JP4762247B2 - Electric heating cigarette with controlled release flavor - Google Patents

Electric heating cigarette with controlled release flavor Download PDF

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Publication number
JP4762247B2
JP4762247B2 JP2007539654A JP2007539654A JP4762247B2 JP 4762247 B2 JP4762247 B2 JP 4762247B2 JP 2007539654 A JP2007539654 A JP 2007539654A JP 2007539654 A JP2007539654 A JP 2007539654A JP 4762247 B2 JP4762247 B2 JP 4762247B2
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Prior art keywords
cigarette
tobacco
electrically heated
preferably
flavor
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JP2008518614A (en
Inventor
ビヴァリー シー ウッドソン
デボラ ジェイ ニューマン
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フィリップ・モーリス・プロダクツ・ソシエテ・アノニム
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Priority to US10/979,103 priority Critical patent/US20050172976A1/en
Priority to US10/979,103 priority
Application filed by フィリップ・モーリス・プロダクツ・ソシエテ・アノニム filed Critical フィリップ・モーリス・プロダクツ・ソシエテ・アノニム
Priority to PCT/IB2005/003617 priority patent/WO2006048774A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24BMANUFACTURE OR PREPARATION OF TOBACCO FOR SMOKING OR CHEWING; TOBACCO; SNUFF
    • A24B15/00Chemical features or treatment of tobacco; Tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/18Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes
    • A24B15/28Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances
    • A24B15/281Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances the action of the chemical substances being delayed
    • A24B15/283Treatment of tobacco products or tobacco substitutes by chemical substances the action of the chemical substances being delayed by encapsulation of the chemical substances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D1/00Cigars; Cigarettes
    • A24D1/002Cigars; Cigarettes with additives, e.g. for flavouring
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D1/00Cigars; Cigarettes
    • A24D1/004Cigars; Cigarettes with a filter located between tobacco rods
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D1/00Cigars; Cigarettes
    • A24D1/08Cigars; Cigarettes with lighting means
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES
    • A24F47/00Smokers' requisites not provided for elsewhere, e.g. devices to assist in stopping or limiting smoking
    • A24F47/002Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes
    • A24F47/004Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel
    • A24F47/008Simulated smoking devices, e.g. imitation cigarettes with heating means, e.g. carbon fuel with electrical heating means

Description

(Related application)
This application is 35 U of US Provisional Patent Application No. 60 / 422,497, entitled “ELECTRICLY HEATED CIGARTETE INCLUDING CONTROLLED RELEASE FLAVORING” filed Oct. 31, 2002. . S. C. 119, a continuation-in-part of US patent application Ser. No. 10 / 695,760, filed Oct. 30, 2003, claiming priority set forth in Section 119, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference. .

  The present invention relates to an electrically heated cigarette.

  Conventional cigarettes are smoked by igniting the end of the cigarette rod, sucking at the mouthpiece end of the cigarette and inhaling air primarily through the ignition end. Conventional cigarettes emit smoke upon burning, and during this combustion, tobacco burns at temperatures typically above 800 ° C. due to smoke absorption. This combustion heat releases various gaseous combustion products and distillates from the tobacco. These gaseous products, when inhaled through the cigarette, cool and condense to form an aerosol, resulting in the flavor and aroma associated with smoking.

  Conventional cigarettes produce medium sidestream smoke while smoldering between smoke absorptions. When ignited, the cigarette is completely consumed or discarded. Although it is possible to re-ignite a conventional cigarette, it is not desirable for subjective reasons including flavor, flavor, and smell.

  An alternative to conventional cigarettes is the electrically heated cigarette used in electric smoking systems. Compared to conventional cigarettes, the electric smoking system significantly reduces sidestream smoke while at the same time allowing smokers to suspend and resume smoking as desired. Exemplary electric smoking systems include US Pat. Nos. 6,026,820, 5,988,176, 5,915,387, 5,692,526, and 5,692,525. 5,666,976, 5,499,636, and 5,388,594, each of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. The electric smoking system includes an electric lighter and an electrically heated cigarette configured to cooperate with the lighter. Electric smoking system provides responsiveness (smoke delivery occurs immediately upon inhalation), desired delivery level (correlates with FTC tar level), desired suction resistance (RTD), and consistency between smoke absorption and cigarette Thus, it is desirable to be able to deliver smoke in a manner similar to that experienced by smokers with conventional cigarettes.

  In conventional cigarettes, volatile flavors have been incorporated to add flavor and aroma to tobacco mainstream and sidestream smoke. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,006,347, 3,236,244, 3,344,796, 3,426,011, 3,972,335, 4,715,390 No. 5,137,034, 5,144,964, and 6,325,859, and International Publication No. WO 01/80671. The added flavoring agent desirably volatilizes when the cigarette is smoked. However, volatile flavors tend to migrate to other components within the cigarette and possibly across the cigarette. Volatile flavorings can be lost from the cigarette during storage and distribution at normal conditions before the cigarette is smoked. The degree of volatile flavor transfer within the cigarette depends on a variety of factors including the vapor pressure of the flavor, the solubility of the flavor in other elements of the cigarette, and the temperature and humidity conditions. In addition, in conventional cigarettes, most of the added flavoring can be lost in sidestream smoke.

  Flavors incorporated in conventional cigarettes can also be chemically and / or physically degraded by contact and / or reaction with other components of the cigarette and the surrounding environment. For example, activated carbon is incorporated into conventional cigarettes to remove gas phase components from mainstream smoke. However, the flavoring agent incorporated in the cigarette along with the activated carbon is absorbed by the activated carbon and clogs the pores of the activated carbon, resulting in the inactivated activated carbon, thus impairing its ability to filter tobacco smoke. It was.

  For the above reasons, the flavoring agents incorporated in conventional cigarettes have not been delivered completely satisfactorily to smokers. As a result, flavors incorporated in some conventional cigarettes do not provide the desired flavor effect to smokers satisfactorily, and the value required of flavors for the original quality of cigarettes may be desirable. Absent. Due to the loss of flavors, the homogeneity of flavored tobacco is not all satisfactory. Furthermore, the adsorption of flavoring agents by the adsorbent in tobacco renders the adsorbent inert, thus reducing their ability to remove gas phase components from tobacco smoke.

  In light of the above-described problems encountered with conventional cigarettes that include flavorants and also adsorbents, an electrically heated cigarette is provided that includes an adsorbent and a controlled release flavorant. In a preferred embodiment, the electrically heated cigarette preferably minimizes the release and transfer of flavor in the cigarette prior to smoking, for example at ambient conditions, and thus preferably minimizes inactivation of the adsorbent by the flavor. Adsorbent and flavoring agent incorporated into the tobacco in the form of Further, the flavoring agent is preferably released in the cigarette in a controlled manner during smoking. As a result, the flavoring preferably improves the essential properties of the cigarette, while the adsorbent maintains its function of removing gas phase components from mainstream smoke.

  A preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette has at least one adsorbent and a flavor release additive comprising one or more flavors. The flavoring agent can be released in the cigarette when the flavoring release additive is heated to at least the lowest temperature that occurs during cigarette smoking.

  The flavoring-release additive can be incorporated in various forms within the electrically heated cigarette. In one preferred embodiment, the flavoring release additive comprises beads. In another preferred embodiment, the flavor release additive is a film. In yet another preferred embodiment, the flavoring-release additive is an inclusion complex comprising a selected host molecule and a flavoring as a guest molecule within the inclusion complex.

  In another preferred embodiment, two or more different flavor release agents with different flavor release temperatures are placed at different locations in the electrically heated cigarette that reach different temperatures. The flavoring release additives can be placed at a location within the electrically heated cigarette that reaches the flavoring release temperature for those flavoring release additives. Thus, the flavoring release additive can provide an efficient and controlled flavor release during smoking.

