 85a and 85b is formed of a laser device, for example. This projector is particularly suitable for an open magnet, and is attached to the ceiling surface of the magnet.
[0105]
According to this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, as shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, a preoperative plan is made before the operation. In the case of puncture, this preoperative plan is based on a plurality of pre-imaged images IM1~ IM3Is used to determine the position of a target such as a tumor, the puncture route, and the puncture start position. In this preoperative plan, the host computer 59 reads a program stored in the storage device 62 in advance, and executes this program one by one, so that it can be exchanged with the operator via the input device 60 and the display device 61. It is designed to be interactive.
[0106]
For example, as shown in FIG. 16, three tomographic images IM of the subject P1~ IM3Is collected in advance, and this middle image IM2Include a target D such as a tumor.
[0107]
For example, three tomographic images IM are displayed on the screen of the display 61 by display processing by the host computer 6.1~ IM3Can be scrolled or divided. For this reason, the operator uses the input device 13 to obtain three tomographic images IM.1~ IM3For example, the middle image IM in which the target D is reflected by observing the images in a progressive manner.2Find this image IM2Is given to the input device 60. This designation information is sent to the host computer 59.
[0108]
The host computer 59 calculates the light projection position of one of the two projectors 85a and 85b based on the information specifying this tomographic image, and sends a control signal corresponding to this calculation amount to the projector 85a. . Accordingly, the projector 85a directly projects light indicating the slice position and range for each tomographic image onto the body surface of the patient P as shown in FIG. As a result, a plurality of tomographic images IM currently targeted1~ IM3The position in the body axis direction is indicated on the body surface.
[0109]
At this time, the middle tomogram IM selected by the operator on the screen of the display 612As shown in FIG. 15, the slice portion of this tomographic image is projected with emphasis. Thereby, it can be easily recognized that the target D is included in the emphasized slice.
[0110]
Next, a tomographic image IM including the target D is displayed on the screen of the display 61.2Is displayed. Therefore, as shown in FIG. 16, the operator operates the input device 13 to mark a target point 87 on the target D with a cursor or the like, and then determines a desired puncture route R. When the puncture route R is determined, the puncture start position E is determined, so the operator marks the target point 88 on the puncture start position E again.
[0111]
Based on the puncture plan information determined in this way, the host computer 59 sends a control signal to another projector 85b. Thereby, the projector 85b projects a mark indicating the puncture start position E onto the body surface (see FIG. 15).
[0112]
Therefore, the surgeon starts puncturing from the puncture start position E on the body surface represented by the light projection mark, and switches the image capturing mode to the fluoro (continuous imaging) mode. By this imaging mode switching, the tomographic image IM of the middle section2Is displayed as a reference image. For this reason, the surgeon advances the puncture of the puncture needle to the target D while viewing the reference screen.
[0113]
In this way, by projecting the puncture plan information directly on the body surface of the patient P as optical information, unlike the case where the puncture work is simply performed using the puncture plan information planned on the screen, the puncture start position and The operator can tell the puncture direction more directly. Therefore, it is possible to accurately recognize the start or puncture state of an actual patient in a short time and perform a puncture operation more accurately and quickly.
[0114]
In addition, it is desirable to display the planned puncture route R superimposed on the reference image. Thereby, the surgeon can easily grasp the puncture start position E and the puncture route R by visual observation.
[0115]
The fourth embodiment described above can be further modified in various ways.
[0116]
For example, in imaging performed in advance for making a puncture plan, the imaging position may be determined while directly projecting light onto the patient P using the projectors 85a and 85b described above. In this case, it is possible to adopt a configuration in which the light projecting position of the projector is changed using a touch panel sub-console or a foot switch that can be used in the shield room. In addition, a handy type projector capable of easily changing the projection position manually can also be used as the projector.
[0117]
In the above-described embodiment, the example in which the puncture route is set in the same cross section has been described, but it is naturally possible to set the puncture path so as to straddle another cross section (slice).
