JP2010522678A - Improved unit security seal - Google Patents

Improved unit security seal Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2010522678A
JP2010522678A JP2010501294A JP2010501294A JP2010522678A JP 2010522678 A JP2010522678 A JP 2010522678A JP 2010501294 A JP2010501294 A JP 2010501294A JP 2010501294 A JP2010501294 A JP 2010501294A JP 2010522678 A JP2010522678 A JP 2010522678A
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JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
shackle
undercut
security seal
pin
locking
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
JP2010501294A
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Japanese (ja)
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JP4933660B2 (en
Inventor
マンゴーン,ピーター,ジー.,ジュニア.
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マンゴーン,ピーター,ジー.,ジュニア.
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Priority to US11/950,094 priority Critical patent/US7703817B2/en
Priority to US11/950,094 priority
Application filed by マンゴーン,ピーター,ジー.,ジュニア. filed Critical マンゴーン,ピーター,ジー.,ジュニア.
Priority to PCT/US2008/085401 priority patent/WO2009073721A1/en
Publication of JP2010522678A publication Critical patent/JP2010522678A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of JP4933660B2 publication Critical patent/JP4933660B2/en
Expired - Fee Related legal-status Critical Current
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F3/00Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps
    • G09F3/02Forms or constructions
    • G09F3/03Forms or constructions of security seals
    • G09F3/0305Forms or constructions of security seals characterised by the type of seal used
    • G09F3/037Forms or constructions of security seals characterised by the type of seal used having tie-wrap sealing means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/14Bale and package ties, hose clamps
    • Y10T24/1402Packet holders
    • Y10T24/1406Adjustable bands
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/14Bale and package ties, hose clamps
    • Y10T24/1498Plastic band
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/48Seals
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/48Seals
    • Y10T292/491Distorted shackle
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/48Seals
    • Y10T292/492Driving
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/48Seals
    • Y10T292/494Interengaging shackle ends, inclosing housing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T292/00Closure fasteners
    • Y10T292/48Seals
    • Y10T292/497Resilient shackle ends
    • Y10T292/498Rigid engaging means

Abstract

  Unit security comprising a shackle, an engagement housing having a passage for receiving the shackle, and at least two locking members spaced along the shackle having an undercut opening to the outer surface of the locking member A seal, wherein at least one pin is disposed within the housing passage and engages the undercut when the shackle is advanced through the passage to provide non-removable engagement of the shackle within the housing. Directed so that at least one undercut resists removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to rupture the brittle member. With a highly brittle member arranged between its inlet and outlet to engage .

Description

Related Application This application is a continuation-in-part of US patent application Ser. No. 11 / 717,376, filed on Mar. 12, 2007. The entire disclosure of the aforementioned patent application is incorporated herein by reference.

The present invention relates to a security seal, and more specifically, a unit-type or integrally-formed security seal that can be efficiently formed by a highly brittle member and a structure that restricts access and improves the safety of the seal. About.

There is a great need for a security seal that can be manufactured efficiently and economically and is easy to use. Many seals are currently available, including seals made of molded plastic, where the hollow body is formed as a single unit with an internal flexible finger that engages the shackle.

[0004] Unfortunately, according to conventional knowledge, in order to efficiently form this type of plastic security seal, the housing is a one-step process without the use of collapsible core molding tool members. Had to be open at both ends to be moldable. However, in general, an open housing facilitates passing a pick or other tool through the housing to disengage the locking fingers that hold the shackle, thereby avoiding the safety features of the device.

[0005] Various approaches have been demonstrated over the years to overcome the shortcomings of molded plastic security seals. None of them were flawless. The initial approach shown in the prior art is shown in FIG. 1A. In this design, a closed lock housing 2 is formed with a resilient lock member 3 that engages a pin 4. This design is very difficult (if not impossible) to manufacture and requires a complex collapsible core molding system that is implemented at a very small scale typical of many conventional security seals. Are difficult to operate, are likely to produce many misformed products, and are expected to involve significant manufacturing interruptions.

[0006] Another example of a prior art design as shown in FIG. 1B includes a sealed housing 7, which is mounted to the sealed housing to close the bore of the locking member. A separate locking member 6 is provided. The sealed housing 7 comprises an optional metal cylinder 5 press fitted into the housing to make it difficult to cut the rear end of the housing for the purpose of accessing the interior of the housing to release the seal. . Unfortunately, this design is complex and expensive to manufacture and assemble. Also, the safety function may be impaired by removing the member 6 from the housing 5 and the receptacle 7 to release the shackle, without any indication that the seal has been breached, and to reassemble later.

[0007] Yet another prior art approach is illustrated in FIG. 1C. The security seal shown in this figure comprises an open borelock member 8 with one end of the bore closed by a separate cover 9. Again, this approach is complex, expensive to make and assemble, and can be devastated and reassembled.

[0008] Accordingly, one object of the present invention is to provide a security seal having a design that can be molded as a unitary device without the use of complex collapsible core molding elements.

[0009] Another object of the present invention is to provide a security seal that is economical to make and easy to operate.

[0010] Another object of the present invention is to provide a security seal that is particularly difficult to escape from a safety function.

[0011] Another object of the present invention is to provide a security seal that achieves an engagement that cannot be breached without destroying the device or providing an indication that functionality has been compromised. Is to provide.

[0012] Another object of the invention is to have one or more highly brittle members that tear or break if the locking mechanism is breached to help prevent unauthorized reuse of the security seal. It is to provide a security seal having a locking mechanism.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a security seal including a member for restricting access for preventing tampering.

[0014] These and other objects and advantages can be achieved by the present invention as described below.

The present invention is a unit-type security seal that can be molded in one step without using a collapsible molded core component. It comprises an engagement housing comprising a shackle, a bore or passage for receiving the shackle, and one or more brittle members that tear or break when the security seal locking mechanism is breached.