  Electrically heated cigarettes can contain various adsorbents. Preferably, the flavorant is preferably adsorbed by providing the flavorant in a flavorant release additive that minimizes the release and / or migration of the flavorant until the flavorant release additive reaches the flavor release temperature. It is substantially prevented from being adsorbed and thus deactivated by the adsorbent, so that it does not adversely affect the adsorbent's ability to remove selected gas phase components from the mainstream smoke of tobacco. Further, since the flavor is released by the temperature into the cigarette, the flavor can be effectively delivered to the smoker in a controlled manner during the cigarette smoke cycle.

  A preferred embodiment of the electric smoking system includes a lighter and at least one electrically heated cigarette that includes at least one adsorbent and flavor release additive.

  A preferred embodiment of a method of making an electrically heated cigarette includes incorporating an adsorbent and a flavoring release additive into the electrically heated cigarette.

  Another embodiment relates to an electrically heated cigarette having a flavor release additive in a tobacco mat, an adsorbent in a filter component, and a tobacco plug that does not include the flavor release additive.

  The electrically heated cigarette includes one or more adsorbents and at least one flavorant to affect the tobacco smoke flavor, flavor, and / or aroma. In a preferred embodiment, the flavoring agent is incorporated into the cigarette prior to smoking in the form of a flavoring release additive that preferably minimizes the release and / or migration of the flavorant within the cigarette. Preferably, the flavoring is released from the flavoring release additive in a controlled manner during cigarette smoking. The flavor release additive allows the flavor to enhance the original properties of the tobacco while eliminating the adverse effects on adsorbent effectiveness in removing selected gas phase components from mainstream smoke.

  In a preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette, the flavorant is released within the cigarette when the flavorant-release additive is heated to at least the lowest temperature that occurs when the smoker inhales mainstream smoke through the cigarette (flavor release temperature). The

  It has previously been found that different areas of an electrically heated cigarette reach different temperatures when a smoker smokes a cigarette. In a preferred embodiment, different flavoring-release additives are selectively placed at two or more locations in an electrically heated cigarette, at each of which at least a minimum temperature is reached, at which temperature The flavorant is released from the flavorant-releasing additive placed in By selectively placing one or more flavoring-release additives within the cigarette, the cigarette can efficiently and controlledly release the flavoring during smoking.

  The flavor release additive can have various configurations and compositions, can be placed in one or more locations, and / or incorporated into one or more components of an electrically heated cigarette. be able to. The flavor release additive can be designed to have a different associated flavor release temperature. Thus, the flavoring release additive can be incorporated into an electrically heated cigarette at a location that is most suitable for efficiently releasing the flavoring from a particular flavoring release additive.

  The electrically heated cigarette can include one or more adsorbents that can remove selected gas phase components from mainstream smoke. By providing the flavoring agent in the flavoring release additive that preferably minimizes the release and / or migration of the flavorant in the cigarette until the flavoring release additive reaches at least a minimum temperature, the flavorant is substantially It is preferable not to deactivate the adsorbent. Accordingly, it is possible to maintain the function of the adsorbent that removes the gas phase component selected from the mainstream smoke of tobacco. Preferably, the flavoring release additive allows the flavoring to be delivered effectively in a controlled manner to the smoker.

  The term “adsorption” as used herein means filtration by adsorption and / or absorption. Adsorption is intended to include interactions on the outer surface of the adsorbent in addition to the interactions within the pores and grooves of the adsorbent. In other words, an “adsorbent” has the ability to condense or retain molecules of other substances on its surface and / or absorb other substances, ie, allow other substances to penetrate into internal structures or pores. It is a substance with ability. As used herein, the term “adsorbent” means either an adsorbent, an absorbent, or a substance that can act as both an adsorbent and an absorbent.

  As used herein, the term “removal” refers to the adsorption and / or absorption of at least a portion of tobacco mainstream smoke components.

  The term "mainstream smoke" includes a gas mixture that travels down through the tobacco rod and is exhausted through the filter end, ie, the amount of smoke that is exhausted or aspirated from the end of the cigarette during cigarette smoking. . Mainstream smoke contains air that is sucked through the heated area of the cigarette and the wrapping paper.

  As used herein, “molecular sieve” means a porous structure composed of an inorganic material and / or an organic material. Molecular sieves include natural and synthetic materials. Molecular sieves can adsorb molecules of a specific size while at the same time eliminating larger size molecules.

  1 and 2 show a preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette 23. However, it should be understood that an electrically heated cigarette can have another configuration suitable for smoking with an electric lighter. The electric heating cigarette 23 includes a tobacco rod 60 and a filter tip portion 62, and the tobacco rod 60 and the filter tip portion 62 are connected to each other by a chip paper 64. Preferably, the tobacco rod 60 includes a tobacco web or “mat” 66 that is tubularly wrapped around the free flow filter 74 at one end and around the tobacco plug 80 at the other end. ing.

  An outer wrap 71 surrounds the cigarette storage mat 66 and is held together along a longitudinal seam. The outer wrap 71 holds the mat 66 wound around the free flow filter 74 and the cigarette plug 80.

  Preferably, the mat 66 includes a base web 68 and a layer of tobacco material 70. The tobacco material 70 may be disposed along the inner surface of the base web 68 or may be disposed along the outer surface thereof. At the tip of the tobacco rod 60, the mat 66 and the outer wrap 71 are wound around the free flow filter 74. Preferably, the tobacco plug 80 includes a relatively short tobacco column 82 of cut filter tobacco, which is held by an inner wrap 84 surrounding it.

  There is a gap 90 between the free flow filter 74 and the tobacco plug 80. The gap 90 is an unfilled portion of the tobacco rod 60 and is in fluid communication with the filter tip 62 via a free flow filter 74.

  Preferably, the filter tip 62 includes a free flow filter 92 disposed adjacent to the tobacco rod 60 and a mouthpiece filter plug 94 at the end of the filter tip 62 remote from the tobacco rod 60. . Preferably, the free flow filter 92 is tubular and allows air to pass with very low pressure drop. The mouthpiece filter plug 94 closes the free end of the filter tip 62.

  The electrically heated cigarette 23 optionally includes at least one row of perforations 12 adjacent its free end. The perforations are preferably formed as slits 17 that extend through the outer wrap 71, the mat 66, and the inner wrap 84.

  To further improve delivery, at least one row of additional perforations 14 constituting the slit 17 is optionally formed at a location along the tobacco plug 80. The perforations 12 or 14 may include a single row of slits or two rows of slits 17. The number and range of slits 17 is selected to control suction resistance (RTD) and delivery along the side wall of the electrically heated cigarette 23.

  Optional holes 16 provided in the mat 66 are covered by an outer wrap 71. The perforations 12 and 14 can be used to approximate the desired delivery level of the cigarette 23, and the holes 16 are used to regulate delivery with less impact on suction resistance (RTD).

  Preferably, the diameter of the electrically heated cigarette 23 is substantially constant along the length direction. The diameter of the electrically heated cigarette 23 is preferably between about 7.5 mm and 8.5 mm, as in the conventional cigarette, so that the electric smoking system 21 has a “mouth feel” that is familiar during smoking. To offer to smokers.

  The tobacco column 82 preferably includes a cut filler of a typical tobacco blend, which includes, for example, bright tobacco, burley tobacco, oriental tobacco, and optionally reconstituted tobacco, other blends. Ingredients and other blend ingredients include conventional tobacco flavors.

  The free flow filter 92 and the mouthpiece filter plug 94 are preferably joined together as a connection plug connected by a plug wrap 101. The plug wrap 101 is preferably a porous and lightweight plug wrap. The connecting plug is attached to the tobacco rod 60 by chip paper 64.

  As mentioned above, the electrically heated cigarette 23 may include one or more adsorbents that remove gas phase components from tobacco smoke. The adsorbent may include one or more porous materials through which tobacco smoke can flow. In a preferred embodiment, the adsorbent is activated carbon. For example, the adsorbent can include activated carbon fines disposed in voids in the filter, or activated carbon particulates loaded into a fibrous material or paper. Activated carbon can be in a variety of forms including particles, fibers, beads and the like. The activated carbon can have different porosity characteristics such as selected pore size and total pore volume.