[0118]
Furthermore, as shown in FIGS. 17A and 17B, the puncture start position E may be directly designated on the subject using a pointing device 89. In this case, the pointing device 89 may be any device that can detect the position information of the tip using a magnetic sensor or an optical sensor. In addition, for example, by using the puncture needle described in the third embodiment, the positions of the two position sensors and the distance to the tip of the needle body are measured in advance, so that the puncture needle can be used without using another pointing device. The puncture position can be determined directly at the tip. Fluoro imaging and display for monitoring the puncture needle is performed in a cross section including the mark 87 designated on the image and the puncture start position E. This facilitates the puncturing operation.
[0119]
Further, in the present invention, as shown in FIG. 18, the puncture plan information may be directly indicated on the body surface using an attachment jig 90 attached to the bed. In this case, the projectors 91 a and 91 b are attached to the attachment jig 90. As another example, a mechanism that directly indicates a puncture start position, a puncture needle insertion direction, and the like may be provided by a mechanical indicator needle or a puncture guide hole through which the puncture needle passes instead of the projector.
[0120]
(Fifth embodiment)
Next, a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to the fifth embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS.
[0121]
Similar to the fourth embodiment described above, this magnetic resonance imaging apparatus is characterized by another example of preoperative planning in interventional MRI.
[0122]
The host computer 59 can perform an interactive preoperative planning process by executing a program stored in advance via the input device 60 and the display device 61. An example of this preoperative planning process is shown in FIG.
[0123]
During this preoperative planning, the patient, who is the subject, is set in the gantry 51 while being laid on a bed, and a region including a target such as a tumor or stenosis is imaged by, for example, the multi-slice method (FIG. 19, step S11). . Thereby, an image for preoperative planning is collected. After this imaging, the state of the patient placed for this MR imaging, that is, the state of sleeping on the bed, is maintained, and then the operation shifts to the preoperative plan using the image captured as described above.
[0124]
Assume that the preoperative plan is a puncture plan. First, by the interactive display process of the host computer 59, the multi-slice images captured in advance are displayed in order on the liquid crystal monitor in the shield room as they are (step S12). Therefore, the surgeon searches for an image including the target from a plurality of displayed images (step S13). Thus, when an image including the target is found, the surgeon sends an operation signal to the host computer 59 via the input device 60 to designate the target on the screen with a point or the like (step S14). The host computer 59 records the position of the target point according to this designation (step S15).
[0125]
Next, in response to the operator's instruction, the host computer 59 sequentially displays each image of the multi-slice that has been captured in advance on the liquid crystal monitor (step S16). Therefore, the operator searches for a slice (cross section) having a position suitable for the insertion start point of the puncture needle as a device while observing each image (step S17). When such a slice is found, the surgeon causes the host computer 59 to designate the insertion start point of the puncture needle with the pointer on the image via the input device 60 (step S18).
[0126]
When the two points of the target point and the insertion start point are determined in this way, the host computer 59 calculates a straight line in the three-dimensional image data (multi-slice data) connecting these two points (step S19). This straight line serves as a guideline indicating the puncture route of the puncture needle.
[0127]
An example of the guideline R determined in this way is schematically shown in FIG. In the figure, reference numeral D denotes a target, reference numeral 87 denotes a target point, and reference numeral 88 denotes an insertion start point. According to this preoperative plan, since the target point 87 and the insertion start point 88 can be designated on different slices, the degree of freedom in setting the guideline R is also increased.
[0128]
When a catheter is used as a device and the target of the catheter operation is a blood vessel, a curve corresponding to the travel of the blood vessel is obtained as a guideline using an MRA (MR angiography) image captured in advance.
[0129]
In this way, when the preoperative plan is executed following the patient setting, the host computer 59 drives one or both of the projectors 85a and 85b, and at least the insertion start point 88 is applied to the body surface of the patient P with the light beam. Project and project the point (step S20). A projector or a projector may be used instead of the projector.
[0130]
The insertion start point of the puncture needle 70 is preferably subjected to a highlight display or a display with a different hue so that it can be easily distinguished from other light-instructed positions. Further, along with the instruction of the insertion start point, a section including the target point may be highlighted by one of the projectors 85a and 85b. Thereby, insertion of the puncture needle 70 can be started easily.
[0131]
Next, the surgeon performs device operation under the MR imaging environment, that is, in this case, a puncturing operation.
