JP4128970B2 - Golf club - Google Patents

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JP4128970B2
JP4128970B2 JP2004075939A JP2004075939A JP4128970B2 JP 4128970 B2 JP4128970 B2 JP 4128970B2 JP 2004075939 A JP2004075939 A JP 2004075939A JP 2004075939 A JP2004075939 A JP 2004075939A JP 4128970 B2 JP4128970 B2 JP 4128970B2
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portion
golf club
part
rigidity
sole
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JP2004313762A (en
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貴之 安藤
勝弘 小林
政衛 鶴巻
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株式会社遠藤製作所
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  The present invention relates to a golf club. More specifically, the present invention relates to a golf club having a particularly improved sole portion for expanding a sweet area in the downward direction of the face surface and improving a flight distance.

Various golf clubs are prepared according to course conditions. In the first hit of the normal middle course and long course, a golf club called a driver is used to extend the flight distance. Since the flight distance directly affects the score, the position of the hit point on the golf club head is an important factor. The striking surface of the golf club is referred to as a face surface, and the user usually does not hit the face surface off the surface under any conditions.
In the address state, the center of gravity projected onto the face surface of the driver club head is located above the center of the face surface when the face surface is viewed from the front. This is because the mass of the club head is inevitably biased upward due to the relation that the upper surface side is wide and the lower side is narrow and substantially inverted trapezoidal or approximately inverted triangular when viewed from the face surface shape. Another reason is that since a portion called a hosel into which the shaft is inserted is attached upward, the mass is further added to the upper position.

The position of the center of gravity is said to be a low center of gravity model, for example, even if it is at the face surface height and approximately 60% from the bottom surface of the sole portion. The hitting position referred to as a so-called sweet area is in the vicinity of the center of gravity and is the area where the flight distance is maximized. For this reason, in order to take advantage of the maximum repulsion property of the head and obtain a flight distance, it is usually necessary to hit in the sweet area above the center of the face. However, depending on the course conditions, not only general amateur golfers whose hit points vary, but even professional golfers may intentionally shift their hit points.
For example, in a headwind (against), if the ball is hit normally, the ball is hit by the wind and the flight distance does not increase. In this case, the hitting point position is usually the lower position of the face surface. However, in this case, the repulsive force is reduced, and the flight distance does not increase compared to the hit in the sweet area. This is because, as described above, the center of gravity is above the face surface, that is, the sweet area that is a high repulsion area is near the center of gravity, and if it is out of the sweet area, the repulsive force decreases. is there.

  For this reason, a repulsive force comparable to that of the conventional sweet area is required even at the lower position of the face portion, and various methods for solving this have been proposed. For example, as a method for increasing the repulsive force, a golf club is disclosed in which a specific area of the face surface is limited and a repulsion coefficient is set to reduce a decrease in flight distance even during offset hitting (for example, Patent Document 1). In addition, as a method of lowering the center of gravity point and consequently increasing the repulsive force of the lower position, a method of providing a weight at the lower position or widening the sweet area in the lower direction has been made (for example, Patent Documents) 2).

On the other hand, as a technique for increasing the rigidity of the golf club, a technique for providing a reinforcing rib on the face portion and increasing the flight distance without giving extra deformation to the sole portion or the crown portion at the time of hitting (for example, Patent Document 3), A technique (for example, Patent Document 4) is disclosed in which a plurality of metal shells are formed inside a head, and a spherical sound adjusting portion is formed on the inner wall of a side peripheral portion by overlay welding to suppress distortion.
JP 2002-17912 A Japanese Patent Laid-Open No. 2002-17908 JP 2000-176056 A JP 2001-54596 A

As described above, a device for extending the flight distance under various conditions has been devised, but the problem is not necessarily solved in a satisfactory state. In particular, there is room for further improvement in order to improve the resilience at the lower position outside the sweet area. The above-mentioned method of limiting the specific area of the face surface and setting the restitution coefficient of the specific part is to reduce the thickness of the face part of the specific area and change the thickness from the center part to the peripheral part. As a result, the repulsion effect is enhanced.
However, although it is effective if it is a specific part, it does not surely increase and maintain the repulsion effect even at the lower position of the face part. Reducing the thickness of the face portion has low rigidity and there is a limit to reducing the thickness itself. On the other hand, if it is too thin, there is also a problem that the repulsion is worsened. In addition, although the method of providing the weight is effective as it is, there is a limit in a golf club that tends to increase the volume of the head.

