JP2011510188A - Submarine drill system and control method of drill system - Google Patents

Submarine drill system and control method of drill system Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2011510188A
JP2011510188A JP2010542403A JP2010542403A JP2011510188A JP 2011510188 A JP2011510188 A JP 2011510188A JP 2010542403 A JP2010542403 A JP 2010542403A JP 2010542403 A JP2010542403 A JP 2010542403A JP 2011510188 A JP2011510188 A JP 2011510188A
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Japan
Prior art keywords
drill
module
tool
rov
carousel
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Pending
Application number
JP2010542403A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
マチン ジョナサン
パーデイ ハロルド
ジュニア ネレッセン ピーター
Original Assignee
ペリー シリングズビー システムズ インコーポレイテッドPerry Slingsby Systems, Inc.
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Priority to US11/972,080 priority Critical patent/US20090178848A1/en
Application filed by ペリー シリングズビー システムズ インコーポレイテッドPerry Slingsby Systems, Inc. filed Critical ペリー シリングズビー システムズ インコーポレイテッドPerry Slingsby Systems, Inc.
Priority to PCT/US2009/030737 priority patent/WO2009089528A2/en
Publication of JP2011510188A publication Critical patent/JP2011510188A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/12Underwater drilling
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B19/00Handling rods, casings, tubes or the like outside the borehole, e.g. in the derrick; Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables
    • E21B19/08Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables; Apparatus for increasing or decreasing the pressure on the drilling tool; Apparatus for counterbalancing the weight of the rods
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B19/00Handling rods, casings, tubes or the like outside the borehole, e.g. in the derrick; Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables
    • E21B19/14Racks, ramps, troughs or bins, for holding the lengths of rod singly or connected; Handling between storage place and borehole
    • E21B19/143Racks, ramps, troughs or bins, for holding the lengths of rod singly or connected; Handling between storage place and borehole specially adapted for underwater drilling
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B19/00Handling rods, casings, tubes or the like outside the borehole, e.g. in the derrick; Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables
    • E21B19/14Racks, ramps, troughs or bins, for holding the lengths of rod singly or connected; Handling between storage place and borehole
    • E21B19/146Carousel systems, i.e. rotating rack systems
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B25/00Apparatus for obtaining or removing undisturbed cores, e.g. core barrels, core extractors
    • E21B25/18Apparatus for obtaining or removing undisturbed cores, e.g. core barrels, core extractors the core receiver being specially adapted for operation under water
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/12Underwater drilling
    • E21B7/124Underwater drilling with underwater tool drive prime mover, e.g. portable drilling rigs for use on underwater floors

Abstract

  The subsea drilling system comprises a drill module having a tool carousel removable and replaceable in or out of water, a skid module, and a ROV connected to and disconnected from the skid module in or out of water, The ROV is used to operate the subsea drilling system. A method of operating a submarine drill system includes the step of removing a tool carousel from a drill module and replacing the tool carousel with another tool carousel in or out of water. The ROV is connected to and disconnected from the skid module in or out of the water. The subsea drilling system is operated using the ROV.

Description

  The present invention relates to a submarine drill system, and more particularly to such a system having a ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle). The present invention also relates to a method for operating a submarine drill system.

  One existing device manufactured for the Monterey Research Institute has a horizontal drilling drill mounted and operated on two ROVs. In addition, other devices manufactured for the Monterey Bay Research Institute use skids.

  However, in this device, the carousel is fixed and mounted horizontally. The subsea drilling system has a removable carousel mounted vertically.

  Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to overcome the disadvantages described hereinabove of conventional devices and methods of this conventional manner, i.e., enabling the carousel to be removed on the surface of the water or on the seabed, The system so that it can be guided in place by pins and guide receptacles so that it can be removed or replaced in water using other ROVs, and the ROV can be connected to a submarine drilling system to steer the submarine drilling system. Can be coupled to the ROV underwater, and can be disconnected from the undersea drilling system skid package underwater, and the ROV can be quickly removed or mounted on the undersea drilling system while the ROV is on the support vessel deck An undersea drill system and a method for operating the undersea drill system are provided.