[0132]
In this device operation, a signal notifying the state of the initial insertion angle of the puncture needle 70 at the insertion start point may be issued with a physical quantity such as sound or light.
[0133]
This issuance process is performed by the host computer 59, and the outline is shown in FIG. The host computer 59 receives the position information (x1, y1, z1) and (x2, y2, z2) of the puncture needle 70 output from the position information calculation circuits 78a and 78b, and determines the puncture needle 70 from the position information. The current angle (insertion angle) is calculated (step S31). Next, the guideline calculated in the preoperative plan is read, and the difference between the initial insertion angle of the guideline and the current angle of the puncture needle 70 is calculated (step S32). Next, the host computer 59 outputs a drive signal set so that the physical quantity to be issued increases as the difference value decreases, to an alarm device (speaker, LED, etc.) (not shown) (step S33).
[0134]
As a result, in device operation, as the initial insertion angle at the insertion start point of the device to be actually inserted becomes closer to that of the predetermined guideline, a light with a louder volume and a higher luminance is provided to the operator. The pitch may be changed as the actual insertion start angle approaches the guideline angle. Thus, since the initial insertion of the device is assisted by sound and light, the surgeon can more accurately insert the device into the subject in accordance with the guidelines determined in advance in the preoperative plan.
[0135]
Further, a visual device such as a head mounted display (HMD) such as liquid crystal glasses may be linked to the host computer 59 in device operation in an MR imaging environment. For example, in the case of liquid crystal glasses, the display on one side (for example, the left eye) is made a transparent lens so that the object (patient) can be directly observed, and the display on the other side (for example, the right eye) is connected from the host computer 59. An image (MR image) showing the operation path is displayed. The surgeon can wear this liquid crystal glasses to perform work by synthesizing the reflected image (substance) from the body surface of the subject and the image seen through the inside of the subject behind the brain. Effective assistance can be obtained even during the insertion operation.
[0136]
Further, in this liquid crystal glasses, the MR images indicating the operation paths may be displayed in stereo on both displays. The liquid crystal displays on both sides are switched at high speed between the transparent mode and the image display mode, and the reflected image (substance) of the body surface of the subject and the calculated image (MR image) indicating the operation path are overlapped as described above. It is possible to provide an image to be displayed, and to help device operation powerfully.
[0137]
In the third to fifth embodiments described above, the treatment / examination device used for interventional MRI has been described as a puncture needle. However, this device is not necessarily a puncture needle, A catheter 101 may be used as shown in FIG. By attaching the position sensors 71a and 71b to the catheter 101, it is possible to obtain the same effects as the puncture needle described above.
[0138]
Further, the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to the third to fifth embodiments can be implemented even when the gantry is a cylindrical type or an open type.
[0139]
【The invention's effect】
As described above, according to one aspect of the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus of the present invention, the tip position of the device is detected, and the movement trajectory data of the device is created from the detected tip position data. Since the movement trajectory data is displayed, not only the position of the tip of the device such as the catheter but also the entire position and direction of the device can be presented to the operator almost in real time with a simple configuration. This contributes to greatly simplifying and improving the device operation in the examination and treatment by the conventional MRI.
[Brief description of the drawings]
FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing a schematic configuration of an open type magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to a first embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 2 is a flowchart showing an outline of a catheter tip locus display process;
FIG. 3 is a view of a monitor screen according to an example of a catheter tip trajectory display.
FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a pulse sequence used for detecting the position of the catheter tip.
FIG. 5 is a view showing an example of a trajectory display of a catheter tip.
FIG. 6 is a view showing another example of the locus display of the catheter tip.
FIG. 7 is a view showing another example of the locus display of the catheter tip.
FIG. 8 is a view showing an example of a trajectory display of a catheter tip with a reference image according to the second embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 9 is a block diagram showing a schematic configuration of a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to a third embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 10 is a view showing a position where a position sensor is attached to a puncture needle.
FIG. 11 is another view showing a state in which the position sensor is attached to the puncture needle.
FIG. 12 is another view showing a state in which the position sensor is attached to the puncture needle.
FIG. 13 is another view showing a state in which the position sensor is attached to the puncture needle.
