JP2012251794A - Activity determination system of oxygen sensor - Google Patents

Activity determination system of oxygen sensor Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2012251794A
JP2012251794A JP2011122678A JP2011122678A JP2012251794A JP 2012251794 A JP2012251794 A JP 2012251794A JP 2011122678 A JP2011122678 A JP 2011122678A JP 2011122678 A JP2011122678 A JP 2011122678A JP 2012251794 A JP2012251794 A JP 2012251794A
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Japan
Prior art keywords
oxygen sensor
value
output value
processing circuit
signal processing
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JP2011122678A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Hiroki Kihara
浩貴 木原
Yuichiro Sawada
雄一郎 沢田
Tsunehisa Nakamura
倫久 中村
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Yamaha Motor Co Ltd
ヤマハ発動機株式会社
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Priority to JP2011122678A priority Critical patent/JP2012251794A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D41/00Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents
    • F02D41/02Circuit arrangements for generating control signals
    • F02D41/14Introducing closed-loop corrections
    • F02D41/1438Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor
    • F02D41/1486Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor with correction for particular operating conditions
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D41/00Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents
    • F02D41/24Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents characterised by the use of digital means
    • F02D41/26Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents characterised by the use of digital means using computer, e.g. microprocessor
    • F02D41/28Interface circuits
    • F02D2041/281Interface circuits between sensors and control unit
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D41/00Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents
    • F02D41/02Circuit arrangements for generating control signals
    • F02D41/04Introducing corrections for particular operating conditions
    • F02D41/12Introducing corrections for particular operating conditions for deceleration
    • F02D41/123Introducing corrections for particular operating conditions for deceleration the fuel injection being cut-off
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D41/00Electrical control of supply of combustible mixture or its constituents
    • F02D41/02Circuit arrangements for generating control signals
    • F02D41/14Introducing closed-loop corrections
    • F02D41/1438Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor
    • F02D41/1444Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor characterised by the characteristics of the combustion gases
    • F02D41/1454Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor characterised by the characteristics of the combustion gases the characteristics being an oxygen content or concentration or the air-fuel ratio
    • F02D41/1456Introducing closed-loop corrections using means for determining characteristics of the combustion gases; Sensors therefor characterised by the characteristics of the combustion gases the characteristics being an oxygen content or concentration or the air-fuel ratio with sensor output signal being linear or quasi-linear with the concentration of oxygen

Abstract

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an activity determination system of an oxygen sensor capable of appropriately determining an inactive state of the oxygen sensor and preventing deterioration in exhaust.SOLUTION: In an activity determination system of an oxygen sensor, a signal processing circuit outputs signals converging on a predetermined convergence value VP when the oxygen sensor is maintained in an inactive state. An inactive determination part determines that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state when an output value Vd(n) from the signal processing circuit is within a predetermined inactive range Rna containing the convergence value VP. The inactive determination part determines that the oxygen sensor is in an active state when the output value Vd(n) from the signal processing circuit is in a predetermined first active range Ra1 which is different from the inactive range Rna. The inactive determination part determines that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state when the output value Vd(n) from the signal processing circuit exceeds a predetermined threshold value Vth contained in the first active range Ra1 toward the convergence value VP during execution of fuel cut operation.

Description

  The present invention relates to an activity determination system for an oxygen sensor.

  Conventionally, an oxygen sensor has been used to appropriately control the air-fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture supplied to an internal combustion engine. The output value of the oxygen sensor changes according to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas. Therefore, the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas can be known by detecting the output value of the oxygen sensor. Then, it is estimated from the output value of the oxygen sensor whether the air-fuel mixture supplied to the internal combustion engine is in a rich state or a lean state. As the oxygen sensor, for example, as disclosed in Patent Document 1, a sensor using stabilized zirconia is used.

JP 2006-170938 A

  However, the above-described oxygen sensor has a very large internal resistance in a low temperature state. For this reason, even if the air-fuel ratio is the same, the output of the oxygen sensor in the low temperature state may differ from the high temperature state. That is, when the oxygen sensor is at a low temperature, a value corresponding to an oxygen concentration different from the actual oxygen concentration may be output. Therefore, in this case, if air-fuel ratio feedback control is performed using the output value of the oxygen sensor, it is difficult to appropriately control the air-fuel ratio. Here, the output value of the oxygen sensor converges toward a predetermined convergence value in the inactive state. For this reason, in the conventional determination apparatus, it is determined whether or not the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state by determining whether or not the output value of the oxygen sensor is within a predetermined inactive range including the convergence value. judge. When it is determined that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state, feedback control using the output value of the oxygen sensor is stopped. As a result, it is possible to avoid control that is not suitable for the actual situation of the internal combustion engine.

  When fuel cut is executed in the control of the internal combustion engine, the oxygen sensor outputs a value indicating a lean state. Thereafter, when the temperature of the oxygen sensor decreases with a decrease in the temperature of the internal combustion engine, the output of the oxygen sensor converges toward the convergence value described above. In this case, depending on the setting of the inactive range, the oxygen sensor may be in an inactive state before the output of the oxygen sensor reaches the inactive range described above. However, the conventional determination method for determining whether the output value of the oxygen sensor is within the inactive range cannot accurately determine the inactive state of the oxygen sensor. Accordingly, it is conceivable that when the fuel cut is executed, it is immediately determined that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state and the feedback control is stopped. However, in this case, the feedback control is actually stopped when the oxygen sensor is in the active state. For this reason, exhaust deterioration may be unnecessarily caused.

