JP4552809B2 - Brass instrument playing actuator and brass instrument playing apparatus - Google Patents

Brass instrument playing actuator and brass instrument playing apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
JP4552809B2
JP4552809B2 JP2005250014A JP2005250014A JP4552809B2 JP 4552809 B2 JP4552809 B2 JP 4552809B2 JP 2005250014 A JP2005250014 A JP 2005250014A JP 2005250014 A JP2005250014 A JP 2005250014A JP 4552809 B2 JP4552809 B2 JP 4552809B2
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brass instrument
actuator
instrument playing
vibration
pressurized gas
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JP2007065196A (en
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順治 藤井
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ヤマハ株式会社
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Description

  The present invention relates to a brass instrument playing actuator and a brass instrument playing apparatus capable of playing a brass instrument.

  Techniques for automatically playing musical instruments by machines are widely known. For example, automatic organs and automatic pianos that automatically perform musical instruments have been produced for a long time. In recent years, machines that automatically play not only keyboard instruments but also wind instruments have been developed. Patent Document 1 discloses a robot that automatically plays brass instruments.

The apparatus described in Patent Document 1 described above performs wind blowing of a wind instrument using a method in which an audio signal close to that of a brass instrument is prepared in advance and input to an electromagnetic actuator. In order to insert acoustic vibrations into a brass instrument, a device has been devised to create a situation close to the phenomenon occurring in a real brass instrument by simultaneously inserting compressed air and applying pressure to the pipe. As a result, the sound emitted from the morning glory part of the brass instrument became a timbre tone, which was close to the image of a real wind instrument.
JP 2004-258443 A

However, in the apparatus described in Patent Document 1, an electromagnetic actuator that is substantially the same as an audio speaker is used, and sound waves generated from the electromagnetic actuator are radiated through a conduit of a brass instrument. Therefore, the brass instrument is merely used as a loudspeaker horn, and its tube resonance is not used. As described above, since the sound is generated without using the resonance of the tube, the electromagnetic actuator of the above apparatus requires a strong energy and has a drawback of high power consumption.
In addition, only one electromagnetic actuator that generates vibration for generating acoustic energy is provided, and it is difficult to reproduce the performance expression by the lip lead. That is, in an actual brass instrument, performance is performed by a lip lead formed by the upper and lower lips of the performer. At this time, the lip lead formed by the upper and lower lips becomes a double lead, and the upper and lower lips are subtle. Various expressions can be given to the performance by proper use. However, since the above-described device emits sound with a single excitation source (electromagnetic actuator), it is greatly different from human performance.
In addition, since the compressed air has a structure that is inserted from a space formed between the lip contact portion of the mouthpiece of the brass instrument and the vibration film, this space must be a sealed space. The mouthpiece and the mouthpiece had to be fixed in an airtight state so as to be a sealed space. Therefore, it is not easy to mount and separate the apparatus from the brass instrument.

  The present invention has been made in view of the above-described background, requires less power consumption, can obtain a tone very close to a human lip lead, and can easily separate a brass instrument from an actuator. An object of the present invention is to provide a brass instrument playing actuator and a brass instrument playing apparatus.

  To solve the above problems, the present invention three-dimensionally covers a membrane assembly composed of a plurality of flexible membranes covering a lip contact portion of a mouthpiece of a brass instrument, and the membrane assembly, A sealed space forming member that forms a sealed space together with the membrane assembly, and a pressurized gas that introduces a pressurized gas into the sealed space forming member and sends the pressurized gas to the mouthpiece side through the boundary of each film There is provided a brass instrument playing actuator characterized by comprising gas introducing means and a vibrator provided on each of the films and vibrating each of the films in response to a supplied excitation signal.

In a preferred aspect of the present invention, the vibrator may be constituted by a piezoelectric element.
In a further preferred aspect of the present invention, the piezoelectric element used for each film may be constituted by a plurality of piezoelectric elements having different vibration bands.
In a further preferred aspect of the present invention, the piezoelectric element may be formed in a film shape.
In a preferred aspect of the present invention, each of the films may also serve as a vibrator that vibrates in response to an excitation signal.

