JP2014229481A - Charged particle ray application device - Google Patents

Charged particle ray application device Download PDF

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JP2014229481A
JP2014229481A JP2013108240A JP2013108240A JP2014229481A JP 2014229481 A JP2014229481 A JP 2014229481A JP 2013108240 A JP2013108240 A JP 2013108240A JP 2013108240 A JP2013108240 A JP 2013108240A JP 2014229481 A JP2014229481 A JP 2014229481A
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Prior art keywords
charged particle
array
lens
electron
application
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JP2013108240A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
百代 圓山
Momoyo Maruyama
百代 圓山
谷本 明佳
Akiyoshi Tanimoto
明佳 谷本
慎 榊原
Shin Sakakibara
慎 榊原
太田 洋也
Hiroya Ota
洋也 太田
早田 康成
Yasunari Hayata
康成 早田
直正 鈴木
Naomasa Suzuki
直正 鈴木
伊藤 博之
Hiroyuki Ito
博之 伊藤
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株式会社日立ハイテクノロジーズ
Hitachi High-Technologies Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/04Arrangements of electrodes and associated parts for generating or controlling the discharge, e.g. electron-optical arrangement, ion-optical arrangement
    • H01J37/10Lenses
    • H01J37/12Lenses electrostatic
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J37/00Discharge tubes with provision for introducing objects or material to be exposed to the discharge, e.g. for the purpose of examination or processing thereof
    • H01J37/02Details
    • H01J37/04Arrangements of electrodes and associated parts for generating or controlling the discharge, e.g. electron-optical arrangement, ion-optical arrangement
    • H01J37/153Electron-optical or ion-optical arrangements for the correction of image defects, e.g. stigmators
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/15Means for deflecting or directing discharge
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01JELECTRIC DISCHARGE TUBES OR DISCHARGE LAMPS
    • H01J2237/00Discharge tubes exposing object to beam, e.g. for analysis treatment, etching, imaging
    • H01J2237/153Correcting image defects, e.g. stigmators
    • H01J2237/1534Aberrations

Abstract

A charged particle beam application apparatus capable of correcting chromatic aberration and spherical aberration and performing high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-stable power source. In a charged particle beam application apparatus for irradiating a charged particle beam on a sample, at least one deflector array having a plurality of deflectors arranged in a region including the optical axis of the charged particle beam is provided. The deflector array 107 has a function of a concave lens with respect to the charged particle beam 101. [Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to a charged particle beam application apparatus for performing highly sensitive and highly efficient inspection and measurement.

  In a semiconductor or magnetic disk manufacturing process, a charged particle beam (hereinafter referred to as primary beam) such as an electron beam or ion beam is irradiated on a sample, and secondary charged particles such as secondary electrons generated (hereinafter referred to as secondary beam). For example, a charged particle beam length measuring device that acquires the above signal and measures the shape and dimensions of a pattern formed on a sample, and a charged particle beam inspection device that checks the presence or absence of defects are used. As such a charged particle beam application apparatus, a so-called scanning electron microscope (SEM) that scans a sample with a primary beam focused in a dot shape has been used.

  The SEM is characterized by higher resolution and deeper depth of focus than the optical microscope, and can observe the surface shape of the sample surface from micron to nanometer order. In addition, it is possible to perform surface analysis such as detecting foreign matter from the contrast of acquired images using the difference in the amount of reflected electrons generated according to the type of substance, or identifying the material of the foreign matter by analyzing the generated X-rays. . Thus, SEM is widely used for research and inspection analysis. Factors that determine the resolution of SEM include diffraction aberration, spherical aberration, chromatic aberration, and light source diameter. Of these, the diameter of the light source can be made sufficiently small by using a high-intensity electron source such as an FE (Field Emission) electron source. On the other hand, since the diffraction aberration is a physical quantity determined by the wavelength and the opening angle, it is difficult to avoid. In addition, since an electron lens cannot be a concave lens in principle as long as it is formed of a general rotationally symmetric magnetic pole or electrode, unlike an optical lens, correction of spherical aberration and chromatic aberration is not easy. For this reason, the resolution of the SEM has been improved by studying the shape and combination of the magnetic lens and the electrostatic lens so as to obtain a minimum beam diameter by balancing the above three aberrations.

  Up to now, a technology that corrects spherical aberration and chromatic aberration of an electron microscope has been put into practical use by breaking the rotational symmetry system by making full use of multipole lenses, and resolution that could not be achieved in the past has been achieved. . In the SEM, it is expected to perform high-resolution observation while using a low acceleration beam to reduce damage to the sample, and in this case, the influence of chromatic aberration is particularly great. For this reason, a multipole aberration corrector that can correct chromatic aberration has been mainly studied (see Patent Document 1). In this type of aberration corrector, the stability of the power source used for the multipole element is required to be about 0.1 ppm.

  On the other hand, in recent years, MEMS technology has been developed, and development of an electron optical system using a small electron lens and a deflector using the MEMS technology has been advanced. For example, in Patent Document 2, an electron beam emitted from a single electron gun is divided into a plurality of beams and individually focused by small lenses arranged in an array to form a plurality of beams. A type of electron beam inspection apparatus is disclosed. Patent Document 3 discloses a technique for dividing a beam into beamlets and focusing them on a common imaging point.

JP 2011-40256 A Japanese Patent No. 4878501 Special table 2009-543116 gazette

The inventors paid attention to a multipole aberration corrector capable of correcting chromatic aberration, which is particularly problematic in high-resolution observation, and further studied. As a result, it has been found that in this configuration, four stages of 12-pole lenses, that is, a total of 48 ultra-high stable power supplies (power fluctuations of 10 −12 or less) will be required. It was feared that meeting this requirement was technically and costly difficult.

  As described above, the aberration correction technique is an indispensable technique for increasing the resolution, but the multipole type aberration corrector has a problem that a large number of highly stable power supplies are required.