In other words, if the head becomes large, adding a weight causes a new problem that the mass of the club head becomes heavy. In addition, the above-described techniques for increasing the rigidity of the club head are merely techniques for increasing the rigidity of the entire body. One part of the same club head has a low rigidity to increase the coefficient of restitution, and the other. It does not have a dual purpose of increasing rigidity and improving the flight distance.
Furthermore, the golf industry is a world that values tradition. If the shape, weight, etc. of the head are significantly different from the conventional one, the swing must be changed, and the rhythm will be damaged. Even if an epoch-making product is developed, a long period of time is required for stable swing fixation on the golf course. Therefore, in golf clubs that are currently on the market and in which the use of players is firmly established, changing the shape greatly causes various troubles such as swing changes. Therefore, it is ideal to develop a club that satisfies the golfer as the appearance of the golf club is improved without changing the current shape greatly.

  Therefore, the rebound area can be expanded, especially in the lower direction, without greatly differing from the conventional shape and without special and limited functions, and even in the lower position including the conventional sweet area, the rebound performance is higher than before. Therefore, it is desired to develop a golf club capable of stably extending a flight distance even under a condition of against.

The present invention has been made based on the technical background as described above, and achieves the following object.
An object of the present invention is to provide a golf club that does not decrease the flight distance even when the ball is hit at the lower position as well as the conventional sweet area.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf club in which when the golf club is addressed, the appearance shape seen from the player is the same as the conventional one, and the hitting performance is improved as compared with the conventional one.
Still another object of the present invention is to provide a golf club that has improved hitting performance and can be produced by the same processing method as before.

The present invention adopts the following means in order to achieve the object.
The golf club according to the first aspect of the present invention includes a face portion which is disposed on the front surface of a metal hollow golf club head and has a striking surface for striking a golf ball, and a body portion constituting the rest.
The body part is
A sole portion forming a lower portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
A crown portion forming an upper portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
A toe portion forming a front portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
A heel portion forming a rear portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
A back portion that is positioned opposite to the face portion and forms a rear portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
In a golf club comprising a hosel part to which a shaft is connected,
An elastically deformable portion formed on the body portion near the end of the face portion and having a structure that is easily elastically deformed by the impact;
It is arranged on the body part on the back part side of the elastic deformation part, and comprises a high-rigidity part for increasing the rigidity of a specific part of the arranged body part.

The golf club of the present invention 2, a golf club according to the present invention 1, wherein the elastically deformable portion is for the sole portion and a lower portion of the face portion is disposed in said sole portion for coupling said high rigidity The portion is arranged on the sole portion in order to increase the rigidity of the sole portion.

The golf club of the present invention 3 is the golf club according to the first or second aspect of the present invention,
The high-rigidity portion is a high-rigidity body having a shape divided into a plurality of portions.

As described in detail above, the golf club of the present invention does not decrease the flight distance even when hitting a golf ball at this lower position as well as the conventional sweet area. The appearance shape is the same as before, the hitting performance is improved as compared with the conventional shape, and it can be produced by the same processing method as before.
Also, the golf club of the present invention does not apply psychological pressure to the player because the appearance seen from the player is the same as the conventional one when the golf club is addressed. Furthermore, the golf club of the present invention has an effect that the flight distance does not change from hitting in a conventional sweet area even if the golf ball has a low trajectory.

[First Embodiment]
FIG. 1 is an external view of the entire golf club according to the present invention, and shows a driver club head. The golf club of the present invention is particularly intended for metal hollow golf club heads. In the description of the first embodiment, a driver club head will be described. The driver club head 1 according to the first embodiment is supported by a shaft A. 2 to 4 show an embodiment of a driver club head 1 in a metal hollow golf club according to the first embodiment. 2 and subsequent figures show only the head portion, and members such as the shaft A are omitted.

  2 is a plan view of the driver club head when the golf club is placed in an address state, FIG. 3 is a front view of the driver club head, and FIG. 4 is a side view of the driver club head. As shown in these drawings, a driver club head (hereinafter also referred to as a head) 1 includes a crown portion 2 that hits the upper portion, a sole portion 3 that hits the bottom portion, a face portion 4 on which a golf ball is hit, and a head 1 A member for supporting the driver club head 1 on the shaft A, a toe portion 5 that contacts the front portion, a heel portion 6 that contacts the rear portion of the head 1, a back portion 14 that contacts the rear portion of the head opposite to the face portion 4, and It is composed of a hosel part 7. In this embodiment, the components other than the face portion 4 such as the crown portion 2, the sole portion 3, the toe portion 5, the heel portion 6, the back portion 14, and the hosel portion 7 are described as the body portion.

