JP2010526000A - Compact continuous over-end take-off with a tension control - Google Patents

Compact continuous over-end take-off with a tension control Download PDF

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JP2010526000A
JP2010526000A JP2010504285A JP2010504285A JP2010526000A JP 2010526000 A JP2010526000 A JP 2010526000A JP 2010504285 A JP2010504285 A JP 2010504285A JP 2010504285 A JP2010504285 A JP 2010504285A JP 2010526000 A JP2010526000 A JP 2010526000A
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Prior art keywords
tension
yarn
roll
drive
thread
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Japanese (ja)
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ビング−ウオー,ロナルド・デイ
マニング,トーマス・ダブリユー
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インビスタ テクノロジーズ エス エイ アール エル
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Application filed by インビスタ テクノロジーズ エス エイ アール エル filed Critical インビスタ テクノロジーズ エス エイ アール エル
Priority to PCT/US2008/060865 priority patent/WO2008131252A1/en
Publication of JP2010526000A publication Critical patent/JP2010526000A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H49/00Unwinding or paying-out filamentary material; Supporting, storing or transporting packages from which filamentary material is to be withdrawn or paid-out
    • B65H49/02Methods or apparatus in which packages do not rotate
    • B65H49/04Package-supporting devices
    • B65H49/14Package-supporting devices for several operative packages
    • B65H49/16Stands or frameworks
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H51/00Forwarding filamentary material
    • B65H51/02Rotary devices, e.g. with helical forwarding surfaces
    • B65H51/04Rollers, pulleys, capstans, or intermeshing rotary elements
    • B65H51/08Rollers, pulleys, capstans, or intermeshing rotary elements arranged to operate in groups or in co-operation with other elements
    • B65H51/12Rollers, pulleys, capstans, or intermeshing rotary elements arranged to operate in groups or in co-operation with other elements in spaced relation to provide a series of independent forwarding surfaces around which material is passed or wound
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H59/00Adjusting or controlling tension in filamentary material, e.g. for preventing snarling; Applications of tension indicators
    • B65H59/38Adjusting or controlling tension in filamentary material, e.g. for preventing snarling; Applications of tension indicators by regulating speed of driving mechanism of unwinding, paying-out, forwarding, winding, or depositing devices, e.g. automatically in response to variations in tension
    • B65H59/384Adjusting or controlling tension in filamentary material, e.g. for preventing snarling; Applications of tension indicators by regulating speed of driving mechanism of unwinding, paying-out, forwarding, winding, or depositing devices, e.g. automatically in response to variations in tension using electronic means
    • B65H59/388Regulating forwarding speed
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments
    • B65H2701/319Elastic threads

Abstract

A compact, continuous, over-end take-off thread spool system (100 '") with tension control device (110-3) allows unwinding of highly viscous elastic yarns from multiple yarn packages (105). The thread tension is monitored to maintain the continuous operation of the spool system by avoiding the breakage of the elastic thread and is controlled by the variable speed motor of the driven take-off roll (130). 117) may optionally be combined with the pretensioner (113A) and used for groups of yarns or for individual yarns.
[Selection] Figure 3C

Description

  The present invention relates to yarn or fiber unwinding devices and, in particular, to target average tension levels and minimums of a plurality of elastic yarns or fibers transported to an downstream spinning machine to the downstream manufacturing machine. The present invention relates to a method and apparatus designed to be continuously supplied with tension fluctuations. It should be noted that the terms “yarn”, “yarn” or “fiber” are used interchangeably throughout this document.

  The most common method of unwinding yarn, yarn or fiber from a cylindrical mandrel (or “tube” or “package”) during the manufacturing process is called “rolling take-off”. When the package is used up, the empty mandrel must be removed and a new package is installed. This operation requires the production line to be shut down and causes non-productive downtime.

  Another prior art example of a method for unwinding a yarn from package (s) held on a spool is the over-end take-off {OETO} method. The OTE method allows continuous operation of the unwinding process because the end of the active package yarn is attached to the leading end of the standby package yarn. In the OETO method, after the active package is completely used up, the standby package becomes the active package. However, a drawback of the OETO method is that unacceptable yarn tension fluctuations occur during the unwinding process.

  In prior art examples of systems and devices that implement the OETO method, the elastic fiber is passed through the system before being supplied to the production line. This prior art OETO system has a rack structure that holds active and standby package spools, a relief section, and a motor driven nip roll. The relaxation section is disposed between the active package and the nip roll of the OA system. The relaxation section helps to suppress the unacceptable yarn tension variations discussed above by providing some slack in the unwinding yarn.

  However, prior art OETO systems having such a relaxation section have problems with fibers or yarns that exhibit high levels of viscosity (ie, yarns that have particularly high cohesion). In addition, yarns with a high level of viscosity also show unusually high fluctuations in frictional force and yarn tension level when the active package is unwound from the spool.

  In addition, the sag of the yarn provided by the relaxation section varies and excess yarn can be unwound from the active package. This excess yarn is drawn into the nip roll and wound onto itself, leading to tangling or cutting of the yarn. The use of yarns having a high level of viscosity further contributes to the possibility of excess yarns that adhere together and adhere to the nip roll. Yarn entanglement or cutting during the unwinding process requires a stop of the production line, delays the unwinding process, and increases manufacturing costs.

Prior art OETO devices are typically configured such that the yarns traverse the relaxation section horizontally. In this configuration, the yarn travels through a nip roll having a vertical axis. However, with such a vertical configuration of the nip roll axis, the yarn placed in the relaxation section between the active package and the nip roll tends to sag. As a result, the yarn position on the nip roll becomes unstable and interference and entanglement occur between adjacent yarns. Each of these problems calls for the production line to be shut down.

  In addition, certain manufacturing applications (eg, mad manufacturing) require the use of as-spun fibers that are substantially finish-free. Such finish-free yarns also present problems associated with the high levels of viscosity discussed above.

  The problems discussed above make application of the OETO method and apparatus particularly difficult when processing yarns with high levels of viscosity. Prior art OETO devices attempt to address these problems in the unwinding process by (1) using yarns with anti-viscous additives attached before the unwinding process and / or ( 2) It has been done by using an rewound package when the active package is unwound and then rewound on a different spool spool to create a rewound package.

  As a result of the problems discussed above, prior art OETO devices have been designed to allow for relaxation sections, high levels of viscosity, and difficulties due to the cutting of yarns unwound by the OETO method. As an example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,057,097, which is owned in its entirety by the assignee of the present application, discloses an OETO method and apparatus for unwinding an elastic fiber package having a high level of viscosity from a package. In particular, the Heiney et al. OETO device proposes that there is a minimum distance between the fiber guide and the fiber package. Heenay et al. State that a minimum distance of less than 0.41 m results in undesirably large tension fluctuations. These variations cause process control difficulties and can also lead to yarn cutting.

  Furthermore, Heiney et al., A distance longer than 0.91 m unwinds the device and makes it ergonomically unfavorable. As the level of viscosity indicated by the fiber increases, the minimum allowable distance, d, increases. For yarns having a viscosity level greater than about 2 g and less than about 7.5 g, d should preferably be at least about 0.41 m, and for yarns having a viscosity level greater than about 7.5 g, d Is preferably at least about 0.71 m. In view of these minimum distance requirements for highly viscous yarns, OETO equipment typically requires a frame with a large footprint that takes up significant floor space in the manufacturing environment. Additional examples for prior art reference are given in US Pat.

  Thus, compared to prior art methods and devices, the need for OA TEO devices to unwind yarns with high levels of viscosity, avoiding problems of tangling, cutting, larger equipment footprint and increased manufacturing cost, It follows the technology. The processing of highly viscous, elastic yarns or fibers is particularly problematic when such as-spun yarns or fibers are substantially unfinished, which creates mud and other personal care products Therefore, it is very common for elastic yarn or fiber used. Accordingly, there remains a need in the art for an OETO device that can be wound with yarns with or without anti-viscous additives and realized with a relatively small footprint. Therefore, there is still a need in the art for a fast and reliable method of unwinding and supplying a highly viscous elastic yarn or fiber from a package to a manufacturing system.