[0016] Preferably, the shackle has at least two locking members spaced along it. Each locking member has at least one undercut extending from the outer surface of the locking member to the undercut floor, the undercut having an inlet and an outlet at both ends of the undercut along the longitudinal axis of the shackle. The locking member preferably has a plurality of pairs of oppositely located undercuts, and the undercut openings of adjacent locking members are offset from each other.

[0017] An engagement housing is disposed adjacent the proximal end of the shackle. It has a passage or bore that receives the shackle, and at least one pin disposed in the passage that is directed to extend into the undercut when the shackle locking member passes through the passage. In a preferred embodiment having a plurality of pairs of undercuts positioned diametrically opposite the locking member, the shackle locking member is positioned at least two diametrically opposite to engage the opposing undercut when passing through the passage. A pin is disposed in the engagement housing.

[0018] In one embodiment of the present invention, the undercut engages so as to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to rupture the highly brittle member. A highly brittle member is disposed between the inlet and the outlet for engaging the pin of the housing. In a preferred embodiment, the highly brittle member is an upright wall protruding from the undercut floor. In another preferred embodiment, the upstanding wall is inclined from the undercut inlet at an angle of about 10 ° to 20 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrowed passage at the undercut outlet. To do. More preferably, the upstanding wall is inclined from the undercut inlet at an angle of about 15 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle.

[0019] A dome-shaped plug can be placed at the distal end of the shackle that is dimensioned to limit unauthorized access to the passage of the engaging housing. The plug has a floor that extends across the plug generally along the longitudinal axis of the shackle so that the plug can move past the pins of the engaging housing as the shackle passes through a passage in the housing. An engagement slot is provided. The undercut floor of the locking member and the engagement slot of the plug are preferably in communication with each other so that, as the shackle passes through the passage, it can slide, bounce and become a locked configuration.

[0020] In another embodiment of the present invention, the unitary security seal comprises an arrow member having a wing that projects beyond the outer contour of the distal locking member. The arrow member is joined to the distal end of the shackle by a highly brittle link. The wing has sufficient resilience to allow it to enter the passage of the engaging housing and compress inward to pass through it and to return to its original shape as it emerges from the housing passage. Thus, the wing engages the upper edge of the engagement housing to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing. Pushing the closed shackle out of the housing provides an indication that the highly fragile link and arrow members have ruptured and the security seal has been broken.

[0021] The features of the invention believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention, together with its objects and advantages, can best be understood by referring to the following description, when read in conjunction with the following drawings, in which like reference numerals identify like elements in several figures.

[0022] FIG. 3 is a diagram of a prior art security seal. It is a figure of the security seal of a prior art. It is a figure of the security seal of a prior art. [0023] FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an elongated security seal according to the present invention. 1 is a perspective view of an elongated security seal according to the present invention. FIG. [0024] FIG. 3 is an elevational view of a proximal portion of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B. [0025] FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the engagement housing that receives the shackle of the security seal of FIG. 3 along line 4A-4A of FIG. [0026] FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the engagement housing that receives the shackle of the security seal of FIG. 3 along line 4B-4B of FIG. [0027] FIG. 3 is an enlarged elevational view of a portion of the shackle of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing three annular locking elements. [0028] FIG. 8 is a generally trapezoidal undercut view of an annular locking member of a security seal. FIG. 6 is a diagram of a generally trapezoidal undercut in an annular locking member of a security seal. [0029] FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the central member of the security seal shackle taken along line 5C-5C of FIG. [0030] FIG. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. FIG. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. FIG. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. FIG. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. FIG. 2B is a partial view of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B showing the shackle going into the engagement housing of the security seal that receives it to lock the shackle into the engagement housing and resist withdrawal. FIG. [0031] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention having a flexible elongate strap between a shackle and an engaging housing that receives the shackle. [0032] FIG. 8 is a partially enlarged elevational view of the distal end of the security seal of FIG. 7 with the handle of the seal removed. [0033] FIG. 8 is a cutaway elevational view of the engagement housing that receives the shackle of the security seal of FIG. [0034] FIG. 8 is an elevational view of the shackle of the security seal of FIG. 7 in lock engagement with the engagement housing receiving the shackle. [0035] The distal end of the shackle of another embodiment of the security seal of the present invention, comprising a highly brittle member disposed within the undercut of the locking member that tears if the locking mechanism of the security seal is breached FIG. [0036] FIG. 12 is a partial perspective view of the distal end of the shackle of the embodiment of FIG. 11 with the distal end of the shackle rotated 90 degrees about its longitudinal axis. [0037] FIG. 13 is a partial perspective view of the proximal portion of the security seal according to FIGS. 11 and 12 as viewed from the bottom of the engagement housing. [0038] The distal end of the shackle of FIGS. 11 and 12 disposed within the dissected engagement housing of the device (without the housing pin) indicating that the attempt to push the shackle out of the housing was unsuccessful. It is a partial elevation view. [0039] Another security seal of the present invention comprising a second brittle member with a resilient wing that compresses upon entry into the passage in the engagement housing and returns to its original shape when it emerges FIG. 6 is a partial perspective view of a distal end of the embodiment. [0040] FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of the brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal. FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of a highly brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal. FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of a highly brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal. FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of a highly brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal. FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of a highly brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal. FIG. 13 is a partial view of the distal end of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 showing shearing of a highly brittle member as the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing of the security seal.

[0041] Turning now to FIGS. 2A and 2B, two views are shown in which the unitary security seal 10 according to the present invention is rotated 180 degrees relative to each other about the longitudinal axis of the device. Unit security seal 10 can be molded from polypropylene, polyethylene, nylon, or other suitable resilient resin in one step without the use of a collapsible molded core component. The security seal includes a shackle 12 having a handle 14 at the distal end and a shackle base 16 at the proximal end. The handle 14 preferably has a serration 18 to facilitate gripping. The shackle can be any desired length, for example, 18 inches, 14 inches, 10 inches, or shorter. The material and dimensions of the shackle (and the rest of the device) are selected to ensure that the shackle is flexible enough to bend relative to the engagement housing of the device described below. The

[0042] Shackle base 16 carries security seal platform 22 at a proximal end with upstanding engagement housing 24. Platform 22 is enlarged in the illustrated embodiment to show flat “flag” surfaces 26A and 26B suitable for labeling and / or numbering the security seal as desired. Yes.