  The subject of this invention is providing the activity determination system of the oxygen sensor which can determine the inactive state of an oxygen sensor exactly, and can suppress the deterioration of exhaust_gas | exhaustion.

  An oxygen sensor activity determination system according to an aspect of the present invention includes an oxygen sensor, a signal processing circuit, an inactivity determination unit, and a fuel cut determination unit. The oxygen sensor outputs a signal corresponding to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas from the internal combustion engine in the active state. A signal from the oxygen sensor is input to the signal processing circuit. The signal processing circuit outputs a signal corresponding to the signal input from the oxygen sensor when the oxygen sensor is in the active state. The signal processing circuit outputs a signal that converges to a predetermined lean output value when the oxygen sensor is in an active state and the oxygen sensor atmosphere is maintained in the same state as the atmosphere. The signal processing circuit outputs a signal that converges to a predetermined convergence value different from the lean output value when the oxygen sensor is maintained in an inactive state. The inactivity determining unit determines that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state when the output value from the signal processing circuit is within a predetermined inactive range including the convergence value. The inactivity determining unit determines that the oxygen sensor is in an active state when the output value from the signal processing circuit is a predetermined first active range different from the inactive range. The fuel cut determination unit determines whether or not a fuel cut of the internal combustion engine is being executed. The inactivity determination unit determines that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state when the output value from the signal processing circuit exceeds a predetermined threshold value included in the first activity range toward the convergence value during the fuel cut. Judge that there is.

  In the oxygen sensor activity determination system according to one aspect of the present invention, the inactivity determination unit is configured to determine whether the output value from the signal processing circuit exceeds a predetermined threshold included in the first activity range. The inactive state is determined. During execution of the fuel cut, the oxygen sensor atmosphere is in a state in which the oxygen partial pressure is high, for example, the atmosphere. For this reason, if the oxygen sensor is in an active state during the fuel cut, the output value from the signal processing circuit does not change from a certain range of values indicating the lean state. Therefore, by detecting that the output value from the signal processing circuit is changing toward the convergence value, it can be accurately determined that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state. In addition, compared with the case where it is determined that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state immediately after the fuel cut is performed, the time for the oxygen sensor to be determined to be in an inactive state although it is actually in an active state is reduced. Can be shortened. For this reason, the control using the output result by the oxygen sensor can be executed as long as possible. Thereby, deterioration of exhaust can be suppressed. Furthermore, the predetermined threshold value is included in the first active range. For this reason, even if the output value from the oxygen sensor is a value within the first active range, the inactive state of the oxygen sensor can be determined in a state in which it is suspected that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state.

1 is a side view showing a motorcycle according to an embodiment of the present invention. The side view of the power unit and rear wheel which concern on one Embodiment of this invention. The figure which looked at the body frame, power unit, and rear wheel concerning one embodiment of the present invention from the front of the cylinder axis. The block diagram of an engine and a control apparatus. The block diagram which shows the structure of ECU. Schematic which shows the structure of a signal processing circuit and an oxygen sensor. The figure which shows the output characteristic of a signal processing circuit. The flowchart which shows an inactive determination process. The time chart which shows the output value of the signal processing circuit in an inactivation determination process. The time chart which shows the output value of the signal processing circuit in the inactivation determination process which concerns on other embodiment. Schematic which shows the structure of the signal processing circuit and oxygen sensor which concern on other embodiment. The time chart which shows the output value of the signal processing circuit in the inactivation determination process which concerns on other embodiment.

  Hereinafter, embodiments of the present invention will be described with reference to the drawings. FIG. 1 is a side view showing a motorcycle 1 as an embodiment of a saddle riding type vehicle according to the present invention. In the drawing, a cross-shaped arrow indicates a direction. In the reference numerals attached to the arrow, “F” is the front, “Rr” is the rear, “U” is the upper, “Lo” is the lower, and “R”. Represents the right side and “L” represents the left side. In the present embodiment, the front / rear, left / right, and up / down directions mean the front / rear, left / right, and up / down directions viewed from the rider seated on the seat 5.

  The motorcycle 1 is a scooter type motorcycle. The motorcycle 1 includes a body frame 2 and a power unit 3. The power unit 3 is attached to the vehicle body frame 2. The power unit 3 is attached to the vehicle body frame 2 so as to be swingable up and down. A seat 5 on which a rider sits is disposed above the power unit 3. A handle 6 and a front wheel 7 are disposed in front of the seat 5. Between the seat 5 and the handle 6, a footrest 8 for placing a foot by the rider is disposed. A rear wheel 9 is disposed below the seat 5. A rear cushion unit 10 is disposed between the power unit 3 and the vehicle body frame 2.

  The power unit 3 includes an engine 11 and a power transmission device 12. The engine 11 corresponds to the internal combustion engine of the present invention. A rear wheel 9 is rotatably attached to the rear portion of the power transmission device 12. The driving force generated by the engine 11 is transmitted to the rear wheel 9 via the power transmission device 12.