  Each part is assembled as a single member by combining individual parts or a plurality of parts in production. Each part is composed of parts, and each part is pressed and integrated by welding or the like. The For example, as a divided part, this golf club is composed of a face part 4, a sole part 3, a crown part 2, a hosel part 7, and a weight. A plate material is cut into a predetermined shape, and heated and press-molded. The heating temperature is, for example, 400 ° C. for the face portion 4 and 900 ° C. for the body portions such as the sole portion 3 and the crown portion 2.

  After being pressed, burrs are removed (trimmed) and TIG welding is performed. In the first embodiment, the material is a titanium alloy, and the parts are welded by butting the face portion 4 and the sole portion 3, and then the hosel portion 7 is joined and welded, and the pressed crown portion 2 is pressed. The members are joined by TIG welding. In this way, the driver club head 1 is integrated and assembled. After welding, this driver club head 1 is subjected to an age hardening treatment (515 ° C. for 5 hours), which is a well-known technique, polished, and completed through a coating process and the like.

The face portion 4 has a curved surface protruding outward, and a plate-like plate is bonded to the face portion 4. The maximum area of the restitution coefficient is the sweet area 9 near the center of gravity 8. Usually, in order to fly a golf ball far away, it is effective to hit the sweet area 9, and for this reason, the repulsion coefficient of this portion is set high. It is well known that if the coefficient of restitution is increased, a golf ball flies far away. This coefficient of restitution occupies an important factor in the performance of a golf club, and a measurement standard is set by the American Golf Association (USGA). This is determined by the following equation:
Vout / Vin = eM−m / M + m
In the above equation, m is the average mass of the test balls, M is the head mass, Vout is the speed after the collision of the test balls, and Vin is the speed before the collision of the test balls. Therefore, Vout / Vin indicates the speed ratio. e is a coefficient of restitution. According to the regulations, the test golf ball is a pinnacle gold (trade name) ball, in which each ball is numbered in advance and the initial velocity is measured and recorded. The average weight is 45.4 grams.

The ball is defined as being stored in a room of 23 ± 1.0 ° C., and the collision speed is determined to be 48.8 m / s. In addition, it is defined in detail in test equipment such as a ball launcher and a ballistic screen, and the test method is defined in detail as well, such as mapping. The reference value for the coefficient of restitution is e = 0.822. Whether the head is suitable or not is determined by comparing the actual collision speed ratio with the reference speed ratio according to the above-mentioned regulations based on the measured mass.
On the other hand, by applying the repulsion coefficient to the above formula, if other conditions are determined, it can be calculated by back calculation. For example, by changing the mass of the head, such as changing the thickness of the face portion 4, it is possible to calculate the restitution coefficient and determine the optimum numerical value setting. As is clear from the above formula, the high speed of the golf ball after collision (hereinafter referred to as a ball) means that the coefficient of restitution is high. The first embodiment is devised so that a test is conducted based on such a definition, and the above-described conventional sweet area is shifted downward and widened within a specified reference value.

  Hereinafter, the first embodiment will be described in detail. In the present invention, an elastically deformable portion that can be elastically deformed when a ball is hit is provided in the body portion in the vicinity of the face portion 4, and further, the rigidity is increased in the vicinity of the elastically deformable portion and on the back portion 14 side. A structure in which a highly rigid portion is provided in the body portion. Therefore, it goes without saying that the elastically deformable portion of the present invention can be applied to the crown portion 2, the toe portion 5, and the heel portion 6 in addition to the sole portion 3. In the first embodiment, the elastically deformable portion is used as the sole portion. This will be explained with the application to the part. FIG. 5 is a side view of a conventional driver club head and corresponds to the side view of the first embodiment shown in FIG. 4 of the present invention.

  FIG. 4 shows an improved example of the sole portion 3, in which an elastically deformable portion capable of elastic deformation is provided and a part of the sole portion 3 is configured with high rigidity. As shown in FIG. 4, a part of the sole portion 3 on the face portion 4 side is a convex portion 10 and a groove 11 when viewed from the crown portion 2 side between the face portion 4 and the back portion 14. The structure is elastically deformable. The convex portion 10 is a portion that is relatively swollen by forming a groove (also referred to as a concave portion) 11. Alternatively, it can be seen that the grooves 11 are relatively formed by forming the convex portions 10. The groove 11 has a gently sloping surface that can be elastically deformed, bulges in the direction of the crown portion 2 in appearance, and has a concave outer shape.

  As shown in FIG. 4, the convex portion 10 and the groove 11 have a shape that forms a gentle curve continuously as a whole. The sole portion 3 on the face portion 4 side is a cut surface obtained by setting a perpendicular to the striking surface of the face portion 4 and cutting along a vertical surface including the perpendicular (a surface including a straight line in a direction indicated by a thread in which an object is suspended). The convex portion 10 is formed at a predetermined angle α (see FIG. 6). The reason why the uneven portion is provided on the sole portion 3 is to give the sole portion 3 an elastic effect when the golf ball is hit. This uneven portion is configured as one of the features of the first embodiment as an elastically deformable portion B that can be elastically deformed. FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line XX shown in FIG. 3 and is a cross-sectional view illustrating the first embodiment in a simplified manner.

