JP2009511775A - Prefabricated composite flooring - Google Patents

Prefabricated composite flooring Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2009511775A
JP2009511775A JP2008534063A JP2008534063A JP2009511775A JP 2009511775 A JP2009511775 A JP 2009511775A JP 2008534063 A JP2008534063 A JP 2008534063A JP 2008534063 A JP2008534063 A JP 2008534063A JP 2009511775 A JP2009511775 A JP 2009511775A
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Japan
Prior art keywords
flooring
molded
beams
formwork
board
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JP2008534063A
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Japanese (ja)
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ウィンドウ,ジョン
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ヘンリー テクノロジー リミテッドHenley Technology Ltd.
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Priority to GB0520482A priority Critical patent/GB2430945A/en
Application filed by ヘンリー テクノロジー リミテッドHenley Technology Ltd. filed Critical ヘンリー テクノロジー リミテッドHenley Technology Ltd.
Priority to PCT/GB2006/003474 priority patent/WO2007042748A1/en
Publication of JP2009511775A publication Critical patent/JP2009511775A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B5/00Floors; Floor construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted therefor
    • E04B5/02Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units
    • E04B5/04Load-carrying floor structures formed substantially of prefabricated units with beams or slabs of concrete or other stone-like material, e.g. asbestos cement
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/30Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure
    • E04C2/38Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure with attached ribs, flanges, or the like, e.g. framed panels
    • E04C2/384Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure with attached ribs, flanges, or the like, e.g. framed panels with a metal frame

Abstract

  The present invention relates to a prefabricated composite flooring and a method for producing the same. The flooring can be produced at the factory. The formwork (10) is made from cold rolled sheet metal members (24, 32) that have been soldered or welded to form the formwork weir. The concrete ceiling board (12) is molded in a mold (10) on a smooth molding surface to be cast. The concrete ceiling plate (12) to be cast is formed of a first bent inner edge of the formwork (10) and a reinforcing bar or wire whose ends are fixed to opposite side faces and ends of the formwork (10). A lower end or hanger suspended below the bottom of a first grid (26) and a row of metal beams (18) arranged in parallel to each other that are soldered or welded to the formwork (10) at opposite ends. 70) is incorporated. A packed bed is then made from a mass (16) or granular material that fills most of the exposed height of a row of metal beams (18) arranged parallel to each other. The concrete floor board (14) is injection-molded into the mold (10) on the upper surface of the packed bed, and is bent at the upper inside edge of the mold (10) and on the opposite side and end of the mold (10). A reinforcing bar or wire second grid (28) to which the ends are fixed and a fixing member (60) fixed to the upper end or the upper end of a beam (18) arranged parallel to each other are incorporated. The top surface of the concrete floor board (14) is a floor-finished product with a float-finish and does not require any smoothing. The bottom surface of the ceiling panel (12) to be cast has a finish defined by the surface into which it is poured, and when the material is used in the construction of a multi-layer building, the floor material is not further processed. Appears as the ceiling of the lower floor room.

Description

  The present invention relates to a prefabricated composite flooring, and more particularly, to a prefabricated composite flooring as a member of a prefabricated construction method or a steel frame construction method for quickly building a building for commercial or industrial use. The present invention also relates to a method for producing the prefabricated composite flooring.

  Prefabricated construction is built from prefabricated wall panels that are screwed or soldered on site to build the architectural framework. Prefabricated wall panels include pre-installed window frames, door frames, electrical connections and / or plumbing connections to reduce on-site construction and finishing time, and cranes and other lifting devices in typical prefabricated construction processes And then assembled to the field by connecting to a robust structure. If the building is a steel frame building, the girder is similarly raised to the installation position on the site and connected to form a rigid frame on which predetermined exterior and interior wall panels are fixed.

  Such architectural floors may be hollow or solid. "Hollow" floor means a floor made of conventional planks or panels, usually made of wood or composite materials such as veneer plywood, wood compaction board, and directional particle board. Placed on a support structure such as wood beams or metal girders. "Solid floor" means traditional concrete floor.