  In view of the foregoing and other objectives, according to the present invention, a subsea drilling system is provided. The system includes a drill module having a tool carousel removable and replaceable in or out of water, a skid module, and a submarine drill system connected to and disconnected from the skid module in or out of water. ROV for maneuvering the vehicle.

  With the objective of the present invention in mind, a method for maneuvering a submarine drill system is also provided. The method comprises the steps of removing a tool carousel from a drill module and replacing the tool carousel with another tool carousel in or out of water, connecting the ROV to a skid module in or out of water, and Cutting from the skid module and operating the subsea drilling system with the ROV.

  The subsea drilling system according to the present invention is configured for taking samples of geological cores by using conventional diamond drilling techniques at a depth of 3000 m or 9840 feet. The system is formed in connection with a suitable weight class ROV and utilizes onshore drilling and coring technology. Conventional coring tools and drill systems are used with reverse circulation drill systems.

  Two main assemblies or packages are provided in the subsea drill system: a subsea drill package and a surface control package. The subsea drilling system according to the present invention interfaces with a suitable ROV, such as a Triton ST200 class ROV. The submarine drilling system operates by employing a suitable ROV to provide a communication line for the hydraulic source and power source. Subsea drilling systems use ST200 class ROVs or any weight class ROV to define supply, service and operation.

  The functional system performance requirements for the baseline submarine drilling system are a coring depth of 12 m or 39.4 feet and a core density estimated at a specific gravity of 3.5. The core diameter and length are 51.8 mm or 2.04 inches, respectively, and 1.5 m or 59 inches per barrel. The drill driving force is 0 to 40 kN (9000 lb / ft), and the pulling force is similar.

  Pipe rod handling performance corresponds to the formation or disassembly of one joint per minute with a 2.0 m or 79 inch long rod. The operating speed for rod driving and withdrawal is 0 to 0.2 m or 0.66 ft / s with no load and 0 to 0.025 m or 1 inch / s with a load of 40 kN or 9000 lb / ft. It is. The drill head is driven at a speed of 15.2 m or 50 feet per minute and withdrawn at a speed of 10.7 m or 35 feet per minute. The drill torque range is from 15 Nm to 250 Nm, or from 11 ft lb to 185 ft lb. The drill speed ranges from 0 to 900 rpm, continuously variable, uses a 2-speed motor, and the maximum drill spindle speed is 1200 rpm.

  The submarine drill system structure was in accordance with Det Norske Veritas or DNV Rules for Certification of Lifting Applications, and the load test was conducted in the presence of DNV.

  Other features that are considered as characteristic for the invention are set forth in the appended claims.

  The present invention is illustrated and described herein as embodiments in a subsea drill system and method of operating a subsea drill system, but nevertheless, without departing from the spirit of the invention, It is not intended to be limited to the details shown, as various applications and structural changes may be made within the scope.

  However, the manner of construction and operation of the invention and their additional objects and advantages are best understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

1 is a diagram showing components of a submarine drill system according to the present invention. FIG. 1 is a front side perspective view of a submarine skid package including a drill module and a skid module. FIG. It is a perspective view from the front and side of ROV. It is the perspective view from the front and the side of the drill module and skid module which mount ROV. FIG. 2D is a front and side perspective view similar to FIG. 2C with the legs extended and the drill head assembly and tool carousel mounted. FIG. 3 is an enlarged elevation view of a drill head assembly. FIG. 3 is a further enlarged cross-sectional view of a drill head assembly. FIG. 3 is a further enlarged cross-sectional view of a drill head assembly. It is a top perspective view of the tool carousel of the drill module. It is an elevation view of a tool carousel. FIG. 9 is an elevation view of the tool carousel enlarged to a size different from that of FIG. 8. It is an elevation view of a tool carousel with a carousel pin receptacle. It is a perspective view of a drive mechanism. It is a perspective view of a foot clamp. It is a perspective view of the tool arm in a retracted position. It is a perspective view of the tool arm in an extending position. It is an expansion perspective view of the gripper of a tool arm. It is an outer side perspective view of a leveling leg part. It is an inside elevation view of a leveling leg. It is an enlarged partial inner side elevational view of a leveling leg part. It is a front side perspective view of the structure frame for drill modules. It is a perspective view of a drill water pump. 2 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic system of a drill module manifold. 2 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic system of a drill module manifold. 2 is a schematic diagram of a hydraulic system of a drill module manifold. 1 is a schematic diagram of an electrical cable and a submarine control device. It is a perspective view of the structural frame for skid modules. It is a perspective view of a surface control station. It is a figure which shows the main drill screen. It is a figure which shows a tool change screen. It is a figure which shows a data logger. It is a perspective view of a reverse circulation drill head. It is a fragmentary perspective view of a circulation drill bit. It is an expansion partial perspective view of a part of circulation drill bit. It is an expansion partial perspective view of a part of circulation drill bit.