As described above, the head 1 is a combination of pressed parts. Accordingly, the portion corresponding to the outline in the figure has a constant thickness, and is a press member formed of a titanium alloy, and the inside C of the head portion is a space portion. In FIG. 6, portion D is a conventional sole portion position. In contrast, in the first embodiment, as shown in the figure, a part is formed as a convex portion 10, and the sole portion below the face portion 4 is formed. 3 is an elastically deformable portion B.
The elastic deformation portion B has a structure in which a part of the lower portion of the face portion 4 is bent, and protrudes toward the sole portion 3 so as to be integrated with the sole portion 3. The protruding thickness (height) E of the convex portion 10 of the elastically deformable portion B is, for example, about 6 mm. When a striking force of F is applied to the striking surface of the face portion 4 as shown by the arrow in FIG. 6, the head itself is elastically deformed in a complex manner. In the first embodiment, an uneven elastic deformation portion B is provided on the sole portion 3 so that the elastic deformation is concentrated on the sole portion 3 side.

  As a result, the sole portion 3 can obtain a considerable elastic effect even when compared with a configuration in which the face portion 4 is as before, for example, a configuration in which the thickness of the face portion 4 is reduced to increase the repulsive force. If the thickness of the face portion 4 is intentionally reduced in order to increase the repulsive force, the rigidity of the head portion itself is weakened. This elastic deformation part B is not limited to the shape shown in this example. Any shape may be used as long as it provides an elastic effect, but an uneven shape is preferred.

Next, the reason for the high rigidity construction will be described. As described above, the structure in which only a part of the sole portion 3 is made uneven so as to be elastically deformable is also a structure that is effective as it has a high repulsive force. However, it is even more effective if the repulsive force is made closer to the instantaneous force. Since the first embodiment has made this possible, the configuration for increasing the rigidity will be described with reference to FIG.
As described above, the elastic deformation portion of the first embodiment is formed such that a part of the face portion 4 is integrally projected (projected) toward the sole portion 3 side. The overhanging portion is slightly thicker than the conventional one because the face portion 4 is bent toward the sole portion 3 side, and is connected to the sole portion 3 to form an integral shape as the convex portion 10. The bent shape gently curves and is reinforced with the same thickness as the face portion 4, and the overhanging portion is elastically deformed when hit by a ball.

  As described above, providing the projections and depressions on the sole portion 3 increases the elastic force and improves the coefficient of restitution. In the first embodiment, a high-rigid body 12 is provided in addition to such a configuration. The rigidity is a physical quantity represented by the reciprocal of this proportionality constant, although the amount of deformation generated at this point is proportional to the value of the load due to the load acting on a part of the solid. Accordingly, high rigidity means that the amount of deformation of the solid is small, and low rigidity means that the amount of deformation of the solid is large.

  Although this overhanging portion is elastically deformed, the rigidity is enhanced by the high-rigidity body 12, so that when the impact force is received, the repulsion effect is further enhanced. That is, the repulsive force is close to the instantaneous force and produces the effect of repelling in a short time. When a striking force is generated in the face portion 4, the concave and convex portions are low in rigidity, so that they bend for a moment. Furthermore, since the back portion 14 side of the overhanging portion is made highly rigid by the high-rigidity body 12, when the striking force is received, it works in a direction that instantly eliminates the low-rigidity deflection, and the sole portion 3 quickly returns to its original shape. It is a function to restore. Accordingly, the repulsive force is increased and the flight distance of the ball is extended. Next, a configuration in which a high-rigid body 12 is provided in order to achieve high rigidity and has a repulsive effect will be specifically described.

  FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the golf club as viewed from the Y direction in FIG. 3 and viewed from the sole portion 3 side. As shown also in FIG. 6, three thin plates are welded to the back surface of the sole portion 3 so as to reinforce the sole portion 3 to obtain a high-rigidity body (high-rigidity portion) 12. The three thin plates are rectangular plate materials arranged in parallel to each other from the back portion 14 side to the face portion 4 side. By fixing this thin plate, the high rigidity portion of the golf club is partially reinforced in addition to the high rigidity convex portion 10.