  FIG. 2 is a side view of the power unit 3 and the rear wheel 9. The rear wheel 9 is disposed behind the engine 11. The rear wheel 9 is arranged so as to line up with the power transmission device 12 in the left-right direction. The engine 11 includes a crankcase 13, a cylinder body 14, a cylinder head 15, and a cylinder head cover 16. The cylinder body 14 is attached to the crankcase 13. The cylinder body 14 is disposed in front of the crankcase 13. The cylinder head 15 is attached to the cylinder body 14. The cylinder head 15 is disposed in front of the cylinder body 14. The cylinder head cover 16 is attached to the cylinder head 15. The cylinder head cover 16 is disposed in front of the cylinder head 15. An intake pipe 21 is connected to the upper surface of the cylinder head 15. An air cleaner 22 is connected to the intake pipe 21. The intake pipe 21 constitutes an intake passage 31 (see FIG. 4) described later. The intake pipe 21 supplies air to the combustion chamber of the engine 11. An exhaust port 23 is formed on the lower surface of the cylinder head 15. The exhaust port 23 protrudes downward from the lower surface of the cylinder head 15. An exhaust pipe 24 is connected to the exhaust port 23. A muffler 25 is connected to the exhaust pipe 24. The exhaust port 23 and the exhaust pipe 24 constitute an exhaust passage 36 (see FIG. 4) described later. The exhaust pipe 24 exhausts exhaust from the combustion chamber of the engine 11.

  A indicated by a one-dot chain line in FIGS. 1 and 2 is a cylinder axis of the engine 11. The cylinder axis A is inclined forward and upward with respect to the front-rear direction of the motorcycle 1. Note that the value of the angle formed by the cylinder axis A and the front-rear direction of the motorcycle 1 is not particularly limited. The tilt angle may be zero. That is, the cylinder axis A and the front-rear direction of the motorcycle 1 may coincide.

  3 is a view of the body frame 2, the power unit 3, and the rear wheel 9 as viewed from the front of the cylinder axis A. FIG. The vehicle body frame 2 has a pair of left and right frames 2a and 2b. The left and right frames 2a and 2b are arranged at an interval in the left-right direction. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the frames 2a and 2b extend rearward and upward in a side view. Further, the frames 2 a and 2 b intersect the engine 11 in a side view. As shown in FIG. 3, the power transmission device 12 is provided on the left side of the engine 11. The power transmission device 12 is provided behind the frames 2a and 2b. The crankcase 13 is disposed behind the frames 2a and 2b. The rear wheel 9 is provided behind the engine 11. The cylinder body 14, the cylinder head 15 and the cylinder head cover 16 are viewed from the front of the cylinder axis A so that the left and right frames 2a, 2c and 16c can be swung vertically without interfering with the frames 2a, 2b. 2b. Further, an oxygen sensor 40 described later is attached to the cylinder head 15. The oxygen sensor 40 detects the oxygen concentration in the exhaust discharged from the combustion chamber of the engine 11. Specifically, the oxygen sensor 40 is attached to the exhaust port 23 of the cylinder head 15.

  FIG. 4 is a configuration diagram of the engine 11 and a control system of the engine 11. As shown in FIG. 4, the engine 11 includes a piston 26, a crankshaft 27, and a connecting rod 28. The piston 26 is movably disposed in the cylinder body 14. The crankshaft 27 is rotatably arranged in the crankcase 13 described above. The connecting rod 28 connects the piston 26 and the crankshaft 27.

  The engine 11 includes a fuel injection valve 32, an ignition device 33, an intake valve 34, and an exhaust valve 35. The fuel injection valve 32 supplies fuel to the combustion chamber 29 in the cylinder head 15. In the present embodiment, the fuel injection valve 32 is disposed so as to inject fuel into the intake passage 31. However, the fuel injection valve 32 may be disposed so as to inject fuel into the combustion chamber 29. The fuel injection valve 32 is connected to a fuel tank 38 via a fuel pipe 37. A fuel pump 39 and a fuel sensor 46 are disposed inside the fuel tank 38. The fuel pump 39 supplies fuel to the fuel pipe 37. The fuel sensor 46 detects the amount of fuel in the fuel tank 38. The ignition device 33 ignites the fuel in the combustion chamber 29. The engine 11 is provided with a rotation speed sensor 41 and an engine temperature sensor 42. The rotation speed sensor 41 detects the engine rotation speed by detecting the rotation speed of the crankshaft 27. The engine temperature sensor 42 detects the temperature of the engine 11. The engine temperature sensor 42 may detect the temperature of a part of the engine 11 (for example, a cylinder). Alternatively, when the engine 11 is water-cooled, the engine temperature sensor 42 may detect the temperature of the coolant. That is, the engine temperature sensor 42 may directly detect the temperature of the engine 11 or may indirectly detect the temperature via a coolant or the like. The intake valve 34 opens and closes between the intake passage 31 and the combustion chamber 29. The exhaust valve 35 opens and closes between the combustion chamber 29 and the exhaust passage 36.

