JP2011003558A - Manufacturing method for display device - Google Patents

Manufacturing method for display device Download PDF

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JP2011003558A
JP2011003558A JP2010227163A JP2010227163A JP2011003558A JP 2011003558 A JP2011003558 A JP 2011003558A JP 2010227163 A JP2010227163 A JP 2010227163A JP 2010227163 A JP2010227163 A JP 2010227163A JP 2011003558 A JP2011003558 A JP 2011003558A
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laser beam
organic el
material
mirror
formed
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JP2010227163A
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Japanese (ja)
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Eiji Matsuzaki
Kazufumi Miyata
一史 宮田
永二 松崎
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Hitachi Displays Ltd
株式会社 日立ディスプレイズ
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Abstract

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To form an organic EL layer of a pixel on an organic EL display device by a transcription method using a laser beam.SOLUTION: The laser beam 41 emitted from a laser light source 40 is reflected with a galvano-mirror 43 by passing through a dichroic mirror 42, and is incident to a parabola mirror 50. Since the galvano-mirror 43 is installed at a focal point of the parabola mirror 50, the laser beam 41 reflecting the parabola mirror 50 passes through a glass window 61 of the vacuum chamber 60, and is incident at a right angle to a material plate 30 installed in the vacuum chamber 60 and preparing an organic EL material. The organic EL material prepared to the material plate 30 is transcribed to an element substrate 10 by being heated and vaporized with the laser beam 41. Accurate transcription of the organic EL material can be attained since the laser beam 41 is always incident to the material plate 30 at a right angle.

Description

  The present invention relates to an organic EL display device, and more particularly to a technique for efficiently and accurately forming an organic EL layer.

  The demand for liquid crystal display devices, organic EL display devices, and the like is increasing as flat displays for monitors, TVs, and the like because the screen is flat and thin. Since the organic EL display device is self-luminous, it has excellent viewing angle characteristics and is expected to have various application fields as a display due to the feature that a backlight is unnecessary.

  In the organic EL display device, a pixel is composed of an organic EL layer composed of a plurality of layers that emit light and a TFT that drives the organic EL layer, and a display region is formed by arranging the pixels on a matrix. In the prior art, the organic EL layer is formed on the planarizing film on the layer where the thin film transistor (TFT) or the like is formed in the pixel portion or on the planarizing film on the layer where the TFT is not formed. Formed by vapor deposition.

  This vapor deposition is performed using a vapor deposition mask for each color. In addition to having to deposit an organic layer for each color, the deposition mask must be changed for each color. In the organic EL display device, since the pixel definition is high, the hole of the vapor deposition mask becomes very small, and the diameter of the hole changes as the vapor deposition is performed, so the vapor deposition mask needs to be replaced or maintained regularly. There is a problem in mass production. In addition, since the size and pitch of pixels formed by vapor deposition are very small, there is a problem that the vapor deposition mask for each color must be aligned with high accuracy. Thus, forming an organic EL layer by vapor deposition has a problem in mass production.

  As a technique for forming an organic EL layer in a pixel portion without vapor deposition, a material plate on which an organic EL material is formed is placed on a base substrate in the vicinity of an element substrate on which a TFT or the like is formed. There is a technique of transferring an organic EL layer to a pixel portion of an element substrate by sublimating or evaporating an organic EL material by irradiating a laser beam.

  “Patent Document 1” describes a technique for improving the accuracy of a transferred organic EL layer by forming a laser beam energy profile in a rectangular shape instead of a Gaussian distribution. “Patent Document 2” describes a technique in which an organic EL material is formed on a convex portion of a metal sheet attached to a glass plate, and the organic EL material formed on the convex portion is transferred to an element substrate. ing.

JP 2003-257541 A JP 2000-12216 A

  “Patent Document 1” and “Patent Document 2” describe a technique for accurately transferring an organic EL material, but regarding a technique for irradiating a laser beam efficiently and at high speed, an energy efficiency of the laser beam, and the like. There is no description.