  Solid floors are preferred for their soundproofing performance and are often designated as collective buildings such as apartments, hotels, student facilities and commercial and industrial facilities. In general, solid floors are basically made of concrete or reinforced concrete and are injected on site. The edge of a solid floor composed of the injection of hydrous concrete is defined by bricks or blocks that define the edge of the building where the floor is placed, the room in the building, or by the border placed on the site. The border may be removed once the concrete has solidified or may be buried in place.

  A solid floor may also be constructed by laying pre-formed concrete floor panels. The panel is molded from the mold away from the site and usually incorporates a metal reinforcement bar. They are often molded with longitudinal holes and grooves to reduce the total weight, and often in a slightly convex shape to help distribute stress in the final building. Ultimately, however, each array of pre-formed solid floor panels is covered with the applied cement to smooth out surface defects and irregularities. The coated surface will not allow construction workers to enter until the cement has dried and solidified, which will inevitably stop the construction process that requires field work, or the coated surface will be solid enough to step in and no damage will occur. Until you change to another area will be delayed.

  EP-A-881067 discloses a prefabricated composite wall or flooring and a method for its production. As a matter of fact, the strength requirements of walls and flooring and in particular the fire performance specifications are widely different, so the disclosure of EP-A-881067 is that a single product is placed vertically into a wall, placed sideways on the floor Don't get me wrong. Although wall and flooring are quite different products, EP-A-881067 can share a common design concept. Accordingly, the following summary of the relevant disclosure of EP-A-881067 is limited to the disclosure of flooring only.

  EP-A-881067 flooring is a prefabricated flooring in the sense that it is molded off-site and then transported to the building site under construction. It is a composite flooring in the sense that it is not a concrete molded single piece that is a typical solid flooring. It is molded as two concrete plates separated by a space, or a barrier (insulation and / or sound insulation). The two concrete plates are molded one at a time in a metal mold having a bottom surface and side surfaces. The bottom surface gives a smooth finish to the lower surface of the previously molded plate, while the side of the mold forms a side dam for the wet concrete of the previous plate. A corrugated plate or a row of metal I-beams is placed on the top surface of the previously molded plate to form a surface that supports the bottom surface of the next molded plate. The side surface of the second molded plate is defined by a dam plate used to define the side surface of the first molded plate, that is, the side surface of the metal mold. If desired, edge details such as peripheral indentations may be added to the second mold plate by placing a formwork border on the periphery of the mold prior to molding the second concrete plate. After molding and after the concrete is poured, the molded composite flooring is lifted from the formwork and all the formwork borders are removed to obtain the final composite flooring product. Therefore, the corrugated valley or I-beam bottom flange is partially embedded in the cast concrete of the first (bottom) molded plate, and the top of the corrugated sheet or I-beam top flange is the second (top). It is partially embedded in the poured concrete on the lower surface of the molded board. The composite structure includes a gap between the two molded plates. The gap may be filled with a heat insulating or soundproofing material such as a foamed resin composition if desired.

The thermal insulation and soundproofing performance of EP-A-881067 composite flooring still has many points to be improved. For soundproofing, the entire length of the I-beam or metal corrugated plate that joins the upper and lower molded plates provides a direct transmission path for sound from one sheet to the other. It does not prevent any transmission of sound from the specified floor to the ceiling defined by the bottom of the lower plate. Fire resistance is also very poor. In the first test, the bottom plate quickly peeled off the metal corrugated plate or I-beam, and the monolithic structure of the composite flooring was lost immediately. The composite flooring of EP-A-881067 is therefore not at all compatible with British Standard 476, 21 parts: 1987, Section 7. This refractory standard maintains its integral structure even after one side of the flooring has been exposed to a furnace temperature that rises above 1,150 ° C for more than 4 hours, with an average temperature rise on the side away from the furnace of 140 ° C. The maximum temperature rise is required not to exceed 180 ° C. The test results are reported as the time elapsed until one of the commonly detected indicators is disqualified due to the loss of monolithic structure of the test sample or the temperature rise away from the furnace.
The object of the present invention is to create a prefabricated composite flooring which exhibits good heat and sound resistance and has performance characteristics much better than EP-A-881067.