  The intake passage 31 is provided with an intake air temperature sensor 43 and an intake pressure sensor 44. The intake air temperature sensor 43 detects the temperature of air taken into the combustion chamber 29 through the intake passage 31. The intake pressure sensor 44 detects an intake pressure that is an internal pressure of the intake passage 31. A throttle valve 51 is provided in the intake passage 31. The throttle valve 51 adjusts the amount of air supplied through the intake passage 31 by adjusting the opening degree. The throttle valve 51 is provided with a throttle position sensor 45 (see FIG. 5). The throttle position sensor 45 detects the opening of the throttle valve 51 (hereinafter referred to as “throttle opening”).

  A catalyst 52 is provided in the exhaust passage 36. As described above, the exhaust passage 36 is provided with the oxygen sensor 40 as an air-fuel ratio sensor. The oxygen sensor 40 can detect whether the air-fuel mixture is in a rich state or a lean state. The rich state means a state where the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture is smaller than the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The lean state means a state where the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture is larger than the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The oxygen sensor 40 will be described in detail later.

  The motorcycle 1 includes an ECU (Electric Control Unit) 60 that controls the engine 11. FIG. 5 is a block diagram showing the configuration of the ECU 60. The ECU 60 includes a calculation unit 61, a storage unit 62, an input unit 63, and an output unit 64. The calculation unit 61 includes, for example, a CPU, and executes various calculations for control to be described later. The storage unit 62 includes, for example, a memory such as a ROM or a RAM, and stores a control program and various information for performing control to be described later. The input unit 63 and the output unit 64 each have an interface circuit. The above-described various sensors 40-46 are connected to the input unit 63. Detection signals from the sensors 40-46 are input to the input unit 63. Specifically, a rotational speed sensor 41, an engine temperature sensor 42, an intake air temperature sensor 43, an intake air pressure sensor 44, a throttle position sensor 45, an oxygen sensor 40, and a fuel sensor 46 are connected to the input unit 63. The fuel injection valve 32 and the ignition device 33 described above are connected to the output unit 64. A command signal to the fuel injection valve 32 and the ignition device 33 is output from the output unit 64 based on the calculation result in the calculation unit 61.

  The ECU 60 executes control of the fuel injection amount from the fuel injection valve 32, control of the ignition timing by the ignition device 33, and the like based on signals from the various sensors 40-46. Specifically, the ECU 60 feedback-controls the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture to a desired air-fuel ratio by correcting the valve opening time of the fuel injection valve 32 based on a signal from the oxygen sensor 40. However, when the temperature of the element made of the solid electrolyte of the oxygen sensor 40 is low, the accuracy of detection by the oxygen sensor 40 decreases. That is, when the temperature of the oxygen sensor 40 is low, the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state with low reliability of detection. On the contrary, when the temperature of the oxygen sensor 40 is sufficiently high, an active state in which the detection reliability of the oxygen sensor 40 is high is obtained. If the air-fuel ratio of the air-fuel mixture is feedback controlled based on the signal from the oxygen sensor 40 when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, it is difficult to accurately control the air-fuel ratio. Therefore, the ECU 60 first determines whether the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state or an inactive state. When the ECU 60 determines that the oxygen sensor 40 is in the active state, the ECU 60 executes the feedback control described above. Further, when the ECU 60 determines that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the feedforward control of the fuel injection valve 32 is based on the fuel injection control amount stored in advance in the storage unit 62 instead of the feedback control described above. Execute. Hereinafter, an activity determination system of the oxygen sensor 40 for determining whether the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state or an active state will be described. The activity determination system of the oxygen sensor 40 includes the oxygen sensor 40, a fuel cut determination unit 65, an inactivity determination unit 66, and a lean rich determination unit 67.

  The oxygen sensor 40 is a sensor using a solid electrolyte made of stabilized zirconia or the like. The oxygen sensor 40 outputs a signal having a voltage value corresponding to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas in the active state. FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram showing the configuration of the oxygen sensor 40 and the input unit 63. As shown in FIG. 6, the input unit 63 has a signal processing circuit 68 connected to the oxygen sensor 40. A signal from the oxygen sensor 40 is input to the signal processing circuit 68. The signal processing circuit 68 is a pull-up circuit, and has an input line 69 and a pull-up resistor R1. The input line 69 connects the oxygen sensor 40 and the calculation unit 61. The input line 69 is connected to the power supply Vcc, and the pull-up resistor R1 is disposed between the power supply Vcc and the input line 69.

  FIG. 7 shows the output characteristics of the signal output from the signal processing circuit 68 to the arithmetic unit 61. In the graph of FIG. 7, the vertical axis indicates the output value (voltage) of the signal processing circuit 68. The horizontal axis indicates time. A solid line L1 indicates a signal output from the signal processing circuit 68 when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state. The signal processing circuit 68 outputs a signal corresponding to the signal input from the oxygen sensor 40 to the arithmetic unit 61 when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state. The oxygen sensor 40 is a binary sensor. The binary type oxygen sensor is a type of sensor whose output changes suddenly between a rich state and a lean state. That is, as shown by the solid line L1 in FIG. 7, when the air-fuel mixture is in a rich state, the signal processing circuit 68 outputs a signal having an output value that converges toward a predetermined rich output value VR. When the air-fuel mixture is in a lean state, the signal processing circuit 68 outputs an output value signal that converges toward a predetermined lean output value VL. Therefore, the signal processing circuit 68 outputs a signal that converges to a predetermined lean output value VL when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state and the atmosphere of the oxygen sensor 40 is maintained in the same state as the atmosphere. In the oxygen sensor 40 of the present embodiment, the rich output value VR is larger than the lean output value VL. For example, the lean output value VL is 0 volts.