  The present invention also provides a brass instrument playing apparatus comprising the above-described brass instrument playing actuator and excitation signal generating means for generating the excitation signal based on performance data indicating the content of a musical sound. To do.

  Further, the present invention provides the above-described brass instrument playing actuator, a pressurized gas control means for controlling the amount of the pressurized gas introduced into the sealed space forming member based on a pressurized gas control signal, and a musical tone. And a pressurized gas control signal generating means for generating the pressurized gas control signal based on performance data indicating the contents of the brass instrument playing device.

  In the above-described brass instrument playing apparatus, the performance operator driving means for driving the performance operator of the wind instrument based on the drive signal and the drive signal generating means for generating the drive signal based on the pitch indicated by the performance data are provided. You may make it do.

According to the present invention, due to the flexibility of each film constituting the film assembly, when the vibration of the film does not match the resonance frequency of the brass instrument, no sound is produced by interfering with the reflected wave, whereas the vibration of the film If it matches the resonance frequency of the brass instrument, it resonates with the reflected wave and amplifies the sound pressure of the sound wave in the pipe to generate a sound like a brass instrument. As described above, since the performance of the brass instrument is actively performed, the timbre of the original brass instrument can be obtained and the power consumption of the vibration device can be reduced.
In addition, according to the present invention, since a plurality of artificial lips can be individually controlled, it is possible to perform a performance very similar to a performance expression by a double lead performed by a human being playing a brass instrument. That is, it is possible to obtain a tone color very close to that of a human lip lead.
Further, according to the present invention, instead of allowing the pressurized gas to flow from between the mouthpiece and the membrane assembly, the edges of each membrane of the membrane assembly are bent toward the mouthpiece by the pressure of the pressurized gas. Pressurized gas flows into the mouthpiece through gaps that are formed and gaps that occur at the boundary of each film due to vibrations from the vibrator, so it is necessary to form a sealed space between the brass instrument actuator and the mouthpiece Since it can be mounted simply by pressing the brass instrument actuator against the mouthpiece, it is easy to mount and separate the brass instrument.

[1. Actuator]
FIG. 1 is a side sectional view of an actuator 1 according to an embodiment of the present invention, and FIG. 2 is a front view of the actuator 1. In the figure, 11 is a flat hollow cylindrical flange. The flange 11 has a flange portion with a large outer diameter on the back side (left side in FIG. 1), and a cylindrical portion with a small outer diameter on the front side (right side in FIG. 1). Reference numeral 12 denotes a dome-shaped back cover, and the back cover 12 is provided so as to cover the back of the flange. Reference numerals 13a and 13b denote vibration membranes made of a flexible member. When viewed from the front of the flange 11, the vibrating membranes 13 a and 13 b have a semicircular shape that covers the top and bottom half by half, and the back side thereof is fixed to the flange portion of the flange 11 by the membrane fixing screw 14. The boundary portions of the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are in intimate contact with each other, and block the air flow when no external force is applied. Further, the tension applied to the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b can be set to an arbitrary value by tightening the membrane fixing screw 14 again after the membrane fixing screw 14 is loosened to adjust the tension of the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b.

  Reference numeral 17 denotes a ring-shaped damper material made of urethane foam or the like. The damper material 17 is attached to the internal space on the front side of the flange 11 so that the outer peripheral surface thereof is in close contact with the inner peripheral surface of the flange 11. The front end face of the damper material 17 is aligned with the front end face of the flange 11, and the vibration films 13 a and 13 b described above are supported by the front end face of the flange 11 and the front end face of the damper material 17. The damper material 17 has a function of lowering the Q value of the vibration films 13a and 13b and flattening the response vibration level in a wide frequency band.

  Reference numeral 18 denotes a circular wire mesh cover provided on the back portion of the damper member 17, and is fixed so that the outer peripheral surface thereof is in contact with the inner peripheral surface of the flange 11. A space surrounded by the wire mesh cover 17 and the back cover 12 is filled with a sound absorbing material 19 such as glass wool. The sound absorbing material 19 has a function of producing an acoustic effect corresponding to a space larger than the actual shape in the space behind the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b.

