JP4574172B2 - Floor board, flooring system, and manufacturing method and installation method thereof - Google Patents

Floor board, flooring system, and manufacturing method and installation method thereof Download PDF

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JP4574172B2
JP4574172B2 JP2003586439A JP2003586439A JP4574172B2 JP 4574172 B2 JP4574172 B2 JP 4574172B2 JP 2003586439 A JP2003586439 A JP 2003586439A JP 2003586439 A JP2003586439 A JP 2003586439A JP 4574172 B2 JP4574172 B2 JP 4574172B2
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floor
floorboard
floor board
board
edge
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JP2005523394A (en
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ダルコ、ペルバン
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ベーリンゲ、イノベイション、アクチボラグVaelinge Innovation Ab
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Priority to SE0201225A priority Critical patent/SE522250C2/en
Priority to SE0203482A priority patent/SE526773C2/en
Application filed by ベーリンゲ、イノベイション、アクチボラグVaelinge Innovation Ab filed Critical ベーリンゲ、イノベイション、アクチボラグVaelinge Innovation Ab
Priority to PCT/SE2003/000641 priority patent/WO2003089736A1/en
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44CPRODUCING DECORATIVE EFFECTS; MOSAICS; TARSIA WORK; PAPERHANGING
    • B44C5/00Processes for producing special ornamental bodies
    • B44C5/04Ornamental plaques, e.g. decorative panels, decorative veneers
    • B44C5/043Ornamental plaques, e.g. decorative panels, decorative veneers containing wooden elements
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B44DECORATIVE ARTS
    • B44FSPECIAL DESIGNS OR PICTURES
    • B44F3/00Designs characterised by outlines
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/02005Construction of joints, e.g. dividing strips
    • E04F15/02033Joints with beveled or recessed upper edges
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F21/00Implements for finishing work on buildings
    • E04F21/20Implements for finishing work on buildings for laying flooring
    • E04F21/22Implements for finishing work on buildings for laying flooring of single elements, e.g. flooring cramps ; flexible webs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/01Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship
    • E04F2201/0107Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by moving the sheets, plates or panels substantially in their own plane, perpendicular to the abutting edges
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/01Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship
    • E04F2201/0107Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by moving the sheets, plates or panels substantially in their own plane, perpendicular to the abutting edges
    • E04F2201/0115Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by moving the sheets, plates or panels substantially in their own plane, perpendicular to the abutting edges with snap action of the edge connectors
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/01Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship
    • E04F2201/0153Joining sheets, plates or panels with edges in abutting relationship by rotating the sheets, plates or panels around an axis which is parallel to the abutting edges, possibly combined with a sliding movement
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/05Separate connectors or inserts, e.g. pegs, pins, keys or strips
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/05Separate connectors or inserts, e.g. pegs, pins, keys or strips
    • E04F2201/0511Strips or bars, e.g. nailing strips
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/05Separate connectors or inserts, e.g. pegs, pins, keys or strips
    • E04F2201/0523Separate tongues; Interlocking keys, e.g. joining mouldings of circular, square or rectangular shape

Description

  The present invention relates generally to the field of floorboards. The present invention relates to floorboards that can be mechanically joined in various patterns to resemble traditional parquet flooring including blocks. The present invention further relates to a floorboard laying method and manufacturing method. The present invention is particularly suitable for use in floating flooring, including floorboards having a laminate surface. The floorboards are joined with a mechanical locking system of a type that is integral with the floorboard, for example not entirely made of a floorboard core. However, the present invention is applicable to other similar floorboards, such as floorboards having a surface layer made of wood or plastic and floatingly joined by an optional mechanical joining system.

  The present invention is particularly suitable for use in a floating laminate flooring with a mechanical joining system. These types of flooring usually include a surface layer, a core, and a balancing layer made of laminate, and are perpendicular along both the long and short sides mechanically, i.e. without the use of adhesives. And it is formed as a rectangular floorboard that is adapted to be joined in the horizontal direction.

  Accordingly, the following description of the prior art, known system problems, and objects and features of the present invention is, by way of non-limiting example, specifically focused on this field of application. However, it should be emphasized that the present invention can be used with any floorboard that has been joined in various patterns by a mechanical joining system. The present invention thus provides a homogeneous wooden flooring and a wooden flooring comprising several layers, a wood fiber or plastic core, and a surface made of printed or plastic, cork, needle felt, etc. It can also be applied to flooring.

  The parquet flooring has been originally performed by laying blocks of appropriate shapes and sizes in various patterns and bonding them to an underlaying floor. In this case, the floor is usually ground to obtain a uniform floor surface and is finished using, for example, varnish or oil. The traditional parquet block by this technique is not provided with any locking means. This is because these blocks are fixed to the subfloor by adhesion. The main drawback of such flooring is that it is very difficult to install. The main advantage is that it can be laid in a complex and attractive pattern due to the lack of locking means.

  According to another known method, the block is grooved over all its edges. In this case, when the block is laid on the underfloor by bonding, the tongue is inserted into the groove at a required position. Thus, this provides a floor in which the blocks are locked vertically to each other by means of tongues engaged with the grooves of two adjacent blocks. The surface becomes smooth and the block can thus deliver a block with a finished varnished surface. Horizontal joints are nailed or glued to the subfloor.

  Traditional parquet blocks are rectangular, usually about 7 x 40 cm. The advantages of the above-mentioned flooring are that the blocks are in an attractive pattern, for example in a diamond pattern in parallel rows with the short sides staggered from each other, or in a herringbone pattern in which the long side of the block is joined to the short side. It can be laid. The disadvantage of such flooring is, among other things, that it is complicated and expensive to install and manufacture. Such flooring cannot move relative to the subfloor. When the blocks contract or expand due to changes in relative humidity (RH), an undesirable gap occurs between the blocks.