  In FIG. 7, a broken line L2 indicates a signal output from the signal processing circuit 68 when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state. As indicated by a broken line L2, when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the signal processing circuit 68 outputs a signal that converges to a predetermined convergence value VP. As described above, the signal processing circuit 68 is a pull-up circuit. That is, when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the internal resistance R0 of the oxygen sensor 40 is maximized. At this time, the signal processing circuit 68 outputs a signal having a predetermined pull-up voltage generated by the pull-up resistor R1 of the signal processing circuit 68 and the power source Vcc. Therefore, when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 converges to a predetermined pull-up voltage that is greater than 0 volts. Therefore, the convergence value VP described above corresponds to a pull-up voltage. The pull-up voltage is a value between the lean output value VL and the rich output value VR. In the present embodiment, the pull-up voltage is larger than the lean output value VL and smaller than the rich output value VR. Therefore, the convergence value VP is a value different from the lean output value VL. The oxygen sensor 40 is a so-called heater-less sensor that is not equipped with a heater for heating the above-described element. For this reason, the heat source for heating the elements of the oxygen sensor 40 is exhaust from the engine 11. Therefore, when the exhaust temperature of the engine 11 is decreasing, the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state. When the oxygen sensor 40 becomes inactive, the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 converges toward the convergence value VP.

  As shown in FIG. 5, the lean rich determination unit 67, the fuel cut determination unit 65, and the inactivity determination unit 66 are included in the calculation unit 61 described above. That is, the calculation unit 61 performs a function as the lean rich determination unit 67, a function as the fuel cut determination unit 65, and a function as the inactivity determination unit 66.

  The fuel cut determination unit 65 determines whether or not the fuel cut of the engine 11 is being executed. The fuel cut determination unit 65 determines whether or not the fuel cut of the engine 11 is being executed based on, for example, a command signal to the fuel injection valve 32. Alternatively, the fuel cut determination unit 65 may determine whether or not the fuel cut of the engine 11 is being executed based on the engine rotation speed and the throttle opening. The fuel cut is executed when a predetermined fuel cut execution condition is satisfied while the motorcycle 1 is traveling. The fuel cut execution condition is, for example, that the engine rotational speed is equal to or higher than a predetermined rotational speed, and the throttle opening is equal to or lower than the predetermined opening. Further, when a predetermined fuel cut release condition is satisfied during the fuel cut, the fuel cut is stopped and the normal operation is resumed. The fuel cut cancellation condition is, for example, that the engine rotational speed is equal to or lower than a predetermined rotational speed. Thereby, engine stall is prevented. Further, the fuel cut cancellation condition may be that the throttle opening is equal to or greater than a predetermined opening. Accordingly, the fuel cut can be released in response to the rider's request for acceleration.

  When the inactive determination unit 66 is in normal operation, that is, when the fuel cut is not being executed, the oxygen sensor 40 is inactive when the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 is within a predetermined inactive range. It is determined that it is in a state. As shown in FIG. 7, the predetermined inactive range Rna includes the convergence value VP described above. The inactivity determination unit 66 determines that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state when the output value of the signal processing circuit 68 is within the inactive range Rna for a predetermined time or longer when the fuel cut is not being executed. judge. As the predetermined time, an appropriate value by which it can be determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state is obtained and set in advance through experiments or simulations. The predetermined inactive range Rna is a range between the first activity determination value V1 and the second activity determination value V2. The first activation determination value V1 is a value between the lean output value VL and the convergence value VP. In the present embodiment, the first activation determination value V1 is larger than the lean output value VL and smaller than the convergence value VP. The second activation determination value V2 is a value between the rich output value VR and the convergence value VP. In the present embodiment, the second activation determination value V2 is smaller than the rich output value VR and larger than the convergence value VP. The second activity determination value V2 is larger than the first activity determination value V1. As the first activity determination value V1 and the second activity determination value V2, appropriate values are obtained in advance through experiments or simulations in order to accurately determine whether or not the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state. ing. The inactivity determination unit 66 indicates that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state when the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 is not less than the first activity determination value V1 and not more than the second activity determination value V2. Is determined. For example, when the engine 11 is idling in a low temperature environment or in a state where the engine temperature is lowered due to rain, the exhaust temperature is lowered. In such a state, even if the fuel cut is not executed, the temperature of the oxygen sensor 40 decreases and the oxygen sensor 40 becomes inactive. In the following description, a range between the lean output value VL and the first activation determination value V1 is referred to as a first activation range Ra1. The range between the rich output value VR and the second activation determination value V2 is referred to as a second activation range Ra2. The inactive range Rna is located between the first active range Ra1 and the second active range Ra2. During the normal operation, the inactivity determination unit 66 determines that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state when the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 is within the first activation range Ra1 for a predetermined time or more. Further, the inactivity determination unit 66 determines that the oxygen sensor 40 is in the active state when the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 is within the second active range Ra2 for a predetermined time or more during normal operation. To do. As the predetermined time, an appropriate value by which it can be determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state is obtained and set in advance by experiments or simulations.