Heaney et al. US Pat. No. 6,676,054 Heaney et al. US Patent Application Publication No. US2005 / 0133653 Manning, Jr. et al. US Patent Application Publication No. US2006 / 0011771

  One embodiment of the present invention is a support frame having a plurality of thread guides, at least one swivel leg coupled to the support frame, and a plurality of package holders, each holder comprising one or more threads. A package of yarns arranged to hold a package and arranged on a rotational axis, the yarn package being configured to allow the yarn to be unwound through one of the plurality of yarn guides; A plurality of package holders secured to at least one pivot leg and a plurality of drive and tension control devices coupled to the support frame, each of the control devices being one of the plurality of yarn packages; And a control device configured to unwind the yarn from the thread.

  In the embodiment of the above-described OT EO spool system, each drive and tension control device includes a pretensioner configured to guide the unwind yarn through the yarn path of the drive and tension control device, and A combined guide roll, at least one eyelet configured to prevent thread entanglement, a horizontal driven take-off roll configured to move the thread through the drive and tension control device, and the horizontal driven take-off roll A variable speed motor configured to drive and control the thread tension; a thread tension sensor through which the unwind thread passes; and increase the speed of the variable speed motor incrementally according to a feedback signal from the tension sensor; Holding, reducing by decrement A tension controller device configured to perform at least one of the following and at least one guide roll configured to output a yarn from the tension control device, the pretensioner and the guide A roll is placed before the horizontal driven take-off roll, the tension sensor is placed after the horizontal driven take-off roll, and the speed of the variable speed motor determines the yarn tension value by means of the controller device. It can be changed by the tension controller device to keep it within a defined range.

  Another embodiment of the present invention is a drive and tension control device for a thread unwinding system, but a pretensioner and a guide roll configured to guide the yarn through the thread path of the drive and tension control device, At least one eyelet configured to prevent thread entanglement, a driven take-off roll configured to move the thread through the drive and tension control device, and driving the driven take-off roll to control the thread tension A variable speed motor configured to, a tension sensor configured to determine the tension on the yarn, and incrementing and maintaining the speed of the variable speed motor according to a feedback signal from the tension sensor Less to reduce by decrement A tension controller device configured to perform one and at least one guide roll configured to output a yarn from the tension control device, the pretensioner and the guide roll comprising: The tension sensor is disposed in front of the driven take-off roll, and the tension sensor is a drive and tension control device for the spooling system disposed after the driven take-off roll.

Yet another embodiment of the present invention is a process of unwinding each elastic yarn from a yarn packaging with a driven take-off roll that is combined for the yarn and driven by a variable speed motor, and each elastic yarn is individually separated. A process of guiding into a tension and control device with a pretensioner and an accompanying guide roll, a process of passing each tension thread through a combined tension sensor, a process of determining whether one or more threads have been cut, and one or more The process of measuring the tension of each of the moving yarns and determining whether any of the moving yarns has a tension that is out of range with respect to a predetermined tension value. And increasing the speed of each driven take-off roll for each moving yarn by increments and decreasing by decrements At least one of the following: the tension of the respective moving yarn is out of range with respect to a predetermined tension value for the moving yarn, and at least one of the increment and decrement numbers is a first correction. When the threshold is below the threshold, and determining whether the average tension for each moving yarn is out of range with respect to the predetermined tension value for the moving yarn; At least one of increasing the take-off roll speed by increments and decreasing by decrements, the average tension of the respective moving yarn is out of range and at least one of the increments and decrements is the first 2 When the correction threshold is below, the process to be performed, and one or more of the threads are cut, not moving, and out of range and the first or second correction threshold. A method of controlling the yarn tension of an elastic unwinding system for simultaneously unwinding a plurality of yarns having a process of setting an alarm when having at least one of having a tension above a value .

  In addition, in an embodiment of the present invention, the guide roll may be arranged before and after the driven take-off roll, the tension sensor may be arranged after the driven take-off roll, and the speed of the variable speed motor is The tension controller device holds or changes the yarn tension value within a predetermined yarn tension range, and the distance between the tension sensor and the horizontal driven take-off roll varies with the yarn tension variation with distance. Fixed and minimized to avoid errors.

  Further, in an embodiment of the present invention, each drive and tension control device further comprises an idler configured to attenuate tension fluctuations in the yarn, the idler being disposed adjacent to the horizontal driven take-off roll. In addition, each drive and tension control device further comprises a plate eyelet configured to send yarn to the drive and tension control device.

  Further, in embodiments of the present invention, each of the plurality of drive and tension control devices are vertically spaced on the support frame to unwind each of the threads individually from the respective package of the plurality of packages. In addition, in the OETO thread spool system, the plurality of drives and tension control devices are configured in parallel on the support frame to unwind each of the threads individually from each package of the plurality of packages.

Some embodiments of the present invention will be further described in the detailed description of the following specification when read with reference to the accompanying drawings.
FIG. 3 is an exemplary perspective view showing an embodiment of the present invention for continuous unwinding of yarn using OETO. It is a top view of the Example shown in FIG. FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating an exemplary embodiment of the present invention that includes tension control. FIG. 6 is a perspective view illustrating another exemplary embodiment of the present invention including tension control. FIG. 6 is yet another perspective view illustrating yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention that includes tension control. FIG. 3B is a plan view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A. FIG. 3B is a plan view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3B. FIG. 3C is a plan view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3C. FIG. 6 is a front elevation view of yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention that includes tension control, each of the four thread groups having a drive and tension control device and sharing a single driven take-off roll. FIG. 6 is a plan view of the system shown in FIG. 5. FIG. 7 is a right side view of the four yarn drive and tension control device shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device. FIG. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another exemplary embodiment of a drive and tension control device having a separate variable speed motor for each individual yarn and a corresponding separate tension sensor. FIG. 6 is an enlarged front elevational view of yet another embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device. It is a right view of the drive and tension control apparatus shown in FIG. It is a top view of the drive and tension control apparatus of one thread | yarn shown in FIG. FIG. 6 is an enlarged front elevational view of yet another exemplary embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device. FIG. 14 is a plan view of a third embodiment of the single yarn drive and tension control device shown in FIG. 13. FIG. 6 is an exemplary enlarged front elevation view of yet another embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device. FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary flow diagram for a tension control / trim algorithm for a method of monitoring thread or fiber tension that may be used in conjunction with the embodiment of the present invention illustrated in FIGS. 3A-3C. 1 schematically illustrates the fiber unwinding test equipment used to obtain the data of Examples 1-5. When the yarn package is unwound using the OETO system embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 3B, the test results of the supply tension measured over time are plotted.

The yarn unwinding device allows a cost-effective use of the OETO method on an unspun OEY yarn with rewound yarns and / or anti-viscous additives. If a tension control device is used, the yarn without the anti-viscous additive may be an OT yarn that is still spun. In particular, the device continuously unwinds the as-spun OEY yarn to provide a relatively constant yarn tension within a relatively small footprint. This provides an improvement in the efficiency of the manufacturing process.

  FIG. 1 is an exemplary perspective view showing an embodiment of the present invention for continuous unwinding of yarn disclosed by the present inventor in US Pat. FIG. 1 shows a system 100 comprising two pivot legs 141, 113, shown in FIG. 1 as two parallel posts connected to a central portion 109 at two pivot points 103 and having a bridging support therebetween. . The central support frame 108 extends from one side of the system 100 in the embodiment shown in FIG.