  FIG. 12 is a schematic view of a system for transferring an organic EL material to the element substrate 10 by the laser beam 41. In this specification, a substrate on which a TFT, an organic EL layer 22, a scanning line, a video signal line, and the like are formed is referred to as an element substrate 10. In FIG. 12, a laser beam 41 emitted from a laser light source 40 enters a galvanometer mirror 43. A YAG laser is used as the laser. The galvanometer mirror 43 can deflect the laser beam 41 by changing the angle of the mirror. Therefore, the laser beam 41 can be scanned at high speed.

  In the vacuum chamber 60, an element substrate 10 and a material substrate on which an organic material is formed are installed in the vicinity of the element substrate 10. The laser beam 41 reflected from the galvanometer mirror 43 enters the material substrate through a glass window 61 formed in the vacuum chamber 60. The organic EL material formed on the material substrate is heated by the laser beam 41, evaporated and transferred to the element substrate 10. The scanning of the laser beam 41 is intermittently performed, and the organic EL material is formed only in a portion corresponding to the pixel portion of the element substrate 10 by turning on the laser beam 41 in the pixel portion.

  This technique can scan the laser beam 41 at a high speed by using the galvanometer mirror 43, but the following problems arise when the laser beam 41 is irradiated at a place other than the center of the material substrate. One problem is that the profile of the laser beam 41 projected onto the material substrate, that is, the spot shape is distorted except at the center of the element substrate 10. For example, when the cross section of the laser beam 41 is a circle, the plan view of the laser beam 41 on the material substrate is an ellipse. That is, the shape of the organic EL material to be transferred changes by the amount of the ellipse. In addition, the amount of change differs depending on the angle at which the laser is incident. Further, the energy density of the projected laser beam 41 also varies depending on the location.

  Another problem with the technique of FIG. 12 is that the laser beam 41 is refracted by the glass window 61. That is, since the direction of the laser beam 41 changes due to refraction by the glass, precise calculation and control are necessary to specify the location where the laser beam 41 is irradiated. The fact that precise control is necessary means that mass production is impaired.

  A feature of the present invention is that the entire area of the display device to be processed is deflected by a galvanometer mirror, reflected by a parabolic mirror, and arranged at the focal point of the parabolic mirror. The laser beam is incident vertically. Specific means are as follows.

(1) A method of manufacturing a display device using a laser beam,
The laser beam is emitted from a laser light source, reflected from a galvanometer mirror, and further reflected by a parabolic mirror, the galvanometer mirror is present at the focal point of the parabolic mirror, and the laser beam is scanned by the galvanometer mirror, The method of manufacturing a display device, wherein the laser beam is vertically incident on the entire area of the display device to be irradiated.

  (2) A method of manufacturing a display device using a laser beam, wherein the laser beam is emitted from a laser light source, passes through a dichroic mirror, is reflected by a galvanometer mirror, is reflected by a parabolic mirror, and the galvanometer mirror is A method for manufacturing a display device, wherein the laser beam is present at a focal point of a parabolic mirror, the laser beam is scanned by the galvanometer mirror, and the laser beam is vertically incident on the entire area of the irradiated display device.

  According to the present invention, by adopting a configuration in which a laser beam can be vertically irradiated on the entire display device, high-precision processing using the laser beam can be performed on the entire display device. In addition, according to the present invention, it is possible to improve the processing throughput by a laser beam.

It is sectional drawing of a top emission type organic electroluminescence display. This is the principle of transfer of the organic EL layer. 1 is a configuration diagram of a transfer system of Example 1. FIG. It is an example of the conventional transfer system. It is a principle diagram of the transfer system of the present invention. It is a comparison figure of the shape of the laser beam on a material board. It is an example of pixel arrangement | positioning of an organic electroluminescence display. It is an example of the convergence system of a laser beam. It is another example of the convergence system of a laser beam. It is an example of organic electroluminescent layer arrangement | positioning of an organic electroluminescent display apparatus. FIG. 6 is a configuration diagram of a transfer system of Example 2. It is a conventional example of a transfer system.

  Before describing specific examples, the configuration of an organic EL display device and the principle of transfer will be described. The organic EL display device is classified into a bottom emission type in which light emission from the organic EL layer is directed to the element substrate side and a top emission type in which the light emission from the organic EL layer is directed to the opposite side of the element substrate. The top emission type is advantageous in terms of luminance because an organic EL layer that emits light can be formed on a region where a TFT or the like is formed. In the following description, the top emission type will be described as an example, but the bottom emission type is essentially the same.

  FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a top emission type organic EL display device. The top emission type includes a top anode type in which an anode is formed on the organic EL layer 22 and a top cathode type in which a cathode is formed on the organic EL layer 22. Although FIG. 1 shows the case of the top anode type, the present invention can be similarly applied to the case of the top cathode type.

In FIG. 1, a first base film 11 made of SiN and a second base film 12 made of SiO 2 are formed on an element substrate 10. This is to prevent impurities from the glass substrate from contaminating the semiconductor layer 13. A semiconductor layer 13 is formed on the second base film 12. The semiconductor layer 13 is converted into a poly-Si film by laser irradiation after an a-Si film is formed by CVD.

A gate insulating film 14 made of SiO 2 is formed so as to cover the semiconductor layer 13. A gate electrode 15 is formed in a portion facing the semiconductor layer 13 with the gate insulating film 14 interposed therebetween. Using the gate electrode 15 as a mask, an impurity such as phosphorus or boron is implanted into the semiconductor layer 13 by ion implantation to impart conductivity, thereby forming a source portion or a drain portion in the semiconductor layer 13.

An interlayer insulating film 16 is formed of SiO 2 so as to cover the gate electrode 15. This is to insulate the gate wiring formed in the same layer as the gate electrode 15 and the drain wiring 17. A drain wiring 17 is formed on the interlayer insulating film 16. The drain wiring 17 is connected to the drain of the semiconductor layer 13 through the interlayer insulating film 16 and the gate insulating film 14 through a through hole.

  Thereafter, an inorganic passivation film 18 made of SiN is deposited to protect the TFT. An organic passivation film 19 is formed on the inorganic passivation film 18. The organic passivation film 19 has a role of protecting the TFT more completely together with the inorganic passivation film 18 and a function of flattening the surface on which the organic EL layer 22 is formed. Therefore, the organic passivation film 19 is formed as thick as 1 to 4 μm.

  A reflective electrode 24 is formed of Al or an Al alloy on the organic passivation film 19. Since Al or Al alloy has a high reflectance, it is suitable as the reflective electrode 24. The reflective electrode 24 is connected to the drain wiring 17 through through holes formed in the organic passivation film 19 and the inorganic passivation film 18.

  Since this embodiment is a top anode type organic EL display device, the lower electrode 21 of the organic EL layer 22 serves as a cathode. Therefore, Al or Al alloy used as the reflective electrode 24 can also serve as the lower electrode 21 of the organic EL layer 22. This is because Al or an Al alloy has a relatively small work function and can function as a cathode.

  An organic EL layer 22 is formed on the lower electrode 21. The organic EL layer 22 is often formed of one layer when formed of a polymer material, but becomes a multilayer film when formed of a low molecular material. In the case of a low molecular material, from the lower layer, for example, an electron injection layer, an electron transport layer, a light emitting layer, and a hole transport layer. It becomes a hole injection layer. The present invention can be applied to any case where the organic EL layer 22 is formed of a polymer or a low molecule.

  In the present invention, the organic EL layer 22 is formed by transfer. When the organic EL layer 22 is formed of a low molecular material, it is necessary to transfer about 5 layers of the organic EL layer 22. That is, the transfer is required 5 times, and the material substrate needs to be changed for each layer. However, also in this case, it is not necessary to change the optical system for controlling the element substrate 10 and the laser beam 41, and only the material substrate may be changed. That is, it is not necessary to align the material substrate and the element substrate 10 or align the material substrate and the optical system. Therefore, although there is a step of changing the material substrate, mass productivity is not greatly impaired.

  On the other hand, when the organic EL layer 22 is formed of a polymer material, the organic EL layer 22 may be a single layer, and thus a technique for forming the organic EL layer 22 by transfer is very suitable.

  An upper electrode 23 serving as a cathode is formed on the organic EL layer 22. As the upper electrode 23, IZO (Indium Zinc Oxide) which is a transparent electrode is used. IZO is deposited on the entire display area without using a mask. The thickness of IZO is formed to be about 30 nm in order to maintain the light transmittance. As the upper electrode, ITO (Indium Tin Oxide), which is a metal oxide conductive film, can be used like IZO.