The upper and lower surfaces of the composite flooring are preferably smooth. Thus, the floor finish is preferably smooth enough to be suitable for tiles and carpets without flooring in the field, while the lower surface is preferably smooth enough to appear decoratively smooth in a lower floor room or as a patterned ceiling finish. Has a good surface finish.
Most importantly, however, a further object of the present invention is to create a prefabricated composite flooring that is compatible with the fire resistance required by British Standard 476, 21 Part: 1987, Section 7.

  The present invention provides a prefabricated composite flooring as defined in claim 1. The present invention also provides a method of manufacturing such a flooring as defined in claim 26.

  One of the properties not found in the flooring described in EP-A-881067 of the flooring of the invention is according to the invention that the formwork forms a permanent part of the flooring, whereas EP-A-881067. According to it is a temporary form in which the flooring is removed prior to use. The flooring formwork of the present invention is soldered or welded to the ends of the grid of reinforcing bars that ultimately reinforce the ceiling board. According to the present invention, the metal beam having a gap for receiving the weight of the two molded plates is soldered or welded to the metal of the mold at the end. The results show that the fire resistance test is considerably better than EP-A-881067 and can pass the test specified in British Standard 476, 21 parts: 1987, 7 without disqualification over the test time of 4 hours. It becomes a composite flooring. At first, it seemed preferable to solder or weld the grid of reinforcing bars that ultimately reinforce the floorboard material to the formwork, but surprisingly only the reinforcing bars of the molded ceiling board are soldered to the formwork or It has been found that the excellent fire resistance described above is obtained when the reinforcing bars of the molded floorboard are welded and removed from the formwork. Thus, by releasing the ends of the reinforcing bars of the floor board, the floor board can be manufactured as a floating floor, and therefore the composite flooring of the present invention can be given excellent soundproofing performance. The fire resistance should theoretically be further improved by connecting the end of the floorboard reinforcing rod to the formwork, but at the expense of increased sound propagation through the composite flooring, the preferred composite flooring of the present invention is It was established that only the reinforcement mesh of the ceiling panel was soldered or welded to the formwork.

  The support beam serves two different functions. Support for the second (top) board is essential on the strength and fire resistance building code of the load bearing floor. It can be satisfactory simply by having a top plate resting on the beam, but more preferably by embedding the upper edge of the supporting beam in the length of the material, or on the upper edge of the supporting beam in the length direction. By being fixed and having a fixing member embedded in the top plate, it is physically fixed to the beam. According to the present invention, the building rule standard concerning the strength and fire resistance of the suspended ceiling can be exceeded with a considerable margin, but the support of the first (bottom) plate can lower the standard. Necessary support can be achieved by embedding the bottom edge in the longitudinal direction of the support beam in the bottom plate or by supporting the suspension member with the associated support beam and embedding in the bottom plate.

  The soundproofing material can be completely or partially filled in the space between the two molded plates, which can be of the same or different material and of the same or different thickness. The top plate must be cemented material such as concrete. The bottom plate may be a cement-based material such as concrete or a gypsum-based material. A typical size is that the individual plates are 50 to 100 mm thick and the spacing is 150 to 300 mm. Preferably, each plate has a thickness of about 65 mm and a spacing of about 225 mm. Other preferred or selectable characteristics of the invention will become apparent from the following description of the drawings.

  The prefabricated composite flooring of FIG. 1 consists of a cold rolled sheet metal frame member and consists of a mold 10 that is welded or soldered to form a precisely sized and proportional end dam for the flooring. As will be described in particular below, a composite floor assembly is constructed which consists of two separate layers of injection reinforced concrete separated from this formwork 10 by a filler.