The two swivel legs 141 and 113 have a plurality of swiveling yarn holding arms 120 (see FIG. 2). The swiveling yarn holding arm 120 holds up to eight wound spools for the package 105 on each of the swivel legs 141, 113. Each of the packages 105 may be either an active package or a standby package. Referring to FIG. 2, the swivel legs 141, 113 of the system 100 are set at an acute angle with respect to the legs of the central portion 109 (θ 1 , θ 2 ). The acute angles (θ 1 , θ 2 ) are in the range of 0 ° to 90 °. As a result, the system 100 may be configured with various orientations of the two swivel legs 141, 113 to optimize space on the production floor.

  In addition, FIG. 1 shows a drive control assembly 110 attached to the central support frame 108 of the system 100. As shown in FIG. 1, the drive control assembly 110 further includes a drive motor 112, a drive roll 114, an electric control box 118, a separator roll 122, a second thread guide 126, a cutting sensor 128, and a third thread guide 132. Have. Multiple drive control assemblies 197 may be used to support the individual yarns provided by each package 105. Yarn guides 138, 132, 126 guide individual yarns from the package to drive roll 114 within drive control assembly 110. The value of the first yarn guide 138, the second yarn guide 126, the cutting sensor 128 and the third yarn guide 132 in the non-limiting example is 8. The power control box 118 is a power supply, a terminal block that provides interface connection for signals to components, a servo drive motor for yarn speed control, a relay, a motor controller, a disconnect detector interface, a D / A converter, A A / D converter and other interface electronics that support the monitoring and operation of the components discussed above of the frame 100 are provided. The frame 100 of FIG. 1 may be used in all embodiments of the present invention.

A non-limiting example of the active and standby package 105 is a wound fiber optic rack package with a total of 3 kg of wound fiber or yarn. While not wishing to be limited, an exemplary yarn for unwinding the OETO is a spandex (segment) such as LYCRA (R) sold by INVISTA SARL (formerly DuPont) Polyurethane). The active and standby package 105 typically occupies one of the positions of two adjacent swivel yarn holding arms 120 on a small footprint frame 100. The swivel yarn holding arm 120 pivots for easy access to the activity and standby package 105. The swivel yarn holding arm 120 holds a regular yarn tube core (eg, as-spun OETO material).

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the yarn winding device shown in FIG. As seen in FIG. 2, the frame 100 can be varied by placing the two swivel legs 141, 113 of the frame 100 holding the package 105 at an angle (θ 1 , θ 2 ) with respect to the central support frame 108. Designed to provide a simple configuration and small footprint. Since the two legs 141, 113 can move and the frame 100 occupies a small footprint, the device takes up less floor space in the manufacturing environment. In addition, the pins 103 may be removed from the central portion 109 to allow further reduction in the dimensions of the unwinding device. That is, with the removal of the appropriate pin 103 at the top and bottom of the central portion 109, one of the two swivel legs 141, 113 is removed from the compact OE Tee unwinder frame 100, 90 With the other swivel legs 141, 113 set at the angles α 1 , α 2 , the device, ie the spool, may have a smaller footprint on the production floor. The remaining reference numbers shown in FIG. 2 are discussed in FIG. 1 above.

  FIG. 3A is another exemplary embodiment of a compact OE thread spool system 100 'with tension control. FIG. 4 is a plan view of the system shown in FIG. 3A. The concept of net tension control for a yarn group will be further illustrated using tsudashi manufacturing as an example yarn manufacturing system. Yarn groups are fed into a tie or other manufacturing process. For example, the first thread group may provide an elastic feature for the right leg portion and the second thread group may provide an elastic feature for the left leg portion. During manufacture, the elastic feature tension for the right or left leg portion may no longer be at an acceptable level due to yarn tension variations. The compact OE thread spool system 100 'can adjust the tension of the first or second thread group independently of the other thread group to correct any such variations. Make it possible.

As seen in FIG. 3A, the system 100 ′ has two pivot legs 141, 113 of the system 100 ′ holding the package 105 at an angle (θ 1 , θ 2 shown in FIG. 4) with respect to the central support frame 108. Designed to provide a variety of configurations and small footprints. Since the two legs 141, 113 can move and the system 100 'has only a small footprint, the system takes up less floor space in the manufacturing environment. In addition, the pin 103 may be removed from the central portion 109 to allow further reduction in the dimensions of the spool shaft system. That is, with the removal of the appropriate pins 103 at the top and bottom of the central portion 109, one of the two swivel legs 141, 113 is removed from the compact OE Tee spool system 100 ' With the other swivel legs 141, 113 set to the angles α 1 , α 2 , the spool shaft system may have a smaller footprint on the production floor. In addition, the light control box 118 discussed in FIG. 1 above may be used with this system 100 ′ to support the operation of the spool axis system. Further, any remaining reference numbers shown in FIGS. 3A-3C may also be defined by the above discussion of FIG. Furthermore, the central support frame of FIGS. 3A-3C and the tension control device 110 of FIGS. 5-15 may be used in all embodiments of the present invention.

  Referring still to FIGS. 5-15, in operation, the lashing machine or other yarn processing manufacturing system may, for example, tension controller 119 of drive and tension controllers 110-1A and 110-1B shown in FIGS. 5 and 8, respectively. A signal may be provided. This signal provides an indication of what speed the motor should run to provide the necessary elongation to achieve the desired tension. The signal from the yarn processing system is typically based on an industry standard, which has been created to indicate the theoretical amount of elongation necessary to achieve the desired tension. The input signal from the yarn processing system is referred to as the tension set point and initially indicates the speed of the driven take-off roll 111 of the drive and tension controllers 110-1A and 110-1B shown in FIGS. 5 and 8, respectively.

  According to a preferred embodiment, the user may enter the desired tension range to be retained for the yarn group directly into the tension controller device 119. The tension controller device receives an input signal from a tension sensor 115-115 ′ ″ representing the yarn tension. The tension controller device 119 has the tension level of the yarn 102-102 ′ ″ coming from the driven take-off roll 111 within the desired tension range. These input signals are used to determine if they can be held or if the tension needs to be increased or decreased. The variable speed motor 127 of the drive and tension controllers 110-1A and 110-1B shown in FIGS. 5 and 8, respectively, allows the tension controller device 119 to have a net tension based on the signal received from the tension sensor 115-115 ′ ″. The speed is maintained until a signal indicating that it is outside the desired range is output. Until the speed falls within the desired range, the output signal from the tension sensor 115-115 "ignores the input signal from the yarn processing manufacturing system. The speed of the variable speed motor 127 of the drive and tension control device 110-1 is changed. That is, the speed of the motor 127 is adjusted to correct tension fluctuations that occur during unwinding or yarn feeding processes.

  If the tension controller device 119 determines that the yarn tension after the driven take-off roll 111 is too high, the tension controller device 119 increases the speed of the motor 127. Alternatively, if the tension controller device 119 determines that the yarn tension after the driven take-off roll 111 is too low, the tension controller device 119 reduces the speed of the motor 127.

  As described above, the compact OETO thread winding shaft system 100 ′ can process not only the signal from the tension sensor 115 but also the yarn processing by determining an appropriate speed for the motor 127 as shown in FIGS. It may also be configured to view signals from the manufacturing system. In an alternative embodiment, the drive and tension control device 110-1A or 110-1B of the compact OE Tee spool system 100 ′ may determine from the tension sensor 115-115 ′ ″ in determining the appropriate speed for the motor 127. It may be configured to see only the signal (ie, the average tension feedback signal) In addition, the compact OE taut spool system 100 'determines the appropriate speed of the motor 127 and is positioned in a number of positions in the system. You may have a sensor.

  FIGS. 3B and 3C are other exemplary embodiments of compact OE thread spool systems 100 "and 100 '", each including tension control. 4B and 4C are plan views of the system shown in FIGS. 3B and 3C, respectively. The operation and components of these embodiments are similar to those of FIG. 3A, and similar components share the same reference numbers between these and the other illustrations below. However, the drive and tension control devices 110-2 and 110-3 of FIGS. 3B and 3C, respectively, are dedicated to the individual yarn line 102. The configuration and operation of various embodiments of the drive and tension controllers 110-2 and 110-3 of FIGS. 3B and 3C, respectively, are further discussed in the following paragraphs.