  In order to solve these problems, wooden floating flooring was first developed. Such flooring is made of a fairly large floorboard, for example 20 cm wide and 120 cm to 240 cm long. The surface is generally made of parquet blocks joined in parallel rows. Such a floor board can be installed easily because a plurality of blocks can be joined simultaneously. The main drawback is that it cannot provide the latest patterns. Later, floating laminate flooring was developed. This is basically a replica of a wooden floating flooring, except that a decorative surface layer made of a printed impregnated paper sheet is laminated to a wood fiber core. Such floorboards are less expensive than wooden floors and have wear and impact resistant surfaces. These types of floating floorboards are joined on their existing subfloor only at their joint edges, i.e. without gluing. Existing subfloors need not be highly smooth or flat. The irregularities are eliminated by an underlay material, for example in the form of a hardboard, cork or foam. Thus, such irregularities do not exist on the subfloor. When the relative humidity changes, the front edge of the floor swells and contracts. The advantage of a floating flooring, for example with a wooden or laminate surface, is that the joint between the floorboards is tight and the change in size is hidden under the baseboard. Such floorboards can be laid more quickly and reasonably manufactured because the surface is much larger than the block. Traditionally, such floating laminates and wooden flooring are usually glued with adhesive on the long side and short side (ie, tongue and adjoining on one floorboard). Are joined by tongue grooves provided on the floor board). In laying, the boards are horizontally aligned with each other, and the protruding tongue along the joining edge of one floor board is inserted into the tongue groove along the joining edge of the adjacent board. Using the same method on the long and short sides, the boards are generally laid in parallel rows with the long side on the long side and the short side on the short side.

  In addition to such conventional floating flooring, which is joined by an adhesive tongue, in recent years there is no need to use an adhesive, but instead it is mechanically joined by a mechanical locking system. Floorboards have been developed. These systems include locking means for locking the board in the horizontal and vertical directions. The mechanical locking system can be formed in one piece with the floorboard, for example by machining part of the core of the floorboard, for example by machining part of the core of the floorboard. In another aspect, a portion of the locking system can be formed of a separate material. This is integrated with the floorboard, i.e. possibly joined to the floorboard during factory production. The floorboards are joined, i.e. interconnected or locked together, by various combinations of tilting, snap-fit, and insertion along the joining edge in the locked position. The floorboards are joined one after another, ie when joining a new floorboard to the previous floorboard, the previous floorboard is connected to another floorboard with one long side and one short side.

  The main advantage of floating floorings with mechanical locking systems is that these floorings can be laid more easily and quickly with high precision by various combinations of inward tilting and / or snap-fits. In contrast to the glued floors, these floors can be easily removed and reused elsewhere.

  In the following description, the surface on which the installed floorboard can be seen is called “front side”, while the opposite side of the floorboard, that is, the side facing the underfloor is called “rear side”. The sheet-like starting material used in manufacturing is called the “core”. The core is coated with a surface layer closer to the front side and a balancing layer closer to the rear side and is divided into a “floor panel” or a plurality of floor panels as described above in subsequent operations. Forms a semi-finished product called “floor element”. When floor panels are machined along their edges to obtain a final shape with a joining system, they are called “floor boards”. The term “surface layer” is applied to the front side of the core and typically means all layers covering the entire front side of the floorboard. The term “decorative surface layer” means a layer that is primarily adapted to provide a decorative appearance to the floor. “Wear layer” mainly relates to a layer that has been adapted to improve the robustness of the front side. The term “laminate flooring” means a floorboard with a surface layer made of a thermosetting laminate comprising one or more paper sheets impregnated with a thermosetting resin. The wear layer of the laminate flooring generally comprises a transparent paper sheet with the addition of aluminum oxide and impregnated with melamine resin. The decorative layer includes a decorative sheet or paper impregnated with melamine.

  The outer part of the floorboard between the front side and the rear side at the edge of the floorboard is called the “joining edge”. In general, the joining edge has several “joining surfaces”. These joining surfaces may be a vertical surface, a horizontal surface, an inclined surface, a rounded surface, a surface on which removal is performed, and the like. These joining surfaces are formed in various materials, such as laminates, fiberboards, wood, plastics, metals (especially aluminum), or sealing materials. By the term “joining” or “locking system” is meant a cooperating connection means for connecting fiberboards in the vertical and / or horizontal direction. The term “mechanical locking system” means that joining in a horizontal direction parallel to the surface and joining in a direction perpendicular to the surface is performed without the use of an adhesive. The mechanical locking system can also be joined by an adhesive in many cases. The term “integrated” means that the locking system can be formed in one piece with the floorboard, or can be formed from a separate material that is factory connected to the floorboard. The term “floating floor” means a flooring formed of a floorboard where only the respective joining edges are joined and thus not bonded to the subfloor. When moved due to moisture, the joint is tightened. Moisture movement occurs along the walls hidden under the baseboard in the outer area of the floor. The term “parquet block” means a rectangular floorboard having the shape of a conventional parquet block or strip. The most common shape is about 40 × 7 cm. However, the parquet block may be 15 to 80 cm in length and 4 to 10 cm in width. The term “floor unit” means several floor boards that are joined together to form part of the flooring. The “length” and “width” of the floorboard generally mean the length and width of the front side.

  The size of the floorboard is, to a large extent, related to the floorboard material, edge machining, type of locking system, and floorboard installation.

  In general, it is advantageous to manufacture the floorboard in small size with hardwood. This is because the wood raw material can be used more efficiently by cutting out defects such as cracks and bumps.

  However, it is advantageous to produce floor boards of completely different types, in particular laminate floorings, in large sizes. This is because the raw materials are used better and the production costs are reduced. This is particularly desirable, for example, when manufacturing floorboards from large floor panels with printed artificial surfaces. In such a case, of course, it is desirable to reduce the number of times of sawing as much as possible.

  Machining the joint edges to form the floorboard is an expensive operation with all types of floor materials. It is well known that floors formed from large panels have a significant number of joints and are quite cost effective over floors made from many small panels. Furthermore, inconvenience arises when the floor panel is small. In particular, it is well known that floor boards are rectangular and narrow, thus creating problems with floors that have a large number of joints on the long sides of the narrow panels.

  Small floorboards with mechanical locking systems are more expensive to manufacture than similar panels with conventional tongue and groove systems. A mechanical locking system that can be locked at a high quality by tilting requires a large amount of material to form the locking system and is therefore generally more difficult to machine than a relatively compact snap system. Is also expensive and complex. Any type of mechanical locking system on the long side of the rectangular panel is generally more expensive to manufacture than any type of mechanical locking system on the short side.

  In general, a floor formed with a large panel can be installed more quickly than a floor formed with a small floor panel.

  WO 01/66877 discloses a system for providing a patterned flooring made of a laminate floorboard. Two embodiments are disclosed. The first embodiment (see FIGS. 4a and 4b) uses an integral locking system, and the second embodiment (see FIGS. 5 and 6) uses a separate joint profile. The floorboard is locked in a non-releasable manner in the vertical direction only by snap-fitting. The first integrated embodiment requires two different types of floorboards called “male” and “female”. Installation with a vertical snap fit is complex and there is a significant risk of damage to the edges or parts of the locking system during locking or unlocking. Furthermore, WO01 / 66877 is directed to a floor board having a size of 1200 mm × 200 mm.