[Second Embodiment]
FIG. 8 shows a second embodiment in which the shape of the sole portion 3 is different from that in FIG. Also in the second embodiment, a part of the face portion 4 has the same bent portion 4a as in FIG. 6, and is projected to the sole portion 3 side so as to be integrated with the sole portion 3 to achieve high rigidity. The difference from FIG. 6 is that an elastically deformable groove (or also referred to as a recess) 13 is positively provided. With this configuration, a thin plate as the high-rigid body 12 is provided on the back surface of the sole portion 3 in the same manner as that shown in FIG.

As described above, the unevenness is provided in the sole portion 3, but the unevenness may have a plurality of wave-like elastically deformable shapes. In addition, the convex portion has been described by bending the lower portion of the face portion 3, but high rigidity may be achieved by a configuration in which a plate-like member other than the face portion 3 is welded. Furthermore, as described above, it goes without saying that the first embodiment can be applied to the crown portion 2, the toe portion 5, and the heel portion 6 in addition to the sole portion 3.
When the golf club is placed in the address state, the crown portion 2 has a shape protruding in a convex shape in the upper direction on a cut surface cut along a vertical surface including a perpendicular line standing on the striking surface. In the same state, the toe part 5 has a shape protruding outward from the center part of the body part. In the same state, the heel portion 6 has a shape protruding outward from the center portion of the body portion. Even when a high-rigidity body is disposed in addition to the sole portion 3, the body portion in the vicinity of the face portion 4 is configured to be elastically deformable as in the case of application to the sole portion 3.

Detailed Explanation of Elastic Deformation Part B FIG. 6 is a simplified view of the XX cross section of FIG. 3, while FIG. 9 is a diagram showing the details thereof. In order to deepen the understanding, the configuration of the elastic deformation portion B will be described in detail with reference to FIG. As described above, the lower part of the face part 4 is bent toward the sole part 3, and forms a bent part 4 a to form a part of the sole part 3. The bent portions of the face portion 4 and the bent portion 4a are bent to form a first bent portion G.
This first bent portion G intersects a tangent line S1 at a substantially central portion of the striking surface of the face portion 4 with a tangent line S2 at a substantially central portion of the bent portion 4a, and the intersection point is gently curved. The intersecting angle α is 90 degrees or more. The angle α of the first bent portion G is not less than 90 degrees and not more than 135 degrees. Preferably, it is 90 degrees or more and 120 degrees or less. This was confirmed by the present inventor based on actual measurement data. This angle is measured using a protractor. Since the striking surface of the face part 4 has a substantially uniform round, when the protractor is applied (in other words, when a tangent is drawn), the gap between the straight line and the curve is measured so that it is almost the same on the left and right. . The bent portion 4a constitutes a part of the sole portion 3 when it is bent.

  Further, the face portion 4 side of the sole portion 3 is coupled to the tip of the bent portion 4a, and the coupled portion is bent to form a second bent portion H. The shape shown in the figure is a concave shape in which a part of the sole portion 3 protrudes in the direction of the crown portion 2, but a configuration without a concave portion is also possible. The second bent portion H is gently formed by intersecting the tangent line S2 of the bent portion 4a and the tangent line S3 of the substantially central portion of the sole portion 3, and the angle α1 is an obtuse angle of 90 degrees or more. The second bent portion H is in a virtual position. In the case of FIG. 9, since part of the sole portion 3 constitutes a recess, it does not appear as an actual state.

The plate thickness t2 of the sole portion 3 is thinner than the plate thickness t1 of the face portion 4. Further, in the second embodiment shown in the figure, the concave portion has a gentle curve immediately from the end portion of the sole portion 3, and is provided in the sole portion 3 as an arch-shaped groove i (11). The arch-shaped groove i has a gently continuous curve. A third bent portion J is formed between a part of the arch-shaped groove i and the bent portion 4a. The third bent portion J is gently formed by intersecting the tangent S2 of the bent portion 4a and the tangent S4 of the substantially rising portion of the groove i, and the angle α2 is an obtuse angle of 90 degrees or more.
Further, the groove i bends gently and continuously with a part of the surface of the sole portion 3 on the back portion 14 side to form a fourth bent portion K. The fourth bent portion K is gently formed by intersecting the tangent S5 of the substantially rising portion on the back portion 14 side of the groove i and the tangent S3 of the sole portion 3, and the angle α3 is an obtuse angle of 90 degrees or more. ing. Each bent portion including the groove i constitutes a part of the elastically deformable portion B. By configuring the elastically deforming portion B in such a configuration, it is possible to maintain a state of high rigidity as in the past within a range defined by the standard without reducing the thickness on the face portion 4 side. On the other hand, the rigidity on the sole portion 3 side is made relatively lower than that on the face portion 4 side.