As can be seen in FIGS. 3B and 3C, the bobbin rack system 100 ″, 100 ′ ″ also allows the two swivel legs 141, 113 of the system 100 ″ holding the package 105 to be at an angle θ relative to the central support frame. 1 and θ 2 are designed to provide a variety of configurations and a small footprint. The two legs 141, 113 can move and the system 100 ″ has a small footprint so that the system Takes less floor space in the manufacturing environment. In addition, the pin 103 may be removed from the central portion 109 to allow further reduction in the dimensions of the spool shaft system. That is, with the removal of the appropriate pin 103 at the top and bottom of the central portion 109, either one of the two swivel legs 141, 113 is removed from the compact OE Tee spool system 100 " By using another swivel leg 141, 113 set at an angle α 1 , α 2 , the spool axis system may have a smaller footprint on the production floor. The electrical control box 118 discussed in Section 1 may be used with both systems 100 ", 100 '" to support the operation of the spool system. Further, any remaining references shown in Figures 3B-3C. The numbers may also be defined according to the discussion of Fig. 1. In addition, the tension control devices of Figs 5 to 15 are applicable to all embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 5 shows a four-thread drive and tension control device 11 installed in the system 100 ′.
It is an enlarged front elevational view for illustration of 0-1. The tension controller device 119 further includes a graphical display 151, a data entry and control keyboard 123, and an alarm lamp 125 that indicates an alarm condition to the operator. The stationary guide 128 and capture rolling guide 129 outside the drive and tension control device 110-1 are also shown in FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 5, guide systems 112A, 112B are used to guide the yarn toward the drive and tension controller 110-1A. In particular, when the compact OE thread spool system 100 'supplies a large number of yarns, the multiple guide systems 112A, 112B drive and tension the control device 110 to prevent the yarn from becoming tangled. Need to lead to -1A. Preferably, the yarn path for each yarn should be separated from the other yarns, but multiple yarns may contact the driven take-off roll 111 as discussed below.

  However, in alternative embodiments, the use of the guide system may be minimized or avoided by taking the yarn directly from the guide 138 to the driven take-off roll 111. As shown in FIG. 5, the guide systems 112A and 112B have a series of contact points. Given a possible high viscosity level of elastic fiber or thread, the contact point is likely to undesirably tension the thread before reaching the drive and tension controller 110-1A. As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, any tension applied to the yarn before it reaches the drive and tension controller 110-1A is amplified by the drive and tension controller 110-1A. It is generally preferred to extend the yarn with a drive and tension controller 110-1A before tension is applied to the yarn.

  According to one embodiment, each yarn group 102-102 '"is driven by a separate drive and tension controller 110-1A having a separate driven take-off roll 111, as shown in FIG. It may be fed to a lashing machine to provide the elastic band feature near the open end of the leg, for example, the first thread group provides the elastic feature for the right leg portion and the second thread group is An elastic feature may be provided for the left leg portion, at the time of manufacture, the tension of the elastic feature for the right or left leg portion is no longer at an acceptable level due to tension variations in the thread. The compact OE thread winding shaft system 100 'allows the tension of the first thread group or the second thread group to be adjusted to another thread group so as to correct any such variations. Allows to be adjusted independently of the network.

  In particular, FIGS. 5 and 8 show exemplary enlarged front elevation views of a multiple yarn drive device 110-1A, a single yarn drive device 110-1B, and a tension control device, respectively. The drive and tension control devices 110-1A, 110-1B include a driven take-off or driven take-off roll 111, a guide roll 113A-113E, a tension sensor 115, a cutting sensor 117, a motor 127, and a tension controller device 119. Optionally, a motion sensor 116 may be included. The tension controller device 119 further includes a graphical display 151, a keyboard 123, and a warning light 125.

  Although piercing production has been described herein, yarn groups may be supplied to other yarn processing production systems by the OETO spool winding system. In operation, the tamping machine or other yarn processing manufacturing system may provide a signal indicating at what speed the motor 127 should operate to provide the necessary elongation to achieve the desired tension, respectively, and drive and tension control. The devices 110-1A and 110-1B are similarly provided to the tension controller 119 shown in FIGS. The signal from the yarn processing system is typically based on industry standards that have been created to show the theoretical amount of elongation necessary to achieve the desired tension. This input signal from the yarn processing system is called the tension set point and initially indicates the speed of the driven take-off roll 111 of the drive and tension controllers 110-1A and 110-1B.

  According to another embodiment, the user may enter the desired tension range to be held for the thread group directly on the keyboard 123 of the tension controller device 119. The tension controller device 119 receives an input signal representing the yarn tension from the tension sensor 115. The tension controller device 119 can use these input signals to maintain the tension level of the yarn leaving the driven take-off roll 111 because it is within the desired tension range, or the tension can be increased or decreased. Decide what needs to be done.

  FIG. 6 shows a plan view of the drive and tension control device 110-1A. The drive and tension control device 110-1A includes a driven take-off roll 111, guide rolls 113A-113A ′ ″ to 113E-113E ′ ″, a tension sensor 115-115 ′ ″, a motion sensor 116-116 ′ ″, and a cutting sensor 117-. 117 ′ ″ and a tension controller device 119. In FIG. 6, the variable speed motor 127 of the drive and tension controller 110-1A indicates that the tension controller device 119 is out of the desired range for the net tension. The speed is maintained until the indicated signal is output based on the signal received from the tension sensor 115-115 ′ ″. The output signal from the tension sensor 115-115 '"ignores the input signal from the yarn processing system and controls the speed of the variable speed motor 127 of the drive and tension controller 110-1A until the speed is within the desired range. That is, the speed of the motor 127 is adjusted to correct for tension variations that occur during the unwinding or yarn feeding process.

  If the tension controller device 119 determines that the yarn tension after the driven take-off roll 111 is too high, the tension controller device 119 increases the speed of the motor 127. Alternatively, if the tension controller device 119 determines that the yarn tension after the driven take-off roll 111 is too low, the tension controller device 119 reduces the speed of the motor 127.

  As described above, the compact OETO spool system 100 'is configured to view not only the signal from the tension sensor 115 but also the signal from the manufacturing system in determining the appropriate speed for the motor 127. In an alternative embodiment, the drive and tension controllers 110-1A, 110-1B of the compact OE thread spool system 100 ′ may determine the appropriate speed of the motor 127 by determining the signal from the tension sensor 115 (ie, It may be configured to see only the tension feedback signal). In addition, the compact OE thread spool system 100 'may include multiple sensors that detect the tension or other parameters with which the system adjusts the appropriate speed of the motor 127.

  FIG. 7 shows a plan view of the driven roll and tension control device 110-A of the yarn group being supplied to the applied product of the yarn processing system. In addition, the compact OETO thread spool system 100 'provides another net tension control for the second thread group that is being supplied to the second application of the thread handling system. As used herein, net tension refers to the final tension of the yarn group that passes over the same driven take-off roll 111. By controlling the net tension of the first yarn group and separately controlling the net tension of the second yarn group, prior art unwinding devices / yarn supply systems can typically make such corrections. Where there was no tension variation in each thread group is corrected.

  FIG. 8 is an exemplary enlarged perspective view of a single thread drive and tension control device 110-1B. The drive and tension control device 110-1B includes a driven take-off roll 111, a guide roll 113A-113E, a tension sensor 115, a cutting sensor 117, a motor 127, and a tension control device 119. Optionally, a motion sensor (not shown) may also be included. The tension controller device 119 further includes a graphical display, a keyboard, and a warning light.