Reference numerals 161a to 163a denote sheet-like vibration elements (piezo elements) attached to the back side of the vibration film 13a, each having an elongated rectangular shape. These vibration elements 161a to 163a are provided with a long side in parallel and spaced apart by a predetermined distance, and are attached in the order of vibration elements 163a, 162a, 161a from the side closer to the boundary between the vibration films 13a, 13b. Yes. In this case, as the length of the long side becomes shorter, the vibration band is changed from a low range to a high range. That is, the vibration element 163a having the longest side vibrates in the low vibration band, the vibration element 161a having the shortest long side vibrates in the high vibration band, and the intermediate vibration element 162a vibrates in the middle vibration band. Yes.
The vibration elements 163b, 162b, and 161b are the same as the vibration elements 163a, 162a, and 161a described above, and are attached to the back surface of the vibration film 13b in a line-symmetric arrangement with the boundaries of the vibration films 13a and 13b as symmetry lines. . The above-described piezo elements for high-frequency, mid-frequency, and low-frequency ranges are each divided into approximately three equal parts of a brass instrument to be played.

Piezo elements 161a to 163a and 161b to 163b attached to the upper and lower vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are wirings for receiving power signals from individual power amplifiers, and the upper and lower vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are independent of each other. It is possible to vibrate.
The piezoelectric elements 161a to 163a and 161b to 163b have very low rigidity, and are easily distorted by reacting easily to the back pressure of the tube. Generate vibrations including

Reference numerals 15a and 15b denote belt-like rubber reinforcing materials attached to the front side of the boundary between the vibrating membrane 13a and the vibrating membrane 13b, respectively. In the state where no external force is applied, the boundary between the vibration films 13a and 13b is tightly closed by the rubber reinforcing material 15.
In the configuration described above, in the state where the boundaries of the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are closed, the space formed by the back side of the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b, the internal space of the flange 11 and the back cover 12 is a sealed space.
Reference numeral 20 denotes a pressurized air insertion port connected to an air tank (not shown). The pressurized air insertion port 20 penetrates the side surface of the flange 11 and communicates with the space filled with the sound absorbing material 19. Yes.

  FIG. 3 shows the relationship between the actuator 1 and the mouthpiece 2 of the brass instrument. FIG. 3A is a diagram showing a state where the actuator 1 is opposed to the mouthpiece 2, and FIG. 3B is a diagram showing a state where the actuator 1 is pressed against the mouthpiece 2. As shown in the figure, the actuator 1 is configured so that the vibration films 13 a and 13 b face the mouthpiece 2 and the vibration films 13 a and 13 b are pressed against the mouthpiece 2 to cover the lip contact portion of the mouthpiece 2. Although a fixing mechanism for fixing the actuator 1 to the brass instrument is not shown, any fixing mechanism can be used as long as the actuator 1 can be fixed by pressing it against the mouthpiece 2 with a predetermined pressing force. I do not care.

  In the state shown in FIG. 3B, when the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are vibrated while blowing pressurized air from the pressurized air insertion port 20, the boundary between the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b is moved to the mouse by the pressure of the pressurized air. It bends to the piece side to create a gap. Further, a gap due to vibration is also generated at the boundary between the vibration films 13a and 13b. Pressurized air is inserted into the wind instrument from the gap generated in this way. The sound waves generated by the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b are reflected by the morning glory portion (not shown) at the tip of the wind instrument and return to the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b. This morning glory part of the air vibrations will be in a state of getting on the pressurized air, and the air will only flow out, so the efficiency of acoustic radiation and acoustic reflection will increase, and a loud sound with directionality like a trumpet can be realized .

As described above, since the rigidity of the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b is set to be very weak, when excited at a frequency that does not match the resonance frequency of the brass instrument, it interferes with the reflected sound wave. Do not pronounce. This is very close to the state where a brass instrument is played by a human being and is natural.
On the other hand, when the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b vibrate at a frequency that matches the resonance frequency of the brass instrument, this sound wave resonates with the reflected wave and amplifies the sound pressure of the sound wave in the pipe, resulting in a natural and large volume like a brass instrument. Pronunciation. In this way, pronunciation using the resonance of the wind instrument is performed.