  The lean-rich determination unit 67 compares the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 with a predetermined determination threshold VA in a state where the oxygen sensor 40 is determined to be in an active state, so that the air-fuel mixture becomes lean and rich. It is determined whether it is a state. Specifically, the lean-rich determination unit 67 determines the air-fuel mixture when the output value from the signal processing circuit 68 is equal to or less than a predetermined determination threshold VA in a state where the oxygen sensor 40 is determined to be in the active state. Is determined to be lean. Further, the lean-rich determination unit 67 is rich in the air-fuel mixture of the engine 11 when the output value of the oxygen sensor 40 is greater than a predetermined determination threshold VA in a state where the oxygen sensor 40 is determined to be in an active state. It is determined that it is in a state. The determination threshold VA is a value between the first active range Ra1 and the second active range Ra2. Therefore, the determination threshold value VA is included in the inactive range Rna.

  When it is determined by the fuel cut determination unit 65 that the fuel cut of the engine 11 is being executed, the inactivity determination unit 66 executes an inactivity determination process shown in FIG.

  First, in step S1, an output value Vd (n) (hereinafter simply referred to as “output value Vd (n)”) from the signal processing circuit 68 is read. As will be described later, the reading of the output value Vd (n) is repeated at a predetermined cycle. For example, the output value Vd (n) is read every calculation period of feedback control based on the output value Vd (n). Note that n indicates the number of computations for feedback control. That is, n = 1 at the first calculation. In the second calculation, n = 2. FIG. 9 is an example of a time chart showing a change in the output value Vd (n) when the fuel cut is executed. Here, from time t0 to time t1, the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state, and the air-fuel mixture is in a rich state. For this reason, the output value Vd (n) is a value within the second active range Ra2. When the fuel cut is executed at time t1, the atmosphere of the oxygen sensor 40 is in a state where the oxygen partial pressure close to the atmosphere is large. That is, when the fuel cut is executed, the atmosphere of the oxygen sensor 40 becomes lean. For this reason, after time t1, the output value Vd (n) decreases and changes to a value within the first active range Ra1.

  Next, in step S2, it is determined whether or not the output value Vd (n) is smaller than the output bottom value Vbottom. When the output value Vd (n) is smaller than the output bottom value Vbottom, the process proceeds to step S3. In step S3, the output value Vd (n) is set as the output bottom value. Then, the process returns to step S1. In the first calculation, step S2 and step S3 are not executed, and the output value Vd (n) is set as the output bottom value Vbottom. When the output value Vd (n) continues to decrease (from time t1 to time t2) after the start of fuel cut by the processing of steps S1-S3, as shown in FIG. 9, the output bottom value Vbottom is , The newly read output value Vd (n) is updated.

  If it is determined in step S2 that the output value Vd (n) is greater than or equal to the output bottom value Vbottom, the process proceeds to step S4. At this time, as shown in FIG. 9, after the start of the fuel cut, the output value Vd (n) decreases to the minimum value (time point t2). That is, the output value Vd (n) has reached the lean output value VL. Then, the minimum value of the output value Vd (n) is set as the output bottom value Vbottom. In FIG. 9, the minimum value of the output value Vd (n) matches the lean output value VL, but the minimum value of the output value Vd (n) may be larger than the lean output value VL.

  In step S4, it is determined whether or not the output value Vd (n) is greater than a predetermined threshold value Vth. That is, as shown in FIG. 9, it is determined whether or not the output value Vd (n) exceeds a predetermined threshold value Vth. When the output value Vd (n) is not greater than the predetermined threshold value Vth, the process returns to step S1. When the output value Vd (n) is larger than the predetermined threshold value Vth, the process proceeds to step S5. In step S5, it is determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state. That is, as shown in FIG. 9, after the output value Vd (n) reaches the minimum value, when the output value Vd (n) becomes larger than the predetermined threshold value Vth (time point t3), the oxygen sensor 40 Determined to be inactive. The predetermined threshold value Vth is determined and set in advance by an experiment or simulation so that the oxygen sensor 40 can be regarded as being inactive when the fuel cut is performed. The predetermined threshold value Vth is smaller than the first activity determination value V1. That is, the predetermined threshold value Vth is a value between the lean output value VL and the first activation determination value V1. Therefore, the boundary value between the first active range Ra1 and the inactive range Rna, that is, the first active determination value V1, is a value between the predetermined threshold value Vth and the convergence value VP. The output value Vd (n) and the output bottom value Vbottom are reset at the end of the fuel cut.

  The activity determination system for the oxygen sensor 40 according to the present embodiment has the following characteristics.