  FIG. 9 is a perspective view of another exemplary embodiment of drive and tension control device 110-2A, which includes a separate variable speed motor 227 and a corresponding tension sensor 215 for each individual thread. Have. Such a system is advantageous because it corrects for variations in each active yarn package. According to one embodiment, the speed of the motor 227 is controlled without receiving input from the yarn processing system. That is, the motor speed is based only on tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 215 and recognized by the tension controller device 219. Alternatively, the speed of the motor 227 may be controlled by receiving input from the yarn processing system in addition to the tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 215. In addition, when only one thread is driven by the driven take-off roll 211, the guide system for the thread supply system is simpler than a system using a large number of threads where the thread path must be kept separate. It becomes.

  When only one yarn is driven by the driven take-off roll 211, the guide system for the yarn supply system may be simplified compared to a system using multiple yarns where the yarn paths must be kept separate. For example, the guide system has only a stationary guide, such as a ceramic eye, through which the yarn passes after it leaves the package, and a first guide roller that guides the yarn towards the driven take-off roll 211.

  In one embodiment of the single thread configuration of FIG. 9, the speed control of the motor 227 is based solely on tension feedback. In this case, the change in speed occurs more frequently and with larger increments / decrements than the yarn feeding system controlled by the tension set point provided by the yarn handling system in combination with the tension feedback discussed above. That's right. In particular, a greater decrease in the speed of the motor 127 causes a slack in the thread before reaching the driven take-off roll 211, which leads to the next slip of the thread around the driven take-off roll 211.

  In order to reduce the possibility of such sagging of the yarn before reaching the driven take-off roll 211, a pretensioner may be used in the first guide roll 213A. Prior art pretensioners rely on the friction between the yarn and the pretensioner to maintain the tension of the yarn supply system and avoid yarn sagging. However, such a friction type pretensioner cannot be applied to an elastic yarn in which viscosity is a problem.

  Thus, the pretensioner guide roll 213A uses a pretensioner that otherwise impedes the rotational speed of the guide roll. In one embodiment of the invention for pretensioner guide roll 213A, a magnet is positioned adjacent to pretensioner guide roll 213A and the material coupled to the guide roll. The material bonded to the guide roll is a ferrous metal, such as steel. The magnetic force slows the rotational speed of the pretensioner guide roll 213A, thereby holding the tension and eliminating yarn slack without depending on friction.

  Further, as shown in FIG. 9, after the yarn is guided near the pretensioner guide roll 213 </ b> A, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211. The wound yarns around the driven take-off roll 211 are either directly adjacent to each other, or are spaced and aligned across the driven take-off roll 211. A tension sensor 215 is positioned after the driven take-off roll 211. The guide roll 213B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 211. In addition, since only one thread is used, the tension sensor 215 may be simplified.

FIG. 10 is an exemplary enlarged front elevational view of yet another embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device 110-2A. As shown in FIG. 10, after the yarn is guided near the pretensioner guide roll 213 </ b> A, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211. The wound yarns around the driven take-off roll 211 are either directly adjacent to each other, or are spaced and aligned across the driven take-off roll 211. In particular, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211 at an angle that is large enough to minimize slippage and small enough to avoid tangling. The angle at which the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211 is called the “first winding angle”. The first winding angle (θ 1 ) is approximately between 2 degrees and 360 degrees. The first winding angle θ 1 may vary depending on the type of fiber elastic yarn used and the corresponding viscosity level. According to one embodiment, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211 at a first winding angle (θ 1 ) of about 270 degrees. The first winding angle (θ 1 ) may be obtained by appropriately positioning the guide roll 213A, the driven take-off roll 211, and the tension sensor 215.

The tension sensor 215 is positioned behind the driven take-off roll 211. The guide roll 213B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 211. The yarn retains a second winding angle (θ 2 ) across the tension sensor 215, which provides an accurate and consistent measurement of yarn tension within the 0 to 180 degree circumference. It is. The yarn is pushed against the yarn guide before and after the tension sensor to ensure a consistent second wrap angle (θ 2 ). The second winding angle (θ 2 ) is obtained by appropriately positioning the guide roll 213B, the driven take-off roll 211, and the tension sensor 215. The tension controller device 219 monitors the thread tension measured by the tension sensor 215 and at least one of increasing, holding or decreasing the speed of the variable speed motor 227 by increments.

  11 is a right side view of the drive and tension control device 110-2A shown in FIG. As shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, after the yarn is guided near the driven take-off roll 211 driven by the motor 227, the yarn passes through the tension sensor 215 and exits the apparatus via the guide roll 213B.

  FIG. 12 is a plan view of the single-thread drive and tension control device shown in FIG. As shown in FIG. 12, after the yarn is guided to the vicinity of the pretensioner guide roll 213 </ b> A, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 211. The wound yarns around the driven take-off roll 211 are either directly adjacent to each other, or are spaced and aligned across the driven take-off roll 211. The tension sensor 215 is positioned behind the driven take-off roll 211. The guide roll 213B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 211.

FIG. 13 is an enlarged front elevational view of yet another exemplary embodiment of a single thread drive and tension control device 110-2B. As shown in FIG. 13, after the yarn is guided near the pretensioner guide roll 313 </ b> A, the yarn is wound around a driven take-off roll 311 driven by a motor 327. The windings around the driven take-off roll 311 are either directly adjacent to each other, or are spaced and aligned across the driven take-off roll 311. In particular, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 311 at an angle that is large enough to minimize slippage and small enough to avoid tangling. The angle at which the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 311 is called the “first winding angle”. The first winding angle (θ 1 ) may be approximately between 2 degrees and 360 degrees. The first winding angle (θ 1 ) may vary depending on the type of fiber elastic yarn used and the corresponding viscosity level. According to one embodiment, the yarn is wound around a driven take-off roll 311 at a first winding angle (θ 1 ) of about 270 degrees. The first winding angle (θ 1 ) may be obtained by appropriately positioning the guide roll 313A, the driven take-off roll 311, and the tension sensor 315.

As shown in FIG. 13, the tension sensor 315 is positioned behind the driven take-off roll 311. The guide roll 313B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 311. The yarn holds a second wrap angle (θ 2 ) across the tension sensor 315 that provides an accurate and consistent measurement of yarn tension within the range of 0 to 180 degrees around the circle. The yarn is pushed against the yarn guide before and after the tension sensor to ensure a consistent second wrap angle (θ 2 ). The second winding angle (θ 2 ) is obtained by appropriately positioning the guide roll 313 B, the driven take-off roll 311, and the tension sensor 315. The tension controller device 319 monitors the yarn tension measured by the tension sensor 315 and at least one of increasing, holding or decreasing the speed of the variable speed motor 327 by increments.

  FIG. 14 is a plan view of the third embodiment of the single-thread drive and tension control device 110-2B shown in FIG. As shown in FIG. 14, after the yarn is guided near the pretensioner guide roll 313 </ b> A, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 311. The tension sensor 315 is positioned after the driven take-off roll 311. The guide roll 313B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 311. The tension controller device 319 monitors the thread tension measured by the tension sensor 315 and performs at least one of increasing, holding or decreasing the speed of the variable speed motor 327 by increments.

  FIG. 15 shows yet another exemplary embodiment of a drive and tension controller 110-3 having a separate variable speed motor 427 for each individual thread and a corresponding separate tension sensor 415. Such a system is advantageous by correcting for variations in each activity package. According to one embodiment, the variable speed of the motor 427 is controlled without receiving input from the yarn processing system. That is, the motor speed is based only on tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 415 and recognized by the tension controller device 419. Alternatively, the variable speed of the motor 427 may be controlled by receiving input from the yarn processing system in addition to tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 415. In addition, as discussed above, when only one yarn is driven by the driven take-off roll 411, the guide system for the yarn supply system is the same as the prior art of FIG. 1 and the embodiment of the present invention of FIG. 3A. As shown in the above, it is simplified compared to a system using multiple yarns.

  When only one yarn is driven by the driven take-off roll 411, the guide system for the yarn supply system is simplified compared to a system using multiple yarns where the yarn paths must be kept separate. For example, the guide system only includes a stationary guide such as a ceramic eyelet plate 403 that passes after the yarn leaves the package, and a first eyelet 430 and a second eyelet 432 that guide the yarn toward the driven take-off roll 411. Have.