  An object of the present invention is to provide a charged particle beam application apparatus capable of correcting chromatic aberration and spherical aberration and performing high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-high stable power source.

In the present invention as an embodiment for solving the above problems, a charged particle beam application apparatus for irradiating a sample with a charged particle beam,
Comprising at least one deflector array in which a plurality of deflectors are arranged in a region including the optical axis of the charged particle beam;
The deflector array has a function of a concave lens with respect to the charged particle beam.

A charged particle beam application apparatus for irradiating a charged particle beam on a sample,
Comprising at least one deflector array in which a plurality of deflectors are arranged in a region including the optical axis of the charged particle beam;
The deflector array has a function of deflecting the charged particle beam in a direction away from the optical axis.

  According to the present invention, it is possible to provide a charged particle beam application apparatus capable of correcting chromatic aberration and spherical aberration and performing high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-high stable power source.

It is sectional drawing for demonstrating the aberration correction method in the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on 1st Example of this invention, and the structure of an aberration corrector, (a) is the case where there is no aberration correction, (b) is ( When a beam is divided into a plurality using an aperture array in a), (c) is a case where a plurality of beams are deflected away from the optical axis using a deflector array in (b), and (d) is ( When the focusing positions of a plurality of beams are matched using a lens array in c), (e) is a case where astigmatism correction is performed using a quadrupole array, and (f) is a case where spherical aberration is corrected. . 1 is a schematic overall configuration diagram for explaining an electron beam application apparatus according to a first embodiment. It is the schematic which shows an example of the beam adjustment screen in the input / output device of the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on a 1st Example. It is a flowchart of the electron beam adjustment for aberration correction in the electronic application apparatus according to the first embodiment. It is a schematic whole block diagram for demonstrating the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on a 2nd Example. It is a schematic sectional drawing which shows the structure of the aberration corrector in the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on a 3rd Example. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the aperture array which comprises the aberration corrector in the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on a 4th Example, and a lens array, (a) is a top view of the aperture array in which the opening part was formed in square array (B) is a plan view of an aperture array in which the openings are arranged at equal distances from the optical axis, (c) is a plan view of the aperture array in which the openings are arranged concentrically, and (d) is a hexagon of openings. FIG. 5E is a plan view of an aperture array arranged in a fine grid, and FIG. 5E is a perspective view of a lens array in which electrode plates on which the aperture array is formed are stacked. It is a figure which shows schematic structure of the deflector array which comprises the aberration corrector in the electron beam application apparatus which concerns on a 4th Example, (a) is a top view of the deflector array corresponding to Fig.7 (a), ( 7B is a plan view of the deflector array corresponding to FIG. 7B, FIG. 7C is a plan view of the deflector array corresponding to FIG. 7C, and FIG. 7D is a deflection corresponding to FIG. FIG. 7E is a plan view of the deflector array corresponding to FIG. 7A, but the deflecting electrode is rotated by 45 degrees with respect to the opening, and FIG. The top view which expanded one, (g) is sectional drawing in the AA 'line of (f).

  In the case of light, since a convex lens and a concave lens can be manufactured, various aberration corrections can be easily performed by a combination thereof. Therefore, the inventors can easily correct spherical aberration and chromatic aberration in a charged particle beam application device if a concave lens function can be realized even when charged particles are used. We thought that it was possible to perform high-resolution observation and inspection. As a result of reviewing the prior art from this point of view, the multi-beam type apparatus has the advantage of being able to individually control a plurality of divided beams, and the beam farther from the optical axis is deflected outward from the optical axis. It was thought that the function of the concave lens can be realized by controlling in this way. That is, after dividing the beam using a small (several μm to several hundred μm) electron lens or deflector and deflecting the beam once from the optical axis, each beam is canceled so as to cancel the deviation of the arrival position on the sample caused by the aberration. Aberration correction is realized by individually controlling. A deflector array or the like for deflecting a plurality of beams can be manufactured by a known MEMS technique.

  Embodiments of the present invention will be described below in detail with reference to the drawings. In all the drawings for explaining the embodiments, the same symbols are attached to the same elements, and the repeated explanation thereof is omitted. Examples of observation devices using electron beams, that is, general electron microscope samples will be described below, but the effects of the present invention are not lost in the case of using ion beams or in the case of inspection and measurement devices.

  A first embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIGS. FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view for explaining the aberration correction method and the configuration of the aberration corrector in the electron beam application apparatus according to the present embodiment. FIG. 1A shows an optical path diagram without aberration correction. For simplicity, it is assumed that the electron optical system is composed of only the macro lens 102. However, in reality, the electron source is located upstream (the direction in which the electron beam flows; the direction in which the electron source is installed), It goes without saying that various optical systems such as a lens for focusing an electron beam generated from an electron source are included. The effect of the present invention is not lost even when another lens is present downstream of the macro lens 102 (the direction in which the electron beam flows; the direction in which the sample is arranged).