  The whole picture of the layered filling structure of the mold 10 is shown in FIG. The lower layer 12 of the poured concrete and the upper layer 14 of the poured concrete are separated by a space including a fairly low density layer such as a lightweight wall material 16. The wall 16 is supported and separated by a row of parallel cold-rolled sheet metal beams 18. Its exact shape is shown in FIGS. 2A and 2C. The parallel-isolated beams 18 are welded or soldered to the mold 10 at their opposite ends, and the cold rolled sheet metal L-shaped parts 20 and 22 are each of the mold members constituting the beam 18 and the mold 10. A runner that is welded or soldered to 24 and supports the wall material 16.

  The poured concrete bottom plate 12 is poured around a reinforcing grid 26 of rods or lines welded or soldered all around the formwork 10. A similar bar or wire grid 28 provides reinforcement for the upper layer 14 of poured concrete. The fact that the bar or wire 28 is soldered or welded to the formwork 10 at its end has become very important in providing fire resistance of the composite flooring according to the present invention. Ceilings and floorboards having these bars or wires as internal reinforcements are preferably integrally connected to the formwork 10 in a soldered or welded row connection extending around the entire circumference of the composite flooring. Further, the molding plate (ceiling and floor) can be embedded in the mold 10 by opening the unsolidified material of the molding plate at the end of the mold 10 around the groove of the C-type cold-rolled portion, preferably the material of the C-type portion. Can be significantly improved by flowing through the holes. For example, the poured concrete of the bottom and top concrete plates extends through the holes 25, 31 formed in the mold members 24 and 30 into the internal voids of the mold members 24 (FIG. 2A) and 30 (FIG. 3), so that the mold is It becomes an integral part of the composite flooring. Beams 18 that support the wall 16 and are separated from each other in parallel are also embedded in the upper and lower ends of the concrete of the bottom and top layers 12 and 14, which enhance the reinforcement of these concrete plates and the strength of the finished flooring.

  Although the corner connections of the formwork 10 must be retained, the formwork members 24 and 30 (FIGS. 2A and 3) may possibly have the same part of each other. An alternative is shown in FIG. 3, where the formwork member 30 is placed within the generally C-shaped portion of the formwork member 24 of FIG. 2A and the end plate 32 is at the height of the formwork 10. The mold member 30 is soldered or welded.

  The construction method of the prefabricated composite flooring of FIG. 1 will be described. First, the mold 10 is made at the factory. The mold members 24 and 30 are laser cut with extremely high accuracy. The formwork member is then preferably placed on a factory floor or table and held in a jig and soldered accurately to the size and ratio of the intended final flooring. The bond 18 is soldered or welded to the opposite formwork member 30, while the formwork 10 is held in a jig, thus the accuracy with which this operation is completed is far greater than that achieved at the construction site. I'm winning. The first bar or wire grid 26 is then soldered or welded into place. Each of the bar or line grids 26 and 28 is of a reinforcing bar or line that is soldered into a square or rectangular grid of intersecting bars or lines, such as a reinforcing net sold under the trademark WELDMESH. A mesh is sufficient. If desired, the top grid 28 may be more heavily loaded than the bottom grid 26. This is because the bottom grid 26 becomes part of the ceiling of the lower room in the final high-rise building, and is subject to more gradual building standards. The bottom grid 26 is held all around the formwork 10 and all the assembly so far, including this stage of flooring, is done in an upside down assembly, and the bar or line grid 26 is the final flange 24A and the final assembly. Are soldered to the portions that become the bottom surfaces 30a of the mold members 24 and 30, respectively. If desired, the grid 26 may be a pre-stretched line 26 as described in GB0515075.0 instead of a pre-soldered mesh of bars or lines. Each line is drawn from a hole in the outer wall of the mold members 24 and 30 and then soldered from the outside of the mold 10. Extending the reinforcing grid 26 in advance is also repeated on the reinforcing grid 28, and is possible because the mold 10 is firmly fixed to a jig on the factory floor or table. However, pre-stretching the grid is not absolutely necessary for the composite floor construction method according to the present invention, and an alternative or additional method of pre-stretching to create a very stable formwork structure is shown in FIG. This can also be achieved by incorporating the brace 32. Each brace 32 is made by unwinding a sheet of metal from a roll. If a thin ridge 34 is formed on the metal sheet of the brace 32 by cold forming the sheet at the apex over almost the entire length of the line 34 shown in FIG. 4A, the tendency of the brace sheet to be rewound is almost Or it is completely removed. Each brace 32 is soldered or welded to the inverted flange portion of the mold 10 at its end, and preferably the brace 32 is subjected to a slight stretch that ensures complete stabilization of the mold 10 when cold. The brace 32 generally extends from corner to corner of the mold 10, or may be placed in any triangular shape.