  In one embodiment of the single thread configuration of FIG. 15, the variable speed control of motor 427 is based solely on tension feedback. In this case, the change in speed occurs more frequently and with greater increments / decrements than the yarn feeding system controlled by the tension set point provided by the yarn handling system, in combination with the tension feedback discussed above. That's right. In particular, a large decrease in the speed of the motor 427 causes the yarn to sag before reaching the driven take-off roll 411, which leads to the next slip of the yarn around the driven take-off roll 411.

  In order to reduce the possibility of such sagging of the yarn before reaching the driven take-off roll 411, a combination of guide roll 422 and pretensioner 420 is used. Non-limiting examples of such pretensioners are models from Tai Wan, Changhua City 500, Chung Sian Road, Da Kong Enterprise Co., Ltd. Chang Chang Road, Chang Hua City 500, Taiwan. No. JH-703A (Model No. JH-703A). Prior art pretensioners rely on the friction between the yarn and the pretensioner to maintain the tension of the yarn supply system and avoid sagging of the yarn. However, such a friction type pretensioner cannot be applied to elastic yarns in which sagging is usually a problem.

  The pretensioner 420 reduces the rotational speed of the guide roll 422. As shown in FIG. 15, after the yarn is guided to the vicinity of the guide roll 422, the yarn is wound around the driven take-off roll 411. The wound yarns around the driven take-off roll 411 may either be directly adjacent to each other or spaced apart and arranged across the driven take-off roll 411. A tension sensor 415 is positioned behind the driven take-off roll 411. The guide roll 413B is disposed after the driven take-off roll 411 and the tension sensor 415. In addition, since only one thread is used, the tension sensor 415 is simplified.

  The drive and tension controller 110-3 of FIG. 15 has a separate variable speed motor 427 for each individual yarn and a corresponding separate tension sensor 415. Such a system is advantageous by correcting for variations in each activity package. According to one embodiment, the speed of the motor 427 is controlled without receiving input from the yarn processing system. That is, the motor speed is based only on tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 415 and recognized by the tension control device 419. Alternatively, the speed of the motor 427 may be controlled by receiving input from the yarn processing system in addition to tension feedback detected by the tension sensor 415. In addition, when only one yarn is driven by the driven take-off roll 411, the guide system for the yarn supply system is simplified compared to a system using multiple yarns where the yarn path must be kept separate. The

  Compared to the previous embodiment of the OETO spooling system with drive and tension control, the guide was changed from roller / pigtail to eyelet (eg, 430, 432). The use of eyelets is entangled, depending on the threading of the yarn between the package and the first guide, reducing the chance of catching or cutting. Embodiments of the invention may use separate eyelets and plates. In the embodiment of the present invention, it is preferable to use a single plate 403 having holes / eyelets as shown in FIG.

  As discussed above, the friction pretensioner (eg, 420 in FIG. 15) provides a consistent minimum tension on the yarn that reduces the initial tension variation caused by possible pull from the package. The pull can cause the tension to drop instantaneously to zero, which will lead to a spike leading to cutting, even with total yarn line tension control.

  In particular, compared to the embodiment of the present invention and the prior art, the driven roll 427 has an idler 421 attached as shown in FIG. The idler 421 provides further attenuation of tension variations before the tension sensor 415. Although FIG. 15 shows one turn of yarn, several turns may be used for the yarn to further increase the contact area between the yarn line and the driven roll, which increase in the speed of the variable control of the motor 427. Improves "pull" and "brake" swings resulting from an increase or incremental addition and a decrease or decrement reduction.

  In addition, as shown in FIG. 3C, tension control devices 110-3 are installed back to back, which increases the space between tension control panels for easier yarn tying, and the opportunity for thread line / thread line interference. Reduce. This facilitates working with system components that are installed at extremely low levels (eg, floor level) or high levels (eg, requiring a platform or ladder).

  FIG. 16 shows a flow chart of a method for controlling the yarn tension of an elastic winding system that unwinds a plurality of yarns simultaneously. Step 1600 is a step of unwinding each elastic yarn from the yarn package with a driven take-off roll that is combined for the yarn and driven by a variable speed motor. In step 1601, each elastic yarn is guided into tension and control using an individual pretensioner and a combined guide roll. In step 1602, each elastic yarn's combined tension sensor passes and a determination is made at 1603 of FIG. 16 to determine if one or more yarns have been cut and this method determines whether any yarn or fiber has been cut. . If a broken thread or fiber is detected, a cut alarm is set at step 1605 and the algorithm is stopped at step 1627A.

  If the thread or fiber break is not detected in step 1603, the method determines whether the thread or fiber is moving in step 1604 of FIG. If the thread or fiber has not moved, a movement alert is set at 1609 and the algorithm stops at step 1627B. If the yarn or fiber is moving, the tension of the moving yarn or fiber is measured in step 1611.

  In step 1612 of FIG. 16, the method determines whether an individual thread or fiber has a tension outside a predetermined range. The predetermined range is preferably defined by at least one of the average range tensions determined in step 1623 and compared to the maximum tensions disclosed in Tables 1-5 below. Alternatively, any acceptable predetermined range of tension may be used with the yarn feed processing system. If a tension with a value outside the range is detected, a tension alarm is set at step 1613.

  Depending on whether the tension outside the range is above or below a predetermined range, in step 1614 of FIG. 16, the motor speed is reduced by a decrease or increased by an increment, respectively. The number of motor speed increments and decrements over the course of the algorithm is stored in step 1620. When the individual thread or fiber tension has an out-of-range value, the method determines in step 1629 whether the number of increments / decrements stored in step 1620 has exceeded a correction threshold.

  If no out-of-range tension value is detected for an individual thread or fiber, the method determines an average tension value for multiple threads or fibers in step 1615 of FIG. In addition, the average value of the yarn or fiber is stored at step 1617.

  In step 1618 of FIG. 16, the method determines whether the average value of the yarn or fiber tension is outside a predetermined range. The predetermined range is preferably defined by at least one of an average range tension and a maximum tension, as disclosed in Tables 1 to 5 below. When the average value of the yarn or fiber tension has an out-of-range value, the method determines in step 1629 whether the number of increments and decrement processes previously stored in step 2320 exceeds the correction threshold. To do.

  The correction threshold value is a predetermined value entered in the initialization algorithm, and may be updated in real time. The predetermined value is the maximum number of modifications that should be allowed by the algorithm before operator intervention is suggested. The value for the predetermined value of the correction threshold may differ in terms of the number of decrements and the number of increments determined to exceed the threshold.

  When the correction threshold is exceeded by either an increment or a decrement number, or both, a tension update alarm is set at step 1625 and the algorithm is stopped at 1627C. When the algorithm stops at any of the steps 1627A, 1627B or 1627C discussed above, the operator may read the alarm status of the device and take appropriate steps to intervene or modify the process.

  When the average yarn, yarn or fiber tension is not out of range, the method maintains the motor speed as shown in step 1621 and returns to step 1603 to repeat the trim tension monitoring algorithm discussed above. The algorithms discussed above may be applied to one or more yarns, yarns or fibers supplied by an OETO thread spool or drive and tension controller.

The following examples, including experiments with Lycra Earl X Rays Earl spandex having no applied finish as the subject (Lycra (R) XA (R ) spandex) Fuaiba, provides information relates performance of embodiments of the present invention To do.

Example 1
The test equipment used in this and the following example data acquisition can be configured in a variety of ways, optionally including or excluding certain design elements and changing the order of certain elements. It was done. The equipment configuration used for Examples 1 to 5 is shown in FIG. 17, which is adapted from US Pat. The apparatus shown in FIG. 17 includes the following elements: a fiber package 10, a stationary guide 20, a first driven roll 30, a tension sensor 40, and a driven take-off roll 50.

  Test equipment geometry and other experimental test conditions are summarized as follows.