  In FIG. 1A, the electron beam 101 is described as a set of equally spaced rays in order to facilitate understanding of the effect of aberration. The electron beam 101 is focused by the macro lens 102 and reaches the surface of the sample 103 while focusing. At this time, if aberration is received, the light beam passing outside the macro lens 102 in the electron beam 101 is bent more strongly. As a result, when the electron beam 101 reaches the sample 103, it originally reaches a different position where it should be focused on one point on the optical axis 104. Next, consider the case where the beam is divided into a plurality of parts using FIG. FIG. 1B differs from FIG. 1A only in that an aperture array 105 for splitting the electron beam is provided. The aperture array 105 has a plurality of apertures arranged on a plate. A portion with an aperture allows an electron beam to pass therethrough, and a portion without an aperture blocks the electron beam. Therefore, after passing through the aperture array 105, the electron beam 101 is divided into a plurality of electron beam groups. When attention is paid to the electron beam 106 in the electron beam group, it can be seen that the arrival point of the electron beam 106 on the sample passes through the optical axis 104 due to aberration and is further away from the optical axis 104 by the distance D. Therefore, if the trajectory is corrected so that each of the divided beam groups is directed to the direction outside the optical axis 104, and the distance D, which is a position shift without aberration correction, is returned, the arrival position of all beams Can coincide with the optical axis. Therefore, as shown in FIG. 1C, a deflector array 107, which is a group of deflectors for controlling each divided electron beam, is arranged downstream from the aperture array, and the divided electron beams reach the sample 103. Aberration can be corrected by controlling to deflect away from the optical axis 104 in order to correct the positional deviation. The deflector array 107 functions as a concave lens with respect to the electron beam 101 in that the electron beam diverges outward, and the combination of the aperture array 105 and the deflector array 107 is an aberration corrector 108. Here, the deflection amount to be given to each of the divided electron beams by the deflector array 107, that is, the deviation of the arrival position without aberration correction, depends on the distance from the optical axis, and increases as the distance increases. Control.

  Next, a case where a lens array 109 is added in order to enhance the effect of the aberration corrector 108 will be described. In FIG. 1D, the aberration corrector 108 is a combination of the aperture array 105, the deflector array 107, and the lens array 109. As shown in FIG. 1B, the position of the focusing point of the electron beam 106 moves upward by a distance F from the sample surface. That is, the focusing intensity of the macro lens 102 varies depending on each divided electron beam. In order to correct this, as shown in FIG. 1D, a lens group 109, which is a lens group for controlling each divided electron beam, is arranged downstream from the aperture array, and each divided electron beam is focused. If the control is performed so that the positions coincide with each other, the correction amount of the aberration is further increased.

  Here, the amount of focusing to be given to each divided electron beam by the lens array 109, that is, the deviation of the electron beam focusing position without aberration correction depends on the distance from the optical axis, and becomes weaker as the distance increases. To control. The lens array 109 is used as an auxiliary lens for the macro lens 102 to focus on the sample 103, and does not form an image of the lens array alone. That is, when two A and B having different distances from the optical axis 104 are selected from the plurality of divided electron beams, the focal length fa of the lens array 109 with respect to the electron beam A is the focal point of the lens array 109 with respect to the electron beam B. It becomes a value different from the distance fb, and further satisfies the relationship of fa> L and fb> L with respect to the distance L between the lens array 109 and the macro lens 102.

  1D shows an example in which the lens array 109 is disposed upstream of the deflector array 107, the same effect can be obtained even when the lens array 109 is disposed downstream of the deflector array 107.

  FIG. 1E shows an example in which a quadrupole array 110 is further added to the aberration corrector 108 in order to further enhance the effect of the aberration corrector 108. Since each of the divided electron beams has different astigmatism depending on the off-axis, the quadrupole array 110 may be controlled as an astigmatism corrector for each beam so as to cancel each. Although FIG. 1E shows the case where the quadrupole array 110 is disposed upstream of the lens array 109, the lens array 109 and the deflector array 107 have the same effect regardless of the order. . In the present embodiment, the lens array 109 and the deflector array 107 are described as different optical elements, but the effect as an aberration corrector is lost even when one optical element serves as two or more elements. I will not.

The case where the aberration to be corrected is a spherical aberration will be described in more detail. In the ideal state shown in FIG. 1F, the inclination angle of the electron beam 106 from the optical axis is θ, and the opening angle of the electron beam 106 is α. When capturing the sample surface as a complex plane in order to grasp it two-dimensionally, θ and α are also expressed as complex numbers. When the spherical aberration coefficient in the image plane definition of the macro lens 102 is Cs, the spherical aberration of the electron beam 106 can be expressed by the following formula 1.
Cs (θ + α) 2 (θ + α) *
= Cs (θ 2 θ * + θ 2 α * + 2θθ * α + 2θαα * + θ * α * 2 + α 2 α * ) (1)
Note that * indicates a complex conjugate. The first term of the expression (1) corresponds to the distortion aberration of the electron beam 106 that does not depend on the opening angle α, that is, the positional deviation D. As described above, the positional deviation D is eliminated by deflecting the electron beam 106 by the deflector array 107. The second term is a first-order complex conjugate term for α, that is, astigmatism. This can be solved by the quadrupole array 110. Since the third term is a first-order term for α, it is field curvature. Since the third term itself indicates a displacement of the position on the sample surface, 2θθ * divided by the opening angle α is the distance to focusing. That is, this corresponds to the moving amount F of the focusing position (see FIG. 1B). The deviation of the focusing position can be eliminated by the lens array 109. The fourth and fifth terms are coma aberration and the sixth term is spherical aberration. These items cannot be solved because the opening angle α is effective when the square is greater than or equal to square. However, since the electron beam 106 is obtained by dividing the electron beam 101, the opening angle is negligibly small as compared with the electron beam 101, and the fourth to sixth terms do not need to be corrected. From the above, it was shown that spherical aberration can be corrected by arranging the aberration corrector 108 shown in FIG. Although the spherical aberration correction method has been described in the present embodiment, chromatic aberration can also be corrected by an aberration corrector that combines a deflector array, a lens array, and a quadrupole array.

  Next, an electron beam application apparatus using the aberration corrector 108 described so far will be described. FIG. 2 is a schematic configuration of the electron beam application apparatus according to the present embodiment.

  The apparatus configuration will be described with reference to FIG. In the downstream direction in which the electron beam 101 is extracted from the electron source 201, a macro lens 202, an aberration corrector 108, a scanning deflector 203, a macro lens 102, and the like are arranged. The electron optical system further includes a current limiting diaphragm, an aligner for adjusting the central axis (optical axis 104) of the primary beam, an astigmatism corrector, and the like (not shown). A sample 103 is disposed under the macro lens 102. At this time, the sample 103 is arranged via a sample mounting stage, a sample holder (none of which are shown) or the like depending on circumstances. When the sample 103 is irradiated with the electron beam 101, secondary electrons 210 are generated by the interaction between the electrons and the sample. This is detected by the detector 209, and an SEM image of the sample 103 is acquired by imaging the scanning deflector 203 in accordance with the position where the electron beam 101 scans the sample 103.