  Referring now in detail to the drawings in the accompanying drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1 in particular, a chart illustrating the components of a subsea drilling system according to the present invention, including a subsea skid package and a surface control package, described in detail below. Is shown.

  FIG. 2A shows a submarine skid package including a drill module 1 and a skid module 100. FIG. 2B shows the ROV 3 used in the submarine skid package, and FIG. 2C shows the ROV 3 mounted on the submarine skid package. The preferred ROV shown here is XLXS125, but others may be used instead. The drill module 1 has two stable leveling legs 80 and the skid module 100 has one stable leveling leg 80, which forms an improved tripod structure. The legs 80 can be stretched as shown in FIG. 2A, retracted as shown in FIG. 2C, or partially stretched to accommodate the sea floor irregularities. The leg 80 has a maximum extension length 53 ", but can also be configured to have a longer or shorter maximum extension length. The two tool arms 70 and drill head 10 described in more detail below are shown in FIG. 2C. 3 which also shows the extended leg 80 shows the drill head 10 positioned below, while the drill head 10 is positioned upward in FIG. 2C and 3 also show a structural frame 90 for the drill module 1 and a structural frame 130 for the skid module 100.

  The ROVs shown in FIGS. 2B, 2C and 3 are suitable ROVs that can be combined with a submarine drilling system at the seabed. The subsea drilling system itself cannot be operated alone, but instead is operated by ROV. Also, a single ROV that can move from one subsea drill system to another and operate them in various settings may be used to operate multiple subsea drills on the seabed. . The ROV has a coupling pin and a wet coupling connector at position 12 that can provide an electrical, hydraulic and communication connection with the vehicle to maneuver the subsea drilling system.

  A submarine drilling system is a system for drilling and coring. The general requirement of the system is that the ROV supplies hydraulic power, power, remote control (telemetry) and spare fiber. The system can drill and recover a 20 m (meter) core using the illustrated structure and diamond drill tool. A special core barrel system referred to as ROV275 Core Barrel and Rod Assembly is used. Although XLS 125 ROV is used as the baseline system, many other types of weight class ROVs can be used with the subsea drilling system according to the present invention. The system uses two packages: a surface control package and a submarine skid package with a drill module 1 as seen in FIG.

  FIG. 4 is an enlarged view showing further details of the drill head 10 of the drill module 1, including an aluminum cross beam 14, two hydraulic lift cylinders 15, 16, a spindle assembly 18, and a hydraulic spindle drive motor. 19 and a non-metallic spindle drive belt 20.

  Even more details regarding the drill head 10 are given by the cross-sectional view of FIG. FIG. 5 shows that the spindle assembly 18 has a spindle 21, a spindle lock cylinder 22, a water swivel 23 and a saver sub 24. The spindle lock cylinder 22 locks the cylinder so that the cylinder is used for torque transmission. The water swivel 23 is a place where water enters the drill head 10 and flows down into the drill pipe for lubrication of the hole to be drilled and removal of shavings. The saver sub 24 is connected to a drill pipe or core barrel for drilling. The hydraulic spindle drive motor 19 is connected to the suspension motor adapter 26 and the drive sprocket 27 using a non-metallic spindle drive belt 20.