  In addition, in order to prevent the organic EL layer 22 from being broken at the end portion due to disconnection, the bank 20 is formed between the pixels. The bank is formed of acryl resin or polyimide resin by photolithography. The light from the organic EL layer 22 is emitted to the side opposite to the element substrate 10 as shown by L in FIG. 1 to form an image.

  FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram showing how the organic EL material is transferred to the element substrate 10 by the laser beam 41. In FIG. 2, the material plate 30 is formed of a base substrate 31 made of quartz glass, a heat absorbing layer 32, and a transfer material layer 33. The transfer material layer 33 is an organic EL material that is transferred to the element substrate 10. The base substrate 31 may be a transparent resin substrate formed of polyethylene or the like. The element substrate 10 is installed in the vicinity of the material plate 30. As described above, the element substrate 10 is formed with a planarization film and a bank made of an organic resin. Then, the organic material is transferred to the pixel portion surrounded by the bank.

  In FIG. 2, the laser beam 41 passes through the base substrate 31 and is absorbed by the heat absorption layer 32 to be converted into heat. The endothermic layer 32 is made of, for example, Mo and has a thickness of about 150 μm. The organic EL material is heated and evaporated by the heat generated in the heat absorbing portion. The evaporated organic EL material adheres to the element substrate 10, and the organic EL layer 22 is formed on a necessary portion of the element substrate 10.

  In the material plate 30, the transfer material layer 33 formed on the endothermic layer 32 is formed to a thickness of about 100 μm, for example, although it varies depending on the organic EL layer 22 to be transferred. Then, a part of the organic EL material evaporated by the laser beam 41 adheres to the element substrate 10. As shown in FIG. 2, the laser beam 41 is incident only on a portion that needs to be transferred, so that the necessary organic EL material can be transferred only to the necessary pixel portion.

  Hereinafter, according to an Example, the detailed content of this invention is disclosed.

  FIG. 3 is a schematic system diagram for forming an organic EL display device according to the present invention. A feature of the present invention is that by using the parabolic mirror 50, the laser beam 41 from the laser light source 40 is deflected by the galvano mirror 43, and at the same time, the galvano mirror 43 is installed at the focal point F of the parabolic mirror 50. The laser beam 41 is always incident at a right angle.

  In FIG. 3, a laser beam 41 emitted from a laser light source 40 passes through a dichroic mirror 42 and enters a galvano mirror 43. As described later, the dichroic mirror 42 has a role of preventing the laser beam 41 reflected and returned from the glass window 61 or the like of the vacuum chamber 60 from entering the laser light source 40 and destroying the laser light source 40. . The galvanometer mirror 43 is installed at the focal point F of the parabolic mirror 50.

  The light incident on the galvanometer mirror 43 is reflected and incident on the parabolic mirror 50. Since the galvanometer mirror 43 is installed at the focal point F of the parabolic mirror 50, the laser beam 41 reflected from the parabolic mirror 50 becomes a parallel light beam regardless of where it enters the parabolic mirror 50. Therefore, the laser beam 41 can be always incident on the material plate 30 perpendicularly. That is, as shown in FIG. 3, the laser beam 41 toward the material plate 30 is parallel even if the deflection angle θ of the laser beam 41 reflected from the galvano mirror 43 and incident on the parabolic mirror 50 is different.

  In FIG. 3, the material plate 30 and the product substrate are installed in a vacuum chamber 60. The laser beam 41 passes through the glass window 61 formed in the vacuum chamber 60, enters the material plate 30, heats and evaporates the organic EL material, and transfers the organic EL material to the element substrate 10. In FIG. 3, the laser beam 41 can be deflected by changing the angle of the galvanometer mirror 43 with respect to the laser beam 41. Therefore, the deflection of the laser beam 41 can be performed at high speed.

  FIG. 4 shows a situation where the organic EL material is transferred by the laser beam 41 when the present invention is not used. In FIG. 4, a laser beam 41 from a laser light source installed outside the vacuum chamber is incident obliquely on the base substrate 31 of the material plate through the glass window of the vacuum chamber. At the portion where the laser beam 41 is incident, the transfer material layer 33 is heated, evaporated, and transferred to the element substrate 10 as indicated by white arrows.