  When the welding of the mold 10, grid 26 and optional brace 32 is complete, the mold 10 is transferred to a smooth, flat molding surface and awaits the molding of the bottom layer 12 with poured concrete. The molding surface (not shown) can be any smooth and flat surface coated with a concrete release agent. It may be a flat metal surface, for example a smooth flat surface of a steel plate placed in a factory. Mirror steel may be used for a smoother molded finish of the poured concrete. Alternatively, the molded surface may be textured to give an attractive textured appearance to the lower surface of the molded floor that becomes the ceiling of the room under the finished building. Of course, any texture must be carefully adjusted so that it does not become an obstacle to release.

  Alternatively, the molding surface may preferably be covered with an adhesive that can adhere to the concrete poured into the mold 10, for example with paper or textiles wetted by spraying or the like. By doing so, the bottom surface of the finished flooring is finished with paper or fabric, giving the best painted surface for the final ceiling decoration.

  The concrete layer 12 may be injected as a single layer of liquid concrete or may be stacked in multiple layers. For example, a first layer of granogel coating about 5 mm thick may be injected first and then 25 mm of C30 grade concrete. Lightweight or perforated concrete is preferred, and the depth of the concrete is preferably slightly deeper than the level of runners 20 and 22 as shown by dashed line 36 in FIGS. 2A and 3. It should be noted that the concrete layer 12 flows through the holes 25 into the end recesses 38 and 40, which are made in the form of the formwork members 24 and 30, respectively (see FIGS. 2A and 3). Care must be taken to ensure that these indentations are completely filled in order to obtain maximum strength.

  While the injected concrete has not yet solidified, the rows of wall members 16 are lined up on the runners 20 and 22 between the beams 18 arranged in parallel next to each other, and the floor portion defined by the formwork 10 is completely formed. Meet. The wall member 16 is preferably wetted with a water-based adhesive prior to installation to strengthen the adhesion to the concrete and is preferably pushed over the runners 20 and 22 into the unsolidified concrete until stable and protrudes the concrete. Is extruded between adjacent wall members and adheres better to the wall member 16. The upper end of the wall member 16 forms a generally smooth surface for the upper injection of the concrete 14 as shown by the dashed line 42 in FIGS. 2A and 3.

  However, before the upper layer of the concrete 14 is poured, a second grid 28 of bars or wires is placed on the protruding upper surface of the parallelly arranged beams 18 and bent into the inside of the formwork member 24. And it is soldered to the flange part 46 bent inside the formwork member 30. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 4A, there is an oblique cruciform brace 32, preferably soldered, on the grid 28.

  The concrete top layer 14 to be poured is then poured onto the wall member 16. The concrete flows into any gaps between the wall members and flows through the holes in the formwork member 24, shown in FIG. 2A and FIG. Increase stability and hardness. The injected concrete upper layer 14 flows around each wall member 16, but is not sufficient to fill any gaps between the concrete upper and lower layers 14 and 12, and is simply injected in FIGS. 2A and 3 for simplicity. The seepage of the upper layer 14 of the concrete below the upper layer of the wall member 16 is not shown. The concrete upper layer 14 may have the same thickness as the lower layer 12 or a different thickness. In FIG. 2A and FIG. 3, the upper layer is shown with a thinner thickness. The top surface of the top layer 14 of concrete that is poured last is finished with a power float to create a finished floor member that has a surface finish that is at least as smooth as the final finish of conventional building technology. This finish is smooth enough so that the finished building does not require a final top leveling for carpets, tiles or laminated floors.