  An electron optical system controller 204 is connected to the various electron optical elements, and the electron optical system controller 204 is controlled by the system controller 205. The system control unit 205 is functionally provided with a storage device 206 and an arithmetic device 207, and is connected with an input / output device 208 having an image display device, a keyboard for inputting signals, and the like. Although not shown, it goes without saying that components other than the control system and the circuit system are disposed in the vacuum vessel and are evacuated to operate.

  Note that the system control unit 205 includes a central processing unit that is the arithmetic device 207 and a storage unit that is the storage device 206, and the arithmetic device 207 executes a program stored in the storage device 206 to perform scanning. It is possible to perform control of the electron optical system controller 204 and the like that perform signal control on the deflector 203 and control of the electron optical system and the like. Further, in the input / output device 208, an input unit such as a keyboard and a mouse and a display unit such as a liquid crystal display device may be separately configured as an input unit and an output unit, or an integrated type using a touch panel or the like. It may be composed of input / output means.

  In order to simplify the description, the aberration corrector 108 is configured to be irradiated with a parallel electron beam. However, as with a normal electron optical system, the aberration corrector 108 may be controlled so as to have a converging or diverging trajectory. The effect as the aberration corrector is not lost.

  Next, a method for adjusting the electron beam so that the aberration is corrected in the apparatus of the present embodiment will be described with reference to FIGS.

  FIG. 4 is a flowchart for performing electron beam adjustment so that aberrations are corrected.

  The operator starts beam adjustment via the input / output device 208 provided with the image display device (step S400 in FIG. 4). The beam adjustment screen shown in FIG. 3 appears on the image display device. Hereinafter, unless otherwise specified, refer to FIG. The operator selects a desired file from the file selection button 300. As a result, preset data stored in the storage device 206 for controlling the electron optical system of the electron beam application apparatus is read out, and the macro lens 102 and the like are read via the system control unit 205 and the electron optical system control device 204. A control signal corresponding to the preset data is input to all the electro-optical elements such as the aberration corrector 108 (step S401 in FIG. 4). This preset data may be determined in advance according to the theoretical value, or may be a value determined in the previous adjustment. Alternatively, a state where all the aberration correctors 108 are turned off may be called.

  Subsequently, the operator selects an electron beam to irradiate the sample from a plurality of electron beams obtained by dividing the electron beam 101 by the aperture array 105 by selecting a number from the irradiation beam selection box 301 (step S402 in FIG. 4). . On the SEM screen 302, an SEM image formed by irradiating the sample with the electron beam selected in step 402 is displayed. If the aberration is not corrected in a state where a plurality of beams are selected, the SEM screen 302 is observed with a blur or a position shift. Therefore, the operator selects an electron beam to be adjusted from the irradiated electron beam by using the adjustment beam selection box 303 in accordance with the position of the image blur or pattern on the SEM screen 302 (step S403 in FIG. 4). It is desirable to adjust the electron beam in order from the beam closer to the center. By this step, a parameter set for adjusting the selected electron beam is displayed in the adjustment box 304. In the adjustment box 304, L corresponds to a lens array, DEF corresponds to a deflector array, and S corresponds to an astigmatism correction array. In FIG. 3, the electron beam C is selected as the electron beam to be adjusted, and the parameters of the adjustment box 304 are four corresponding to the electron beam C from the lens array, deflector array, and astigmatism correction array, respectively. The example is displayed one by one.

  The operator adjusts each parameter of the adjustment box 304 so that the blurring of the image on the SEM screen 302 and the positional deviation of the pattern disappear (step S404 in FIG. 4). At the same time, the operator also uses the common optical element adjustment box 305 to perform optical adjustment on the macro lens common to all electron beams, such as the macro lens 102, and other common optical elements (in FIG. 4). Step S405). Steps S404 and S405 in FIG. 4 are repeatedly performed so that the amount of blur of the image displayed on the SEM screen 302 falls within the allowable range (step S406 in FIG. 4). Each optical condition adjusted by pressing 306 is stored in the storage device 206, and the electron beam adjustment is completed (step S407 in FIG. 4). Although all adjustments in this embodiment are performed manually by the operator and the determination is also performed by the operator, the amount of blur is automatically measured from the image, and the measurement result is fed back to the control system. The method may be automatically implemented and determined.

  In this adjustment, it is assumed that no special sample is prepared. However, a standard pattern may be prepared as an adjustment sample.

  In step S402 in this adjustment, an electron beam to be irradiated on the sample is selected. Although a mechanism for this is not shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, mechanical selection by a beam selective diaphragm or electrical selection by beam blanking is conceivable. The beam selective diaphragm can be realized by changing the opening position of a general movable diaphragm. Automatic selection is possible by moving the movable part of the movable diaphragm on the motor control or on the stage. The electrical selection by blanking may be realized by adding a dedicated deflector array or superimposing a blanking signal on the deflector array.

  Needless to say, the beam adjustment screen shown in FIG. 3 is not limited to this example, and can be variously modified.

The aberration corrector shown in FIG. 1 (e) is mounted on the electron beam application apparatus shown in FIG. 2, and the electron beam is adjusted according to the flowchart shown in FIG. Good images could be obtained and the dimensions could be measured with high accuracy. Thereby, cost reduction can be achieved without using an ultrastable power source.
As described above, according to this embodiment, it is possible to provide a charged particle beam application apparatus capable of correcting spherical aberration and performing high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-high stable power source.

  A charged particle beam application apparatus according to a second embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIG. Note that the matters described in the first embodiment but not described in the present embodiment can be applied to the present embodiment as long as there is no particular circumstance.