  In FIG. 9, one arch-shaped groove (recess) i is provided, but a plurality of arch-shaped grooves (recesses) i may be provided. In other words, the cross-sectional shape shown in FIG. 9 is that if the clockwise rotation angle (α) rotating from the tangent line S1 to the tangent line S2 is positive and the counterclockwise direction is negative, the tangent line S1 to tangent line S2 is positive. To tangent S4 continuously changes from plus, tangent S4 to tangent S5 minus, and tangent S5 to tangent S3 continuously plus. That is, one continuous positive and negative change from the tangent S1 to the tangent S3 means that one recess is formed. Two changes mean that two recesses are formed. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 9, the plus and minus angle change is an angle change within 90 degrees, which means that the concave portion is a concave groove having a gentle curvature. Those having no change in angle from plus to minus have a configuration without a recess.

  The crown portion 2 has a conventional shape, and the appearance of the face portion 4 side does not change when viewed from the player when the golf club is addressed. By lowering the rigidity of the sole portion 3 side compared to the face portion 4 side, the lower portion of the face portion 4 is easily bent with respect to impact. By adopting a gentle curve configuration, the shock is reduced and the risk of strength reduction such as cracking of the golf club itself at the time of impact is eliminated, and the spring effect is enhanced. For this reason, the conventional sweet area 9 will approach the sole part 3 side. That is, the sweet area 9 spreads downward and enhances the repulsion effect.

  When hitting downward in the face portion 4 (less than a position of about 60% in height from the sole portion 3 side), the face portion 4 is caused by a spring effect due to a gentle bending portion on the sole portion 3 side and bending through the groove. The lower part of the striking surface is bent to enhance the repulsion effect. As a result, the golf club according to the first embodiment can shift the conventional sweet area 9 in the downward direction of the striking surface of the face portion 4. As a result, the sweet area 9 is widened. For this reason, even if the ball is hit at the lower position of the face portion 4, the flight distance is not reduced as in the prior art, and the flight distance can be stably extended. Further, since the sweet area 9 is widened, the maximum repulsion coefficient can be increased. Furthermore, in the first embodiment, a high-rigid body 12 is provided on the back surface of the sole portion 3 in addition to this configuration. For this reason, this golf club 1 is configured to be highly rigid and elastically deformable. This configuration can improve the impact performance.

  FIG. 10 is an explanatory view schematically showing a state in which the ball 23 is hit on the hitting surface of the face portion 4. This shows the striking state of the ball 23 at the position F shown in FIG. 6, and the principle content of the above-described configuration will be described in detail with reference to FIG. When the ball 23 is hit on the face portion 4, the face portion 4 and the sole portion 3 are deformed in the direction of the back portion 14 as indicated by a two-dot chain line in FIG. 10. One ball 23 is also deformed. Reducing the deformation amount of the ball 23 reduces the hysteresis loss accompanying the deformation of the ball 23 when returning to the original spherical shape due to the elasticity of the ball 23. Therefore, a small deformation amount of the ball 23 means that a hitting energy loss of the ball 23 is small. When the deformation amount of the face portion 4 is increased, the deformation amount of the ball 23 can be relatively reduced, the restitution coefficient can be increased, and the flight distance of the ball 23 can be extended.

  At this time, the sole portion 3 is also deformed downward as the face portion 4 is deformed by the impact. However, conventionally, the angle formed by the face portion 4 and the sole portion 3 has been an acute angle as shown in FIG. In the first embodiment, as shown by the first bent portion G described above, by setting this angle to 90 degrees or more, the portion in the lower region from the center of the striking surface of the face portion 4 is particularly effective at the time of striking. However, the structure is less rigid and easily elastically deformed than before. In this way, the lower portion of the face portion 4 is elastically deformed more greatly than in the prior art due to the synergistic effect of the face portion 4 and the sole portion 3. At the same time, since the high-rigid body 12 of the sole portion 3 is disposed, this portion repels suddenly, so that when the ball is struck on the striking surface in the downward direction of the face portion 4, the restitution coefficient is not lowered as compared with the conventional case. The effect of extending the flight distance of the ball 23 occurs.

[Third Embodiment]
Next, a third embodiment will be described. FIG. 11 shows a third embodiment. Only the modified example of the elastically deformable portion B that can be elastically deformed due to the uneven shape will be described below with the sole portion 3 as an example. Providing a thin plate as the high-rigidity body 12 is common to the first embodiment described above, and a detailed description thereof will be omitted.
FIG. 11 shows a third embodiment. In this case, the face part 4 side of the sole part 3 has a bend with the sole part 3 at an obtuse angle α in a cut surface cut along a vertical plane (address state) including a perpendicular line standing on the striking surface of the face part 4. On the premise that it is formed, the aforementioned groove 13 (FIG. 8) is changed to a flat portion 13a. Compared to the above-described configuration, the configuration has no groove and projects outward as compared with the conventional configuration, but the back portion 14 and the face portion 4 are flat. When a hit is applied to the face portion 4, the flat portion 13a is elastically deformed to increase the restitution coefficient of the head.