  WO00 / 20705 discloses a system for locking laminated floorboards together with separate joint profiles that are connected to the floorboard when installed. The joint profile locks the floorboards together with a non-releasable snap fit. A specific purpose of WO 00/20705 is to reduce the amount of waste associated with the manufacture of floorboards, particularly with respect to the formation of mechanical locking systems.

  German patent DE 197 18 319 C2 discloses a hardwood parquet strip with a locking system along the long and short edges. This locking system is provided to lock the parquet strips together with other parquet strips in connection with laying. However, the parquet strips need to be glued and the purpose of the mechanical lock is to hold the floorboards together as the adhesive hardens. Mechanical locking is done only in the horizontal direction. The parquet strip has a length of 250 mm to 1000 mm and a width of 45 mm to 80 mm.

  For ease of understanding the description of the invention and the knowledge of the problems of the invention, reference is made to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 of the accompanying drawings for features and prior art associated with these specific sizes. Further details will be described below.

  The main part of all floating laminate floors (see FIG. 1a) is made of a rectangular floorboard 1 'having a length 4a of about 120 cm and a width 5a of about 20 cm. With the latest printing technology, it is possible to produce laminate floorings that are very accurate copies of various natural materials such as wood and stone in terms of appearance. The most common pattern is imitation of parquet flooring that includes block 40. These blocks are typically about 7 cm wide and 20 to 40 cm long. In general, a floorboard includes three parallel block rows whose short sides are staggered from each other. This means that at least one block 41 on the short side 5a, 5b of the floorboard is shorter than the other two blocks. When floorboards are joined (see b in FIG. 1), the appearance is unnatural compared to a true prior art parquet floor made of the same length of blocks with different short sides. This is also true for wooden floating floors.

  Another problem that leads to an unnatural appearance relates to manufacturing technology. This is shown in FIG. The laminate flooring is manufactured by a floor element 2 formed by laminating a printed melamine resin-impregnated decorative paper sheet on a wood fiber core. Next, the floor element 2 is sawn into several tens of floor panels 3. The floor board 1 is machined along the edges of these floor panels. Machining along the edges is accomplished by first machining the long sides 4a, 4b of the panel with machine 101 and then moving these panels to another machine 105 that machine the short side. Done. Associated with impregnation, the decorative paper swells in an uncontrolled manner. Manufacturing tolerances associated with swelling and laminating, sawing, and machining along the edges shift the block position from the desired position on various floorboards. When the two floor boards are joined together at their short sides, the blocks 41a, 41b are displaced laterally and their lengths vary significantly (see c in FIG. 1). All of these effects create significant manufacturing problems associated with the manufacture of laminate flooring with a three block parquet pattern.

  To solve these problems, many different methods have been used to control the manufacturing process when manufacturing laminate flooring. The most common method is to control manufacturing using a state-of-the-art camera that automatically measures and localizes semi-finished products during the manufacturing process. Furthermore, various patterns are formed by specially displacing the blocks so that wrinkles about the position do not appear as much as possible. In wooden flooring, blocks of different lengths and parallel displacements are used to hide the block with the short side cut off. None of the prior art methods yielded satisfactory results. Floating flooring can gain a large market if it can provide a natural parquet pattern in combination with reasonable manufacturing and laying.

3a-3d show examples of mechanical locking systems used in floating flooring. All these systems produce waste W. This waste is generated in connection with sawing (SB) and in connection with the machining of the mechanical connection means. In order to minimize this waste W, manufacturers have tried to make the floorboard as large as possible and to reduce the number of joints as much as possible. Therefore, the floorboard must be wide and long. Narrow floor boards include many joints per unit area of the floor surface. Such narrow laminate floorboards having a width and length corresponding to prior art parquet blocks are not well known. The narrowest laminate floorboard has a width of 15 cm or more and a length of 100 cm or more. FIG. 3e shows the connection by inward tilting of two adjacent sides 1, 1 ′ of the two floorboards, and FIG. 3f shows the connection by snap-fit.
WO01 / 66877 WO00 / 20705 German patent DE 197 18 319 C2

  It is an object of the present invention to provide a floorboard that can be mechanically joined to a floating flooring having a natural parquet pattern that corresponds with the prior art parquet block in terms of appearance. Another object is to provide a suitable joining system, laying method, and laying pattern for these floorboards.

  The present invention is based on a first understanding that very small floorboards can be joined quickly and with very high precision by means of a mechanical joining system combined with the latest manufacturing techniques and special laying methods. The surprising result was that the flooring with a small floorboard could be installed almost as fast and with the same quality as a conventional flooring with a fairly large floorboard. It can be installed more quickly and with better results than a large floorboard with a mechanical joining system. This is because small floorboards are easy to handle, the friction surface along the long side of the joint is small, and therefore easy to displace, and finally the curved part associated with the snap fit is small and resists It was found that this is because the short side snap-fit can be performed with a small force due to the small size. An additional advantage is that the short side of the narrow floorboard can be manufactured with a locking system that only locks in the horizontal direction and does not require a vertical snap fit. Such a locking system can be provided, for example, by removing the tongue 22 provided on the short side of a rectangular floorboard having a locking system similar to that of FIG. On the floor where the floorboards were installed in parallel rows with different short sides, the narrow short sides (5a, 5b) of the two locked floorboards were nevertheless locked It is held in the desired vertical position by the long sides (4a, 4b). Such a floor can be installed very easily because it is only necessary to tilt the long side for installation. The floorboard can be manufactured with a tilt locking system on the long side and without a locking system on the short side. The short sides can be brought together by friction of the long sides or by gluing and / or nailing the floorboard to the subfloor. Such a narrow short side can be installed more quickly and with the same high quality as a wide short side. Conversely, a wide short side without a vertical locking system warps the short side, increasing the risk of making the floor uneven.