  A further enlarged view of the spindle assembly 18 shown again in FIG. 6 shows the spindle 21, spindle lock cylinder 22, water swivel 23 and replaceable saver sub 24. The spindle 21 has four spindle detents 29, eight spindle drive balls 30, and a spindle lock cylinder having a spindle sprocket 25 and a spindle lock spring 28. The ball actuation circuit 31 leads to a portion having a slide 36 that can be pressurized and can be pushed up to lock the ball against the spindle 21 by pushing the ball inward. The drill head 10 also includes an upper ball bearing 32 and a lower ball bearing 33 that receive loads in either direction resulting from the application of the drill. An upper bearing correction circuit 34 is provided to add oil into the bearing to prevent seawater from entering. An RPM sensor (not shown) mounted at the position 35 measures the RPM of the drill head 10.

  FIG. 7 shows a tool carousel 40 that is part of the drill module 1. The tool carousel 40 is supported by a drill module frame 90, which also holds the drill head 10 in the upper or raised position. The tool carousel 40 has a cylindrical shape with 12 slots that can carry tools. Each slot can carry two tools, giving the possibility to use up to 24 tools in the tool carousel 40.

  8 and 9 are enlarged to show more details of the tool carousel 40. The bottom of the tool carousel 40 has a drive wheel 43 that drives the carousel from slot to slot as an intermittent drive wheel. The drill tools 45, 46 are arranged in their respective slots and are held by tool holding fingers 76. The drill tool also includes a core barrel disposed in the carousel as described below. As described above, although there are 12 slots, 11 slots remain usable up to 22 drill tools 45, 46, and one slot remains unused. One slot is left empty to prevent the tools 45, 46 from falling out of the carousel 40 during start and retrieval operations. The carousel 40 has an upper retaining ring 42 with an opening formed therein for ease of access to allow the tools 45, 46 to be removed from the carousel 40. The carousel 40 has a lifting eye 43 and a carousel guide receptacle 44 that only couples with the upper guide pin on the frame 90 as shown in FIG. 9 and seen in FIG. A lower retaining ring is also provided and will be described below. The carousel uses the lifting eye 43 and lowers the drive assembly onto the submarine drilling system so that the carousel can be withdrawn and replaced safely, thereby carrying additional tools and continuously drilling deeper holes. If a need arises, the carousel can be replaced with a different carousel.

  FIG. 10 is an enlarged view of the lower portion of the tool carousel 40, which can be withdrawn from the seabed and replaced with other carousels according to the operations performed by the system operator at that time. . Reference numeral 48 indicates a lower retaining ring having a lower guide pin receptacle 49 for receiving the lower guide pin 51. A guide pin receptacle 53 that is part of the carousel 40 itself receives a square male drive pin 54 that is part of the drive mechanism 50. As the carousel 40 slides down, as seen in FIG. 7, the lower guide pin 51 faces the bottom of the carousel, while the upper guide pin faces the top of the carousel. The carousel can be mounted on these guide pins and driven by a drive system. When the carousel is pulled, the square drive pin 54 is separated from the receptacle 53, the guide pin 51 on the bottom is separated from the receptacle 49, and the top guide pin is separated from the receptacle.

  FIG. 11 shows a drive mechanism 50 that employs a known Geneva mechanism assembly used for intermittent drive to drive the tool carousel 40. The drive mechanism 50 has a geneva drive motor 55 that rotates 360 degrees. The oil supply motor mounting adapter 56 is disposed above the drive motor 55, and the Geneva drive wheel 58 driven by the motor 55 has a drive pin 54 that is connected to and disconnected from the tool carousel 40. The drive wheel 58 is intermittently driven by 1/12 of the outer circumference for each rotation of the motor 55. Intermittent drive is performed by a pin 59 having a shaft that meshes with the slot 57.

  FIG. 12 shows the foot clamp assembly 60 of the drill module 1. The foot clamp assembly 60 includes an upper foot clamp 62, shown with the cover removed, and a lower foot clamp 64, separated by a plate 65 attached to the frame. The upper foot clamp 62 has foot clamp grip cylinders 66 and 67 and a gripper slide bearing 68. The lower foot clamp also uses the same cylinder as the cylinders 66, 67 and the same slide bearing as the slide bearing 68. The foot clamp assembly 60 functions to grip the pipe to form and disassemble the joint. A rotating cylinder 69 that can be attached to the bearing and can be rotated up to 100 degrees by a hydraulic cylinder used to form and disassemble the joint is used to rotate the upper foot clamp 62. The lower foot clamp 64 does not rotate, but instead is stationary and attached to the frame. The foot clamp used is a special grip that is made of a high-strength, high-hardness material and is used to grip the pipe.