[Fourth and fifth embodiments]
FIG. 12 shows a fourth embodiment, which is an example in which the entire sole portion 3 is projected from the face portion 4 to the back portion 14 as a convex portion 13b in a curved shape outside the head. FIG. 13 shows a fifth embodiment, which is an example in which the entire sole portion 3 is curvedly formed as a concave portion 15 extending from the face portion 4 to the back portion 14 inside the head.

[Sixth Embodiment]
FIG. 14 shows a sixth embodiment, which is a modified example of the joint portion from the bent portion 4 a to the sole portion 3. A bent portion 16 having a folded surface substantially parallel to the striking surface of the face portion 4 is formed as a coupling portion. The sole portion 3 extending from the bent portion 16 to the back portion 14 is substantially flat and has a linear shape in the sectional view of the figure. When the face portion 4 is hit, the bent portion 16 is greatly deformed.

[Seventh embodiment]
FIG. 15 shows a seventh embodiment. In this case, as described above, when the golf club is placed in the address state, the face portion 4 side of the sole portion 3 is a cut surface cut by a vertical plane including a perpendicular line to the striking surface of the face portion 4. In this configuration, a plurality of concave and convex portions are provided on the face portion 4 side of the sole portion 3. This configuration is based on the premise that the bent portion with the sole portion 3 is formed at an obtuse angle α. As shown in FIG. 15, there are three protrusions 17 and two grooves 18. The repulsion effect is the same as described above, but the uneven shape is slightly smaller than the above example due to space constraints.

[Eighth and ninth embodiments]
FIG. 16 shows an eighth embodiment. This embodiment is a modification of the groove i (11), but shows an arched form in which the groove 19 has a rectangular shape. FIG. 17 shows a ninth embodiment. This embodiment is also a modification of the groove i (11), but shows a rectangular arch shape in which the groove 20 forms a step. In either case, the effect is not different from the above case.

[Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Embodiments]
FIG. 18 shows a tenth embodiment in which the sole portion 3 has a low rigidity, and the plate thickness t3 of a part of the thin plate 21 of the sole part 3 is made thinner than the plate thickness t4 of the other part to reduce the rigidity. It is. FIG. 19 shows an eleventh embodiment in which the sole portion 3 has low rigidity, and a part of the sole portion 3 is divided (cut) to form a divided portion 3a and a divided portion 3b, and the face portion 4 is hit. This is a configuration in which the dividing portions 3a and 3b slide relative to each other. FIG. 20 shows a twelfth embodiment in which the sole portion 3 has a low rigidity. One or more through holes 22 are provided in a part of the sole portion 3 near the face portion 4 to reduce the rigidity of the sole portion 3. It is a thing.

  Although various embodiments have been described above, it goes without saying that the present embodiment is not limited to these embodiments. Although the elastic deformation part B and the high-rigidity body 12 are mainly described in the sole part 3, it is needless to say that the elastic deformation part B and the high-rigidity body 12 are applied to the entire body part. In addition, although explanations in the individual embodiments are omitted, it is common to provide the high-rigidity body 12 in addition to the elastically deformable portion B in any example. The elastically deforming portion B is preferably the uneven shape described above, but may be a gentle V-shape or a shape similar to a bellows. The elastic deformation portion B may have any shape as long as the elastic effect is enhanced and the rigidity is reduced.

Next, performance improvements related to these configurations will be described by replacing the examples with experimental examples. FIG. 21 shows experimental results applied to the golf club shown in the sixth embodiment of the present embodiment. In the present experimental example, a 4 to 5 g thin plate is welded to the back surface of the sole portion 3 as the high-rigidity body 12. FIG. 6 is a diagram showing a distribution of repulsion coefficients when a golf ball is hit on the face portion 4, and plots the positions of the same repulsion coefficients on contour lines based on experimental results. FIG. 22 is a drawing of the results of an experiment performed on the conventional golf club under the same striking conditions as in FIG. The experiment was conducted under the following conditions.
Face material: Cold rolled material of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al Thickness 2.9mm
Sole material: Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al Thickness 1.15mm
Crown part material: Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al Thickness 1.0mm
Volume: About 420cc Mass about 195g.
Loft angle β: 10.5 degrees Lie angle γ: 56.5 degrees

  In this experimental example, the maximum repulsion coefficient of the example shown in FIG. On the other hand, the maximum restitution coefficient of the conventional example of the data shown in FIG. 22 was 0.8199. Further, when the comparison is made under the same conditions, it is clear that the data shown in FIG. 21 has a higher repulsion coefficient on the sole portion 3 side than that in FIG. That is, it means that it is possible to fly a golf ball at a far distance even when hitting on the face portion 4 surface close to the sole portion 3 as compared with the conventional case. The effect is clear.