  The present invention is based on a second very surprising understanding that the manufacturing costs for small floorboards with mechanical joining systems are not necessarily higher than for large floorboards. Small floorboards, in particular, have significantly more joints per floor area than floorboards, and when using prior art mechanical joining systems, the cost and waste of machining are reduced. Large amount. However, these problems can be largely eliminated when manufacturing the floorboard and forming the joining system according to the present invention. The small floorboard means that a large amount of wood raw material is used. This is because it is easier to manufacture a small block free of bumps and defects than to manufacture a large board. The form of the floorboard and its position on the floor can also be used to form a floor with a decorative appearance formed by sawing the floor elements, for example a laminate floor, in a cost-effective manner. . For example, several hundreds of floorboards can be manufactured by sawing a 2.1 × 2.6 m floor element having a printed veneer pattern. Such a small floorboard with the shape of a parquet block can be joined in various patterns in various laying directions. A parquet pattern of blocks that cannot be manufactured using today's technology can be formed. The problem of decorative paper swelling is eliminated and precise positioning and pattern matching associated with sawing is not required. This reduces manufacturing costs. When the floorboard is narrow, the angle error between the long side and the short side is less visible with a narrow floorboard than with a wide floorboard.

  The present invention is based on a third understanding that in floating flooring, for example, a small floorboard with a configuration corresponding to a conventional block can be used, which is advantageous in some cases. Such floating flooring includes significantly more joints than conventional flooring with large boards. The joints provided in a large amount per unit area reduce the movement of the floor along the wall because each joint has a predetermined flexibility. Laminate flooring moves, for example, about 1 mm per meter when the relative humidity changes over a year. When the width of the floor board is 66 mm, for example, 15 joints are included per meter. In this case, the maximum joint gap between two adjacent top edges of the two floorboards is 0.06 mm when the floor is prevented from moving by the load. Such a joint gap is not visible. The joint gap must be adapted to the floor type. On the laminate floor, a joint gap of 0.01 mm to 0.1 mm or slightly larger is sufficient. On an oak hardwood floor, the joint gap is about 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm. It is advantageous to combine such a joint gap with a chamfer provided at the adjacent upper edge so that it is not known that it is open in the dry state. Thus, a floating flooring that includes a small floorboard is particularly large if it is manufactured with a locking system that can move at least to some extent horizontally along and / or towards the joining edge in the locked position. Can be laid in space. Such floors actually behave as floating floors that use both full floor movement and movement within the locking system to counter changes in humidity.

  The present invention is based on a fourth understanding that narrow floorboards have a much smaller bend when changing RH than wide floorboards. This makes the floor flat and easy to install.

  The present invention is based on a fifth understanding that flooring, including many small floorboards, gives a good possibility of providing a high quality laying where the joint gap is not visible. The laminated body and the wooden flooring may be curved in the lateral direction because the moisture content in the board is uneven. Such a “banana shape” creates a visible joint gap. When the length of the board is shortened from, for example, 1200 mm to 400 mm, the joint gap is greatly reduced. Narrow boards are also easier to bend, in fact, the mechanical locking system automatically pulls the boards together and eliminates the banana shape completely.

  The present invention solves the moisture problem that arises in adhering a wooden block to a concrete floor by a wood block joined in a floating manner so that a plastic moisture barrier can be placed between the wooden floor and the concrete. Based on the sixth understanding.

  The present invention further provides a very convenient way of forming a natural parquet pattern comprising parallel displaced timber blocks having a predetermined width corresponding to the floorboard and typically a parquet block. Based on the seventh understanding that it is to be formed in a narrow width.

  The present invention provides a floor system including a floor system including a floor board having the same width, preferably different lengths, and a length that is an even multiple of the width, and a mechanical locking system that is mirrored and reversed. Based on an eighth understanding that the floor system provided can be provided. With such a floor system, it is possible to lay with all the latest patterns that can be provided by conventional parquet blocks. Laying can be done very quickly and with good accuracy. Such a floor system can form a modern pattern that further includes a surface layer that could only be used with a few variations in conventional use. For example, a surface layer made of needle felt or linoleum can be bonded to the HDF board. When such a floor element is manufactured in various types of colors and machined to the floor system according to the present invention, it cannot be provided by the original surface layer by joining various floorboards of various colors. It is possible to form a very varied and up-to-date pattern.

  Finally, the present invention is based on the understanding that the short side of a narrow floorboard must be able to withstand the same loads as the fairly long short side of a conventional floating flooring. This is because the point loads applied to the same are the same. For example, the 85 mm short side of the floor according to the invention must thus be able to withstand the same loads as the 200 mm short side of a conventional floor. The short side should suitably be strong enough to withstand a tensile load of 100 kg or more. For narrow boards, a joining system laid by tilting the short side down, displacing along the joining edge, and tilting the long side down is particularly convenient. This is because a joining system joined by tilting can be stronger than a joining system joined by snap action. The floorboard according to the invention comprises a joining system that can be joined by tilting downwards on the long and short sides.

  The above matter means that according to the present invention, it is possible to provide a small floorboard having a form corresponding to a conventional parquet block, which is thought to be possible in a surprising manner and heretofore. In contrast to that, it means that it helps to provide the benefits of floating flooring. These advantages greatly exceed the known disadvantages.

  The principle of the present invention described above can be applied to a floor system having a form other than the conventional parquet block. For example, a stone can be replicated in the form of 200 × 400 mm, 200 × 600 mm, etc. with a joint system that is inverted with mirror image objects that can be joined by tilt and / or snap fit. These forms can be joined in the latest pattern as described above, with the long side being adjusted, the short side being the short side, or the long side being the short side.

  These objects are achieved in whole or in part by the floorboard, flooring system, floorboard block, and laying and manufacturing method described in the independent claims. The dependent claims and description contain examples of the invention.

  Thus, according to a first aspect of the present invention, there is provided a rectangular floorboard for providing a patterned floating flooring, wherein the floorboard is provided with a floorboard at least along both long edges. There is provided a floorboard in which two floorboards are provided with integral connecting means for locking each other, and the upper edges of the floorboard and the second floorboard define a vertical plane in a joined state. The connecting means is configured to lock the floor board and the second floor board to each other in a horizontal direction perpendicular to the vertical plane. The connecting means connects the floor board and the second floor board to the main floor board. They are locked together in a vertical direction perpendicular to the plane. The floorboard is characterized in that the length of the long edge of the floorboard does not exceed 80 cm and the length of the short edge of the floorboard does not exceed 10 cm.

  The flooring made of such a small floorboard provides a good imitation of a classic pattern parquet flooring. This is because the joints coincide with the parquet blocks and do not form pattern shifts or “additional” joints as formed by known parquet and laminate floorboards. Thus, the problem of two adjacent floorboards with patterns that are incompatible with each other is eliminated as compared to the known parquet floorboards. Due to the integrated mechanical locking system, the floorboard is easier to install than a floorboard for classic parquet flooring.