  In order to lift the finished floor member from the molding surface, lifting holes, rivets and other working structures are formed around the formwork 10, and after the concrete has solidified, the floor member is directly lorry or other transported with suitable working equipment. They are loaded onto cars and transported to the final site under construction. The accuracy of the dimensions of the floor members produced in the factory conditions is such that it can be practically guaranteed with the correct placement on the screws and screw holes preset on or in the building under construction.

  There are many alternatives to the above construction method. The function of the wall member 16 is to reduce the total weight of the floor member because it has a lower density than concrete. For this reason, the use of lightweight wall members is described in the above embodiment. Wall members made of fire husks or porous aggregates such as those sold under the trademark THERMALITE ™ are very suitable. Member 16 is used to increase the thickness of the floor member without sound insulation and undue increase in total weight, and many other materials can be used for this purpose. For example, foamed polystyrene, balsa material, asbestos, a glass fiber mat, a hollow molded plastic box, or the like may be used instead of the wall member. The member 16 can even be replaced by a hollow box made of waxed dumbpole. When using plastic or cardboard boxes, it is preferable to fill them with sound absorbing materials such as asbestos, glass fiber mats, shredded newspaper, paper clay, compressed soot, recycled rubber particles or other lightweight products from the waste recycling industry. Alternatively, the longitudinal space between the layers 12 and 14 below and above the concrete to be poured can be filled with a light grain material such as chopped soot, granulated waste newspaper, hollow sphere, or polystyrene grain. Good. A wood board such as wood board or plywood board or directional particle board is then placed on the filler to form a generally flat surface 42 into which the concrete top layer 14 is poured, and all the rest of the assembly steps are as described above. It is. If the loose or granular filler can be compressed or does not completely fill the space separating the two molded concrete plates 12 and 14 of the finished floor member, the runner of FIG. Preferably, runners (not shown) similar to 20 and 22 are incorporated.

  The completed floor member is very easily and safely transported and is protected from accidental end damage by the formwork 10 which is the main part of the building, so little additional protection during transport is required.

  As seen in FIGS. 1, 3, 3A, and 4, the mold member 30 is formed on its end plate 32 with a flange 33 bent outward. Although not shown, a similar outwardly bent flange can be formed on the mold member 24 if desired. The function of the outwardly bent flange is to support the floor member during transportation and in the final building. In the building, the floor member is placed over a set of prefabricated wallboards that are originally suspended by flanges before being screwed, barbed or soldered for final fixation.

  The upper surface of the floor member is as smooth as a power floating worker can make, which is as smooth as a conventional floor that is leveled in the field. The bottom surface is as smooth as the molding surface on which the floor member is made, and is a very high level of smoothness because of factory conditions. Or you may coat | cover with paper by shape | molding on paper as mentioned above. Or you may coat | cover with the textile fabric by shape | molding on the textile fabric adhere | attached on the lower surface of the floor member after shaping | molding, or by shape | molding on the textile molding surface, As a result, it becomes an eye-catching ceiling fabric.

  The embodiment of FIGS. 1-4 uses the soundproofing material shown in FIGS. 2, 2A and 3 as a wall member, and fills the space between the lower and upper concrete plates 12 and 14 entirely. This results in a floor member with good sound insulation in all wavelength regions and at the same time better insulation, but the sound insulation should fill less than half of the total space between the first and second concrete plates. 5-11 show seven embodiments of the prefabricated composite floor member according to the present invention, respectively, wherein the soundproofing material is in a layer limited to the lower part of the space between the first and second concrete plates, on the soundproofing material. Has space. 5 to 11, the same reference numerals as in FIGS. 1 to 4 are used as much as possible, and the following description is limited to differences between different embodiments.