[0043] The engagement housing 24 includes a conical member 28 that extends substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the shackle 12 when the shackle 12 is not locked and bent, as shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. Is provided. The conical member 28 has a central passage in the form of a bore 30 extending therethrough. The base 29 of the conical member, in the illustrated embodiment, flares outwardly into a series of triangular brace members 31 to increase the strength of the engagement housing and ensure integrity. The brace member is disposed on an optional circular pedestal 33 formed in the platform 22.

[0044] To instruct the user to insert the handle 14 and shackle 12 into the inlet 35 of the bore 30 as necessary to effect proper irreversible locking of the shackle within the engagement housing. , Arrows 34 are formed on the back surface 36 of the platform 22. The configuration for irreversibly locking the shackle is described in more detail below.

[0045] FIG. 3 is an enlarged elevational view of a portion of the proximal end of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B, with diametrically located pins 38A and 38B visible in the bore 30. FIG. The pin longitudinal axis A (FIG. 4A) is generally parallel to the bore axis. (As shown, two pins are preferred, but one pin can be used.) In the cross-sectional view of the engagement housing 26 of FIGS. 4A and 4B, the pin 38B is above the wall 40 of the bore 30. It can be seen that it is molded and extends into the bore. Pins 38A and 38B are substantially identical and each include a tapered nose portion 42 having sides 44 and 46 that are generally flat angled. In the illustrated embodiment, these sides are at an angle of about 30 ° relative to the longitudinal axis A of the pin, but they can be at any suitable angle, preferably on that axis. The angle is in the range of about 25 to 40 degrees. The pin has a length CC and a width DD.

[0046] Each of the pins 38A and 38B also includes a pin base 48. The base has a recess 50 that extends to the outer edges 52 and 54 of the pin to create projections 56 and 58 that are directed rearwardly on either edge of the base of the pin.

[0047] FIG. 5 is an enlarged elevational view of a portion of the shackle 12 of the security seal of FIGS. 2A and 2B. As can be seen, the shackle comprises a central member 60 that carries an integral annular locking member 62 spaced in series. The central member 60 in the illustrated embodiment has opposing generally flat surfaces 63 and 65 (FIG. 5C) that provides sufficient force on the shackle to overcome the engagement of the shackle within the engagement housing. It is thin enough to ensure that the central member breaks before it can be transmitted. Such a break at any point in the central member of the shackle signals that the security seal has been broken and prevents unauthorized reuse of the device. However, the central member 60 can be circular or other cross-sectional shapes as desired.

[0048] In a straight configuration (before the shackle is bent and locked into the engagement housing) as shown in FIG. 5, the central longitudinal axis of the central member as indicated by line "B" Is generally straight. The locking members each have a length “AA” and are spaced longitudinally from one another along the central member by a distance “BB”. Rotating the shackle to move the generally trapezoidal undercuts 64A and 64B (FIGS. 5A and 5B) in the locking member 62 to align with the pins, as described below, at the base of the pins Resistance is provided by the side 71 which slopes upwardly of the fan-shaped notch 67 where the projections 56 and 58 face.

[0049] The specific relationship between the length AA of the locking member, the spacing BB between the locking members, and the length CC of the pin is BB <CC
AA + BB> CC
Need to be maintained. Maintaining this relationship is that when the shackle is in place within the engagement housing, the pin remains generally engaged with the trapezoidal undercut, and the pin is spaced between adjacent lock members BB. It helps to ensure that the shackle cannot be moved to a free position within.

[0050] The locking members 62 each extend generally radially upward from the flat surfaces 63 and 65 of the central member and extend generally from a distal edge 66 to a proximal edge 68 of each annular locking member, and are generally trapezoidal. Undercuts 64A and 64B. The generally trapezoidal undercut has an outlet opening 73 that is coextensive with the proximal edge 68 and an inlet opening 75 that is coextensive with the distal edge 66. The openings 73 and 75 are substantially parallel, and the opening 75 is larger than the opening 73. Thus, pins 38A and 38B enter through opening 75 and are "passed through the constriction" through a trapezoidal undercut and opening 73 as the shackle moves and engages engagement member 24. become. The outlet opening 73 has a width EE. The width DD of the pins 38A and 38B is preferably substantially equal to the width EE of the exit opening in order to minimize the possibility that the engaging member will function loosely from the pin. In this context, “substantially equal” means that the width of the exit opening engages both sides of the opening and does not prevent the shackle from being advanced through the engagement housing while the pin is in the exit opening. This means that the size of the pin is such that it can pass through the pin.

[0051] A generally trapezoidal undercut 64A and 64B is illustrated in FIGS. 5A and 5B. Thus, as can be seen in these figures, the undercut 64A is relative to the inner wall 70A, which is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis B of the central member 60 of the uncurved shackle, and to the longitudinal axis B. It has an angled outer inclined wall 72A. In the illustrated embodiment, the angle “C” of the inclined wall is about 15 ° with respect to the longitudinal axis B. An angle of this magnitude is most preferred, but preferably the angle can range from about 10 to 20 degrees. The undercut 64B is such that the inner wall 70B of the undercut 64B is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis B and the outer inclined wall 72B is at an angle that generally matches the angle of the inner wall 72A. The entire image is a mirror image of the undercut 64A. Each proximal end of the annular locking member has a fan-shaped notch 67 as shown in FIG. Inclined walls 72A and 72B help to guide the pin into the undercut region and to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement member by returning the pin from the trapezoidal undercut as a whole. Optional bosses 78 and 80 may also be provided that project into a generally trapezoidal undercut adjacent to.