  According to an embodiment, the connecting means may be configured such that the floor board and the second floor board are locked to each other by at least inward inclining so that the upper joint edges come into contact with each other. The performance of the connecting means that can be connected by tilting work is advantageous. This is because the joining system joined by tilting can be formed more firmly and easier to install than the joining system joined by the snap action.

  According to another embodiment, the connecting means may be adapted to release the floorboard and the second floorboard by tilting upwards away from the subfloor. Such release or unlocking of the floorboard facilitates laying, adjusting, replacing and reusing the floorboard.

  According to another embodiment, the second floorboard may be substantially the same as the floorboard. Thus, only one type of floorboard need be produced to provide flooring.

  According to another embodiment, the floorboard may comprise a surface layer made of a thermosetting resin. By providing a floorboard having such a laminate surface, its wear resistance can be improved compared to a wooden strip surface for a parquet floor with a classic pattern.

  According to another embodiment, the floorboard may comprise a surface layer comprising wood or wood veneer. A surface layer made of wood or wood veneer provides the look and feel of a true wooden parquet floor, while at the same time being less expensive than a conventional parquet floor. Thus, the floorboard core may be made of any known core material such as wood slate, HDF, MDF, particle board, plywood, and the like.

  According to another embodiment, the connecting means may comprise a separate part that protrudes from the joining edge and is mechanically joined to the core of the floorboard. Such separate parts can be used instead of removing material from the edge of the floorboard, thus reducing the amount of wasted material.

  According to another embodiment, the surface of the floorboard may be provided with a decoration or a shape corresponding to a conventional parquet block with a length of 30 cm to 80 cm and a width of 5 cm to 10 cm. .

  According to another embodiment, the joint edges provided in pairs facing the long edges of the floorboard have protruding locking elements integral with the floorboard, the opposite edges of the same pair The portion includes a locking groove for receiving a locking element of an adjacent floorboard.

  According to another embodiment, the length of the long edge of the floorboard may exceed 15 cm and the length of the short edge of the floorboard may exceed 4 cm.

  According to the second aspect of the present invention, there is provided a patterned floating flooring in which the pattern is provided by the shape of each floor board constituting the patterned floating flooring. This flooring is characterized in that the patterned floating flooring includes the floorboard described above.

  According to a third aspect of the present invention, there is provided a block made of floorboard for providing a floating floor. The block made of floorboards includes at least two of the floorboards described above, and these at least two floorboards are the first of the at least two floorboards. At least one short edge is arranged to be aligned with at least one short edge of a second of the at least two floorboards.

  Several variations of the invention are possible. The floorboard can be provided with all conventional mechanical joining systems. For example, a special floorboard can be produced comprising nine floorboards according to the invention joined in three rows shifted in parallel. Thus, the short sides are not aligned and are misaligned in a row. Such a floorboard can be laid by tilting the long side downward, displacing it laterally, and snapping the short side. In other embodiments, it can be laid by tilting the short side inward, laterally displacing, and tilting downward. Various combinations of snap fit and insertion along the joining edge of the long side or short side, lateral displacement of another long side or short side, and snap fit can be used.

  According to a fourth aspect of the present invention, there is provided a long edge portion and a short edge portion, and the long edge portion includes an integral connecting means for locking the floor board to the second floor board. A method is provided for manufacturing a rectangular floorboard provided with a stop system. The method is adapted to provide at least two floor panels and machine a first pair of floor elements having such a size and opposite edge portions of the floor elements, the floor board Displacing a set of tools linearly relative to each other to provide a final shape of at least a portion of the short edge of the substrate, dividing a floor element into the at least two floor panels, and the at least two Displacing a set of tools for machining one of the floor panels and a second pair of opposed edge portions of the floor panel linearly relative to each other to provide at least a portion of the locking system; Including. The manufacturing method described above is particularly suitable for manufacturing small floorboards as described above.

  By this method, a small floor board can be reasonably manufactured. Both the first and second steps can be performed on the same production line. If the same locking system is provided on the long and short sides of the floorboard, the same tool set can be used for both the long and short sides. By rotating the panel through 180 ° before sawing, the inverted A board and B board can be formed as a mirror image object.

  The fifth and sixth aspects of the present invention provide respective flooring systems that include floorboards that are the same width but different lengths, and the length is a multiple of the width. According to one embodiment, the floorboard has a splicing system that is reversed with mirrored objects that can be spliced by inward tilting. These floorboards can be laid in many different patterns with the long side joined to the short side. According to another embodiment, four different types of floorboards are provided which differ from each other in terms of length and / or orientation of the locking system (usually mirror image).

  The seventh and eighth features of the present invention are to provide another method for installing flooring using the floorboard described above. By using one of these methods, the floor can be laid quickly and effectively according to the present invention. According to one variant, the floorboards are joined at a predetermined angle with locking means in contact with each other, but at a position shifted from the final position when the floorboards are laid flat on the underfloor. The floorboard is then shifted relative to another floorboard in the previously laid row by a predetermined distance corresponding to its overall length before locking is finally performed.

  The manufacturing and laying techniques described above are particularly suitable for small floorboards, but can advantageously be used with other large form floorboards.

  The invention will now be described in more detail according to its various features with reference to the accompanying schematic drawings illustrating embodiments of the invention.

  FIGS. 4a to 4c show floorboards 1, 1 'provided with a mechanical locking system on the long sides 4a, 4b and the short sides 5a, 5b. The vertical locking means includes, for example, a tongue groove 23 and a tongue 22 (see a in FIG. 5). The horizontal locking means includes a locking element 8 that cooperates with the locking groove 14. All floorboards are rectangular and have a width corresponding to conventional parquet blocks. Thus, the width is about 1/3 of a conventional laminate floorboard. In FIG. 4a, the surface of the floorboard has the shape of a parquet block. In FIG. 4b, the surface has a decorative surface layer that includes two parquet blocks, and in FIG. 4c, the surface layer includes three parquet blocks. The surface layer may be made of various fiber materials such as a laminate, wood, plastic, linoleum, cork, and needle felt. The surface may be printed or varnished.

  FIG. 4d shows that such a floorboard, which may contain one or more blocks, can be joined to the flooring in a natural way to form a brick-bonding pattern. All the blocks have a total length except for the blocks in the outer part of the floorboard. If the floorboard contains more than one block (see b and c of FIG. 4), a specific pattern alignment must be performed during manufacture. On the other hand, if the floorboard includes a single block according to FIG. 4a, such pattern matching is not necessary. The floor board can be formed by sawing the floor element. The floor element only has a pattern that includes, for example, a veneer that varies in shades to resemble a wood block formed from different logs of the same type of wood. In the flooring according to FIG. 4d, the blocks are shifted by a predetermined distance corresponding to half their length. FIG. 4e shows an example shifted by 1/3 of the length.