  In the first embodiment, the simplest configuration of the electron optical system including the aberration corrector 108 is shown. In the present embodiment, a configuration relating to an electron beam application apparatus having a more practical configuration will be described. The aberration corrector 108 in this embodiment is the same as that shown in Embodiment 1, that is, the aperture array 105, the deflector array 107, the lens array 109, and the quadrupole array 110 shown in FIG. It is shown in combination.

  FIG. 5 is a schematic overall configuration diagram of an electron beam application apparatus according to the present embodiment. In the apparatus configuration of FIG. 5, a macro lens 202, an aberration corrector 108, and a macro lens 102 are arranged in the downstream direction in which the electron beam 101 is extracted from the electron source 201, and further, a scanning deflector is arranged further downstream. 501 and a macro lens 502 are provided. As described in the first embodiment, the aberration corrector 108 includes a combination of the aperture array 105, the deflector array 107, and the like. When the sample 103 is disposed under the macro lens 502 and the sample 103 is irradiated with the electron beam 101, secondary electrons 210 are generated by the interaction between the electrons and the sample. This is detected by the detector 209, and an SEM image of the sample 103 is acquired by forming an image according to the position where the electron beam 101 scans the sample 103 by the scanning deflector 501.

  The configuration of FIG. 5 differs greatly from the configuration of FIG. 2 in the first embodiment in that a scanning deflector 501 and a macro lens 502 are disposed downstream of the aberration corrector 108 and the macro lens 102 disposed immediately below the aberration corrector 108. It is a point. The aberration corrector 108 in this embodiment divides the electron beam 101 into a plurality of electron beams by an aperture array, and each beam acts on each of the array elements (deflector array 107, lens array 109, four elements). Through the pole array 110). When the scanning deflector 501 is arranged upstream of the aberration corrector 108, the electron beam is scanned on the array-shaped element, and each beam passes through the opening of the array-shaped element. Becomes difficult. For this reason, in this embodiment, the scanning deflector 501 is disposed downstream of the aberration corrector 108. Further, in order to simplify the adjustment, no other electro-optical element is disposed between the aberration corrector 108 and the macro lens 102. The scanning deflector 501 is disposed downstream of the macro lens 102. In many cases of realizing high resolution by SEM, a scanning deflector is disposed between the sample and the lens immediately above the sample in order to shorten the working distance from the sample to the lens immediately above the sample, that is, the objective lens. Is practically difficult. Therefore, in this embodiment, another macro lens is disposed downstream of the macro lens 102 (macro lens 502). With this configuration, the macro lens 502 can be used as an objective lens, and the working distance from the macro lens 502 to the sample 103 can be made sufficiently short.

  Further, by disposing the macro lens 502 downstream of the combination of the aberration corrector 108 and the macro lens 102, various elements other than the scanning deflector 501 are disposed between the macro lens 102 and the macro lens 502. it can. In this embodiment, the detector 209 is disposed. Similarly, an EXB deflector for assisting detection of secondary electrons, a reflector, or the like may be arranged.

  As described above, in this embodiment, the macro lens 502 serving as the objective lens is disposed downstream of the aberration corrector 108 and the macro lens 102, and the scanning deflector 501 and other electro-optical elements are added. It was set as the practical electron beam application apparatus structure.

  Also in the present embodiment, as in the first embodiment, a current limiting diaphragm, a primary beam center axis (optical axis) adjustment aligner, an astigmatism corrector, and the like are added to the electron optical system ( Not shown). The sample 103 is arranged via a sample mounting stage, a sample holder (none of which are shown), or the like according to circumstances.

  An electron optical system controller 204 is connected to the various electron optical elements, and the electron optical system controller 204 is controlled by the system controller 205. The system control unit 205 is functionally provided with a storage device 206 and an arithmetic device 207, and is connected with an input / output device 208 having an image display device, a keyboard for inputting signals, and the like. Although not shown, it goes without saying that components other than the control system and the circuit system are disposed in the vacuum vessel and are evacuated to operate.

  Note that the system control unit 205 includes a central processing unit that is the arithmetic device 207 and a storage unit that is the storage device 206, and the arithmetic device 207 executes a program stored in the storage device 206 to perform scanning. It is possible to perform control of the electron optical system controller 204 and the like that perform signal control on the deflector 203 and control of the electron optical system and the like. Further, in the input / output device 208, an input unit such as a keyboard and a mouse and a display unit such as a liquid crystal display device may be separately configured as an input unit and an output unit, or an integrated type using a touch panel or the like. It may be composed of input / output means.

  In order to simplify the explanation, the aberration corrector 108 is configured to be irradiated with a parallel electron beam. However, as in a normal electron optical system, the aberration corrector 108 is controlled so as to have a converging or diverging trajectory. However, the effect of the present invention is not lost.

  The method of adjusting the electron beam so that the aberration is corrected is the same as that of the first embodiment.

As a result of observing and measuring the sample after adjusting the electron beam according to the flowchart shown in FIG. 4 using the electron beam application apparatus shown in FIG. 4, a fine image with a fine pattern can be obtained, and high accuracy The dimensions could be measured.
As described above, according to this embodiment, it is possible to obtain the same effects as those of the first embodiment. In addition, by disposing two macro lenses between the aberration corrector and the sample, the working distance from the macro lens to the sample can be made sufficiently short, and various elements are arranged between the two macro lenses. it can.

  A third embodiment of the present invention will be described with reference to FIG. In this embodiment, a specific configuration of the aberration corrector 108 for correcting chromatic aberration will be described. Note that portions other than the details of the aberration corrector 108, such as the configuration of the electron optical system and the method of adjusting the electron beam, are the same as those in the first or second embodiment, and thus the description thereof is omitted.