In the present embodiment, the vibration elements 163a, 162a, 161a and the vibration elements 163b, 162b, 161b are responsible for the high-frequency, mid-frequency, and low-frequency ranges, respectively. Response is possible in a wide frequency band.
Moreover, since the tension | tensile_strength which concerns on the diaphragm 13a, 13b can be made into arbitrary values with the film | membrane fixing screw 14, the tension | tensile_strength matched with the key (sound range) of the wind instrument can be set.
In addition, the sound absorbing material 19 can produce an acoustic effect equivalent to the area larger than the actual shape in the space behind the vibrating membranes 13a and 13b, so that the cavity of the human oral cavity and the bronchus and lungs in the back thereof can be created. Can be set to imitate.

[2. Performance device]
FIG. 4 is a diagram showing a schematic configuration of a performance device 100 using the actuator 1. In the figure, 3 is a trumpet, and 2 is a mouthpiece attached to the trumpet 3.
20a, 20b, 20c are piston valves. Piston solenoids 22a, 22b, and 22c are respectively arranged on the upper portions of the piston valves 20a, 20b, and 20c, and are arranged so that the axis of the plunger is the same as the axis of the corresponding piston valve. . As a result, the piston solenoids 22a, 22b, and 22c can respectively press down the corresponding piston valves. Since the trumpet 3 is a general trumpet, description of other components is omitted.

  In place of the piston solenoids 22a, 22b, and 22c, a hydraulic or pneumatic drive piston may be used. In short, as long as the piston valves 20a, 20b, and 20c of the trumpet 3 can be operated in accordance with the purpose of performance, the system may be operated in any manner.

  In FIG. 4, reference numeral 101 denotes a control unit including an arithmetic device such as a CPU (Central Processing Unit). A storage unit 102 includes a storage device such as a RAM (Random Access Memory), a ROM (Read Only Memory), or a hard disk, and stores various programs for operating each unit of the performance device 100. The control unit 101 controls each unit of the performance device 100 by reading and executing a program stored in the storage unit 102.

The storage unit 102 stores performance data D1 as shown in FIG. The performance data D1 is performance data in the MIDI (Musical Instruments Digital Interface) format, for example, and is performance data having data indicating each note corresponding to the performance of the music.
The performance data may be stored in advance in the storage unit of the performance device 100, or performance data generated from the performance data generation device may be supplied as needed.

  Reference numeral 103 denotes a sound source device, and 110a and 110b denote power amplifiers that drive the piezoelectric elements 161a to 163a and 161b to 163b of the actuator 1, respectively. The power amplifiers 110a and 110b are connected to the sound source device 103, and input signals to the piezo elements 161a to 163a and 161b to 163b in accordance with signals supplied from the sound source device 103, and the piezo elements are the vibrating membranes 13a or 13b. The sound wave is generated in the pipe by vibrating.

  In this way, by using the two power amplifiers 110a and 110b, the upper lip (vibration film 13a) and the lower lip (vibration film 13b) are driven with different vibration waveforms according to the performance data, thereby being rich near natural. Performance is possible. Note that the same drive waveform may be supplied from both power amplifiers 110a and 110b.

  A pressurized air control unit 104 is connected to the pressurized air insertion port 20 of the actuator 1 by an air path P. Reference numeral 105 denotes an air tank connected to the pressurized air control unit 104 through an air path P, and 106 denotes an air compressor. Under the control of the control unit 101, the pressurized air control unit 104 opens and closes a valve (not shown) in the air path P that is pressurized and inserted from the air tank 105 into the pressurized air insertion port 20. The amount of air to be inserted is adjusted by opening and closing.

  A piston control device 107 drives piston solenoids 22a, 22b, and 22c. The piston control device 107 determines the piston valve to be pressed and the pressing amount of the piston valves 20a, 20b, and 20c of the trumpet 3 under the control of the control unit 101, and the piston solenoids 22a to 22 corresponding to the determined piston valve. A drive current is supplied to 22c, and the piston valve is pressed down.