  In another preferred embodiment, the adsorbent is one or more suitable molecular sieve adsorbent materials. Molecular sieve adsorbents that can be used in the electrically heated cigarette 23 include, but are not limited to, zeolites, mesoporous silicates, aluminophosphates, mesoporous aluminosilicates, and mixed dioxide gels (more details One or more of the other relevant porous materials can be included, such as International Patent Application WO 01/80973, incorporated herein by reference.

  In a preferred embodiment, the adsorbent is one or more zeolites. Zeolites include crystalline aluminosilicates having pores such as grooves of uniform and molecular size dimensions and / or cavities. There are many known native zeolite structures with pores of various sizes and shapes that can significantly affect the properties of these materials with respect to adsorption and separation processes. Molecules can be separated on zeolites by size and shape effects related to the possible orientation of the molecules in the pores and / or by differences in adsorption forces. The pores of the molecular sieve material using one or more zeolites in the electrically heated cigarette 23 having pores larger than one or more selected gas phase components of the gas desired to be filtered. Only selected molecules small enough to pass through can enter the cavity and be adsorbed on the zeolite.

The zeolite is, but is not limited to, one or more of zeolite A, zeolite X, zeolite Y, zeolite KG, zeolite ZK-5, zeolite BETA, zeolite ZK-4, and zeolite ZSM-5. be able to. In a preferred embodiment, zeolite ZSM-5 and / or zeolite BETA is used. ZSM-5 enters the MFI structural classification group and is represented by crystal chemistry data [Na n (Al n Si 96-n O 192 ) to 16H 2 O, where n <27, orthorhombic, Pnma] Zeolite BETA enters the BEA structural group and is represented by crystal chemistry data [Na 7 (Al 7 Si 57 O 128 ) tetragonal, P4 12 2 ]. These two zeolites are thermally stable at temperatures up to about 800 ° C. and can be incorporated into the cigarette filter and / or tobacco rod of the electrically heated cigarette 23.

  In another preferred embodiment, the adsorbent incorporated into the electrically heated cigarette 23 has a composite composition. In such embodiments, the adsorbent includes, for example, activated carbon and one or more molecular sieve materials such as those described above. For example, the adsorbed fibers can be impregnated with at least one adsorbent.

  In the electrically heated cigarette 23, microporous, mesoporous, and / or macroporous molecular sieves can be used depending on the selected components that are desired to be removed from the mainstream smoke of tobacco.

  The adsorbent can be incorporated into one or more locations of the electrically heated cigarette 23. For example, the adsorbent can be placed in the passage of the tubular free flow filter 74, in the free flow filter 92, and / or in the void space 90. The adsorbent can additionally or alternatively be incorporated into the tobacco plug 80.

  FIG. 3 shows another preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette 23 that includes a filter 150. Filter 150 includes an adsorbent in the form of oriented fibers 152 and a sleeve 154 such as paper surrounding the fibers 152. The adsorbent can be, for example, one or more of activated carbon, silica gel, zeolite, and other molecular sieves in fiber form. The adsorbent can be, for example, a surface modifying material such as a surface modified silica gel such as aminopropylsilyl (APS) silica gel. The adsorbent mixture can provide different filtration characteristics to obtain the target filtered mainstream smoke composition.

  Alternatively, the fibers 152 can include one or more adsorbent materials, such as, for example, microcavity fibers such as the TRIAD® microcavity fibers disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 01/80973. Carbon, silica, zeolite and the like to be impregnated. In a preferred embodiment, the fibers are formed into microcavity fibers impregnated with one or more particles of adsorbent material or alternatively continuous activated carbon fibers. The fibers preferably have a diameter of about 10 microns to about 100 microns. The fibers have a length of about 10 microns to about 200 microns, for example.

  In another preferred embodiment, the fibers are bundles of discontinuous fibers that are oriented parallel to the direction of mainstream smoke flow through the electrically heated cigarette.

  The filter 150 containing the fibers 152 is preferably pleatless adsorbed fibers having total denier per denier and denier per filament, preferably through a sleeve 154 preformed or formed in situ during the filter forming process. It can be formed by stretching a bundle of materials. The formed filter can be cut to a desired length. For example, the length of the filter can be from about 5 mm to about 30 mm.

  Filter 150 including fibers 152 can be incorporated into an electrically heated cigarette at one or more desired locations. With further reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, in a preferred embodiment, the filter 150 can be replaced with the entire free flow filter 92. In another preferred embodiment, the free flow filter 150 can be replaced with a portion of the free flow filter 92. The filter 150 may contact (that is, contact) the free flow filter 74, may be disposed between the free flow filter 74 and the mouthpiece filter plug 94, or may contact ( (That is, contact). The filter 150 preferably has a diameter substantially equal to the outer diameter of the free flow filter 94 to minimize smoke bypass during the filtration process.

  Preferably, the fibrous adsorbent has a high loft with an appropriate packing density and fiber length so that parallel paths between the fibers are created. Such a structure can effectively remove a significant amount of selected gas phase components such as formaldehyde and / or acrolein, while preferably removing only a minimum amount of particulate matter from the smoke. The selected gas phase component can be significantly reduced while at the same time having little effect on the total particulate matter (TPM) in the gas. In order to achieve such a filtration function, a sufficiently small packing density and a sufficiently short fiber length are desirable.

  The amount of adsorbent used in the preferred embodiment of the electrically heated cigarette 23 depends on the amount of selected gas phase components in the tobacco smoke and the amount of components that it is desired to remove from the tobacco smoke. Determined.

  As mentioned above, the electrically heated cigarette 23 also includes at least one flavoring release additive. Flavorings include, but are not limited to, spice flavors such as mint, mint, peppermint and spearmint, chocolate, licorice, citrus, and other fruit flavors, gamma octalactone, vanillin, ethyl vanillin, softener flavor, cinnamon , Methyl salicylate, linalool, bergamot oil, geranium oil, lemon oil, ginger oil, and one or more flavorings including tobacco flavor. In a preferred embodiment, the flavoring is menthol and optionally at least one mint flavoring.

  As noted above, flavoring release additives can have different structures and compositions within an electrically heated cigarette. In one embodiment, the flavor release additive is in the form of beads. The beads preferably encapsulate the flavoring and provide controlled release of the flavoring within the cigarette during the smoke absorption cycle.

  The beads preferably comprise at least one encapsulating material and at least one flavorant. The encapsulating material preferably comprises a binder, which can be, for example, one or more of coconut oil, konjac gum, xylitol, zein, hydroxypropylcellulose, sorbitol, maltitol, and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose. Other materials known in the art that can improve the bead-forming properties of the encapsulating material or increase its stability can also optionally be incorporated into the beads. In a preferred embodiment, the beads have a substantially uniform composition and the flavoring is substantially uniformly distributed. Such a structure allows flavoring to be released from the beads in a more uniform manner during smoking.

  Depending on the composition of the beads, the minimum temperature at which the beads release flavoring can be adjusted. Beads comprising one or more of the binders described above preferably have a minimum temperature at which the flavoring is released at at least about 40 ° C, such as from about 40 ° C to about 150 ° C. The beads prevent the exposure of the flavoring to undesired substances in the atmosphere (eg, air, package interior) and undesired substances in the cigarette, and the flavor release additive is at a sufficiently high temperature during cigarette smoking. Minimize flavor release and / or migration until heated. As a result, the flavoring agent is preferably substantially prevented from moving through the cigarette, reacting with other substances or atmospheres in the cigarette, and inactivating the adsorbent present in the cigarette.