  FIGS. 5a to 5d show that if the joining system is formed of separate strips 6, the waste generated in connection with sawing can be greatly reduced. The separate strip 6 is mechanically fixed by the tongue 38 cooperating with the tongue groove 36. The fixing is performed by snap-fitting to the joint edge of the floor board 1 so that the upper lip 20 and the lower lip 21 bend upward and downward, respectively, when the strip 6 is inserted toward the tongue groove 36 of the floor board 1. be able to. The locking element 37 cooperates with a locking groove 39. The strip 6 can be joined to the tongue groove 36 in many different ways. For example, the locking groove 39 may be formed in the lower lip 21 and the locking element 37 may be formed in the lower front part of the strip 6 to cooperate with the locking groove 39. The joining of the strip 6 and the joining edge of the floorboard can also be performed by tilting the strip 6 inward or by snap-fitting the strip 6 in any upwardly angled position. With this locking system, narrow floorboards can be manufactured in a cost-effective manner without generating much waste. FIG. 5 a shows an example of a laminate floorboard 1, 1 ′ including a wood fiber core 30 and a laminate surface layer 31. In this embodiment, the separate strip 6 contains wood fibers. The material of the strip 6 based on wood fiber is hardwood, plywood, particle board, fiber board such as MDF or HDF, compression laminate made of wood fiber impregnated with thermosetting resin, or similar material There may be. FIGS. 5a and 5b show a locking system that can be locked by inward tilting and snap fit, and FIGS. 5c and 5d show a locking system that can be locked by snap fit. The protruding part P2 of the strip 6 extending beyond the upper part of the joining edge is equal to or greater than the floor thickness T in this embodiment. This facilitates locking by inclining about the upper part of the joint edge. On the long side of the narrow floorboard, a locking system comprising a separate strip that can be achieved by tilting the locking and unlocking is particularly desirable.

  6a to 6d show the laying procedure. The floorboard is rectangular and can be mechanically joined. The laying operation is started by, for example, inclining the short side portions of the floorboards to join the first row R1. The first row, which is actually an optional row of floors, includes a floor board G1 called the first board. The second floor board G2 (see FIG. 6a) in the second row R2 is arranged at an angle A with respect to the first floor board G1, and the upper joining edge thereof is brought into contact with the joining edge of the first floor board G1. FIG. 6b shows that the use of a wedge-shaped tool WT as a support can facilitate laying. Next, the new floor boards G3 in the second row R2 are locked to each other with the short side portions thereof being in contact with the short side portions of the second floor board G2 in the second row. This joining of the short side can be effected by inclining inward with respect to the joining edge of the short side or by inserting along the joining edge of the short side by snap-fitting. During inward tilting and preferably snap-fit, this joining is performed such that the upper joining edge of the new floor board G3 is positioned at a predetermined distance from the upper joining edge of the first floor board G1. During insertion along the joining edge of the short side, this is not necessary since a new board G3 can be inserted in contact with the first board. First, after a new board G3 is joined to the first board G1 by snap action, it is displaced laterally along the long side part, and the short side part is snapped onto the short side part of the second floor board G2. May be. The new G3 and second floor board G2 are then displaced laterally along their long sides parallel to the first floor board G1. The first lateral displacement may be essentially equal to the floorboard length 4a. Then another new floorboard G3 'may be joined according to Fig. 6d. After the entire row R2 is essentially filled, all floorboards are tilted down and locked. Essentially all installations can be made in this way.

  FIGS. 7A to 7E are views of the same laying viewed from above. The new boards G3, G3 ', and G3 "are tilted and then displaced to enlarge the new row R2. This laying is repeated until the second floor board G2 reaches the outer part of the floor according to FIG. The main advantage is that the entire row R2 can be laid without having to move the floor layer along the floor row. Due to the weight and flexibility of the floorboard, the various floorboards tilted upward will take different angles. These floor boards can easily slide in a semi-locked state. This is shown in FIG. The locking means 22, 23, and 8, 14 are not fully locked, so that the locking element 8 is partially inserted into the locking groove 14 to reduce friction and at the same time the board. 1, 1 'is prevented from sliding away.

  This laying method is particularly suitable for small floorboards, but can also be used for large floorboards. By this laying method, laying can be automated. Another advantage is that this laying method allows automatic laying by a laying device. Thus, according to the present invention, it further comprises a floorboard laying device, which can be laid using a suitable device including, for example, the following parts and functions. This apparatus has an accommodating portion for accommodating a large number of new floor boards G3 and G3 '. These floor boards are stacked on each other, for example. There is a first insertion device for inserting a new board G3 at a predetermined angle with respect to the first board G1 in the first row R1. The insertion operation is performed along the short side so that the short side of the second board G2 and the new board G3 are mechanically locked. The apparatus further includes a second insertion device for laterally displacing the two joined boards parallel to the first row R1. As the device is moved from the first row R1, all boards that have not reached a position parallel to the underfloor are finally tilted downward toward the underfloor.

  FIG. 8 shows a method for manufacturing a flooring with a mechanical joining system. The floor element 2 is sawn to form a new floor element 2 '. These floor elements are then machined along their long sides, for example with a machine having two chains. In this way, a semi-finished product in the form of a short side panel 2 '' is produced. This machining, which is a rational machining of the long side of the floor element, actually forms the short side 5a, 5b of the floorboard. After this first machining, the short side panel 2 ″ is sawn into the floor panel 3. The edges of these floor panels are then machined along the long sides 4a, 4b, for example with a machine with only one chain. This method involves machining the long side last, and performing a special sawing or separating operation between the machining of the short side of the floorboard and the machining of the long side. It is based on the fact that the manufacturing is different from the conventional manufacturing. Thus, this method means that it is very reasonable that the short side can be produced in a large form, even if the floorboard is narrow. Today's machines are less productive. This is because the short side is machined by a cam provided on the chain. This means that the board is machined at a predetermined distance marked with reference D in FIG. The risk of mistaking the angle between the long side and the short side is significantly less than in conventional manufacturing. By aligning the board with the ruler RL before long side machining, any lateral misalignment associated with sawing the floor panel can be eliminated.

  If the floorboard has a width of 85 mm and a length of 6 × 85 = 510 mm, the machining of the long side takes 6 times as long as the machining of the short side. An efficient operating line includes a short side machine and sawing unit, and a plurality of, for example, six long side machines.