  The operation of this embodiment having the above-described configuration is as follows. When the control unit 101 reads the performance data D1 from the storage unit 102, the control unit 101 generates upper lip vibration information S1, lower lip vibration information S2, pressurized air information S3, and piston control information S4 from the read performance data. The upper lip vibration information S <b> 1 is a signal for vibrating the vibration film 13 a on the upper side of the actuator 1. The control unit 101 supplies the upper lip vibration information S1 to the power amplifier 110a, and the power amplifier 110a drives the piezo elements 161a to 163a according to the supplied signal.

  The lower lip vibration information S2 is a signal for vibrating the lower vibration film 13b of the actuator 1. The control unit 101 supplies the lower lip vibration information S2 to the power amplifier 110b, and the power amplifier 110b drives the piezo elements 161b to 163b according to the supplied signal. Further, the control unit 101 supplies the pressurized air information S3 to the pressurized air control unit 104, and the pressurized air control unit 104 adjusts the amount of air inserted into the actuator 1 in accordance with the supplied signal. Further, the control unit 101 generates piston control information S4, and the piston control device 107 drives the piston solenoids 22a, 22b, and 22c in accordance with the supplied signal. An automatic performance using the trumpet 3 is performed by the above processing.

In this embodiment, since there are two flexible vibration films 13a and 13b and power amplifiers 110a and 110b for vibrating the vibration films 13a and 13b so as to simulate actual lips, both vibration films By changing the vibration phases of 13a and 13b according to the input signal, it is possible to control from a large volume to a small volume even with a combination of input signals having a narrow amplitude width. For example, it is also possible to realize a rapid volume change while stabilizing the pitch (pitch), as performed by a skilled performer.
Here, FIGS. 5A to 5E show amplitude states (sound pressures) when the vibration phases of the upper and lower lips (vibrating films 13a and 13b) are adjusted. FIG. 5A shows a case where the same waveform is given in the same phase up and down, FIG. 5B shows a case where the same waveform is given up and down and the phase is shifted by 45 °, and FIG. FIG. 5D shows the case where the same waveform is given by shifting the phase up and down by 90 °, and FIG. 5D shows the case where the same waveform is given by shifting the phase up and down by 135 °. FIG. 5E shows the case where the same waveform is given up and down and the phase is shifted by 180 ° (inversion). In this case, the synthesized waveform is 0, and the air does not vibrate. As described above, by appropriately changing the waveforms applied to the upper and lower vibrating membranes 13a and 13b, it is possible to generate subtle vibrations in the double lead.

  FIG. 6 is a diagram showing waveforms when the lip is caused by slightly changing the vibration frequency of the upper and lower lips (vibrating films 13a and 13b). In this way, by slightly shifting the vibration frequency of both vibrating membranes 13a and 13b, a transient state that produces a subtle timbre that occurs in an actual brass instrument can be expressed, and a sound that includes subtle resounding can be steadily generated. Can also be generated. In this way, it is possible to enrich the timbre.

  In the embodiment described above, the piston controller 107 and the piston solenoid 22 (inside the two-dot broken line) shown in FIG. 4 may be omitted. When using a brass instrument such as a signal wrapper or bugle that does not have a pipe length adjusting device such as a piston, it is not necessary to adjust the pipe length.

  In the above-described embodiment, the control unit 101 generates the upper lip vibration information S1, the lower lip vibration information S2, the pressurized air information S3, and the piston control information S4 from the performance data, and the respective signals are respectively transmitted. Although supplied to the control device, these vibration information, pressurized air information, piston control information, and the like may be stored in advance as performance data.

[3. Generation of performance data]
Next, a method for generating the performance data described above will be described.
FIG. 7 is a diagram showing a schematic configuration of the performance data generating apparatus 200. As shown in FIG. In the figure, reference numeral 30 denotes a brass instrument mouthpiece. A vibration pressure sensor 31 detects air vibration (AC pressure component) and outputs a signal indicating air vibration. Reference numeral 32 denotes a static pressure sensor that detects an air flow (DC pressure component) and outputs a signal indicating the air flow.

  Reference numeral 33 denotes a sensor control device that receives signals output from the vibration pressure sensor 31 and the static pressure sensor 32. A data converter 34 converts a signal supplied from the sensor controller 33 into performance data D1 using a function or table stored in advance.