  The beads can be in any desired shape such as various regular and irregular shapes, including circular, square, rectangular, elliptical, other polygonal, cylindrical, fibrous and the like. The beads can have various sizes. Preferably, the beads are microbeads having a maximum particle size of less than about 25 microns, more preferably less than about 1 micron. By reducing the size of the beads, the surface area of the beads is increased so that a more uniform and controlled flavor release can be achieved.

  The beads can be manufactured by any suitable process that produces beads having the desired structure, composition, and size. For example, the beads can be manufactured by extrusion, spray drying, coating, or other suitable process. In a preferred embodiment, the beads are formed by forming a solution, dispersant, or emulsion that includes a binder, a flavoring agent, and optional additives to form a bead that can be separated and dried. The A process for preparing beads containing active ingredients such as flavors is disclosed in US Pat. No. 6,325,859, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

  The electrically heated cigarette 23 preferably includes an amount of beads that provides the desired amount of flavor in the cigarette. In preferred embodiments, the electrically heated cigarette comprises up to about 20%, more preferably from about 10% to about 15% beads, based on the total weight of tobacco in the cigarette. For example, a cigarette containing 100 mg tobacco preferably contains up to about 20 mg beads. The beads can preferably contain up to about 20% flavor. Cigarettes can include, for example, from about 1 mg to about 15 mg of flavoring.

  In a preferred embodiment, the beads are placed in at least one location of the electrically heated cigarette 23 that reaches at least the lowest temperature at which flavoring is released from the beads into the cigarette during smoking. For example, the beads may be in the tobacco rod 60, in the gap 90 between the tobacco plug 80 and the free flow filter 74, on one or more surfaces of the free flow filter 74, on or in the mat 66, and / or It can be placed on or in the inner wrap 84 surrounding the tobacco plug 80.

  In another preferred embodiment, different bead compositions having two or more different minimum flavor release temperatures can be incorporated at two or more locations within an electrically heated cigarette, wherein the cigarette is smoked During this position different temperatures are reached. For example, beads having a first flavorant release temperature are placed at a first position in a cigarette that reaches the first flavorant release temperature, and beads having a second flavorant release temperature are placed in the first flavorant. It can be placed at a second location in the cigarette that reaches a second flavor release temperature higher than the release temperature. For example, the two flavor release temperatures can vary up to about 100 ° C. For example, these two temperatures can vary up to about 10 ° C, 20 ° C, 30 ° C, 40 ° C, 50 ° C, 60 ° C, 70 ° C, 80 ° C, 90 ° C, or 100 ° C.

  In another preferred embodiment, the flavoring release additive comprises a film. The film preferably encapsulates the flavoring and can release the flavoring into the cigarette at a controlled temperature during smoking. In a preferred embodiment, the film comprises up to 20% by weight, more preferably from about 10% to about 15% flavor. In a preferred embodiment, the film also encapsulates menthol and optionally mint.

  The film form of the flavor release additive preferably comprises at least one encapsulant and at least one flavor. The encapsulating material preferably comprises a binder, which can be, for example, one or more of carrageenan, gelatin, agar, duran gum, gum arabic, gar gum, xantum gum, and pectin. Other materials known in the art that can improve the film-forming properties of the encapsulating material or increase its stability can optionally be added to the film. In a preferred embodiment, the film has a substantially uniform composition and the flavoring is substantially uniformly distributed. Such a configuration allows flavoring to be released from the film in a more desirable manner during smoking. The film encapsulating material provides a barrier to flavor release.

  Depending on the composition of the film, the minimum temperature at which the film releases flavoring can be adjusted / selected. Films comprising one or more of the above-mentioned binders preferably have a minimum temperature at which a flavorant of at least about 50 ° C. is released, such as up to about 120 ° C. The film prevents the flavoring from being exposed to cigarettes and undesired substances in the atmosphere, and substantially prevents the flavoring from being released until the film is heated to the flavoring release temperature during cigarette smoking. .

  The film can be applied to one or more components of an electrically heated cigarette as a liquid coating that dries into a film. There are no restrictions on the dimensions of the dried film. Preferably, the maximum thickness of the dried film is from about 50 microns to about 150 microns, more preferably about 75 microns.

  The film can be manufactured by any suitable process that produces a film having the desired structure, composition, and dimensions. For example, the film can be applied by a coating process such as spray coating, dipping, electrostatic deposition, printing wheel application, gravure printing, ink jet application, and the like. In a preferred embodiment, an emulsion, suspension, or slurry comprising a binder, flavor, and optional additives is provided and then one or more selected components of an electrically heated cigarette. Is applied as a coating to one or more selected surfaces. The coating is preferably dried to remove moisture and / or other solvents to form a solid film having the desired dimensions. Exemplary processes that can be used to prepare films are described in US Pat. No. 3,006,347 and commonly assigned 4,715,390, each incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In the issue.

  The electrically heated cigarette 23 preferably includes an amount of film that releases a desired amount of flavor during cigarette smoking. In preferred embodiments, the electrically heated cigarette comprises up to about 20%, more preferably from about 10% to about 15% film, based on the total weight of tobacco in the cigarette to which the film is added. For example, if a film is added to the mat, the weight of tobacco contained in the mat is preferably based on the weight of the amount of film. When a film is added to the mat and tobacco plug, the total weight of tobacco contained in the mat and tobacco plug is preferably based on the weight of the amount of film added in the cigarette. Preferably, the weight of the tobacco contained in the mat is based on the weight of the amount of film added to the mat, and the weight of the tobacco contained in the tobacco plug is based on the weight of the amount of film added to the tobacco plug. It is. In a preferred embodiment, the tobacco can include from about 1 mg to about 15 mg of flavoring.

  In a preferred embodiment, the film is placed in at least one location of the electrically heated cigarette 23 that reaches at least the flavor release temperature. For example, the film can be disposed on the tobacco plug 80, on the inner wrap 84 surrounding the tobacco plug 80, on the mat 66, and / or on the outer wrap 71 surrounding the mat. When the film is placed on the inner wrap 84 and / or the outer wrap 71, the weight of the inner wrap 84 and / or the outer wrap 71 is a weight basis for the amount of film. In another preferred embodiment, the film is preformed, chopped, and incorporated into tobacco plug 80 and / or other selected locations that reach the flavor release temperature.

  In another preferred embodiment, different flavored films having two or more different minimum flavor release temperatures can be incorporated at different locations on the electrically heated cigarette, where different locations are available during cigarette smoking. The temperature of exceeds the minimum release temperature of different films.

  In another preferred embodiment, the flavoring release additive is an inclusion complex. The inclusion complex includes a “host molecule”, and the flavoring agent is a “guest molecule” in the inclusion complex. This inclusion complex allows for controlled release of flavors within the cigarette during smoking. In a preferred embodiment, the flavoring agent is a lipophilic organic flavoring agent, preferably concentrated within the hydrophobic cavity of the host molecule. Preferred flavors include, but are not limited to, mint such as menthol, peppermint and spearmint, chocolate, licorice, citrus and other fruit flavors, gamma octalactone, vanillin, ethyl vanillin, softener flavor, spice flavors such as cinnamon, methyl Contains salicylate, linalool, bergamot oil, geranium oil, lemon oil, ginger oil, and tobacco flavor. In a preferred embodiment, the flavoring comprises vanillin and gamma octalactone. In a preferred embodiment, the inclusion complex comprises up to about 20% by weight, more preferably from about 10% to about 15% flavoring.

  The host molecule of the inclusion complex is preferably cyclodextrin. Cyclodextrins are, for example, glucopyranose subunits described in US Pat. No. 3,426,011 and commonly assigned US Pat. No. 5,144,964, each incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. It is a cyclic oligosaccharide containing units. The inclusion complex is formed when the flavoring material is mixed with a selected cyclodextrin in solution. The flavoring agent stays in the ring structure of cyclodextrin. Cyclodextrins and flavors are usually co-precipitated, filtered and dried.