  For example, a mirror image symmetric locking system can be provided by rotating the short side panel 2 ″ before sawing by 180 ° in a horizontal plane. In another aspect, the floor panel 3 may be rotated correspondingly after sawing.

  Long side and short side machining can be done on one and the same machine and using the same tool set. Several variations are possible. For example, the long side may be first machined. In this case, the length of the floor element corresponds to several floor boards and the width corresponds to one floor board. After the initial machining, the floor element is divided into several floor panels and then the edges of these floor panels are machined along the short side.

  FIGS. 9a-e show a floor system comprising two different board configurations with mirror-symmetric mechanical locking systems that can be joined by inward tilting at the long and short sides.

  FIG. 9a shows the locking system. In this embodiment, this system is integrally formed with a core of the floor board and is designed so that the long side can be joined to the short side. Vertical locking is provided by the tongue 22 and the groove 23. Horizontal locking is effected by strips and locking elements 8 provided on one floor board 1 and locking grooves 12 provided on the other floor board 1 'cooperating therewith. Advantageously, the locking system is essentially the same on both the long side and the short side. In this embodiment, the locking system is the same. However, it should be pointed out that the present invention is also applicable to floorboards having different locking systems and / or locking systems comprising materials different from or different from the core. Such differences exist between different floorboards and / or exist between the long side and the short side. The locking system can be joined by inward tilting. In this example, the locking system withstands a high tensile load corresponding to about 100 Kg with a locking system having a length of 100 mm along the joining edge. The locking element 8 has a considerable vertical height VT and a horizontal length HT. In this embodiment, the vertical height VT is 0.1 times the floor thickness T, and the horizontal length HT is 0.3 times the floor thickness T.

  FIG. 9b shows a floor board 41A having a width of 1M and a length of 6M which is six times the width. The dimensional accuracy is 0.1 mm or less, and in some cases, the tolerance is advantageously 0.05 mm or less. With modern machines, a tolerance of 0.02 mm can be achieved. FIG. 9c shows the same floorboard 41B, which differs in that the locking system is mirror image reversed and reversed. 41 A and 41 B have short sides with the same tongue side 22 and groove side 23. The tongue side 22 of the long side portion of the floor board 41A is provided on the groove side of the floor board 42B. Thus, the locking system is reversed with mirror image symmetry.

  With such a flooring system, it can be laid with the latest pattern. This is because the long side can be joined to the short side and the laying direction can be changed. A modular system whose length is an integral multiple of the width increases the possibility of change.

  FIGS. 9d and 9e show the corresponding floorboard with a length of 9M. In this embodiment, this is, for example, 9 times the width 1M. Furthermore, if the floor system includes boards of various lengths, more advanced patterns can be provided.

  Obviously, various modifications are possible within the scope of the above principle. FIG. 9f shows two short sides 5a and 5b of two adjacent edges of the floorboard. Only the horizontal locking body including the strip 6, the locking element 8 and the locking groove 12 is provided. Such a floorboard may be provided with a locking system shown in FIG. 5a on its long side and can be installed in parallel rows. If the floorboard has a locking system that is mirror-image-symmetric and reversed as described above, the long side can be installed in a herringbone pattern relative to the short side. Floorboards can be formed in many different lengths and widths. The floor system may include three or more floorboards of different sizes, and the floorboards may be the same width but random length. Some floor boards may have a width of 1M, and other floor boards may have a width of 2M or more. Moreover, the side part of the floor board does not necessarily have to be parallel. For example, the short side portion may have an angle of 45 ° with respect to the long side portion. Such a production can reasonably be done on a machine with two chains and the cams of these chains being displaced so that the board passes through the grinding tool at an angle of 45 °, for example. In addition, other optional angles can be formed in this manner.

  FIG. 10 shows an example of a method of joining the floor board 41A by applying the short side part to the floor board 42B already laid with the long side part inclined inward. According to the present invention, joining is performed by inclining the long side portion of the floor board 41A inward. Such a floor board called the second floor board 41A is in a position inclined upward with respect to the first floor board 42B of the first row laid in advance during the first laying process. The short side portion of the second floor board 41A is brought into contact with the long side portion of the first floor board 42B that has already been laid. It is advantageous to use a support WT to hold this floorboard and the already laid second row of floorboards in a tilted position. A new floor board 41A 'is tilted against the long side of the second floor board 41A in the second row perpendicular to the floor board 42B laid first. After the new floor board 41A is locked to the second floor board 41A, in the locked state, the upper short side edge is displaced along the joining edge until it contacts the long side edge of the first board 42B. . Next, the entire second row including the floor boards 41A and 41A 'is tilted downward toward the underlaying floor. If an appropriate laying sequence is applied, the latest pattern can be laid by the angle-angle method. The joining system has great strength and can be laid on a large floor without an expansion joint between floor sections.

  FIG. 11a shows a floor system in which floor boards 41A and 42A having different lengths are combined so that all rows have the same length, and the entire floor unit FU has a locking system on all sides. A method of making the floor unit FU of the present invention will be described.

  11b and 11c show a method of changing the length of the floor unit FU by combining boards having different lengths. The length of the floor unit can be changed in steps of half the length of the shortest board. The width can be varied by the number of columns according to FIG.

  FIG. 12a shows that the floor unit FU is adjusted to the size of the room so that a decorative frame made of a sawing board 41A that can be used to finally fit the floor to the size of the room can be formed. Show what you can do. In order to form a decorative pattern, floorboards 41A and 41B with mirrored and inverted locking systems are used. 01-04 shows a laying sequence that can be used to join floorboards using an angled tilt method. After the floor units FU are installed in parallel rows with boards having different lengths, the board 41B which is mirror-image-symmetric and reversed is joined to the short side portion of the floor unit 02. The length of the board corresponds to the width of six floor boards in the modification. Next, the vertical rows 03 are joined by a method of inclining at an angle, and finally the laying of the floor is completed by locking the horizontal rows 04 in the same manner.

  Of course, this and other patterns can be joined by a combination of tilt, displacement, and snap fit, or just by snap fit. Furthermore, insertion along the joining edge can also be used. With the short side locking system having no tongue shown in FIG. 9f, it can be installed only by tilting the long side.

  FIG. 12b shows a modification. In this embodiment, this modification includes a plurality of boards 41B that are mirror-symmetrically reversed. Laying can be performed, for example, according to the laying order 01-09, as described above.