  When the performer blows into the mouthpiece 2, the air vibration and air flow at this time are detected by the vibration pressure sensor 31 and the static pressure sensor 32, respectively. The sensor control device 33 supplies signals detected by the respective sensors to the data conversion device 34, and the data conversion device 34 generates performance data D1 from the supplied signals.

  In this embodiment, measurement is performed using two sensors, the vibration pressure sensor 31 and the static pressure sensor 32, and thereby high-accuracy data can be obtained. Of course, it is possible to measure with the same sensor without using two types of sensors.

  These performance methods can perform what is stored as performance data in the form of data reproduction after the elapse of time, or perform so-called real-time performance simultaneously with performance data acquisition. It is also possible to use a computer network (remote performance) in the way of handling performance data different in time. It is also possible to play a plurality of brass instruments simultaneously using the performance data. In addition, by converting the pitch information of the performance data into octaves, it is possible to simultaneously play brass instruments with different sound ranges in Unison.

[4. Modified example]
Although the embodiment of the present invention has been described above, the present invention is not limited to the above-described embodiment, and can be implemented in various other forms. An example is shown below.
(1) In the above-described embodiment, three types of piezoelectric elements for high frequency, medium frequency, and low frequency are used. However, the number of types of piezoelectric elements is not limited to three. In the above-described embodiment, an example in which a piezo element is used has been described. However, a vibrator other than the piezo element may be used.
Further, a vibrator may be incorporated in the vibration film, or the vibration film itself may be configured by a flexible vibrator.

(2) The performance data generation method is not limited to the method described in the above embodiment. For example, as shown in FIG. 8, the trumpet 3 is provided with a muffler 36 and a microphone 37 to mute the sound. The signal output from the microphone 37 installed in the device 36 may be converted into performance data by the data converter 34.

  Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 9, a musical sound generated from the trumpet 3 may be collected by the microphone 5, and the collected sound waveform may be converted into performance data by the data converter 34. Also, air flow data estimated with reference to past measurement experimental values may be created based on the signal from the microphone in the data arithmetic processing converter of FIG. 8 or FIG.

(3) The vibration films 13a and 13b of the actuator 1 are appropriately pressed against the mouthpiece by the arm of the performance device, the arm of the robot, or the like. Since the sound output differs depending on the subtle difference in the pressing, the pressing force may be controlled. By adding such control, it is possible to express subtle nuances such as actual human performance.

(4) In the above-described embodiment, pressurized air is used as the pressurized gas, but the gas used may be other than air. A pressurized gas may be selected in accordance with a desired tone color.

(5) In the above-described embodiment, the vibration films 13a and 13b are used. That is, although two upper and lower diaphragms are used for the mouthpiece, the number of diaphragms is not limited to two and may be three or more. Further, when the mouthpiece is covered with a plurality of vibrating membranes, there are various modes for enclosing the mouthpiece. For example, FIG. 10A uses two diaphragms 130 and 131, but the upper diaphragm 130 has a smaller area covering the mouthpiece 2. In the example shown in FIG. 10B, the four vibrating membranes 130 to 133 cover the mouthpiece radially. In the example shown in (c) of FIG. 10, the three vibrating membranes 130, 131, and 132 cover the mouthpiece 2 by being divided in the vertical direction. In order to approach a human lip lead, it is not always necessary to have two diaphragms, and an appropriate number and shape can be set. Of course, various shapes and numbers may be set for the diaphragm in order to realize new performance effects and performance expressions that are not found in human performance.

It is a sectional side view of an actuator which is an embodiment of the present invention. It is a front view of the actuator of the embodiment. It is a figure which shows the relationship between the actuator and mouthpiece of the embodiment. It is a figure which shows the relationship between the actuator and mouthpiece of the embodiment. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the performance apparatus of the embodiment. It is a figure which shows the amplitude condition at the time of giving the same waveform to the upper and lower vibration film in the same phase. It is a figure which shows the amplitude condition at the time of giving the same waveform up and down and shifting the phase by 45 degrees. It is a figure which shows the amplitude condition at the time of giving the same waveform up and down and shifting the phase by 90 degrees. It is a figure which shows the amplitude condition at the time of giving the same waveform up and down and shifting the phase by 135 degrees. It is a figure which shows the amplitude condition at the time of giving the same waveform up and down and shifting the phase by 180 degrees (inversion). It is a figure which shows the waveform which concerns on the same embodiment. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the performance data generation apparatus of the embodiment. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the performance data generation apparatus which concerns on a modification. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the performance data generation apparatus which concerns on a modification. It is a figure which shows an example of a structure of the diaphragm which concerns on a modification.