  Alpha cyclodextrin, beta cyclodextrin, and gamma cyclodextrin contain 6, 7, and 8 glucopyranose subunits, respectively. In a preferred embodiment, the inclusion complex desirably contains a wide variety of guest molecules and comprises readily available beta cyclodextrins. Betacyclodextrin has a linked subunit ring structure with a three-dimensional torus configuration including a hydrophobic cavity with a diameter of 7.5 angstroms and hydrophilic upper and lower edges.

  The minimum temperature at which the inclusion complex comprising cyclodextrin releases flavoring is preferably at least about 60 ° C., such as from about 60 ° C. to about 125 ° C. By incorporating the flavoring agent into the inclusion complex, the flavoring agent can be protected from exposure to undesired substances in the cigarette and until the flavoring release additive is heated to the flavoring release temperature during cigarette smoking, It is preferred that the release and / or migration of flavors to the atmosphere is minimized.

  The inclusion complex is preferably in powder form. The maximum size of the powder is preferably less than about 200 microns.

  Inclusion complexes can be made by forming an aqueous solution of beta cyclodextrin and flavoring. The inclusion complex can be recovered from the solution in powder form. However, the solution can be applied directly to one or more selected locations of one or more components of the electrically heated cigarette by any suitable process. The inclusion complex powder can alternatively be used to form a solution or suspension. Inclusion complexes can be applied by coating processes such as slurry coating, spraying, dipping, electrostatic deposition, printing wheel application, gravure printing, ink jet application, and the like. In a preferred embodiment, a solution, suspension, or slurry comprising cyclodextrin and flavoring is prepared and applied as a coating to selected surfaces of selected components of an electrically heated cigarette. An exemplary process that can be used to add an inclusion complex to an electrically heated cigarette is described in commonly assigned US Pat. No. 5,144,964, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. ing.

  The electrically heated cigarette 23 preferably includes an amount of inclusion complex that provides the desired amount of flavoring in the cigarette. In a preferred embodiment, the electrically heated cigarette comprises up to about 15%, more preferably less than about 8% inclusion complex, based on the weight of the outer wrap or mat. For example, if an inclusion complex is applied to the mat, the weight of the mat is preferably based on the weight of the amount of inclusion complex applied to the mat. When inclusion complexes are applied to the mat and outer wrap, the total weight of the mat and outer wrap is preferably based on the weight of the amount of inclusion complex applied to the mat and outer wrap. The weight percent of the inclusion complex applied to the mat and / or the outer wrap may be the same or different. In a preferred embodiment, the cigarette contains about 1 mg to about 50 mg of flavoring.

  In a preferred embodiment, the inclusion complex is placed in at least one location of the electrically heated cigarette 23 that reaches at least the lowest temperature at which flavoring is released from the cigarette inclusion complex during smoking. For example, the inclusion complex can be disposed on the inner wrap 84, the mat 66, and / or the outer wrap 71.

  In another preferred embodiment, the electrically heated cigarette comprises two or more different types of flavoring release additives such as beads and films and / or inclusion complexes, each flavoring release additive comprising: Has different flavor release temperatures. Different flavorant release additives are incorporated at two or more locations within the same electrically heated cigarette that reach different temperatures during smoking to allow for more controlled release of the flavorant during smoking. Can do.

  4 and 5 show a preferred embodiment of an electric smoking system in which a preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette can be used. However, it should be understood that the preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette can be used in other configurations of an electric smoking system, such as a different electrical lighter configuration. The electric smoking system 21 includes an electrically heated cigarette 23 and a reusable lighter 25. The cigarette 23 is configured to be inserted into and removed from the cigarette receiver 27 that opens at the front end 29 of the lighter 25. When the cigarette 23 is inserted, the smoking system 21 is used in the same way as a conventional cigarette, but it is not necessary to ignite or smolder the cigarette 23. The cigarette 23 is discarded after smoking.

  Preferably, each cigarette is smoked at least a total of 8 times per smoke (smoking cycle). However, the cigarette 23 can be configured to provide less or more total smoke absorption available.

  The lighter 25 includes a housing 31 having front and rear housing portions 33 and 35, respectively. A power source 35 a, such as one or more batteries, is disposed within the rear housing portion 35 and supplies energy to the heater fixture 39. The heater fixture 39 includes a plurality of electrical resistance heating elements 37 (FIG. 6). The heating element 37 is disposed in the front housing portion 33 and is configured to slide the cigarette 23 to receive it. A stop 183 disposed within the heater fixture 39 defines the end of the cigarette receiver 27 (FIG. 2).

  The control circuitry 41 in the front housing portion 33 selectively establishes electrical communication between the power source 35a and one or more of the heating elements 37 during each smoke cycle.

  The rear housing portion 35 of the housing 31 is configured to open and close to facilitate replacement of the power source 35a. Preferably, the front housing part 33 is removably attached to the rear housing part 35 by mechanical engagement.

  Referring to FIG. 5, in a preferred embodiment, the control circuitry 41 is triggered by a smoke evacuation activation sensor 45, which detects either the change in pressure or the change in air flow that occurs when the smoker begins to draw cigarettes. Sensitive to crab. The smoke absorption sensor 45 is preferably disposed in the front housing portion 33 of the lighter 25 and communicates with the space inside the heater fixture 39 via a port 45 a extending through the side wall portion 182 of the heater fixture 39. When the sensor 45 is activated, the control circuitry 41 causes current to flow through the appropriate one of the heating elements 37.

  In a preferred embodiment, an indicator 51 is provided at a position along the outside of the lighter 25 to visually display the number of smoke absorption remaining in the cigarette 23 or other selected information. Indicator 51 preferably includes a liquid crystal display. In the preferred embodiment, indicator 51 displays the image selected when cigarette detector 57 detects the presence of cigarette in heater fixture 39. Cigarette detector 57 may include any device that senses the presence of an electrically heated cigarette. For example, the cigarette detector 57 can include an induction coil 1102 adjacent to the cigarette receiver 27 of the heater fixture 39, and a lead 1104 that connects the induction coil 1102 and the oscillator circuit in the control circuitry 41. In such a case, the cigarette 23 should include a metal element (not shown), which will cause the cigarette detector 57 to be present in the cigarette whenever a suitable cigarette 23 is inserted into the cigarette receiver 27. The inductance of the coil winding 1102 is affected so as to generate a signal indicating Control circuitry 41 provides a signal to indicator 51. When cigarette 23 is removed from lighter 25, cigarette detector 57 no longer detects the presence of cigarette 23 and indicator 51 is turned off.

  The heater fixture 39 supports the inserted cigarette 23 so that the heating element 37 is arranged in parallel to the cigarette 23 at approximately the same position for each newly inserted cigarette 23. Fix to the heating element 37. In a preferred embodiment, the heater fixture 39 includes eight heater elements 37 that are parallel to each other, and these heater elements are arranged coaxially about the axis of symmetry of the cigarette receiver 27. The position where the fully inserted cigarette 23 and each heating element 37 contact is referred to herein as the heater footprint or carbonization zone 42.

  As shown in FIG. 6, each heating element 37 preferably includes at least first and second serpentine elongated members 53 a and 53 b adjacent to the tip 54. The heater portions 53a, 53b, and 54 form a heater blade 120. The tip 54 is adjacent to the opening 55 of the cigarette receiver 27. Both end portions 56 a and 56 b of each heater element 37 are electrically connected to both electrodes of the power source 35 a so as to be selectively operated by the control device 41. The electrical path through each heating element 37 passes through the terminal pin 104, the connection part 121 between the terminal pin 104 and one free end part 56a of the meandering member 53a, and the other through at least a part of the tip part 54, respectively. The serpentine member 53b and its end portion 56b are established. Preferably, the connection ring 110 forms a common electrical connection to each of the ends 56b. In a preferred embodiment, the ring 110 is connected to the positive electrode of the power source 35 a through a connection 123 between the ring 110 and the pin 105.