  In order to correct chromatic aberration, it is necessary to control the trajectory according to the energy of the electron beam, that is, to give chromatic dispersion to the trajectory. However, when chromatic dispersion is given, if the entire electron beam trajectory is changed at the same time, the original electron beam trajectory may be greatly deviated and the aberration may not be corrected. . In order to avoid this, it is desirable that the basic electron beam trajectory is not greatly affected when chromatic dispersion is applied.

  FIG. 6 shows a specific configuration of the aberration corrector 108 for correcting the aberration. As in FIG. 1, the electron beam 101 enters the aberration corrector 108, enters the macro lens 102 with the aberration corrected, and reaches the sample 103. The chromatic aberration to be corrected increases as the distance from the optical axis 104 increases. The aberration corrector 108 includes an aperture array 105, a lens array 601, a deflector array 602, a deflector array 603, and a lens array 604. The electron beam 101 is divided into a plurality of beam groups by the aperture array 105. Of the electron beam group, attention is focused on the electron beam 605. The electron beam 605 forms an image at the position of the deflector array 602 by the action of the lens array 601. The deflector array 602 deflects the electron beam 605 in a direction away from the optical axis 104 and acts as a concave lens. The deflector array 603 deflects the electron beam 605 in the direction of turning back. Here, if the deflection intensity applied to the deflector arrays 602 and 603 is approximately the same, the electron beam 605 after passing through the deflector array 603 takes a trajectory that shifts away from the optical axis 104, and the electron beam trajectory. Can avoid big changes.

  On the other hand, since the intensity of deflection by the deflector array 602 differs depending on the intensity of the electron beam, chromatic dispersion is generated by the deflector array 602. Reference numerals 606a to 606c indicate the trajectories of the centers of the low energy electron beam (606a), the average energy electron beam (606b), and the high energy electron beam (606c). The lower the energy, the higher the sensitivity of the deflector arrays 602 and 603 and the stronger the deflection in the direction away from the optical axis 104. As described above, since the strengths of the deflector arrays 602 and 603 are approximately the same, the beam of any energy is shifted in the direction away from the optical axis 104, and the central trajectory of each energy is indicated by 606a to 606c. As you can see, they are parallel. When the lens array 604 is inserted, it becomes possible to control the dispersion trajectories of the electron beam trajectories 606a to 606c having different energies again, and chromatic aberration correction can be realized. Note that spherical aberration can also be corrected in this configuration.

As a result of observing and measuring the sample after adjusting the electron beam according to the flowchart shown in FIG. 4 using the electron beam application apparatus shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 5, a good image with a fine pattern can be obtained, The dimensions could be measured with high accuracy.
As described above, according to this embodiment, it is possible to provide a charged particle beam application apparatus that can correct chromatic aberration and spherical aberration and perform high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-stable power source.

  A fourth embodiment of the present invention will be described. Since the elements constituting the aberration corrector in the present embodiment have minute openings, minute electrodes, wirings, and the like, they are created using the MEMS technology. In the present embodiment, specific configurations of the aperture array, the deflector array, the lens array, and the quadrupole array constituting the aberration corrector 108 described in Embodiments 1 to 3 will be described with reference to FIGS. To do.

  FIG. 7 is a diagram showing a schematic configuration of the aperture array and the lens array. As shown in the first to third embodiments, in this embodiment, in order to perform aberration correction, the electron beam is divided into a plurality of electron beams by the aperture array. In FIGS. 1 and 6, an example in which the beam is divided into five electron beams arranged in one dimension has been described. However, in practice, a two-dimensional aperture array is formed. Examples of the opening are shown in FIGS. 7A to 7D. FIG. 7A shows an example in which the openings 702 are formed in a 5 × 5 square array on the electrode plate 701. In addition, although the code | symbol 702 was attached | subjected representatively only to one opening part, the other thing shown with the surrounding white shape is an opening part similarly. Further, the number of openings is not limited to 5 × 5. FIG. 7B shows an example in which the opening 702 is located at the center, that is, at the same distance from the optical axis. FIG. 7C shows an example in which the aperture is not circular but the electron beam is split concentrically. FIG. 7D shows an example in which the openings are arranged in a hexagonal close-packed lattice shape. In either case, the electron beam collides with the electrode plate 701, passes only the electron beam that has reached the opening 702, and the other electron beams are blocked to be divided into a plurality of electron beams. The electrode plate 701 is made of metal and used as a ground potential so as not to be affected by charging due to the collision of the electron beam.

  FIG. 7E shows an example in which a lens array is formed by laminating three electrode plates that form an aperture array. The electrode plate 703a and the electrode plate 703c act as an Einzel lens for each divided electron beam passing through the opening 702 by applying a lens voltage from the lens voltage source 704 to the ground potential and the electrode plate 703b. . In this embodiment, an example in which the number of electrodes to which a voltage is applied is one (703b), but a plurality of electrode plates may be provided between two ground electrodes (703a, 703c). Further, although the lens voltage applied by the lens voltage source 704 is a negative voltage, it may be a positive voltage.

  FIG. 8 is a diagram illustrating the deflector array. FIGS. 8A to 8D correspond to FIGS. 7A to 7D, respectively. 8A to 8D, the position of the opening 802 of the deflector array is the position of the opening 702 of the opening array shown in FIGS. 7A to 7D. And correspondingly arranged. Around the opening 802 provided in the electrode plate 801, there is a deflection electrode 803 for deflecting an electron beam passing through the opening 802. In addition, although the code | symbol 802 was typically attached | subjected only to one opening part, the other thing is also an opening part similarly, and the code | symbol 803 was attached | subjected only to one deflection electrode, For example, in FIG. 8A, the shape disposed opposite to the deflection electrode 803 and the two shapes rotated 90 degrees with respect to the same opening are also deflection electrodes. The same applies to the ones arranged around other openings. A voltage for deflecting the electron beam is applied to the deflection electrode 803. For this reason, although not shown in FIGS. 8A to 8E, the electrode plate 801 guides the applied voltage up to the deflection electrode 803 as described in FIG. 8F. Wiring is formed. Since the deflection electrode 803 is used as a deflector, it is desirable that the deflection electrode 803 be formed in a pair with the counter electrode. However, when there is not enough space for forming the above-described wiring on the electrode plate 801, the counter electrode may not be used and the light may be deflected with one pole. In this embodiment, the case of electrostatic deflection using a deflection electrode has been described. However, if a deflection coil is used instead of the deflection electrode, magnetic field deflection can be performed.