  One requirement for laying the floor as described above without high quality and visible seam clearance is to manufacture the floorboard with a high degree of dimensional accuracy. Advantageously, each joint can provide a certain degree of flexibility so that manufacturing tolerances can be balanced. In this case, the clearance P between the locking surfaces of the locking element 8 and the locking groove 12 is advantageously, for example, 0.05 mm, as shown in FIGS. Such play P does not produce a visible seam gap. A chamfer 133 on the upper joint edge can also be used to conceal the joint gap and remove portions of the hard surface layer so that the upper joint edge is more flexible and compressible.

  FIG. 13a shows another pattern that can be laid out in order 01 to 07 according to an angled tilt method. The pattern can be formed with only one type of board that does not necessarily have a mirrored and reversed bonding system.

  FIGS. 14a and 14b show a diamond pattern of offset diamond that can be laid by first joining the floorboard to two floor units FU1 and FU2. These two floor units are then joined together, for example by inward tilting.

  FIGS. 15 a, b, and c show other patterns that can be formed by the floor system and laying method described above.

  16a and 16b show a herringbone pattern that can be joined by tilting the long side inward and snapping the short side into the long side. Laying can be done in many different ways, for example by simply tilting the long side. In FIG. 16, the floor can be laid with both the groove side 23 and the tongue side 22 set in the laying direction ID. It is more convenient to lay with only the groove side 23 in the laying direction according to FIG.

  FIGS. 16C to 16E show a herringbone pattern using two and three blocks.

  FIGS. 17a, b, and c show a method of forming a corresponding pattern on a floorboard having a shape resembling stone, for example. The floor board is provided with a decorative groove DG on one long side and one short side. The decorative groove is formed, for example, by removing a part of the outer decorative layer, so that the decorative layer or other part of the surface layer positioned under the core becomes visible.

  FIG. 17c shows a method of joining the floorboards that are mirror-image-symmetric and reversed after installation in the latest pattern in which the decorative groove borders the floorboard.

  It should be noted that the present invention can be applied to smaller boards, blocks, or strips than those described above. Such a strip may be, for example, 2 cm wide and 10 cm long. The invention can also be used for the production of very narrow floor panels, for example about 1 cm or less, which can be used to connect various floor units or as decorations.

a, b, and c are figures which show the floorboard of a prior art. It is a figure which shows manufacture of the laminated body flooring by a prior art. a to f are views showing examples of known mechanical locking systems. a to e are views showing the flooring according to the present invention. FIGS. 4A to 4D are views of a bonding system according to an embodiment of the present invention. a to d are diagrams illustrating a laying method according to the present invention. a to d are diagrams illustrating a laying method according to the present invention. a to e are views showing a manufacturing method according to the present invention for manufacturing a floorboard. a to f are diagrams showing a floor system according to the present invention. It is a figure which shows laying of the floor board by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. It is a figure which shows the example of the various patterns and laying methods by this invention. 1 is a diagram illustrating an example of a floor system using a floorboard according to the present invention in a convenient form and laying pattern to resemble a stone floor.

Explanation of symbols

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 Rectangular floor board 1 '2nd floor board 4a, 4b Long edge part 5a, 5b Short edge part 8 Locking element 14 Locking groove VP Vertical surface 30 Core 31 Surface layer

Claims (4)

  1. A method for manufacturing a rectangular floorboard (1) having a long edge (4a, 4b) and a short edge (5a, 5b), wherein the floorboard is connected to a second floor. In a method, provided is a locking system comprising integral connecting means for locking to the board (1 ').
    Machining a first pair of floor elements (2 ') and such facing edges of the floor elements (2'), which are adapted to provide at least two floor panels (3) Displacing a set of tools (110a, 110b) linearly relative to each other to provide a final shape of at least part of the short edges (5a, 5b) of the floorboard (1);
    Dividing the floor element (2 ′) into the at least two floor panels (3); and a second pair of opposite edge portions of one of the at least two floor panels and the floor panel. A method comprising: linearly displacing a set of tools for machining relative to each other to provide at least a portion of the locking system.
  2. The method of claim 1, wherein
    The machining of the first pair of opposed edge portions of the floor element includes machining at least a portion of a second locking system provided at the short edge (5a, 5b). Feature method.
  3.   The method according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the length of the long edge (4a, 4b) of the floor board (1) is 80 cm or less, and the short edge (5a, 5b) of the floor board (1). The length of is 10 cm or less.
  4. To install a flooring comprising a mechanically locked rectangular floorboard (1, 1 ') in which the long side (4a, 4b) and the short side (5a, 5b) are joined in parallel rows Wherein the floorboards are paired reverse connecting means (8, 9, 14) for locking in the vertical and horizontal directions (D1 and D2, respectively) to similar adjacent floorboards. , 22) along its four joint edges,
    In the method, the connecting means of the floor board is provided so that the two joint edges of the long side portions (4a, 4b) can be locked by inward tilting,
    The second floor board (G2) is arranged in the second row (R2) at a predetermined angle with respect to the first floor board (G1) in the first row (R1), and the upper joint of the second floor board (G2) is joined. Contacting an edge with a joining edge of the first floor board (G1);
    The new row board (G3) is placed in the second row (R2) in the second row (R2) such that the upper joining edge of the new floor board (G3) is in contact with the joining edge of the first floor board (G1). ) The second floor board (G2) of the second floor board (5b) to be locked,
    Displacing both the new floor board (G3) and the second floor board (G2) in a lateral direction parallel to the long side portion (4a) of the first floor board (G1);
    The lateral displacement is longer than a length (4a) of the floorboard, and includes a step of tilting the second floorboard and the new floorboard (G2, G3) downward after the lateral displacement. A method characterized by that.
JP2003586439A 2002-04-22 2003-04-22 Floor board, flooring system, and manufacturing method and installation method thereof Active JP4574172B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
SE0201225A SE522250C2 (en) 2002-04-22 2002-04-22 Rectangular floorboard for providing a patterned floating flooring, has opposing long edges, each having a length not exceeding 80 centimeters and short edges having a length not exceeding 10 centimeters
SE0203482A SE526773C2 (en) 2002-11-21 2002-11-21 Rectangular floorboard for providing a patterned floating flooring, has opposing long edges, each having a length not exceeding 80 centimeters and short edges having a length not exceeding 10 centimeters
PCT/SE2003/000641 WO2003089736A1 (en) 2002-04-22 2003-04-22 Floorboards, flooring systems and methods for manufacturing and installation thereof

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JP4574172B2 true JP4574172B2 (en) 2010-11-04

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EP1719854A3 (en) 2009-03-04
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