  Preferably, the heating elements 37 are individually energized by the power source 35a under the control of the control circuit configuration 41, and heat the cigarette 23 preferably 8 times at spaced positions near the periphery of the cigarette 23. This heating allows for eight smoking cycles from cigarette 23, as is usually done with conventional cigarette smoking. It may be preferable to activate more than one heating element at the same time for one or more of the smoke absorptions or for all the smoke absorptions.

  The heater fixture 39 includes an air inlet port 1200 through which air is drawn into the lighter. When air enters the lighter and the smoke sensor 45 is activated to recognize the start of smoke absorption, a pressure drop is caused. The range of induced pressure drops is selected to be within the range of pressure drops detectable by the pressure sensor 45.

  The length of the tobacco plug 80 and its relative position along the tobacco rod 60 is preferably selected based on the configuration and position of the heating element 37 of the electric smoking system 21. When the cigarette 23 is properly positioned against the stop 182 (FIG. 2) in the lighter of the electric smoking system, a portion of each heating element contacts the tobacco rod 60. This contact area is referred to as the heater footprint 95 and is the area of the tobacco rod 60 where the heating element 37 is expected to reach a sufficiently high temperature to allow cigarette smoking without burning cigarette paper, mats or tobacco. It is. The heater footprint 95 can be placed along the tobacco rod 60 at an equal distance 96 from the free end 78 of the tobacco rod 60 for all cigarettes 23 fully inserted into the lighter 25.

  Preferably, the length of the cigarette 23 cigarette plug 80, the length of the heater footprint 95, and the distance between the heater footprint 95 and the stop 182 are such that the heater footprint extends beyond the cigarette plug 80 and the air gap 91 Is selected so as to overlap a part of the distance 98. The distance 98 is also referred to as the “heater gap outer wrap” 98. The distance over which the remainder of the heater footprint 95 overlaps the plug 80 is referred to as the “heater filler outer wrap” 99.

  The length of gap 91 and tobacco plug 80 and the distribution of perforations 263 can be adjusted to adjust the smoking characteristics of cigarette 23, including adjustment of flavor, aspiration, and delivery. The pattern of holes 263, the length of the gap 90, and the amount of heater filler outer wrap 99 (and heater gap outer wrap 98) also adjust the immediacy of response to facilitate delivery consistency. Can be controlled.

  The electrically heated cigarette according to the preferred embodiment has advantages. By encapsulating one or more additive flavors, especially volatile flavors, the flavors can be retained in the tobacco until smoked. In addition, the flavoring is preferably temperature released in a controlled manner during smoking, thus providing the smoker with the improved intrinsic properties of cigarettes. Preferably, the deactivation of the adsorbent in the tobacco is minimized because the flavoring agent can be retained in the flavoring release additive until the cigarette is smoked. As a result, the adsorbent maintains the function of removing selected gas phase components from mainstream smoke.

  Preferably, the adsorbent comprises crepe carbon paper adjacent to the mouthpiece plug. In a preferred cigarette, a polypropylene sleeve is provided around the crepe carbon paper to prevent volatile flavors from moving between cigarettes and desorbing the adsorbent while the cigarette is stored in a cigarette pack. . When carbon paper is placed in a cellulose acetate tube, the carbon activity level may be reduced by triacitin or triacetin adsorption by the carbon. Carbon paper is sold by Schweitzer-Muduit, and filter plugs including polypropylene sleeves and carbon paper are available from Filtrona. An electrically heated cigarette containing an adsorbent with crepe carbon paper in a polypropylene sleeve placed in the cigarette filter exhibits desirable suction resistance (RTD).

  FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate another preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette 23 that includes a filter 150. The filter 150 includes an adsorbent in the form of crepe carbon paper and a polypropylene sleeve 154 surrounding the crepe carbon paper. In FIG. 7, the free flow filter 74 contacts (ie, abuts) the free flow filter 92, the free flow filter 92 contacts (ie, abuts), and the filter 150 includes the mouthpiece filter plug 94. In contact with (ie, contact). Alternatively, in FIG. 8, the free flow filter 74 contacts (or abuts) a solid segment 151 similar to the mouthpiece filter plug 94, and the solid segment 151 contacts (or abuts) the filter 150. 150 is in contact with (ie, in contact with) the mouthpiece filter plug 94.

  In one embodiment, the flavor release additive is placed in a tobacco mat surrounding the tobacco plug. The tobacco plug is preferably free of flavoring-release additives, which makes it possible to produce cigarettes with the same blend of tobacco within the tobacco plug in menthol or non-menthol cigarettes. Having a flavor within the tobacco mat preferably allows for more efficient delivery of flavor during smoking and more rapid delivery of flavor at the beginning of smoke absorption. As described in commonly assigned US Pat. No. 5,692,525, the length of the tobacco plug, air gap, and heater filler outer wrap provides the desired flavor, suction, and delivery and immediate response. Can be adjusted to provide gender and / or delivery consistency.

  Also, capsulating the flavor in the matrix of the tobacco mat reduces the migration of volatile flavors such as menthol from the tobacco rod to the carbon holding portion of the filter. Thus, the carbon activity level increases the shelf life and improves the maintenance of that activity level.

  The menthol flavor is preferably provided in the form of a temperature sensitive powder, such as a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. By using additive materials in the form of temperature sensitive powders such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powders, the additive materials can be stored with reduced mobility properties and pre-set stimulating effects such as heating Can be controllably released when is added. Thus, additive materials in temperature sensitive powders such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powders reduce the level of evaporation and migration over time in smoking articles due to the properties obtained by using temperature sensitive powders. be able to. Suitable menthol-containing powders are available from Mane SA, located in Le Bar Sur Loop, France.

  In a multi-stage drying (MSD) process, the additive material is generally formed by multi-stage spray drying, fluid bed drying, and / or belt drying to form a multi-stage drying (MSD) powder. In order to maintain the effectiveness of the additive material, drying is performed at a low temperature, in which case this temperature is effective for drying but does not adversely affect the additive material being dried. For example, when the multistage dry (MSD) powder contains a flavoring agent, the drying temperature used in making the multistage dry (MSD) powder is lower than the volatilization temperature of the flavorant. For example, a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder containing a flavoring agent can be dried in multiple stages at a temperature such as 20-50 ° C, 50-100 ° C, 100-150 ° C, or 150-200 ° C.

  Also, if spray drying is utilized, for example, the additive material can be atomized from a liquid source to a spray of droplets where the droplets are combined with the first temperature dry air in the processing chamber. It can be placed in contact to remove moisture. The droplets can then be further dried in a second temperature dry air to form a dry temperature sensitive powder. Preferably, the second temperature is lower than the first temperature, but still warm enough to provide effective drying characteristics. For example, an additive material such as menthol having a volatilization temperature of about 250 ° F. (121 ° C.) is sprayed onto the substrate and then passed through a tunnel dryer at 200 ° F. (93.3 ° C.) for a large amount of liquid. The portion can be evaporated and then air dried at room temperature to form the final temperature sensitive powder.

  Since the powder is temperature sensitive, the additive material can be contained until the temperature changes as in the case of heating, and the movement of the additive material can be reduced. For example, the flavor additive in the temperature sensitive powder within the cigarette may encapsulate the flavor and / or adsorbent, etc., until a sufficient amount of heat is applied to release the flavor from the temperature sensitive powder. Can be used to isolate from other parts of the cigarette.

  As a result, temperature sensitive powders can be used effectively in smoking articles that contain an adsorbent and in which the additive material should otherwise be adsorbed by the adsorbent. By using a temperature sensitive powder, the additive material is not released during storage, but can be released during cigarette smoking, and the additive material can also alter the cigarette smoke characteristics.