  In FIG. 8A, a deflection electrode facing two orthogonal directions is provided. Thereby, the direction of deflection can be freely controlled.

  Here, as described in the first and third embodiments, the deflection direction of the deflector array is a direction away from the optical axis or a direction approaching the optical axis. Therefore, there is a case where it is not necessary to provide a degree of freedom in the deflection direction. FIG. 8B shows an example. The deflection electrode 803 in FIG. 8B is arranged in a direction opposite to the center of the pattern, that is, a straight line extending radially from the optical axis. Thereby, it has the structure which deflects in the direction away from an optical axis, or the direction approaching an optical axis. Compared with the configuration of FIG. 8A, although the degree of freedom in the deflection direction is reduced, there is an advantage that the space for wiring can be afforded and the sensitivity of deflection can be increased due to the small number of electrodes. Alternatively, a deflecting electrode may be provided in a direction rotated 90 degrees with respect to the same opening, and may be used as an auxiliary.

  FIG. 8C is an example in which circumferential electrodes are arranged by utilizing the fact that the same deflection strength is obtained when the off-axis distance from the optical axis is the same. In this example, the lens array cannot be arranged, but since the area of the opening is large, there are advantages that the interrupted current can be reduced and that the number of power supplies for control may be small.

  Here, in FIGS. 8A and 8D, four deflection electrodes are provided for one opening. Therefore, it can also be used as a quadrupole, for example for astigmatism correction. However, when used as a quadrupole, there is no degree of freedom in the astigmatism direction. For this reason, for example, in the case of FIG. 8A, if FIG. 8E in which the deflection electrode is rotated by 45 degrees with respect to the opening is also used, the degree of freedom in the astigmatic direction can be increased. Or it is good also considering rotation with respect to opening of four electrodes as a required direction previously.

  FIG. 8F is an enlarged view of one of the deflector arrays. Here, it has shown about what has four electrodes for deflection | deviation per opening like Fig.8 (a), FIG.8 (d), and FIG.8 (e). The deflection electrode 803 is connected to a wiring 804, and the wiring 804 is routed on an electrode plate 801 or a wiring substrate so as to be connected to a control power supply (not shown). FIG. 8G is a cross-sectional view taken along the broken line AA ′ shown in FIG. The deflection electrode 803 is formed along the wall surface of the opening 802 opened in the electrode plate 801, and acts as a deflector when a control signal is applied thereto.

After adjusting the electron beam according to the flowchart shown in FIG. 4 using the electron beam application apparatus shown in FIG. 2 or 5 for the aberration corrector provided with the aperture array, lens array, and deflector array shown in FIG. As a result of observing and measuring the sample, it was possible to obtain a good image with a fine pattern and to measure the dimensions with high accuracy.
As described above, according to this embodiment, it is possible to provide a charged particle beam application apparatus that can correct chromatic aberration and spherical aberration and perform high-resolution observation and inspection without using an ultra-stable power source.

  In addition, this invention is not limited to an above-described Example, Various modifications are included. For example, the above-described embodiments have been described in detail for easy understanding of the present invention, and are not necessarily limited to those having all the configurations described. Further, a part of the configuration of a certain embodiment can be replaced with the configuration of another embodiment, and the configuration of another embodiment can be added to the configuration of a certain embodiment. Further, it is possible to add, delete, and replace other configurations for a part of the configuration of each embodiment.

  INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY The present invention is useful as a charged particle beam application apparatus, particularly as a high resolution observation / measurement and inspection technique using a charged particle beam.

DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 101 ... Electron beam, 102 ... Macro lens, 103 ... Sample, 104 ... Optical axis, 105 ... Aperture array, 106 ... Divided electron beam, 107 ... Deflector array, 108 ... Aberration corrector, 109 ... Lens array, 110 DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS ... Quadrupole array, 201 ... Electron source, 202 ... Macro lens, 203 ... Scanning deflector, 204 ... Electro-optical system controller, 205 ... System controller, 206 ... Storage device, 207 ... Arithmetic device, 208 ... I / O device 209 ... detector 210 ... secondary electron 300 ... file selection button 301 ... irradiation beam selection box 302 ... SEM screen 303 ... adjustment beam selection box 304 ... adjustment box 305 ... common optical element adjustment box 306 ... Save button, 400 ... Electron beam adjustment start step, S401 ... Preset data readout step S402 ... irradiation beam selection step, S403 ... adjustment beam selection step, S404 ... adjustment beam adjustment step, S405 ... common optical system adjustment step, S406 ... adjustment completion determination step, S407 ... completion step, 501 Deflector for scanning, 502 ... Macro lens, 601 ... Lens array, 602 ... Deflector array, 603 ... Deflector array, 604 ... Lens array, 605 ... Split electron beam, 606a ... Central trajectory of low energy beam , 606b... Central trajectory of beam of central energy, 606c... Central trajectory of high energy beam, 701... Electrode plate, 702... Opening, 703a ... Electrode plate, 703b. Source, 801 ... Electrode plate, 802 ... Opening, 803 ... Deflection electrode, 8 4 ... wiring.