  The inactivity determination unit 66 determines whether the output value Vd (n) exceeds a predetermined threshold value Vth included in the first active range Ra1 after the output value Vd (n) reaches the minimum value during the start of the fuel cut. Based on whether or not, the inactive state of the oxygen sensor 40 is determined. If the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state during the fuel cut, the output value Vd (n) does not increase from the minimum value. That is, the output value Vd (n) that rises in this way is a signal that cannot be continuously obtained during execution of fuel cut if the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state. Therefore, by detecting that the output value Vd (n) increases toward the convergence value VP, it can be accurately determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state. Further, when the fuel cut is executed, it is immediately determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, and the feedback control can be executed as long as possible as compared with the case where the feedback control is stopped. Thereby, deterioration of exhaust can be suppressed. Further, by adding a device such as an operational amplifier to the input unit 63 of the ECU 60, an increase in cost can be suppressed as compared with the case where the accuracy of the activity determination of the oxygen sensor 40 is improved.

  Even if the output value Vd (n) is within the first active range Ra1, the oxygen sensor 40 may actually be in an inactive state during the fuel cut. In the activity determination system for the oxygen sensor 40 according to the present embodiment, the predetermined threshold value Vth is included in the first activity range Ra1. For this reason, even if the output value Vd (n) from the oxygen sensor is a value within the first active range Ra1, the oxygen sensor 40 is suspected to be in an inactive state during the fuel cut. In addition, the inactive state of the oxygen sensor 40 can be determined. In particular, the fuel cut may be executed while the motorcycle 1 is traveling. Therefore, as described above, when the fuel cut is performed, it is determined early that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, so that the oxygen sensor 40 is determined to be inactive with a margin during traveling. Can do. On the other hand, it is often during the idling operation of the engine 11 that the sensor 40 is determined to be in an inactive state during the normal operation. On the other hand, the fuel cut may be performed during traveling. For this reason, during traveling, it may be determined that the sensor 40 is in an inactive state by executing a fuel cut.

  Since the signal processing circuit 68 is a pull-up circuit, when the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the output value Vd (n) converges toward the convergence value VP. By detecting such a change in the output value Vd (n), it can be accurately determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state.

  Since the oxygen sensor 40 is a binary sensor, if the oxygen sensor 40 is in an active state during the fuel cut, the output value Vd (n) increases from the minimum value after the start of the fuel cut. There is no. Therefore, it is possible to accurately determine that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state by detecting the change in the output value Vd (n) as described above.

  In the heaterless type oxygen sensor 40, the temperature of the element tends to decrease during the fuel cut. Therefore, the present invention is particularly effective for the heaterless type oxygen sensor 40.

  As mentioned above, although one Embodiment of this invention was described, this invention is not limited to the said embodiment, A various change is possible in the range which does not deviate from the summary of invention.

  For example, the straddle-type vehicle is not limited to the motorcycle described above, and may be an irregular terrain vehicle (ALL-TERRAIN VEHICLE) or another vehicle such as a snowmobile. The motorcycle is not limited to the scooter described above, and may be another motorcycle such as a moped or a sports type.

  In the above embodiment, the lean output value VL is smaller than the rich output value VR. However, as shown in FIG. 10, the lean output value VL may be larger than the rich output value VR. That is, the level of the output value Vd (n) may be inverted with respect to the output value Vd (n) of the above embodiment. In this case, after the output value Vd (n) reaches the maximum value, when the output value Vd (n) becomes smaller than the predetermined threshold value Vth, it is determined that the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state.

  The signal processing circuit 68 is not limited to a pull-up circuit, and may be a pull-down circuit as shown in FIG. Specifically, the signal processing circuit 68 shown in FIG. 11 has an input line 69 and a pull-down resistor R2. The input line 69 is connected to the oxygen sensor 40 and the calculation unit 61. The input line 69 is connected to the ground G, and the pull-down resistor R2 is disposed between the ground G and the input line 69. When the oxygen sensor 40 is in an inactive state, the output value Vd (n) from the signal processing circuit 68 converges toward 0V. That is, in this case, the predetermined convergence value of the present invention is 0V. In this case, the lean output value VL needs to be a value different from 0V. This is because the inactive state of the oxygen sensor 40 is determined by the change from the lean output value VL toward the convergence value VP.

  The oxygen sensor 40 is not limited to a binary type, and may be a linear type sensor. That is, the oxygen sensor 40 may be a sensor that linearly outputs a value corresponding to the oxygen concentration in the active state. The signal processing circuit 68 is not included in the input unit 63 of the ECU 60 but may be provided integrally with the oxygen sensor 40.

  In the activity determination shown in FIG. 8 described above, the read output value Vd (n) may be smoothed. The annealing process is a process of averaging the output value Vd (n).