  The distances between the stationary guide and the first driven roll, between the first driven roll and the tension sensor, and between the first driven roll and the take-off roll are 0.22, 1.94, and 2.1-3. 4m. In this example, the first driven roll having a diameter of 8.89 cm is not grooved. The yarn line is held in a horizontal (relative to the ground) plane, and its direction change in the horizontal plane is held constant at 0 ° when the yarn line passes through the stationary guide. The distance between the package and the first guide was changed. The yarn line was wound 360 ° around the first driven roll. The yarn line draft was controlled at 2.15 × by maintaining the surface speed of the first roll at 93.4 m / min and the surface speed of the take-up roll at 294.3 m / min.

Tension data (expressed in grams) are model PDM-8 data logger, and model TE-200-C-CE-DC sensor {Electro Collected by Electromatic Equipment Co.}. All tension measurements were averaged over a 5 minute run time using a data sampling frequency of approximately 82 samples per second.

  “Average range tension” was defined as follows: within each 1.25 second time tension measurement, the minimum and maximum tension levels were recorded (resulting in 103 data points). Average range tension was calculated by averaging the difference (between the minimum and maximum values) over a 5 minute run.

The fiber evaluated in this test is as-spun lycra (R) XA (R ) {Invistasar, the original EI DuPont de Nemours and Company (INVISTA SARL, formerly E.I. registered trademark of du Pont de Nemours and Company) and had a linear density of 620 dtex (decigram per kilometer).

  Table 1 shows the yarn line tension variation measured by the sensor when the distance between the package and the stationary guide, d, was varied over a distance between about 0.25 and 0.81 m.

Table 1 shows that the yarn line tension (expressed as either average range or maximum tension) decreases as the distance between the package and the stationary guide increases. Minimum tension not shown in the table ranges from about 0.6 to 1.4 grams. Unexpectedly, a relatively sudden increase in average range tension is usually identified by the occurrence of a preceding yarn line cut, and the absolute level of tension and tension fluctuations rise to unacceptably high levels. It has been discovered that there is a minimum distance of about 0.41 m, under which (eg, observed by plotting maximum tension versus distance) occurs.

Example 2
Test equipment similar to that described in Example 1 but configured to closely correspond to the preferred embodiment of the OT-winding design shown in FIG. 17 was used. The equipment includes the following elements in the order encountered by the moving yarn line: fiber package, capture rolling guide, stationary guide, capture rolling guide, first driven roll, capture rolling guide, tension sensor, and driven take-off roll. Have.

  The distances between the stationary guide and the first driven roll, between the first driven roll and the tension sensor, and between the first driven roll and the take-up roll are 0.43, 0.51 and 2.43 m, respectively. . The first driven roll is one roll having one groove having a depth of 0.38 mm. The yarn line is also held in a horizontal plane. The distance between the package and the stationary guide was kept constant at 0.65 m, but the angle and θ were changed. The yarn line draft was held at 4 × by controlling the first driven roll and take-up roll to surface speeds of 68.6 m and 274.3 m / min, respectively.

  In addition to monitoring the yarn line tension as in Example 1, tension spikes were also recorded. The “tension spike” is the average number of sudden tension increases greater than 25 grams on the baseline tension within 5 minutes.

A variety of as-spun lycra Rx spandex fibers exhibiting various levels of viscosity were evaluated. Viscosity levels were characterized by measuring the OA tension (in grams) by the following method, which consists of the fiber package and ceramic pigtail guide, with each axis directly in line. It was a method of installing 0.61m apart. The fiber is passed over the guide at a yarn line speed of 50 meters per minute and over the tension sensor.
end) pulled from package.

  Table 2 shows the variation in the yarn line tension as the angle θ increases, where θ corresponds to the rotational axis of the package and the central axis of the stationary guide orifice perpendicular to the orifice plane, respectively. It is defined as an acute angle created by the intersection of virtual lines.

  A review of the data in Table 2 revealed an unexpected relationship between the yarn line tension and the angle between the package and the centerline of the stationary guide. As the angle increases, the yarn line tension increases and tension spikes occur more frequently. At sufficiently large angles, thread line cutting occurs. When the yarn line passes through the guide, the sensitivity of the yarn line tension to the angle traversed by the yarn line depends on the properties of the fiber. The data in Table 2 indicates that fibers characterized by higher viscosity show higher sensitivity of yarn line tension for this angle. For some fibers that exhibit exceptionally high viscosity levels, the angle beyond which yarn line cutting is unavoidable is less than about 10 °.

Example 3
This series of runs, using the test equipment described previously and configured as in Example 2, evaluated the effect of angle on the yarn line tension for fibers of various viscosity levels. The distance between the package and the stationary guide, d, was kept constant at 0.65 m. The yarn line draft was held 4 × by controlling the first driven roll and take-up roll to surface speeds of 68.6 and 274.3 m / min, respectively. All other experimental conditions were as described for Example 2. The data is summarized in Table 3.

The high viscosity fibers tested in this series of runs are the same as the two fibers tested in Example 2. Comparison of these same fiber data in Tables 2 and 3 shows that the yarn line tension increases with increasing angle and yarn line cuts occur at excessively high angles. {In contrast, a fiber with a finish can run at an angle of 90 ° or less without increasing the yarn line tension, without generating tension spikes and without cutting the yarn line. Having a viscosity of 1.406, 924dtex denier, merge 16795 (Lot 1019), the finished of Lycra are X-rays are tape -162 Sea (Lycra (R) XA (R ) T-162C) Fuaiba is 0-90 ° When run at an angle, there was no increase in yarn line tension and no tension spikes. }
These data show that limiting the angle that the yarn line traverses when the yarn line passes through the first stationary guide provides an uninterrupted manufacturing process, even for high viscosity fiber yarn lines.

Example 4
This series of runs using the test equipment previously described and configured as in Example 2 shows the effect of different viscosity levels on the distance between the package and stationary guide, d on the yarn line tension. evaluate. The angle, θ, was kept constant at 22 °. The yarn line draft was controlled at 4 × and the take-up speed was controlled at 274.3 m / min.

These fiber test results in Table 4 show the minimum distance between the package and the fixed guide below which the yarn line tension and average range tension increase unacceptably. This minimum depends on the viscosity level of the fiber being tested. In contrast, essentially influence the distance from the package to the stationary guide is on to low-viscosity Lycra Earl spandex (Lycra (R) spandex) is not. These results highlight the difficulties in maintaining process conditions that run smoothly with high viscosity fibers. The OTE thread spool system allows for successful control of processes using such fibers.

Example 5
Operational testing of the embodiments of the present invention was performed in commercial production conditions using fibers characterized by various levels of viscosity. Table 5 summarizes these test results. The data is based on the fact that each tension measurement reported is the average of the minimum of four separate measurements, each consisting of one tube running for 10 minutes. Obtained as in the example. Similarly, each number of tension spikes reported in Table 5 is the average number of spikes greater than 25 grams above the baseline tension in 10 minutes. Measurements were made on a near full (surface) or near empty (core) package. The core measurement is the measurement on the approximately 1.6 cm thick yarn or fiber remaining on the tube. In five unspun fiber runs, four ran without running problems. One fiber sample, Merge 1Y331, resulted in an unacceptable occurrence of tension spikes. The fiber showed an unusually high level of viscosity even with the fiber as spun, as evidenced by the fact that the average range tension is more than 60% higher than that of the fiber with the next highest viscosity level. .

Example 6
FIG. 18 shows some exemplary test results representing typical values collected by running a full package from start to finish in an embodiment of the invention similar to that shown in FIG. Show. Without tension control or the addition of anti-viscous additives, increasing tension profiles are typically due to the high yarn viscosity forces near the tube core that lead to excessive elongation of the yarn that causes the cut. Be expanded. The presence of fluctuating yarn tension in the supply package, as shown by the fairly consistent value of tension shown in FIG. 18, is compensated with the tension controlled yarn supply system of FIG. 3B. It should be noted that the tension control parameters are not optimized for this test, but the tension is consistently present as shown by the fairly flat nature of the graph of FIG. Should. The yarn used for this test is a 680 dtx tape 262 (T262) made on the 3rd day of 2005. The appendix contains plotted test data that varies between about 90 and 95 grams as shown.