FIG. 14 is another view showing a state in which the position sensor is attached to the puncture needle.
FIG. 15 is a diagram for explaining a configuration for directly showing puncture plan information such as a puncture start position on a patient body surface, which is performed in a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to a fourth embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 16 is a schematic diagram of an image displayed when making a puncture plan.
FIG. 17 is a diagram for explaining a modification of the configuration for designating the puncture start position.
FIG. 18 is a diagram for explaining another example of the mounting state of the projector.
FIG. 19 is a flowchart illustrating an outline of a preoperative plan executed by the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to the fifth embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 20 is a schematic diagram for explaining a preoperative plan in the fifth embodiment.
FIG. 21 is a schematic flowchart showing processing for assisting the operator in setting the initial insertion angle of the device.
FIG. 22 is a view for explaining a mounting state of a position sensor with respect to a catheter as a treatment / inspection device.
[Explanation of symbols]
GN, 51 Gantry
1,52 Static magnetic field magnet
2 Static magnetic field power supply
3,53 Gradient coil
4,54 Gradient amplifier
5,56 sequencer
6,59 host computer
7T, 7R, 54 RF coil
8T, 57 transmitter
8R, 58 receiver
10 Calculator
11, 62 storage device
12,61 Display
13,60 input device
17 Catheter (interventional device)
18 RF detection coil
20 Input device (operating means)
70 Puncture needle
70A grip part
71a-71c position sensor
72 Support
78a to 78b position information calculation circuit
81a-81b position sensor
85a, 85b Floodlight
89 pointing devices
90 Mounting jig
91a, 91b Floodlight
101 cursor

Claims (12)

  1. In a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus for interventional MRI involving operation of a device to be inserted into a subject,
    Detection means for continuously detecting the position of the tip of the device as position data;
    Creating means for creating movement trajectory data indicating a movement state of the device based on the position data continuously detected;
    Display means for displaying the movement trajectory data so that the display mode changes according to each time when the position of the tip portion is detected , and
    The creation means attaches a mark to the continuously detected position data at appropriate times, groups the position data between the marks for each mark, and moves the grouped data to the movement trajectory. Create as data,
    The display means displays the grouped data in a different manner for each group.
    Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim and this.
  2. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1.
    The creation means stores the position data of the tip portion in time series to create the movement trajectory data.
  3. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1 .
    The creation means is a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus provided with an operation means provided at an operation hand portion of the device and generating a signal for attaching the mark.
  4. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1 .
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the display means is means for displaying the grouped data with different brightness or color for each group.
  5. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 4 .
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the display means is a means for displaying the grouped data for each group with different brightness or color corresponding to the elapsed time since the grouping.
  6. In the magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 5 ,
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the display means is a means for superimposing and displaying the movement trajectory data on a reference image.
  7. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1.
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the display means is a means for displaying the position data of the tip detected by the detection means together with information representing a time series of detection of the position data.
  8. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 7 .
    The information representing the time series is one of a difference in brightness when displaying the position data, a difference in hue when displaying the position data, and a difference in the degree of thinning when displaying the position data. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus.
  9. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1.
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the display unit is a unit that superimposes and displays the position data of the tip detected by the detection unit on a reference image.
  10. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 1.
    The detection means includes a minute RF detection coil attached to the tip of the device, means for collecting an MR signal in the vicinity of the RF detection coil excited by an RF magnetic field together with application of a gradient magnetic field, and a frequency of the MR signal Means for obtaining the position of the RF detection coil as the tip position through analysis.
  11. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to claim 10 .
    One of the RF detection coils is a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus attached to the tip of the device.
  12. The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus according to any one of claims 1 to 11 ,
    The magnetic resonance imaging apparatus, wherein the device is a catheter.
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US7483732B2 (en) * 2004-04-15 2009-01-27 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Magnetic resonance imaging of a medical device and proximate body tissue
EP2346398B1 (en) * 2008-10-23 2013-08-14 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Cardiac- and/or respiratory-gated image acquisition system for virtual anatomy enriched real-time 2d imaging in interventional radiofrequency ablation or pacemaker placement procedures
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