Claims (13)

  1. A charged particle beam application device for irradiating a sample with a charged particle beam,
    Comprising at least one deflector array in which a plurality of deflectors are arranged in a region including the optical axis of the charged particle beam;
    The charged particle beam application apparatus, wherein the deflector array has a function of a concave lens with respect to the charged particle beam.
  2. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 1,
    Further comprising an opening array having a plurality of openings for dividing the charged particle beam into a plurality of charged particle beams;
    The charged particle beam application apparatus, wherein the plurality of openings are arranged in the opening portion array so that the plurality of charged particle beams are deflected by the deflector array, respectively.
  3. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 2,
    The charged particle beam application apparatus further comprising one or more macro lenses having a common action with respect to the plurality of charged particle beams.
  4. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 2,
    A charged particle beam application apparatus, further comprising one or more lens arrays that individually focus the plurality of charged particle beams.
  5. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 2,
    A charged particle beam application apparatus, further comprising one or more quadrupole arrays that individually give astigmatism to the plurality of charged particle beams.
  6. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 3,
    One or more lens arrays for individually focusing the plurality of charged particle beams;
    The macro lens includes a first macro lens, and the first macro lens is disposed downstream of the deflector array and the lens array in the traveling direction of the charged particle beam. apparatus.
  7. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 6,
    When two charged particle beams A and B having different distances from the optical axis are selected from the plurality of charged particle beams, the focal length fa of the lens array with respect to the charged particle beam A is the charged particle beam B. Different from the focal length fb of the lens array with respect to
    Furthermore, for a distance L between the lens array and the first macro lens,
    fa> L and fb> L
    Charged particle beam application apparatus characterized by satisfying the above relationship.
  8. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 6,
    The macro lens includes a second macro lens in addition to the first macro lens,
    A detector for detecting secondary charged particles generated as a result of irradiation of the sample with the plurality of charged particle beams;
    A scanning deflector for scanning the sample with the plurality of charged particle beams;
    The charged particle beam application apparatus, wherein the second macro lens, the detector, and the scanning deflector are located downstream of the first macro lens.
  9. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 4,
    The lens array includes a first lens array and a second lens array;
    The deflector array includes a first deflector array and a second deflector array;
    The first lens array is arranged on the most upstream side of the lens array,
    The charged particle beam application apparatus, wherein the first deflector array and the second deflector array are disposed between the first lens array and the second lens array.
  10.   The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the deflector array is formed by a MEMS process.
  11.   The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 4, wherein the deflector array or the lens array is formed by a MEMS process.
  12.   6. The charged particle beam application apparatus according to claim 5, wherein the deflector array or the quadrupole array is formed by a MEMS process.
  13. A charged particle beam application device for irradiating a sample with a charged particle beam,
    Comprising at least one deflector array in which a plurality of deflectors are arranged in a region including the optical axis of the charged particle beam;
    The charged particle beam application device, wherein the deflector array has a function of deflecting the charged particle beam in a direction away from the optical axis.
JP2013108240A 2013-05-22 2013-05-22 Charged particle ray application device Pending JP2014229481A (en)

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KR20180018483A (en) * 2015-03-10 2018-02-21 헤르메스 마이크로비전 인코포레이티드 Apparatus using a plurality of charged particle beams
JP2018513543A (en) * 2016-04-13 2018-05-24 エルメス マイクロビジョン,インコーポレーテッドHermes Microvision Inc. Multiple charged particle beam equipment
JP2018520495A (en) * 2015-07-22 2018-07-26 エルメス マイクロビジョン,インコーポレーテッドHermes Microvision Inc. Multiple charged particle beam equipment
US10109456B2 (en) 2015-03-10 2018-10-23 Hermes Microvision Inc. Apparatus of plural charged-particle beams
US10157723B2 (en) 2016-08-03 2018-12-18 Nuflare Technology, Inc. Multi charged particle beam writing apparatus and method of adjusting the same
US10734190B2 (en) 2018-05-18 2020-08-04 Nuflare Technology, Inc. Multiple electron beam irradiation apparatus, multiple electron beam inspection apparatus and multiple electron beam irradiation method

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KR20180018483A (en) * 2015-03-10 2018-02-21 헤르메스 마이크로비전 인코포레이티드 Apparatus using a plurality of charged particle beams
US10643820B2 (en) 2015-03-10 2020-05-05 Hermes Microvision Inc. Apparatus of plural charged-particle beams
KR102014868B1 (en) * 2015-03-10 2019-08-27 에이에스엠엘 네델란즈 비.브이. Apparatus using a plurality of charged particle beams
US10276347B2 (en) 2015-03-10 2019-04-30 Hermes Microvision Inc. Apparatus of plural charged-particle beams
US10109456B2 (en) 2015-03-10 2018-10-23 Hermes Microvision Inc. Apparatus of plural charged-particle beams
CN108738363B (en) * 2015-07-22 2020-08-07 Asml荷兰有限公司 Arrangement of a plurality of charged particle beams
CN108738363A (en) * 2015-07-22 2018-11-02 汉民微测科技股份有限公司 The device of multiple charged particle beams
JP2018520495A (en) * 2015-07-22 2018-07-26 エルメス マイクロビジョン,インコーポレーテッドHermes Microvision Inc. Multiple charged particle beam equipment
US10395886B2 (en) 2015-07-22 2019-08-27 Asml Netherlands B.V. Apparatus of plural charged-particle beams
CN108292583A (en) * 2016-04-13 2018-07-17 汉民微测科技股份有限公司 The device of multiple charged particle beams
JP2018513543A (en) * 2016-04-13 2018-05-24 エルメス マイクロビジョン,インコーポレーテッドHermes Microvision Inc. Multiple charged particle beam equipment
US10157723B2 (en) 2016-08-03 2018-12-18 Nuflare Technology, Inc. Multi charged particle beam writing apparatus and method of adjusting the same
US10734190B2 (en) 2018-05-18 2020-08-04 Nuflare Technology, Inc. Multiple electron beam irradiation apparatus, multiple electron beam inspection apparatus and multiple electron beam irradiation method

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