[0052] The generally trapezoidal undercut inner wall and sloping wall intersect the fan-shaped notch 67 at or near its respective high point. Thus, as will be explained in more detail below, if the protrusions at the base of pins 38A and 38B abut the bottom 69 of the fan-shaped notch, the shackle is rotated to align the pin with the trapezoidal undercut as a whole. Is subjected to resistance by a side surface 71 that slopes upwardly of the notch.

[0053] Attention is now directed to FIGS. 6A-6F to illustrate the irreversible locking function obtained when the shackle 12 is inserted into the inlet 35 of the engagement housing 24 in the "C" direction. In this way, a portion of the shackle distal end 82 is engaged with the laterally inclined wall 72B of the generally trapezoidal undercut 64B of the first annular locking member 62A engaging the side 46 of the pin 38A. It is shown in 6A. As the distal end of the shackle member is further moved into the bore 30 of the engagement housing, the pin rides along the inclined wall 72B and the shackle member that travels with the advanced inclined wall pressed against the pin rebounds; Or it rotates counterclockwise (FIG. 6B). The pin 38A can deflect slightly under the force applied by the inclined wall, but bounces back to its original position as the shackle moves past the pin. When the shackle reaches the position shown in FIG. 6C, the nose portion 42 of the pin 38 enters the spacing 84A between the first annular locking member 62A and the second annular locking member 62B and the annular The locking member 62A begins to emerge from the generally trapezoidal undercut 64B.

[0054] In FIG. 6E, the generally trapezoidal undercut 64B of the shackle's most distal lock ring 62A disengages from the pin so that the shackle 12 has a generally trapezoidal undercut of the annular lock ring 62B. 64A is shown advanced to the point where it meets the nose portion 42 of pin 38A. In FIG. 6E, as the shackle continues, the contact surface 70B is moved along the pin, thereby causing the shackle to bounce back and rotate clockwise with the pin pressed against the inclined wall 70B. This continues until the pin base 48 exceeds the distal edge 68 of the first lock ring as shown in FIG. 6F. In this position, the protrusions 56 and 58 (FIG. 4A) at the base of the pin 38A or 38B abut against the bottom 69 of the sector cutout. As a result, any attempt to remove the shackle from the engagement housing 24 (by moving it in the direction “D”) is prevented by the offset of the generally trapezoidal undercut of the adjacent locking member. . Further, to return the pin out of the lock housing, no matter how a pick or other member is passed longitudinally through the bore 30 to the pin and attempts to rotate the shackle, it will be reversed. Furthermore, it is prevented by the offset of the trapezoidal undercuts 64A and 64B. Furthermore, the same results are obtained with respect to attempts made at the proximal or distal end of the bore. As the shackle further advances into the lock housing, it rotates alternately clockwise and counterclockwise as described above. Trying to remove the shackle, as more lock members are present makes it more complex to disable the lock mechanism for each successive lock member in and near the bore hole 30 It becomes even more difficult after more locking members have moved beyond the pins. This resistance to shackle removal is facilitated by bosses 78 and 80 that help prevent the inclined wall from moving distally past the pin.

[0055] FIGS. 7-10 illustrate another embodiment of the present invention in which the security seal 100 includes an engagement housing 104 (configured as described above with respect to configurations 22 and 24 of the security seal 10). A generally flat strap 102 is provided disposed between the shortened shackle portion 106 having a handle 108 at the distal end. In the illustrated embodiment, the shackle portion 106 includes three annular locking members 110, 112, and 114.

[0056] The distal end of shackle portion 106 (with the handle of the seal removed for purposes of illustration) is shown in FIG. As can be seen in this figure, the shackle comprises a central member 116 having a generally circular cross section. As is apparent in this figure, the locking members 110, 112, and 114 each have a different configuration, but have the same length “AAA”. Beginning with an intermediate annular member 112, the locking member has a generally trapezoidal undercut 118 that extends radially upward from the surface 120 of the central member 116. This generally trapezoidal undercut extends from the distal surface 122 of the annular locking member 112 to the proximal surface 124. Proximal surface 124 is generally flat but includes a proximally directed spar 126. The generally trapezoidal undercut comprises an inner wall 128 that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shackle and an outer inclined wall 130. The angle of the inclined wall with respect to the shackle axis is about 15 °, and preferably ranges from about 10 to 20 degrees.

[0057] The most distal annular locking member 110 ("entrance locking member") guides the shackle over the locking pin of the engagement housing, and when the shackle is fully engaged, It plays the role of closing the entrance to the bore 160. The inlet locking member has a generally straight undercut 132 having an outer side wall 134 and an inner side wall 136. The most proximal end of the generally straight undercut wall is rounded at 138 and 140 to facilitate the entry of pins 162A and 162B into the undercut as described below. . The undercut 132 also prevents the formation of a clear line of sight during the undercut, and thus the entry of a pick or other tool intended to overcome the protection of the shackle engaged in the engagement housing. In order to prevent this, the undercut 118 is offset. This is indicated, for example, by a dashed line 142 that extends proximally from the inner sidewall 136 within the annular locking member 110 and intersects the outer inclined wall 130 of the annular locking member 112.

[0058] Finally, the shackle 106 includes a proximal annular locking member 114 attached to the strap 102. The annular locking member 114 has a distal surface 144 and a generally trapezoidal undercut 146 that extends radially upward from the surface 120 of the central member 116. The undercut 146 includes a generally flat outer wall 148, an inner wall 150 having a rounded entry point 152, and an inwardly inclined foundation wall 156. The undercut 146 is closed at its base 158. The spacing between the locking members 110 and 112 is indicated by FFF, and the spacing between the locking members 112 and 114 is indicated by BBB.