  In FIG. 4, the laser beam 41 from the laser light source 40 is incident on the glass window 61 of the vacuum chamber 60 obliquely. Then, first, the laser beam 41 is reflected at the interface of the glass window 61 with the atmosphere. Next, the laser beam 41 is reflected again at the interface of the glass window 61 with the vacuum. Further, the laser beam 41 is reflected on the surface of the material plate 30. Thus, in the conventional example, the use efficiency of the laser beam 41 is lowered.

  Another problem is that the spot shape of the laser beam 41 on the material plate 30 changes depending on the location because the laser beam 41 is obliquely incident on the material plate 30. This state is shown in FIG. Show. The cross section of the laser beam 41 in FIG. As shown in FIG. 6A, in the conventional example, the spot shape of the laser beam 41 changes to an ellipse on the material plate 30, and the ellipticity changes depending on the location. As a result, it becomes difficult to obtain uniform pixel sizes over the entire screen of the element substrate 10.

  Furthermore, if the spot diameter is increased around the screen of the element substrate 10, the energy density of the laser beam 41 is reduced, and the manner of evaporation of the organic EL material is also different. Therefore, the amount of organic EL material to be transferred can be controlled. It becomes difficult. That is, if the evaporation conditions of the organic EL material are to be the same, it is necessary to increase the energy density of the laser beam 41 in the material plate 30 corresponding to the periphery of the screen of the element substrate 10.

  Furthermore, the conventional problem is that the path of the laser beam 41 changes because the laser beam 41 is refracted by the glass window 61 of the vacuum chamber 60. That is, due to the refraction of the glass window 61, the incident position of the laser beam 41 is shifted by the arrow D shown in the lower part of FIG. And the deviation | shift amount D changes with places. When a specific organic EL material is formed on a specific pixel by transfer using the laser beam 41, it is necessary to control the rotation angle of the galvanometer mirror 43 in consideration of the refraction of the glass for each location, which is very complicated. Requires action. This results in increased transfer accuracy and manufacturing costs.

  On the other hand, FIG. 5 shows how the organic EL material is transferred by the laser beam 41 when the present invention is used. In FIG. 5, a laser light source installed outside the vacuum chamber enters the base substrate 31 of the material plate at a right angle through the glass window of the vacuum chamber. At the portion where the laser beam 41 is incident, the transfer material layer 33 is heated, evaporated, and transferred to the element substrate 10 as indicated by white arrows.

  In FIG. 5, the laser beam 41 from the laser light source 40 travels straight and enters the glass window 61 at a right angle. Since the laser beam 41 enters the glass window 61 at a right angle, the path of the laser beam 41 does not change. Further, since the laser beam 41 is always incident on the material plate 30 at a right angle, there is no change in the spot of the laser beam 41 on the material plate 30. Therefore, the energy density of the laser beam 41 on the material plate 30 is also constant. This state is shown in FIG. In FIG. 6B, the cross section of the laser beam 41 is a circle, but the spot shape of the laser beam 41 on the material plate 30 is also a circle. As described above, according to the present invention, the spot shape of the laser beam 41 is constant at any position of the material plate 30, so that control is easy.

  On the other hand, reflection of the laser beam 41 at the glass window 61 or the like occurs even when the laser beam 41 is incident at a right angle. For example, as shown in FIG. 5, the laser beam 41 reflected from the glass window 61 is reflected in the opposite direction and enters the laser light source 40. When the laser beam 41 enters the laser light source 40, the laser light source 40 may be destroyed. In order to prevent this, in the present invention, a dichroic mirror 42 is disposed between the galvano mirror 43 and the laser light source 40 as shown in FIG. The dichroic mirror 42 has a property of transmitting light from a specific direction and reflecting light from other directions. The dichroic mirror 42 is designed to transmit the laser beam 41 from the laser light source 40 and reflect the laser beam 41 reflected from the glass window 61 or the like, so that the light reflected from the glass window 61 or the like is reflected. Reflected, the laser beam can be directed again to the material plate 30 and used as transfer energy.