  The soundproofing material shown in FIGS. 5 to 11 is represented by a row of mats 50 of a soundproofing material such as asbestos. It can be understood that any alternative special soundproofing material may be used, or any other material discussed hereinabove. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4, the beam 18 has a J shape as shown in FIG. 2C, and the upward flange at the bottom of J is used as a protrusion on which the wall member 16 is placed. A simpler shape of the beam 18A shown in FIG. Preferably, the liquid level into which the concrete underlayer 12 is poured is marked on the beam 18A by writing (not shown) or by a hole (not shown) drilled in the vertical wall of the beam 18A before assembly. It is injected until it reaches the top or bottom of the written mark or the drilled hole. As in the previous embodiment, the reinforcing bar or wire first and second grids 26 and 28 are soldered to the formwork as is the end of the beam 18A. After the concrete bottom plate is molded to the required depth, the soundproof mat 50 is placed between the beams, and the plate 52 is placed on a longitudinal support runner 54 that is soldered or welded to the support beams. A similar runner 56 is spotted by soldering or welding inside the mold member 24. The plate 52 serves as the basis for the injection of the second concrete plate 14 which has been previously injected and finished with floats.

  The space above the mat 50 in FIG. 5 reduces the propagation of sound between the upper and lower concrete plates 14 and 12 to some extent and naturally increases the thermal insulation of the composite flooring in FIG. Splitting the space longitudinally into the relatively narrow horizontal grooves by the beams 18A reduces lateral sound propagation along the flooring, but the beams 18A themselves are directly connected from one floorboard to the other and sound. It becomes a propagation path and a propagation path of sound of a specific frequency. This sound propagation path is interrupted by dividing the beam into two small groups. That is, the beam 18B embedded in the end of the top concrete plate 14 shown in FIG. 6 and the beam 18C embedded in the lower end of the bottom concrete plate 12. In FIG. 6, the beams 18B and 18C are shown as having a J-shaped portion, and the more inward flange portion of this J-shaped portion is buckled along the unsupported end relative to the simple C-shaped portion of FIG. To increase the stability and strength of the beam. However, as the beams 18B and 18C in FIG. 6 are arranged one above the other, a wall member that necessarily depends on the concrete top plate 14 or a wall upright from the concrete bottom plate 12 that occupies less than half between the two concrete plates. Have a member. The reinforcing effect of the beams 18B and 18C is remarkably improved by using a wide beam as shown in FIG. 7, and the beams 18B are shifted so that they are brought into contact with one surface of the beam 18C. By having a relatively small distance between a pair of adjacent beams as shown in FIG. 7, the bending moment transmitted from one beam to the other at the outer end of the formwork is maximum for the maximum force. Become. The number of beams 18B and 18C used and the spacing between them depends on the width of the flooring and the length over which each beam is applied.

  FIG. 8 shows another arrangement of the beams, showing a pair of beams 18C attached to the concrete bottom plate 12 alternating with a pair of beams 18B attached to the concrete top plate 14 in the width of the flooring. The advantage of this arrangement is that the reinforcement string 80, shown only one in the figure, is soldered or fixed between the unfixed ends of a pair of adjacent beams to strengthen the beam assembly if necessary and resist buckling. It can be welded.

  As seen in each of FIGS. 6-8, the runner 54 that supports the plate 52 is soldered or welded to the beam 18B that is ultimately embedded in the concrete of the top plate 14. Another way of supporting the plate 52 is shown in FIG. A mass of expanded polystyrene 90 is placed at the top of the beam 18C, and a higher mass of expanded polystyrene 92 is placed at the inward and upward bottom ends of the beam 18B. The plate 52 is simply hung between adjacent pairs of chunks 90 or 92 before pouring the concrete top layer 14. Since foamed polystyrene is a very low sound propagation body, there is very little sound propagation from the concrete top plate 14 to the concrete bottom plate 12 through the masses 90 and 92, which does not give any final flooring once the concrete layer 14 has solidified. Has no structural role. Of course, it should be understood that a combination of polystyrene lumps and runners may also be used. For example, FIG. 10 shows a combination of a polystyrene block 90 placed on the beam 18C and a runner 54 soldered to the beam 18B. FIG. 10 also illustrates how the work tube is incorporated into the flooring of the present invention. FIG. 10 illustrates the working tube 100, for example a plastic tube, extending laterally of the beams 18B and 18C. The tube 100 is suitable for passing electrical wires completely through the flooring, or from the outer end to the center, down from the ceiling, up from the floor, or simply bent 90 ° parallel to the beam. Tube 100 passes through holes drilled in beams 18B and 18C, but these holes are of different sizes and the tube is in contact with and supported by beam 18B shown in FIG. Do not touch. It is also possible to reverse the relative dimensions of the holes drilled in the beam so that the tube is supported by the beam 18C and not in contact with the beam 18B. Avoiding contact with a set of beams can ensure that sound propagation through the flooring does not travel through the tube 100.