  A fail-safe mechanism opens the jaws when hydraulic pressure is released. The jaws are configured with another set of jaws where larger dimensions up to 89 mm are required for grip size tools ranging between 25 and 70 mm. The maximum passage opening is set to 108 mm. Torque tolerances are up to 1000 ft lbs (1356 Nm).

  FIG. 13 shows one of the two tool arms 70 of the drill module 1 shown in FIGS. 2C and 3. The upper tool arm 70 is a collection tool arm, and the lower tool arm 70 is an adjustment tool arm. Each tool arm 70 that is hydraulically actuated independently or together includes a collection arm 72 and a mounting bracket 74. Tool arm 70 is used to withstand the maximum torque generated by drill head 10 and is used to tighten and loosen the tool joint with a spindle. Tool arm 70 therefore has an extension with a gripper 76. The lower adjustment tool arm 70 is used to position the tool relative to the centerline of the foot clamp assembly 60. An energy chain 73 for the moving hose is provided on the gripper arm 72. FIG. 14 shows the gripper arm 72 retracted, while FIG. 13 shows the retracted gripper arm 72. It can be seen from the enlarged view of FIG. 15 that the gripper 76 of the grabber tool arm has a carbide insert 77 while a plastic insert is provided on the lower or adjustment tool arm.

  The tool arm 70 is made of aluminum and is actuated by a hydraulic cylinder so that it can be pushed in and out while being slid. The grip function achieved by opening and closing the jaw 76 is also hydraulically actuated. To help fine-tune the arm, an additional bump feature is provided that can move the arm to one inch in the lateral direction up to 1 inch (2.54 cm).

  16 to 18 includes an outer cylinder 82 that is attached to the frame by an adjustable clamp, and an inner cylinder 84 that can be expanded and contracted by hydraulic pressure in the outer cylinder 82. The inner cylinder 84 also has a removable leg pad 86. The two slide bearing ring assemblies 87 bear a slide load when the leg 80 expands and contracts. Again, the function of the legs 80 is to raise and lower the overall system height during seabed operations. The legs can be used to adjust the height of the system when placed on the seabed in various terrain situations up to an angle of 20 °.

  FIG. 19 shows a structural frame 90 for the drill module 1 with a removable guide beam 92, slides and rollers for movement of the drill head 10. Frame 90 consists of a welded top and bottom made of aluminum with bolted vertical members and is load tested up to 3G (3 times the acceleration of gravity).

  FIG. 20 shows the drill water pump 102 of the skid module 100 that forms a submarine skid package with the drill module 1. The drill water pump 102 is a conventional, readily available equipment driven by a hydraulic motor. The drill water pump 102 is used to deliver water along the drill pipe to a drill bit that can be used to flush the drill shaving.

  21, 22 and 23 are schematic views of the hydraulic systems 105, 110 and 115 of the drill module manifolds 1, 2 and 3 which are powered by the ST200ROV hydraulic system. That is, the ROV operates the hydraulic function by supplying hydraulic fluid to the subsea drilling system and then returning it to the ROV. Three to nine function control manifolds used to control the subsea drill system are attached to the subsea drill system.

  More specifically, FIG. 21 shows a schematic overall view of the hydraulic system 105 in the manifold 1, the manifold 1 being used for drill feeding, drill head lifting and lowering and lifting drill control as seen from left to right. , The first of the three manifolds with the first four motion controls. The fifth control is for the carousel motor. The last four hydraulic controls are used for foot clamp and spindle lock.

  FIG. 22 shows the hydraulic system 110 of the manifold 2. Again, the first two valves, viewed from left to right, are used to control the speed of the hydraulic motor that drives the spindle. The third valve is for the shift speed used to control the height shift of the hydraulic motor. The remaining bulbs are used for gripper or grabber, adjustment arm and bump functions, basically used for tool arms.