  The use of additive materials such as flavors within temperature sensitive powders such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powders in smoking articles is particularly advantageous in cigarettes containing adsorbents. By using a temperature sensitive powder such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powder in a cigarette containing an adsorbent, adsorption of the additive material in the temperature sensitive powder by the adsorbent is substantially prevented and the additive material is controlled. Can be released.

  Although any temperature sensitive powder that can controllably release additive material is contemplated herein, the term “multi-stage dry (MSD) powder” is used to describe the temperature sensitive powder for purposes of illustration. I will decide. However, it should also be understood that multi-stage dry (MSD) powder is a preferred temperature sensitive powder due to its ease of manufacture and completeness.

  The term “temperature sensitivity” is used herein to mean a temperature controlled response by a powder. For example, as used herein, a temperature sensitive powder that includes an additive material releases the additive material when a preset amount of heat is applied to release additive properties from the temperature sensitive powder.

  The terms “releasably disposed” or “controllably released” as used herein means the inclusion of additive material properties in a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder form and the controlled release of additive material properties. Used to do. In multi-stage dry (MSD) powder form, the additive material is included to a degree sufficient to substantially avoid or minimize undesired migration during, for example, storage of smoking articles with multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. It is. The term also includes, but is not limited to, migration sufficient to controllably release additive material in the form of multi-stage dry (MSD) powder when, for example, the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder is heated or burned. Including what is possible.

  Multi-stage dry (MSD) powder is a temperature sensitive powder as described above, in which case the additive material is released from the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder by melting the powder or other thermal interaction with the powder. Can do. The temperature sensitive properties of the additive material and other components of the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder allow the additive material to be controllably released by heat. For example, when liquid menthol is incorporated into a multistage dry (MSD) powder, where starch is used to form a multistage dry (MSD) powder in combination with a multistage dry (MSD) process, the temperature at which the menthol liquefies is: The critical temperature for releasing menthol from multi-stage dry (MSD) powder (by melting).

  Multi-stage dry (MSD) powders are preferably incorporated into tobacco mats to provide an encapsulated flavor with controlled release characteristics and low storage and transfer characteristics.

  Multi-stage dry (MSD) powders allow controlled release of additive materials in addition to additive materials, possibly promoting, or affecting the properties of additive materials or multi-stage dry (MSD) powders during heating or combustion. Can include any material that will be. For example, multi-stage dry (MSD) powders can include spray-driable products, preferably spray-driable products for food products such as starch, sorbitol, maltodextrin or the like. The product can encapsulate additive materials such as menthol, but does not significantly alter the desired properties such as menthol flavor in the additive material.

  Multi-stage dry (MSD) powder can be produced by any suitable multi-stage dry (MSD) powder production method, such as spray drying, fluid bed drying, and / or belt drying, where drying is a drying To produce the additive material in powder form, it is carried out at a temperature below the melting or volatilization level of the additive material and / or multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. If excessively high temperatures are used, the additive material and / or multi-stage dry (MSD) powder will melt or volatilize during processing, resulting in a mass of multi-stage dry (MSD) powder or multi-stage dry (MSD) powder form May cause the release of additive material from.

  Multi-stage dry (MSD) powder with additive materials inside is formed by a multi-stage drying process. In an exemplary multi-stage drying process, the additive material is provided in liquid form and is then sprayed into heated air at a first temperature via a pressure nozzle or rotary atomizer to form droplets where it is heated. The air removes excess liquid and forms semi-dry droplets. The semi-dried droplets are then sent to a secondary drying zone that is heated to a second temperature that is different from the first temperature, where the secondary drying zone removes excess liquid and the semi-dried droplets. Used to dry the drops into a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. In this way, liquid or viscous products such as liquid menthol (comprising emulsifiers and spray-driable products) can be converted into dry temperature-sensitive powders, here improving the properties of the liquid products Retention can be obtained.

  A preferred method of making a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder that results in encapsulated additive material includes liquefying the additive material and mixing the liquefied additive material with an emulsifier such as modified edible starch to form an emulsion. The additive material can be a liquid or viscous additive such as liquid menthol, or it can be a solid additive that can be liquefied by using solvents, heat, or other liquefaction methods.

  The emulsion can then be mixed with a powder such as maltodextrin and / or sorbitol or other spray-dryable medium, in which case the powder encapsulates an emulsion of additives and emulsifiers. The emulsion and powder mixture can then be sprayed and dried. Drying is preferably performed in two stages. Initially, the spray mixture can be sprayed through a heated air dryer at a first temperature to remove most of the liquid. The sprayed mixture can then be dried at a second temperature and the remaining liquid removed from the powder. Preferably, the first temperature is higher than the second temperature to alleviate any damage that may be caused by prolonged exposure to high temperatures and to efficiently allow the final product to dry. is there. By using multiple temperature steps, the additive material can be encapsulated and dried in multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, where the additive material is releasably disposed in the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder.

  The tobacco mat is preferably formed by forming a base web using a papermaking type process and simultaneously or subsequently adding tobacco flavoring material onto the base web. In the first part of the process, the tobacco strip is washed with water and the soluble material is recovered for use in a subsequent coating step. The remaining (extracted) tobacco fibers are used in the preparation of the slurry used in the web / paper forming process to form the base web. To reinforce the base web, the carbon fibers can be added to the slurry by dispersing the carbon fiber stock in water and adding, for example, sodium alginate to facilitate the dispersion. The carbon fiber dispersion is then (optionally) added to the tobacco-fiber slurry (optionally) along with conventional flavors. Any other hydrocolloid that can be added in place of sodium alginate, preferably as long as it does not interfere with the flavored tobacco response, is water soluble and has an appropriate molecular weight to impart strength to the tobacco mat. The resulting mixture is then wet deposited on a conventional paper machine Ford linear wire or the like (such as a steel belt) to form a base web. The soluble material previously removed by washing the tobacco strip is mixed with the ground tobacco, and this mixture is passed over a Fordrinier wire and a standard drum placed behind a drum or Yankee dryer. A reverse roll coater is preferably used to coat on one side of the base web. The ratio of tobacco soluble material to tobacco dust or particles in the additive slurry is preferably set to a value between about 1: 1 and 20: 1, preferably 4: 1 or close. The additive slurry can also be cast or extruded onto the base web. Alternatively, the coating process can be performed off-line separately from the production of the base web. The flavoring agents conventionally used in the tobacco industry are preferably added during or after the coating stage. In order to improve the coating properties of the slurry, pectin or other hydrocolloid is preferably added in the range of 0.1 to 2.0% by weight of the tobacco mat.

  Provided is a preferred method of incorporating a flavor release additive, such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, into a tobacco mat, wherein the tobacco mat is layered on the tobacco mat in a flavor release addition, such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. Release is controlled when cigarettes containing objects and incorporating tobacco mats are smoked. A preferred method is by forming a base web and then applying a slurry consisting of a flavoring release additive such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powder and a liquid such as water, preferably onto a base web containing powdered tobacco. Forming a tobacco mat. The slurry can be spread on a tobacco mat. Finally, the slurry can be dried by exposure to ambient air, or it can be dried by heating the slurry, in which case the temperature of the applied heat depends on the additive material in the flavor release additive. Is an effective temperature that does not melt or volatilize.

  A slurry of a flavor release additive, such as multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, and a liquid is a base so that the amount of time the flavor release additive is included in the slurry is minimized to avoid volatilization of the additive. It is preferably prepared just before application on the web. More generally, the heat activated flavor release agent is preferably low in water solubility to be compatible with the process of manufacturing the tobacco mat or incorporating the flavor release agent into the tobacco mat. The temperature of the slurry is preferably maintained at a suitable temperature, such as 80 ° F. to 100 ° F. (26.6 ° C. to 37.8 ° C.), or about 90 ° F. (32.2 ° C.) Prevent crystallization of additive materials such as menthol and volatilization of additive materials at high temperatures.

  In addition, glycerin, pectin, and tobacco dust can also be used in wet slurries for structural and appearance purposes, in which case the slurry is spread using a doctor knife (blade) and spread onto a tobacco mat. A relatively uniform thickness can be provided.