[0059] In FIG. 9, the engagement housing 104 is shown with the bore or passage 160 shown in broken lines. A portion of the engagement housing has been cut away in this view to represent the pin 162A in the housing (pin 162B has been removed to improve the clarity of the view). Pin 162A includes a tapered nose 164 that generally matches the tapered nose 42 of pins 38A and 38B. The base 166 of the pin 162A includes a rearwardly projecting pin spar 168 that generally coincides with the spar 126 of the annular locking member 112. The pin has a length CCC and a width DDD. As in the embodiment of the present invention of FIGS. 1-7, the pin length CCC must be greater than the spacing BBB between the annular members 112 and 114, and the pin width DDD is the engagement member Preferably, the overall trapezoidal undercut 118 outlet opening EEE is substantially equal to minimize the possibility that 104 may loosen and function. However, in the illustrated embodiment, the offset of the generally trapezoidal opening of the annular members 112 and 114 and the engagement of the spars 126 and 168 provide an important locking function in this embodiment, so that the annular Note that the spacing FFF between members 110 and 112 is greater than the spacing BBB between annular members 112 and 114.

[0060] Turning now to FIG. 10, the distal end of the shackle 106 is shown locked within the engagement housing 104. FIG. A portion of the shackle locked within the engagement housing is below the surface of the housing and is shown in this figure as a dashed line. As is apparent from this figure, when the shackle is first inserted into the housing, the pin 162A aligns with the straight undercut 132 (with the pin 162B aligned with a similar undercut on the opposite side of the shackle). The undercut moves past the pin as the shackle is advanced into the engagement housing. When the undercut is moved past the pin to place the pin within the spacing FFF between the annular locking member 110 and the annular locking member 112, the pin nose 164 causes the inclined wall on the outside of the undercut 118 to move. The shackle rotates as the sloping wall is moved along the pin until it contacts 130 and the pin reaches the proximal end of the undercut 118. At this point, the advancing shackle causes the pin 162A to emerge from the undercut 118 and moves through the spacing BBB between the annular locking member 112 and the annular locking member 114. As the shackle continues to move, when the shackle moves further into the engagement member, the pin nose 164 is moved until the inclined foundation wall 156 engages the pin and causes the shackle to bounce or rotate in the opposite direction. Enter the undercut 146 of the proximal annular locking member 114. When the proximal end 124 of the annular locking member 112 passes over the pin and the spar 168 at the base of the pin also passes over the spar 126 of the annular member 112, rotation causes the spars 126 and 168 to engage each other as shown. Thus, the shackle is irreversibly locked in the engagement housing. Thus, any attempt to twist the engagement housing to return the pin through the undercut is prevented by the engagement between the spars 126 and 168 and no matter how the force is withdrawn from the engagement housing. No matter how hard the pick or any tool attempts to enter the engagement housing, the entry lock member 110 is blocked by engagement between the base 166 of the pin and the proximal end of the lock member 112. And an offset between undercuts 118, 132, 146 (and thus no obvious line of sight).

[0061] FIGS. 11 and 12 are partial elevational views of the distal end of another embodiment of the unitary security seal 200 of the present invention showing an improvement of the embodiment of FIGS. The embodiment of FIGS. 11 and 12 includes three annular locking members 222, 242, and 266, and an optional distal plug 204, as will be discussed in more detail below. The security seal 200 also includes a shackle portion 201 having flat surfaces 202A and 202B (not shown) on either side of the shackle portion. The shackle portion 201 is joined to a flat strap 203 having an optional rectangular incision 205 so that when excessive force is applied to the strap, the strap narrows between the corner of the incision and the strap edge. Ensure the strap breaks in the degenerated area. Even when there is no notch, it is preferable that the strap is designed to break (in terms of thickness, width, material, etc.) when an excessive force is applied.

[0062] The strap 203 includes an engagement housing 207, such as the engagement housing 24 of the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6, or the engagement housing 104 of FIGS. Extends to the proximal end of the seal. A partial bottom perspective view of the engagement housing 207 with diametrically disposed pins 162A and 162B having a spar 262 at its base or rear edge is shown in FIG. As with the previous embodiments of the present invention, the security seal may also include a flag with a surface such as flag surfaces 26A and 26B of FIGS.

[0063] The security seal 200 includes an optional spherical plug 204 having an engagement slot 206A at its distal end, the engagement slot 206A being generally aligned with the longitudinal axis of the shackle portion. Extend across the diameter of the. The plug is spherical in the illustrated embodiment, but the overall top surface helps to prevent any attempt to capture the plug by the tool, as described below in connection with FIG. As long as it represents a dome-like surface, it may have other shapes. A substantially identical engagement slot 206B (not shown) is disposed on the opposite surface of the spherical plug, directly opposite the engagement slot 206A. The floor 208 of the engagement slots 206A and 206B is generally flat and coplanar with the respective flat surfaces 202A and 202B of the shackle portion 201. As shown, the spherical plug 204 is preferably attached to the distal end of the shackle portion 201 by a neck member 214, but such a neck member need not necessarily be included. In a preferred embodiment, the neck member is present and attempts to avoid the plug by pushing the plug away causes the plug to break, resulting in a highly brittle link that gives the seal an indication of tampering.

[0064] The engagement slot 206A (and its corresponding engagement slot 206B) includes optional inlet ramps 218 and 219 at the inlet 216A to the engagement slot. Slopes 218 and 219 help guide pins 162A and 162B into the engagement slots when the distal end of the security seal is advanced into the engagement housing. The engagement slot has side surfaces 220 and 221 and likewise facilitates undisturbed movement of the shackle distal end beyond the pin in the engagement housing as will be described in more detail below. For this purpose, an outlet ramp 223 can be provided at the proximal end of the engagement slot, as shown.