  FIG. 7 is an example of the pixel arrangement of the organic EL display device. In FIG. 7, rectangles R, G, and B are pixels on which the organic EL layer 22 is formed. R represents a red pixel 101, G represents a green pixel 102, and B represents a blue pixel 103. In the figure, CX is the horizontal diameter of the pixel, for example, 30 μm, and CY is the vertical diameter of the pixel, for example, 90 μm. On the other hand, the horizontal pitch of the pixels is 40 μm, for example, and the vertical pitch of the pixels is 120 μm, for example. In order to form an organic EL material in such a small pixel region by transfer, the laser beam 41 needs to be narrowed down.

  When the laser beam 41 is emitted from the light source, the beam diameter can be reduced to 100 μm to 300 μm. However, the laser beam 41 necessary for the transfer needs to be further reduced. For this purpose, the laser light source 40 shown in FIG. 3 is provided with an optical system for focusing the laser beam 41.

  FIG. 8 shows an example of an optical system for focusing the laser beam 41. In FIG. 8, the laser beam 41 is incident from the right direction. The laser beam 41 is narrowed down by a convex lens 71 and converted into parallel rays by a concave lens 72. The diameter of the laser beam 41 incident on the convex lens 71 is about 100 μm, but the diameter of the laser beam 41 can be reduced to about 30 μm.

  FIG. 9 shows an optical system in the case where a beam having a better parallelism is required. In FIG. 9, the laser beam 41 from the light source enters the first convex lens 73. The first convex lens 73 is a lens having a strong lens action and focuses before entering the first convex lens 74. Thereafter, the laser beam 41 enters the first convex lens 74 and is converted into parallel rays. The parallel light further enters the capillary plate 75. A small cylindrical hole is formed in the capillary plate 75. Therefore, the light exiting the capillary is very good in parallelism. Therefore, even if there is a certain optical path until the laser beam 41 enters the material plate 30 for transferring the organic EL material from the laser light source 40, the spread of the laser beam 41 can be prevented. In the above description, the optical system for focusing the laser beam 41 has been described as existing in the laser light source 40 of FIG. 3, but this optical system is installed between the dichroic mirror 42 and the galvanometer mirror 43 in FIG. Also good.

  As described above, the organic EL layer 22 of each pixel of the organic EL display device formed according to the present invention can be uniform in outer shape and width from the screen center to the screen periphery. According to the present invention, the size of the organic EL layer 22 formed in the center of the screen and the size of the organic EL layer 22 formed in the periphery of the screen can be formed within ± 15%. Also, the film thickness of the organic EL layer 22 can be suppressed to within ± 10% at the screen center and the screen periphery. Note that the size and thickness of the organic EL layer 22 in this case is a case where pixels of the same color are compared.

  As described above, by using the present invention, an organic EL display device can be manufactured by a transfer method. An organic EL display device with uniform image characteristics over the entire screen can be manufactured.

  When the screen is relatively large like a TV, as shown in FIG. 10, pixels emitting the same color in the vertical direction may be arranged in stripes. In FIG. 10, R, G, and B represent the striped red light emitting organic EL layer 104, the striped green light emitting organic EL layer 105, and the striped blue light emitting organic EL layer 106, respectively. The width CX of each color stripe is, for example, 30 μm, and the pitch PX of each pixel is, for example, 40 μm. With such a pixel arrangement, when the organic EL layer 22 is formed, alignment in the vertical direction is not necessary. With such an arrangement, a transfer system different from that in the first embodiment is possible.

  11 is a schematic diagram showing a manufacturing method of the organic EL display device in the present embodiment. In FIG. 11, the organic EL layer 22 is formed by transfer as in the first embodiment. The optical system of the laser beam 41 for transfer is the same as in the first embodiment. A difference from the first embodiment is that the laser beam 41 for transfer is not directly incident on the material plate 30 from the laser light source 40 through the optical system, but a laser mask 80 installed outside the glass window 61 of the vacuum chamber 60. It is incident on the material plate 30 through.

  In FIG. 11, the holes of the laser mask 80 correspond to the pixels of the element substrate 10 onto which the organic EL layer 22 is transferred. The laser beam 41 passing through the laser mask 80 is incident on the material plate 30 to evaporate the organic EL material, and this organic EL material is transferred to the element substrate 10 as in the first embodiment. In the first embodiment, a desired pixel is formed by controlling the pulse time of the laser beam 41 while intermittently scanning the laser beam 41 with the galvanometer mirror 43.