  FIG. 23 shows the hydraulic system 115 of the manifold 3 that controls skids and options. The first valve is blank. The second valve is used to control the motor of the water pump used to send water through the drill string to the drill bit. The remaining three valves are used for adjusting legs and can be used to move the legs up and down.

  FIG. 24 shows an electrical cabling diagram 120 and a submarine controller 125. The cable wiring diagram is basically similar to the hydraulic system and has controllers for all three manifolds, manifolds 1 and 2 and skid manifold 3. The schematic shows various sensors and various applications. Inside each of these manifolds is a Perry Slingsby smart valve controller or LCV (local valve controller). Each board controls a specific function within its manifold.

  FIG. 25 shows a structural frame 130 for the skid module 100 that is configured for various interfaces. The illustrated structural frame 130 is specifically provided for the ST200ROV interface. The structural frame 130 is also made of an aluminum welded frame and is tested up to 3G.

  FIG. 26 shows that the surface control package is a rack mount 141 with a display 142, an inclined control panel 145 with two drill joysticks, a 19 inch touch screen LCD color monitor 143, and an IBM Blade computer 144 with a USB interface to the equipment. , RS232 to RS485 converter, surface control 140 including a stand-alone console with keyboard and mouse.

  FIGS. 27A and 27B show examples of the main drill screen and tool change screen of the surface control 140 displayed on a touch screen monitor.

  FIG. 28 shows a data logger for surface control 140 showing an example of how functions are logged and stored during drilling operations. Log records are later used by geologists after the hole has been drilled to verify that the drilling process has been carried out successfully.

  FIG. 29 shows a configuration used for reverse circulation drills that differs from conventional drills to use reverse circulation of water. Water is pumped down through the outside of the drill tool annular section and pulled up through the center. Basically, the reverse circulation drill draws swarf into the water bag assembly instead of feeding it into the core barrel.

  A comparison of FIG. 4 and FIG. 29 shows what should be done to the drill head 10 to modify the drill head 10 to reverse circulation. A second swivel 131 is added with a gooseneck tube or connecting hose 132 leading to the sample reservoir bag. The reverse circulation drill uses different drill tools: RCD (Reverse Circulation Drilling) drill rod 133 and different bits.

  FIG. 30 is an enlarged view showing the RCD drill rod 133 and the RCD drill bit 134. It will be appreciated that an outer tube 136 and an inner tube 137 are provided in which water flows in the direction of the arrows. The arrows indicate that water is pushed down through the outer tube 136 and then into the drill bit 134 and the water is then pulled up through the center of the inner tube 137 and through the connection 132 to the water storage bag.

  31 and 32 are further enlarged to show more detail of the double tube or reverse circulation tube structures 136, 137 and drill bit 134, respectively.

Claims (27)