[0065] Proximal movement from the spherical plug 204 then faces the most distal locking member 222 of the shackle portion. The locking member 222 has a rounded nose portion or dome 224 that transitions into a portion 226 having a straight cylindrical outer profile. The outer locking member has substantially the same outer contour. The outer contour of the cylindrical portion 226 (and other locking member cylindrical portions) is preferably sized to achieve a tight but slidable fit within the bore 209 of the engagement housing. ing. A portion of the surface of the first locking member is formed in an undercut 228A having a floor 229A as shown. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, floor 229A is flush with shackle flat surface 202A to provide clearance for the lock housing pins, but then, as will be shown in more detail below, pin 162A and barrier In order to ensure proper engagement between the walls 252, a thickness is provided to form a step 233 at the inlet 245 to the locking member. The same undercut 228B and step are disposed on the underside of the locking member that is located approximately diametrically opposite the undercut 228A.

[0066] The undercut in the locking member 222 has a first generally flat wall 230 that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shackle portion, but is rounded at the distal end of the undercut. Can have corners 231. The flat wall 230 is also aligned with the corresponding widest proximal point of the slot 206A, which preferably coincides with the proximal end of the ramp 220 in the illustrated embodiment. The second wall 234 of the undercut 228A, which is a generally opposed flat wall 230, provides elasticity of the distal end of the shackle over the engagement pin in the engagement housing when the seal is closed and locked. In order to function as a constriction when promoting a sexual movement, the shape is irregular as shown. The second wall 234 has an inlet portion 235 that aligns with the wall 221 of the engagement slot 206A. The wall 234 tapers gently inward (towards the flat wall 230) to the transition point 236, at which it will be adequately spaced as the shackle moves past the pins in the engagement housing. To ensure that the wall 234 transitions to an outwardly sloped area 238.

[0067] Proceeding toward the proximal end of the security seal, it then faces the distance 240 (corresponding to the distance FFF in FIG. 8), followed by the middle annular locking member 242. The intermediate locking member includes an undercut 244 having an inlet 245 and an outlet 247 along the longitudinal axis of the shackle portion. The undercut has a floor 249. The undercut 244 extends from a first flat wall 246 that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis of the shackle portion and is generally aligned with the widest corresponding proximal portion of the undercut 228A. Further, the distal end of the second annular locking member 242 is preferably rounded as indicated at 250.

[0068] The intermediate undercut 244 comprises a highly brittle member in the form of an upright brittle barrier wall 252 that is integral with the rest of the security seal and formed from the same material as that portion. The highly brittle barrier wall 252 has opposing sides 254A and 254B, the upper edge of which is the outer contour 258 of the annular locking member 242 so that it can pass through the engagement housing without interfering with the edge of the passage. The shape is matched to Preferably, side 254B is slightly curved to help pass the undercut constriction over the pin. A proximally directed spar 260 is disposed at the proximal end of the barrier wall 252.

[0069] The upstanding barrier wall is preferably below the undercut inlet at an angle of about 10 ° to 20 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrowed passage at the undercut outlet. Inclined to. More preferably, the barrier wall slopes downward from the undercut inlet at an angle of about 15 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle. Also preferably, the pins 162A and 162B are of a predetermined width substantially equal to the narrowed passage width.

[0070] In operation of the security seal 200, the surface 254B of the highly brittle wall 252 has a wall spar 260 corresponding to the spar 126 in the previous embodiment of the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. It corresponds generally to the inclined wall 130 outside the undercut 118. The wall spar 260 interlocks with the pin base spar 262 (FIG. 13) to irreversibly lock the shackle in the engagement housing as described above with respect to the security seal embodiment of FIGS. However, when sufficient force is applied to the locked or engaged shackle to remove it from the engaging housing, the brittle wall 252 will be shown below as shown in FIGS. Rupture from undercut 244. In the less preferred state, the wall is at least distorted and bent and remains sufficiently bent to prevent reinsertion and relocking of the seal. If the security seal is then closed again by pushing the shackle member back through the engagement housing, it will not lock because there is no highly brittle wall (or bends in the disengaged state). This provides an indication that the security seal has been broken.

[0071] To ensure that the highly brittle barrier member shears as desired when the shackle is pushed out of the engagement housing, the unit security seal material has the proper tensile properties and break It preferably has elongation properties. For example, materials having a flexural modulus of at least about 300,000 psi and a break elongation at 73 ° of about 50% to 80%, preferably about 75% are currently preferred. One material that can be used in making the seal is a polyacetal sold by DuPont under the Delrin 500T trademark.

[0072] Continuing in the proximal direction, next faces the belt spacing 264, followed by a proximal locking member 266 having an undercut 267 similar to the undercut 118 of the embodiment of FIGS. To do. Preferably, the pins 162A and 162B have a predetermined length, and the spacing 264 between the intermediate locking member and the proximal locking member is shorter than the predetermined length of the pin.

[0073] Thus, the engagement process for this embodiment of the invention is generally similar to that described above with respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 7-10, with the side 254B of the highly brittle barrier wall 252 being It functions in the same manner as the outer sloping wall 130 and causes the shackle to bounce as the wall 252 moves along the pin, as described in more detail above with respect to the outer sloping wall 130.

[0074] Referring now to FIG. 14, an elevation view is shown in which the distal end of the shackle of the security seal of FIGS. 11 and 12 is disposed within the security seal engagement housing 207 (without pins 162A and 162B). As shown, the housing 207 is cut open to show the distal end of the shackle portion. As can be seen in this view, the dome-shaped nose portion 256 prevents entry of the engagement housing into the bore 209. Although the dome-shaped nose portion is shown adjacent to the upper edge 284 of the engagement housing in this view, no shackle can be removed from the engagement housing even if the nose portion is spaced from the upper edge. It helps to prevent pushing back. First, the dome-shaped nose portion makes it very difficult, if not impossible, to pass the tool through the bore 209 of the engagement housing passage to remove the shackle from the housing. It is. Second, the rounded exposed surface of the rounded nose portion makes it very difficult to capture the shackle with a tool such as a screwdriver 268 to push it back from the bore of the engagement housing. Thus, in this figure, the screwdriver 264 is shown grabbing the surface of the rounded nose portion, thereby preventing the shackle from attempting to push back from the engagement housing. Further, even without the nose portion 256, the seal can be configured such that the dome 224 of the lock member 222 protrudes from the housing in such a manner that the dome surface of the lock member makes it difficult to capture with a tool.