  In this embodiment, by using the laser mask 80, the organic EL material can be transferred to the element substrate 10 by continuously scanning the laser beam 41. Therefore, the time for the transfer process can be shortened as compared with the first embodiment. In the first embodiment, since the pulse of the laser beam 41 is emitted in synchronization with intermittent scanning, precise control over time is required. In contrast, in this embodiment, the laser beam 41 may be continuously scanned, so that such a complicated system is not necessary. Accordingly, the manufacturing cost can be reduced.

The laser mask 80 used in this embodiment is similar to the shadow mask in the case of forming the organic EL layer 22 by conventional vapor deposition, but the process maintenance is easier in this embodiment. That is, unlike the shadow mask in the case of vapor deposition, the laser mask 80 can be installed outside the vacuum chamber 60. This has an advantage that vacuum contamination by the mask can be prevented. Further, in the case of vapor deposition, since the organic EL material to be deposited adheres to the shadow mask, the hole diameter of the shadow mask changes and the shadow mask needs to be replaced periodically. On the other hand, the laser mask 80 in this embodiment has no much deposit, so that the lifetime of the mask is much longer in this embodiment.
On the other hand, the problem of this embodiment is the alignment accuracy between the mask and the element substrate 10 because the distance from the laser mask 80 to the material plate 30 or the element substrate 10 is long. However, in this embodiment, since the laser beam 41 is incident on the laser mask 80 at a right angle, control is easier than in the vapor deposition method in which the deposited material is incident on the shadow mask from an oblique direction except for the center. That is, the disadvantage that the element substrate 10 and the laser mask 80 are separated can be offset by the laser beam 41 entering the laser mask 80, the material plate 30, the element substrate 10 and the like perpendicularly. Therefore, this embodiment is a powerful method for transferring the organic EL material to the element substrate 10.

  As described above, the present embodiment has been described by taking an example of a screen in which the pixels shown in FIG. 10 are formed in a stripe shape, but the same applies to the case of a dot-shaped pixel as shown in FIG.

  DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 10 ... Element substrate, 11 ... 1st base film, 12 ... 2nd base film, 13 ... Semiconductor layer, 14 ... Gate insulating film, 15 ... Gate electrode, 16 ... Interlayer insulating film, 17 ... SD wiring, 18 ... Inorganic passivation Membrane, 19 ... Organic passivation film, 20 ... Bank, 21 ... Lower electrode, 22 ... Organic EL layer, 23 ... Upper electrode, 30 ... Material plate, 31 ... Base substrate, 32 ... Endothermic layer, 33 ... Transfer material layer, 40 DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS ... Laser light source, 41 ... Laser beam, 42 ... Dichroic mirror, 43 ... Galvano mirror, 50 ... Parabolic mirror, 60 ... Vacuum chamber, 61 ... Glass window, 71 ... Convex lens, 72 ... Concave lens, 73 ... First convex lens, 74 ... Second convex lens, 75 ... Capillary plate, 80 ... Laser mask, 101 ... Red pixel, 102 ... Green pixel, 03 ... the blue pixel

Claims (2)

  1. A method of manufacturing a display device using a laser beam,
    The laser beam is emitted from a laser light source, reflected from a galvanometer mirror, and further reflected by a parabolic mirror,
    The galvanometer mirror is present at the focal point of the parabolic mirror, and the laser beam is scanned by the galvanometer mirror;
    The method of manufacturing a display device, wherein the laser beam is vertically incident on the entire area of the display device to be irradiated.
  2. A method of manufacturing a display device using a laser beam,
    The laser beam is emitted from a laser light source, passes through a dichroic mirror, is reflected by a galvanometer mirror, is reflected by a parabolic mirror,
    The galvanometer mirror is present at the focal point of the parabolic mirror, and the laser beam is scanned by the galvanometer mirror;
    The method of manufacturing a display device, wherein the laser beam is vertically incident on the entire area of the display device to be irradiated.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2018181049A1 (en) * 2017-03-30 2018-10-04 株式会社クオルテック Method for manufacturing el display panel, manufacturing device for el display panel, el display panel, and el display device

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