  FIG. 23 to FIG. 25 are data of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21, and are data diagrams showing the flight distance when the hit position of the face portion 4 is changed. The loft angle is 9.25 degrees, and the head weight is 208.4 g. FIG. 23 shows a case where the ball is hit at the center of the face portion 4, and the flying distance is 228.9 yards on average. FIG. 24 shows a case where the ball is hit near the crown part 2 by 5 mm from the center of the face part 4, and the flight distance is 228.2 yards on average. FIG. 25 shows a case where the ball is hit by 5 mm from the center of the face portion 4 and the flying distance is 228.7 yards on average. The flying distance was not so different regardless of where it was hit. In other words, even when hitting at the lower part near the sole part 3 from the center of the face part 4, it is shown that there is no decrease in the flight distance.

FIG. 1 is an external view showing the entire golf club. FIG. 2 is a plan view of the driver club head of the present invention. FIG. 3 is a front view of the driver club head of the present invention. FIG. 4 is a side view of the driver club head of the present invention and shows the first embodiment. FIG. 5 is a side view of a conventional driver club head. FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line XX of FIG. 3 and shows the first embodiment. 7 is a view taken in the direction of arrow Y in FIG. FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken at the same position as in FIG. 6 and shows a second embodiment. FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view showing details of FIG. FIG. 10 is an explanatory diagram when the ball is hit on the face portion. FIG. 11 is a cross-sectional view showing the third embodiment. FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view showing the fourth embodiment. FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view showing a fifth embodiment. FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view showing the sixth embodiment. FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional view showing the seventh embodiment. FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view showing the eighth embodiment. FIG. 17 is a cross-sectional view showing the ninth embodiment. FIG. 18 is a sectional view showing the tenth embodiment. FIG. 19 is a sectional view showing the eleventh embodiment. FIG. 20 is a sectional view showing the twelfth embodiment. FIG. 21 is a repulsion coefficient distribution diagram of a head in an embodiment in which a thin plate is provided on the back surface of the sole portion. FIG. 22 is a repulsion coefficient distribution diagram of a head in a conventional form. FIG. 23 is a diagram showing a flight distance result by hitting the face portion, and shows test values when hitting the center of the face portion. FIG. 24 is a diagram showing a flight distance result by hitting the face portion, and shows test values when hitting from a crown portion of 5 mm from the center of the face portion. FIG. 25 is a diagram showing a flight distance result by hitting the face portion, and shows test values when hitting from the sole portion by 5 mm from the center of the face portion.

Explanation of symbols

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 ... Driver club head 2 ... Crown part 3 ... Sole part 4 ... Face part 5 ... Toe part 6 ... Heel part 7 ... Hosel part 8 ... Center of gravity 9 ... Sweet area 10 ... Convex part 11 ... Groove 12 ... High rigid body (high (Rigid part)
14 ... Back part B ... Elastic deformation part

Claims (3)

  1. It is arranged on the front surface of a metal hollow golf club head, and comprises a face portion having a striking surface for striking a golf ball, and a body portion constituting the rest,
    The body part is
    A sole portion forming a lower portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
    A crown portion forming an upper portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
    A toe portion forming the metal hollow golf club head;
    A heel portion forming the metal hollow golf club head;
    A back portion that is positioned opposite to the face portion and forms a rear portion of the metal hollow golf club head;
    In a golf club comprising a hosel part to which a shaft is connected,
    An elastically deformable portion formed on the body portion near the end of the face portion and having a structure that is easily elastically deformed by the impact;
    A golf club comprising: a high-rigidity part arranged on the body part on the back part side of the elastically deforming part and for increasing the rigidity of a specific part of the arranged body part.
  2. The golf club according to claim 1,
    The elastic deformation portion is disposed on the sole portion where the lower portion of the face portion and the sole portion are coupled,
    The high-rigidity portion is disposed on the sole portion in order to increase the rigidity of the sole portion.
  3. In the golf club according to claim 1 or 2,
    The golf club according to claim 1, wherein the high-rigidity portion is a high-rigidity body having a shape divided into a plurality of parts.
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US8591353B1 (en) 2008-01-10 2013-11-26 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. Fairway wood golf club head
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