[0075] Further, even though the shackle can be pushed back from the bore of the engagement housing, this destroys the locking feature of the security seal, as described below with respect to FIGS. If a security seal is used to indicate that a sealed container or other item has not been tampered with, this ensures that a broken seal cannot be illegally reused.

FIG. 15 shows another security seal embodiment of the present invention shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, which replaces the dome-shaped nose portion 256 with an annular locking member 222, An arrow member 270 having elastic wings 272 and 274 protruding beyond the outer contour 268 of 242 and 266 is used. The arrow member 270 is joined to the distal end of the shackle portion 201 by a highly brittle link 276.

[0077] Thus, when the distal end of the security seal according to the present invention is pushed into the passage in the engagement housing, the wings 272 and 274 of the arrow member 270 are compressed inward and emerge from the bottom of the passage, Returning to its original shape, the lower side surfaces 280 and 282 of the wing engage the upper edge 284 (FIG. 14) of the engagement housing. When trying to push the shackle back from the engagement housing, the underside of the wing gets caught on the upper edge of the engagement housing and the brittle link breaks when the breakage point of the brittle link 276 is reached . Then, when the shackle is reinserted into the engagement housing, the arrow member is of course missing, providing a visual indication that the security seal has been tampered with.

[0078] Turning now to FIG. 16A, an enlarged shackle portion 201 is shown, the majority of the engagement housing is removed, and the spar 262 of the pin 162A is replaced with the spar 260 of the highly brittle barrier wall 252 of the housing. They are engaged with each other. Next, when a force is applied to the distal end of the shackle in direction "F", the highly brittle barrier wall 252 begins to tear from the floor 224A of the undercut 228A, as shown in FIGS. 16B to 16E. The large piece continues until it breaks from the undercut floor and breaks away as shown in FIG. 16F. When there are no more brittle members, the security seal lock function is broken and the seal is displayed. When the seal is re-installed, simply apply light pressure in direction “F” to remove the shackle from the housing, and the locking function provided by the brittle barrier wall can be easily reconfirmed to break It is confirmed that there is no.

[0079] All references, including publications, patent applications, and patents, mentioned in this specification are individually and specifically shown to incorporate each reference by reference herein, and are fully To the same extent as specified, it is incorporated herein by reference.

[0080] In the context of describing the present invention, the use of the terms "a", "an", and "the" and similar references (especially in the context of the appended claims) is specifically indicated herein. It should be construed to include both singular and plural unless the context clearly dictates otherwise. The recitation of value ranges herein is intended only to serve as a concise way of referring individually to each individual value falling within the range, unless otherwise indicated herein. Each individual value is incorporated herein as if it were individually listed herein. All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples or exemplary language (eg, “such as”) given herein is intended only to better illustrate the invention, and unless otherwise indicated in the claims, No limitation of the scope of the invention is posed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element essential to the practice of the invention.

[0081] Preferred embodiments of the present invention include the best modes known to the inventors for practicing the present invention and are described herein. It should be understood that the illustrated embodiments are examples only and should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention.

Claims (26)