Explanation of symbols

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 ... Actuator, 11 ... Flange, 12 ... Back cover, 13a, 13b ... Vibration membrane,
DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 14 ... Membrane fixing screw, 15 ... Rubber reinforcement material, 161a, 161b ... Piezo element for high region, 162a, 162b ... Piezo element for middle region, 163a, 163b ... Piezo element for low region, 17 ... Damper material, 18 ... Wire mesh Cover, 19 ... Sound absorbing material, 20 ... Pressurized air insertion port, 2 ... Mouthpiece, 3 ... Trumpet, 20a, 20b, 20c ... Piston valve, 22a, 22b, 22c ... Solenoid for piston, 100 ... Performance device, 101 ... Control part 102 ... Memory | storage part 103 ... Sound source device 104 ... Pressurized air control part 105 ... Air tank 106 ... Air compressor 110a, 110b ... Power amplifier.

Claims (8)

  1. A membrane assembly composed of a plurality of flexible membranes covering the lip contact portion of the mouthpiece of a brass instrument,
    A sealed space forming member that three-dimensionally covers the membrane assembly and forms a sealed space together with the membrane assembly;
    A pressurized gas introduction means for introducing a pressurized gas into the sealed space forming member and sending the pressurized gas to the mouthpiece side through the boundary of each film;
    A brass instrument playing actuator comprising: a vibrator provided on each of the films and vibrating each of the films in accordance with a supplied excitation signal.
  2.   2. The brass instrument playing actuator according to claim 1, wherein the vibrator is constituted by a piezoelectric element.
  3.   3. The brass musical instrument playing actuator according to claim 2, wherein the piezoelectric element used for each film is composed of a plurality of piezoelectric elements having different vibration bands.
  4.   4. The brass instrument playing actuator according to claim 2, wherein the piezoelectric element is formed in a film shape.
  5.   2. The brass instrument playing actuator according to claim 1, wherein each of the films also serves as a vibrator that vibrates in response to an excitation signal.
  6. A brass instrument playing actuator according to any one of claims 1 to 5,
    A brass instrument playing device comprising: excitation signal generating means for generating the excitation signal based on performance data indicating the content of a musical sound.
  7. A brass instrument playing actuator according to any one of claims 1 to 5,
    A pressurized gas control means for controlling an introduction amount of the pressurized gas introduced into the sealed space forming member based on a pressurized gas control signal;
    A brass instrument playing device comprising: a pressurized gas control signal generating means for generating the pressurized gas control signal based on performance data indicating the content of a musical sound.
  8. A performance operator driving means for driving the performance operator of the wind instrument based on the drive signal;
    The brass instrument playing device according to claim 6, further comprising: drive signal generating means for generating the drive signal based on a pitch indicated by the performance data.
JP2005250014A 2005-08-30 2005-08-30 Brass instrument playing actuator and brass instrument playing apparatus Expired - Fee Related JP4552809B2 (en)

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JP2007264345A (en) * 2006-03-29 2007-10-11 Toyota Motor Corp Wind instrument player and adapter for playing
JP4301325B2 (en) * 2007-05-28 2009-07-22 ヤマハ株式会社 Musical instrument playing actuator, performance assisting mouthpiece, brass instrument, automatic performance device and performance assisting device
KR101389500B1 (en) 2012-11-20 2014-04-29 주식회사 필룩스 Speaker of a musical instrument type
CN105471319B (en) * 2015-12-30 2017-06-16 南京理工大学 A kind of air-flow cause sound piezo-electric generating forced vibration device
CN105391345B (en) * 2015-12-30 2017-06-16 南京理工大学 A kind of piezoelectric generator fluid dynamic sound source excitation method

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JP2004177828A (en) * 2002-11-28 2004-06-24 Yamaha Corp Automatic wind instrument playing device
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