  In the above embodiment, monitoring of the increase in the output value Vd (n) is started from the start of the fuel cut, but the determination of the inactive state of the oxygen sensor is made after a predetermined time has elapsed from the start of the fuel cut execution. May be started. For example, as shown in FIG. 12, the determination of the inactive state of the oxygen sensor described above may be started after the elapse of a predetermined time dt from the fuel cut execution start time t1. This prevents the oxygen sensor 40 from being erroneously determined to be in an inactive state even if a signal indicating a rich state is output immediately after the fuel cut is started even if fuel is not injected. can do. The reason why the signal indicating the rich state is output immediately after the start of the fuel cut even if the fuel is not injected is as follows. It takes time for the exhaust to move from the exhaust port of the engine to the oxygen sensor. Therefore, if the combustion immediately before the start of the fuel cut is in a rich state, a signal indicating the rich state is output from the fuel cut start timing recognized by the ECU until the exhaust reaches the oxygen sensor. Become. For this reason, immediately after the start of the fuel cut, a signal indicating a rich state is output even if the fuel is not injected. Another reason is that there is a reaction delay of the oxygen sensor itself. Further, the fuel adhering to the intake port may enter the combustion chamber during the fuel cut and burn. In this case as well, a signal indicating a rich state is output immediately after the start of fuel cut even if fuel is not injected. Since the determination of the inactive state of the oxygen sensor described above is started after a lapse of a predetermined time from the start of fuel cut execution, erroneous determination can be prevented even if such a phenomenon occurs.

  ADVANTAGE OF THE INVENTION According to this invention, while the subject of this invention can determine the inactive state of an oxygen sensor exactly, the activity determination system of the oxygen sensor which can suppress deterioration of exhaust_gas | exhaustion can be provided.

40 Oxygen sensor 66 Inactivity determination unit 65 Fuel cut determination unit 68 Signal processing circuit

Claims (8)

  1. An oxygen sensor that outputs a signal corresponding to the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas from the internal combustion engine in an active state;
    When a signal from the oxygen sensor is input and the oxygen sensor is in an active state, a signal corresponding to the signal input from the oxygen sensor is output, and the oxygen sensor is in an active state and the oxygen sensor atmosphere is in the atmosphere. A signal that converges to a predetermined lean output value when maintained in the same state, and a signal that converges to a predetermined convergence value different from the lean output value when the oxygen sensor is maintained in an inactive state A signal processing circuit for outputting
    When the output value from the signal processing circuit is within a predetermined inactive range including the convergence value, it is determined that the oxygen sensor is in an inactive state, and the output value from the signal processing circuit is the inactive state. An inactivity determination unit that determines that the oxygen sensor is in an active state when the oxygen sensor is in a predetermined first activity range different from the activity range;
    A fuel cut determination unit for determining whether or not a fuel cut of the internal combustion engine is being performed;
    With
    The inactivity determination unit is configured to output the oxygen when an output value from the signal processing circuit exceeds a predetermined threshold included in the first active range toward the convergence value during execution of the fuel cut. Determining that the sensor is in an inactive state;
    Oxygen sensor activity determination system.
  2. The boundary value between the first active range and the inactive range is a value between the predetermined threshold and the convergence value.
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to claim 1.
  3. The signal processing circuit has a pull-up circuit,
    The convergence value is a value of a pull-up voltage of the pull-up circuit.
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to claim 1 or 2.
  4. The oxygen sensor is a binary sensor,
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to any one of claims 1 to 3.
  5. When the fuel cut is not being executed, the inactivity determination unit is in an inactive state when the output value of the signal processing circuit is within the inactive range for a predetermined time or more. To determine,
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to any one of claims 1 to 4.
  6. The oxygen sensor is a heaterless type sensor.
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to any one of claims 1 to 5.
  7. The inactivity determination unit starts determining the inactive state of the oxygen sensor during execution of the fuel cut after a predetermined time has elapsed from the start of execution of the fuel cut.
    The oxygen sensor activity determination system according to any one of claims 1 to 6.
  8.   A straddle-type vehicle comprising the oxygen sensor activity determination system according to any one of claims 1 to 7.
JP2011122678A 2011-05-31 2011-05-31 Activity determination system of oxygen sensor Withdrawn JP2012251794A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2011122678A JP2012251794A (en) 2011-05-31 2011-05-31 Activity determination system of oxygen sensor

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2011122678A JP2012251794A (en) 2011-05-31 2011-05-31 Activity determination system of oxygen sensor
EP11188522.4A EP2530289B1 (en) 2011-05-31 2011-11-10 Activation determining system for oxygen sensor
ES11188522.4T ES2561438T3 (en) 2011-05-31 2011-11-10 Activation determination system for oxygen sensor

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JP2012251794A true JP2012251794A (en) 2012-12-20

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JP2011122678A Withdrawn JP2012251794A (en) 2011-05-31 2011-05-31 Activity determination system of oxygen sensor

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Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS60212650A (en) * 1984-04-04 1985-10-24 Toyota Motor Corp Electronic control type fuel injector
US4970858A (en) * 1988-03-30 1990-11-20 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Air-fuel ratio feedback system having improved activation determination for air-fuel ratio sensor
JP2745754B2 (en) * 1990-01-23 1998-04-28 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Activity determination device for oxygen sensor
JP4477481B2 (en) 2004-12-20 2010-06-09 本田技研工業株式会社 Oxygen concentration sensor mounting structure
EP1724458A1 (en) * 2005-05-19 2006-11-22 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for diagnosing a measured value

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EP2530289B1 (en) 2016-01-27
ES2561438T3 (en) 2016-02-26
EP2530289A3 (en) 2014-10-08
EP2530289A2 (en) 2012-12-05

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