  1. With shackle,
    An engagement housing having a passage for receiving the shackle;
    At least one locking member of the shackle having at least one undercut extending from a surface of the locking member to an undercut floor, the undercut being generally along a longitudinal axis of the shackle A locking member having an inlet and an outlet;
    At least one pin disposed in the passage of the engagement housing that is oriented to extend into the undercut when the locking member of the shackle passes through the passage;
    An inlet and outlet for engaging the pin so that the undercut resists removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to rupture a brittle member. A unit-type security seal comprising a highly brittle member disposed between the two.
  2.   The unit-type security seal according to claim 1, wherein the highly brittle member is an upright wall protruding from the floor of the undercut.
  3.   The upstanding wall is inclined from the inlet of the undercut at an angle of about 10 ° to 20 ° with respect to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrowed passage at the outlet of the undercut. The unit type security seal according to claim 2.
  4.   The upright wall is inclined from the inlet of the undercut at an angle of about 15 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrowed passage at the outlet of the undercut. The unit type security seal of 2.
  5.   The shackle is removed from the engagement housing until the upright wall has a proximal edge and the pin has a rear edge and sufficient force is applied to rupture the brittle member. The unitary security seal of claim 2, wherein the proximal edge of the wall engages the rear edge of the pin to resist.
  6.   A wall spar is disposed at the proximal end of the wall and a base spar is disposed at the rear edge of the pin to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing. 6. A unitary security seal according to claim 5, wherein a spar interlocks with a spar at the base of the pin.
  7.   4. A unitary security seal according to claim 3, wherein the pin has a predetermined width substantially equal to the width of the narrowed passage.
  8.   At least one distal locking member; at least one proximal locking member spaced longitudinally from the distal locking member along the shackle; and the proximal locking member The unitary security seal of claim 1, comprising at least one highly brittle member disposed in the undercut.
  9.   The unit-type security seal according to claim 8, wherein the pin has a predetermined length, and an interval between the lock members is shorter than a predetermined length of the pin.
  10.   The unitary security seal of claim 1, wherein undercuts of at least two adjacent locking members are offset from each other.
  11.   Each locking member has a pair of generally diametrically opposed undercuts, wherein at least a pair of opposing pins are disposed in the engagement housing, and the shackle locking member passes through the passage The unitary security seal of claim 1, wherein the unitary security seal is oriented to engage an diametrically located undercut.
  12.   12. The shackle has a central member with at least two opposing generally flat surfaces to form an increasing step in the undercut, each containing the highly brittle member. Unit security seal.
  13.   The unitary security seal according to claim 1, wherein the highly brittle member is bent or distorted when a sufficient force is applied when attempting to remove the shackle from the engagement housing.
  14.   The unit-type security seal according to claim 1, comprising a surface for applying at least one label or a surface for assigning serial numbers.
  15. With shackle,
    An engagement housing having a passage for receiving the shackle;
    At least two locking members spaced apart from each other along the shackle, each having at least one undercut extending from a surface of the locking member to an undercut floor; Each having a locking member having an inlet and an outlet generally along the longitudinal axis of the shackle;
    At least one pin disposed in the passage of the engagement housing having a nose portion oriented to engage the undercut when the shackle passes through the passage;
    At least one of the undercuts and the inlet opening at an angle of about 10 ° to 20 ° with respect to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrow passage at the outlet of the undercut. A highly brittle wall member extending between the outlet openings for guiding the shackle through the pin and tearing the brittle member when the shackle is advanced into the engagement housing; A unitary security seal in which the highly brittle member is positioned to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to the housing.
  16.   The brittle wall member has a proximal end with a wall spar and the pin has a rear edge with a base spar to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing. The unitary security seal of claim 15, wherein the wall spar meshes with the base spar of the pin.
  17.   The unit-type security seal according to claim 15, wherein the pin has a predetermined length, and an interval between the lock members is shorter than a predetermined length of the pin.
  18. With shackle,
    An engagement housing having a passage for receiving the shackle;
    At least proximal and distal locking members spaced along the shackle, wherein a plug at the distal end of the shackle prevents access to the passage of the engagement housing The plug has an engagement slot having a floor that extends across the spherical plug generally along the longitudinal axis of the shackle;
    Each of the locking members has at least one undercut opening to the outer surface of the locking member having the corresponding floor in communication with each other and the engagement slot of the plug;
    A locking member in which the undercuts of adjacent locking members are offset from each other;
    At least one pin disposed within the passage of the engagement housing oriented to engage the engagement slot of the plug and the undercut of the locking member when the shackle passes through the passage; A unit-type security seal.
  19.   The unitary security seal of claim 18, comprising a highly brittle link connecting the plug to the shackle.
  20.   The proximal lock member undercut engages the pin so as to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to rupture the brittle member. The unit-type security seal according to claim 18, comprising a highly brittle member.
  21.   The engagement slot is adapted to direct the pin into the engagement slot when the distal end of the security seal is advanced into the engagement housing. The unitary security seal of claim 18, comprising an inlet ramp at the inlet.
  22.   Each of the engagement members has a second undercut opening located generally diametrically opposite the first undercut opening, the plug being a generally rounded top surface, and the surface of the spherical plug The unitary security seal of claim 18 having a second engagement slot located diametrically opposite the first engagement slot.
  23.   21. The unitary security seal of claim 20, wherein the bottom surface of the engagement slot is generally flat and there is an increased step at the entrance to the proximal lock member undercut.
  24. With shackle,
    An engagement housing having a passage for receiving the shackle;
    At least proximal and distal locking members spaced along the shackle, each of the locking members having at least one undercut opening to the outer surface of the locking member; A locking member in which the undercuts of adjacent locking members are offset from each other;
    At least one pin disposed in the passage that is directed to engage the undercut when the shackle passes through the passage;
    An arrow member having a wing protruding beyond the outer contour of the distal locking member joined to the distal end of the shackle by a highly brittle link, wherein the wing enters the engaging housing Engaging the upper edge of the engagement after the wing emerges from the housing passage so that it can be compressed inward to pass through and resists removal of the shackle from the engagement housing. An arrow member having sufficient resilience that can return to its original shape as a whole when it emerges from the housing passage to fit together,
    A unitary security seal that provides an indication that pushing the shackle from the housing ruptures the brittle member and breaks the security seal.
  25.   An undercut of the proximal locking member and the inlet opening at an angle of about 10 ° to 20 ° relative to the longitudinal axis of the shackle to form a narrowed passage at the outlet of the undercut A highly brittle wall member extending between the outlet openings for guiding the shackle through the pin and tearing the brittle member when the shackle is advanced into the engagement housing; 25. The unitary security seal of claim 24, wherein the highly brittle member is positioned to resist removal of the shackle from the engagement housing until sufficient force is applied to the housing.
  26.   The unit type security seal according to claim 24, wherein the pin has a predetermined length, and a distance between the lock members is shorter than a predetermined length of the pin.
JP2010501294A 2007-03-12 2008-12-03 Improved unit security seal Expired - Fee Related JP4933660B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

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US11/950,094 US7703817B2 (en) 2007-03-12 2007-12-04 Unitized security seal
US11/950,094 2007-12-04
PCT/US2008/085401 WO2009073721A1 (en) 2007-12-04 2008-12-03 Improved unitized security seal

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JP2010522678A true JP2010522678A (en) 2010-07-08
JP4933660B2 JP4933660B2 (en) 2012-05-16

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US (1) US7703817B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2225167B1 (en)
JP (1) JP4933660B2 (en)
BR (1) BRPI0807729A2 (en)
CA (1) CA2676431C (en)
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JP2012253909A (en) * 2011-06-03 2012-12-20 Daiwa Kasei Kogyo Kk Belt clamp
CN103696627B (en) * 2014-01-08 2016-07-13 苏州泰盾施封设备有限公司 A kind of can the plastic paper strip seal device of twice use
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EP2225167A4 (en) 2012-04-25
CA2676431A1 (en) 2009-06-11
CA2676431C (en) 2010-10-19
WO2009073721A1 (en) 2009-06-11
EP2225167A1 (en) 2010-09-08
BRPI0807729A2 (en) 2014-06-03
JP4933660B2 (en) 2012-05-16
EP2225167B1 (en) 2013-02-13
US20090072553A1 (en) 2009-03-19
US7703817B2 (en) 2010-04-27
MX2009009129A (en) 2009-11-23

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