  1. A submarine drilling system,
    A drill module having a removable and replaceable tool carousel in or out of the water;
    A skid module;
    A subsea drilling system comprising a ROV connected and disconnected with the skid module in or out of water, the ROV being used to operate the subsea drilling system.
  2.   The subsea drilling system according to claim 1, wherein the drill module has a structural frame, and the tool carousel is guided to a position on the structural frame by a pin and a guide receptacle.
  3.   The submarine drill system according to claim 2, wherein the tool carousel is removable and replaceable in water by another ROV.
  4.   The subsea drilling system according to claim 2, wherein one of the pins drives the tool carousel.
  5.   The submarine drill system of claim 1, wherein the tool carousel has a slot for receiving a drill tool.
  6.   The seabed according to claim 1, wherein the drill module has a drill head having a spindle assembly and a drive motor for driving a drill rod, and the drill head is movable up and down on a hydraulic lifting cylinder. Drill system.
  7.   The subsea drilling system according to claim 1, wherein the drill module includes a foot clamp for grasping a pipe to form and disassemble a joint.
  8.   6. The subsea drilling system according to claim 5, wherein the drill module has a tool arm for inserting the drill tool into the slot and for removing the drill tool from the slot.
  9.   The subsea drill according to claim 1, wherein the drill module has a structural frame, the skid module has a structural frame, and a stable leveling leg is attached to the frame to correspond to uneven terrain in water. system.
  10.   The subsea drilling system according to claim 1, wherein the skid module has a water pump for sending water along a drill pipe to a drill bit for flushing shavings.
  11.   The subsea drilling system according to claim 1, wherein the skid module has a structural frame for receiving the ROV.
  12.   The submarine drill system of claim 11, wherein the structural frame includes pins and connectors for the ROV.
  13.   The subsea drill system according to claim 1, further comprising a surface control package having a display, a monitor, a computer and an interface for remotely controlling the subsea drill system.
  14.   The submarine drill system according to claim 6, wherein the drill rod is a reverse circulation drill rod, and a swivel hose is connected to the spindle assembly for reverse circulation drilling and leads to a water storage bag.
  15. A method of maneuvering a submarine drill system,
    Removing the tool carousel from the drill module in or out of water and replacing the tool carousel with another tool carousel;
    Connecting the ROV to the skid module in or out of water and disconnecting the ROV from the skid module;
    Operating the subsea drilling system with the ROV.
  16.   The method of claim 15, further comprising guiding the tool carousel to a position on the structural frame of the drill module using a pin and a guide receptacle.
  17.   The method of claim 15, further comprising performing the step of removing and replacing the tool carousel in water with another ROV.
  18.   The method of claim 15, further comprising driving the tool carousel with one of the pins.
  19.   The method of claim 15, further comprising placing a drill tool in a slot of the tool carousel and removing the drill tool from the slot of the tool carousel.
  20.   16. The method of claim 15, further comprising: driving a drill rod using a spindle assembly and drive motor on the drill head of the drill module; and moving the drill head up and down with a hydraulic lift cylinder.
  21.   16. The method of claim 15, further comprising the step of grasping a pipe to form and disassemble a joint using a foot clamp of the drill module.
  22.   20. The method of claim 19, further comprising the step of inserting and removing the drill tool from the slot using a tool arm of the drill module.
  23.   16. The method of claim 15, further comprising the step of responding to underwater rough terrain using stable leveling legs attached to a structural frame of the drill module and the skid module.
  24.   16. The method of claim 15, further comprising: using the water pump of the skid module to send water along a drill pipe to a drill bit for flushing swarf.
  25.   The method of claim 15, further comprising coupling the ROV to pins and connectors on a structural frame of the skid module.
  26.   The method of claim 15, comprising remotely controlling the subsea drill system using a surface control package having a display, a monitor, a computer and an interface.
  27.   16. The method of claim 15, further comprising the step of guiding swarf from the reverse circulation drill rod through the spindle assembly and swivel hose to the water storage bag for reverse circulation drilling.
JP2010542403A 2008-01-10 2009-01-12 Submarine drill system and control method of drill system Pending JP2011510188A (en)

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JP2016069968A (en) * 2014-09-30 2016-05-09 日油技研工業株式会社 Core ring device for remote control unmanned prober
JP2017043974A (en) * 2015-08-27 2017-03-02 国立大学法人福島大学 Underwater movable columnar mud collecting device, columnar mud collecting machine and underwater survey device
CN105379594A (en) * 2015-11-24 2016-03-09 玖龙浆纸(乐山)有限公司 Fruit cultivating bag paper and preparation method thereof
CN105379594B (en) * 2015-11-24 2019-03-12 玖龙纸业(乐山)有限公司 A kind of fruit cultivating bag paper and preparation method thereof
WO2017146156A1 (en) * 2016-02-26 2017-08-31 トピー工業株式会社 Geological sample collecting method and work device having ground biting function

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NO20101128L (en) 2010-09-16
WO2009089528A3 (en) 2009-10-08
CN101970787A (en) 2011-02-09
GB2469417A (en) 2010-10-13
WO2009089528A2 (en) 2009-07-16
BRPI0906832A2 (en) 2015-07-14
GB201013403D0 (en) 2010-09-22
US20090178848A1 (en) 2009-07-16

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