  The foregoing description illustrates and describes the present invention. In addition, while this disclosure shows and describes only preferred embodiments of the present invention, as noted above, the present invention can be used in various other combinations, variations, and environments. It is to be understood that variations and modifications may be made within the scope of the inventive concepts represented herein and which are commensurate with the skill and knowledge of the above disclosure and / or related art. The embodiments described above further illustrate the best mode known for carrying out the invention, and to those skilled in the art, in such or other embodiments, and for specific applications or It is intended that the present invention be utilized with various modifications necessary for use. Accordingly, the description is not intended to limit the invention to the form or application disclosed herein. Also, it is intended that the appended claims be construed to include alternative embodiments.

Claims (21)

  1. A support frame comprising a plurality of thread guides;
    At least one swivel leg coupled to the support frame;
    A plurality of package holders fixed to the at least one swivel leg, each holder configured to hold one or more packages of yarns, each package of yarns comprising the plurality of yarns; A package holder, and a plurality of drive and tension control devices coupled to the support frame, the drive device being arranged on a rotating shaft configured to be unwound through a yarn guide, each of the devices An apparatus configured to unwind the thread from one of the package of threads, wherein each of the drive and tension control device passes through the thread path of the drive and tension control device. A pretensioner and a combined guide roll configured to guide the yarn;
    At least one eyelet configured to prevent tangling of the yarn;
    A horizontal driven take-off roll configured to move the yarn through the drive and tension control device;
    A variable speed motor configured to drive the horizontal driven take-off roll and control the yarn tension;
    A thread tension sensor through which the unwinding thread passes;
    A tension controller device configured to perform at least one of increasing, maintaining and decreasing the speed of the variable speed motor according to a feedback signal from the tension sensor; and At least one guide roll configured to output the yarn from the tension control device,
    The pretensioner and guide roll are positioned before the horizontal driven take-off roll, the tension sensor is positioned after the horizontal driven take-off roll, and the speed of the variable speed motor is controlled by the tension controller device, An OE thread spooling system that can be changed to maintain the thread tension value within a predetermined thread tension range.
  2.   2. The OETO yarn spool of claim 1 wherein each drive and tension control device further comprises an idler configured to damp tension variations in the yarn, the idler being disposed adjacent to the horizontal driven take-off roll. system.
  3.   2. The OETO yarn winding axle system of claim 1 wherein each drive and tension control device further comprises a plate eyelet configured to send the yarn to the drive and tension control device.
  4.   2. The OETO yarn winding shaft system according to claim 1, wherein the yarn is an elastic yarn.
  5.   5. The OE of claim 4, wherein each of the plurality of drive and tension control devices is vertically spaced on the support frame to unwind each of the threads individually from each package of the plurality of packages. Theo thread winding shaft system.
  6.   5. The OETO thread winding shaft according to claim 4, wherein said plurality of drive and tension control devices are arranged in parallel on said support frame to unwind each said thread individually from each of said plurality of packages. Rack system.
  7. 7. The OETO yarn winding shaft system according to claim 5 or 6, wherein the first winding angle of the yarn around the driven take-off roll is in a range between about 2 and 360 degrees.
  8.   7. The OETO yarn winding shaft system according to claim 5 or 6, wherein the first winding angle of the yarn around the driven take-off roll is about 270 degrees.
  9.   9. The drive according to any one of claims 5, 6, 7 or 8, wherein the drive and tension control device further comprises a second winding angle of the thread which is in the range between about 0 and 180 degrees around the tension sensor. The OETO thread winding shaft system described in 1.
  10.   10. The pretensioner creates pretension in the unwind yarn by moving a magnet positioned adjacent to the guide roll to induce movement of ferrous material coupled to the guide roll. Oee Tau thread winding rack system.
  11. A drive and tension control device for a bobbin winding system,
    A pretensioner and a guide roll configured to guide the yarn through the yarn path of the drive and tension control device;
    At least one eyelet configured to prevent tangling of the yarn;
    A driven take-off roll configured to move the yarn through the drive and tension controller;
    A variable speed motor configured to drive the driven take-off roll and control the yarn tension;
    A tension sensor configured to determine the tension on the yarn;
    A tension controller device configured to perform at least one of increasing, maintaining and decreasing the speed of the variable speed motor in accordance with a feedback signal from the tension sensor; and And at least one guide roll configured to output the yarn from the control device,
    The pretensioner and the guide roll are arranged before the driven take-off roll, and the tension sensor is arranged after the driven take-off roll.
  12.   12. The drive and tension control device of claim 11, further comprising an idler configured to damp tension variations in the yarn, the idler being disposed adjacent to the driven take-off roll.
  13.   12. The drive and tension controller of claim 11 further comprising a plate eyelet configured to send a thread input to the drive and tension controller.
  14.   12. The drive and tension controller of claim 11 wherein the speed of the variable speed motor is varied by the tension controller device to maintain the yarn tension value within a predetermined range of yarn tension.
  15.   15. The drive and tension control device of claim 14, wherein the distance between the tension sensor and the driven take-off roll is minimized to avoid yarn tension variation errors associated with the distance.
  16.   The drive and tension control device according to claim 11, wherein the yarn is an elastic yarn.
  17.   17. The drive and tension control device of claim 16, wherein the first winding angle of the yarn around the driven take-off roll is in the range between about 2 and 360 degrees.
  18.   The drive and tension control device of claim 15, wherein the first winding angle of the yarn around the driven take-off roll is about 270 degrees.
  19.   18. The drive and tension control device of claim 16 or claim 17, wherein the second winding angle of the thread around the tension sensor is in the range between about 0 and 180 degrees.
  20. Unwinding each elastic yarn from yarn packaging with a combination driven take-off roll driven by a variable speed motor for the yarn,
    The process of guiding each elastic yarn into tension and control device with individual pretensioner and combination guide roll;
    The process of passing the tension sensor in combination with each elastic thread,
    Determining whether one or more threads have been cut;
    Determining whether one or more yarns are moving and measuring the tension of each of the moving yarns;
    Determining whether any of the moving yarns have a tension that is out of range with respect to a predetermined tension value;
    At least one of increasing the speed of each driven take-off roll for each moving yarn by increments and decreasing it by decrementing, the tension of the respective moving yarn is the predetermined for the moving yarn. Performing when the tension value is out of range and at least one of the increment and decrement numbers is below a first correction threshold;
    Determining whether the average tension for each respective moving yarn is out of range with respect to the predetermined tension value for the moving yarn;
    At least one of increasing and decreasing the speed of the respective driven take-off roll is that the average tension of the respective moving yarn is out of range and the number of increments and decreases When at least one of the threads is below a second correction threshold, and when one or more of the threads are cut, not moving, and out of range, the first or second correction threshold A method of setting an alarm when in at least one state of having a tension above a value, and controlling the yarn tension with an elastic winding system that unwinds a plurality of yarns simultaneously.
  21.   21. The method of claim 20, further comprising the step of feeding each elastic yarn on a combination idler configured to attenuate tension variations in the yarn.
JP2010504285A 2007-04-20 2008-04-18 Compact continuous over-end take-off with a tension control Pending JP2010526000A (en)

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US92542307P true 2007-04-20 2007-04-20
PCT/US2008/060865 WO2008131252A1 (en) 2007-04-20 2008-04-18 Compact continuous over end take-off (oeto) creel with tension control

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JP2016520492A (en) * 2013-04-03 2016-07-14 インヴィスタ テクノロジーズ エスアエルエル Process for draft control in elastic yarn feeding

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CN101678989A (en) 2010-03-24
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US20080283653A1 (en) 2008-11-20
WO2008131252A1 (en) 2008-10-30

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