  Also provided is a preferred method of forming an encapsulated film on a tobacco mat that includes multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, where the film allows additive material in the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder to migrate into the smoking article. Further reduction is possible. By providing a film, the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder is isolated from other parts of the smoking article or other smoking articles when packaged together, and any mutual between the additive material and the other part of the smoking article. The effect can be reduced. A preferred method involves forming a tobacco mat and then spraying the film onto the mat using a spray nozzle, where the temperature of the film in the spray nozzle is between 120 ° F. and 160 ° F. ( 48.9 ° C. to 71.1 ° C.), more preferably about 140 ° F. (60 ° C.). The film can then be placed in a dryer to facilitate and complete drying, where the temperature in the dryer does not melt, burn, or adversely affect the film or multi-stage dry (MSD) powder.

  A preferred embodiment is provided for forming a cigarette with a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, where the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder can control the release of additive material to the cigarette during cigarette smoking. A preferred method includes crushing tobacco and removing tobacco liquid, also known as concentrated extract (CEL). The remaining tobacco solids can then be mixed with cellulose or the like to form a base web. A slurry comprising multi-stage dry (MSD) powder, CEL, glycerin, and / or pectin can then be formed on the base web to form a multi-stage dry (MSD) powder layer on the base web.

  Next, an optional layer of tobacco dust, such as additional tobacco flavoring, can be applied and spread across the base web on the slurry to further enhance aesthetics, in which case the base web and slurry are later Can be dried. Finally, preferably a carrageenan film or other relatively non-flavored heat-reactive food film is formed on a dried base web having a dried slurry layer to produce multi-stage dried (MSD) powder, CEL, glycerin, And / or sealing the slurry component containing pectin under the film can prevent migration of any part of the base web or slurry containing multi-stage dry (MSD) powder.

  A preferred embodiment is provided for making a tobacco mat comprising multi-stage dry (MSD) powder for cigarettes, wherein the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder can releasably place tobacco smoke flavor components into the tobacco mat. become. A preferred method involves forming a tobacco mat incorporating the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder by mixing the multi-stage dry (MSD) powder with tobacco and then forming a tobacco mat from the mixture. Preferably, the tobacco is ground or reconstituted reduced tobacco so that the tobacco and multi-stage dry (MSD) powder are miscible before forming the tobacco mat from the tobacco and multi-stage dry (MSD) powder. Is preferred.

  Preferably, the tobacco mat is formed such that the width of the formed tobacco mat is greater than the width of the tobacco mat used in the cigarette. For example, the tobacco mat can be formed to a width of about 12-18 inches (30.5-45.7 cm).

  Furthermore, a spray nozzle can be used to optionally spray the film onto the tobacco mat, in which case the film is preferably heated to liquefy the film material. For example, if carrageenan is used for the film, the carrageenan is between about 120 ° F. and 160 ° F. (48.9 ° C. to 71.1 ° C.), more preferably about 140 ° F. (60 ° C.). To a desired spray viscosity. The film can then be dried in ambient air, or a dryer or vacuum may be used to enhance the drying process.

  After the tobacco mat is formed (after the film is formed if necessary), the tobacco mat can be slit or cut to a size for use with smoking articles. For example, if the tobacco mat is to be used with a non-conventional standard size cigarette, such as a cigarette used in an electrically heated cigarette smoking system, a cigarette mat width of about 23.2 mm is desirable. become.

  Another method is also provided for forming a film on a cigarette mat comprising multistage dry (MSD) powder for cigarettes, where the drying process for the film is part of the cigarette mat winding process. A preferred method involves forming a first bobbin of a tobacco mat containing multi-stage dry (MSD) powder before forming a film thereon. The tobacco mat from the first bobbin can then be unwound from the first bobbin to the second bobbin and wound on the second bobbin for later incorporation into the cigarette. Between the first bobbin and the second bobbin, the film can be attached to the tobacco mat as the tobacco mat moves from the first bobbin to the second bobbin. Preferably, the first bobbin is located a distance from the second bobbin, where this distance allows the film to dry before being wound on the second bobbin.

  Preferably, the film is applied on the tobacco mat in the form of several lines, where the surface tension causes the film to spread over the entire surface of the tobacco mat. Optionally, the film and tobacco mat can be heated to dry the film while the cigarette mat is wound thereon toward the second bobbin, but the first bobbin and second The distance between the first bobbin and the second bobbin is preferably an effective distance that allows the film to be dried between the first bobbin and the second bobbin without using heating. For example, an effective distance for drying a carrageenan film on a tobacco mat about 16 inches (40.6 cm) wide is about 33 feet between a first bobbin roll and a second bobbin roll. (10 m).

  Similarly, inclusion complexes containing beta-cyclodextrin for non-menthol cigarettes, for example, are incorporated into tobacco mats as described above to provide an encapsulated flavor with controlled release characteristics and reduced transport characteristics during storage. Preferably it is provided.

  The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, while the invention has been illustrated and described in accordance with various preferred embodiments, it will be appreciated that modifications and changes can be made to the present invention without departing from the invention as set forth in the claims.

FIG. 2 shows a preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette used in an electrically heated smoking system with no partially assembled tobacco. It is a figure which shows the assembled state of the electric heating cigarette shown in FIG. 1 of the state which the one end of a tobacco is contacting the stop part of the electric lighter of an electric smoking system. FIG. 5 shows another preferred embodiment of an electrically heated cigarette used in an electrically heated smoking system with no tobacco partially assembled. 1 shows a preferred embodiment of an electric smoking system with an electrically heated cigarette inserted into an electric lighter. FIG. It is a figure which shows the electric smoking system shown in FIG. 4 in the state where the cigarette was pulled out from the lighter. It is a figure which shows the heater attachment tool of an electric smoking system.

Claims (7)

  1. An electrically heated cigarette for an electric smoking system,
    At least one adsorbent;
    A flavor release agent comprising at least one flavor;
    The at least one flavorant can be released in the electrically heated cigarette when heated to at least a minimum temperature;
    An electrically heated cigarette, wherein the adsorbent comprises crepe carbon paper, and the crepe carbon paper is disposed within a polypropylene sleeve disposed within a filter of the electrically heated cigarette.
  2.   The electrically heated cigarette of claim 1, wherein the flavoring release additive is disposed in a tobacco mat surrounding a tobacco plug.
  3.   The electrically heated cigarette according to claim 2, wherein the tobacco plug does not have a flavor release additive.
  4.   4. The electrically heated cigarette of claim 3, wherein the flavoring release additive has an inclusion complex comprising beta cyclodextrin incorporated into the tobacco mat.
  5.   The electrically heated cigarette according to claim 4, wherein the flavor release additive includes a non-menthol flavor.
  6.   The electrically heated cigarette according to claim 2, wherein the flavor release additive comprises a multi-stage dry powder incorporated in the tobacco mat.
  7.   The electrically heated cigarette according to claim 6, wherein the flavorant releasing additive includes a menthol flavorant.
JP2007539654A 2002-10-31 2005-11-02 Electric heating cigarette with controlled release flavor Active JP4762247B2 (en)

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US10/979,103 US20050172976A1 (en) 2002-10-31 2004-11-02 Electrically heated cigarette including controlled-release flavoring
US10/979,103 2004-11-02
PCT/IB2005/003617 WO2006048774A1 (en) 2004-11-02 2005-11-02 Electrically heated cigarette including controlled-release flavoring

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CN101043827A (en) 2007-09-26
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AT444002T (en) 2009-10-15
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KR101280736B1 (en) 2013-07-01
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IL181939D0 (en) 2007-07-04
UA92474C2 (en) 2010-11-10
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US20050172976A1 (en) 2005-08-11
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KR20070073962A (en) 2007-07-10
EA012169B1 (en) 2009-08-28

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