  FIG. 11 shows another position of the working tube 100 supported by a hole drilled in the beam 18C under the beam 18B. The soundproof mat 50 of FIG. 11 is drawn thicker than that of FIGS. 5 to 10, but in principle, in this embodiment, the mat is wrapped on the tube 100 and has a height along the cross-sectional line of FIG. Because it increases. Of course, the soundproof mat 50 of FIGS. 5-10 can be of any thickness and can even occupy the entire height between the concrete bottom plate 12 and the plate 52 on which the concrete plate 14 is placed.

  5-8, the top plate 14 is molded on a row of separate plates 52. FIG. These plates 52 are supported on runners 54 secured to the beams 18A or 18B that support the upper plate over the entire width. The use of separate plates 52 between each pair of adjacent support beams 18A or 18B requires the additional work of cutting each plate 52 to its size and assembling one by one between the beam and the support on the runner 54. I need. A preferred architecture is to use a single plate 52A as shown in FIG. The plate 52A is placed directly on the beam 18D that supports the upper plate 14 over its entire width. These beams 18D are hollow box-shaped beams as shown in FIG. 12, and are made of cold sheet metal like the beam 18 in FIG. 2C and the beam 18A in FIGS. The fact that the stiff plate 52A rests on the hollow beam 18D is that the beam 18D supports the top plate 14 across its entire width, but is a row that is screwed to the hollow beam 18D with a self-tapping screw 62 that passes through the hard plate 52A. The supporting member 60 significantly improves the support. As shown in FIG. 13, the fixing member 60 has a cradle shape, and each includes a pair of upstanding side surfaces 64 upstanding from a flat foundation 66. Grooves 68 are carved on top of the upstanding sides 64 to straddle the bars or lines of the reinforcing grid 28. When the fixing member 60 is screwed to the hollow beam 18D through the hard plate 52A, the entire surface of the reinforcing grid 28 is supported in the upward direction, the lateral direction, and the downward direction of the main load.

  Each cradle 60 in FIG. 13 supports the reinforcing bars or lines of the grid 28 oriented in only one direction, while the different crabs 60 are oriented in directions orthogonal to each other, and both the longitudinal and lateral reinforcing bars or lines of the grid 28 are oriented. Support both. Alternatively, a cradle 60a can be used as shown in FIG. 13a or 13b. FIG. 13a shows a process in which the sheet metal material 60b is bent to make the lily pad 60a of FIG. 13b. The rows of oval cutouts of material 60b are separated by a relatively narrow metal film 63 and define fold lines so that the sheet metal material of FIG. 13a can be easily bent by hand into the shape of FIG. 13b. A pre-formed hole 65 is opened in the flange serving as the foundation of the final twister 60a so as to receive the screw 62 of FIG. 12, and the grooves 68a and 68b receive the vertical and horizontal reinforcing bars of the reinforcing grid 28, respectively. Grooves 68a and 68b may be equidistant from the foundation shown in FIG. 13b, in which case cradle 60a is easily twisted along one of the fold lines used, so that the grooves are at different levels of the longitudinal and transverse reinforcing bars. Like that. Alternatively, the grooves 68a and 68b may be at different heights to reflect different levels of vertical and horizontal reinforcing bars.

  FIG. 12 shows a state in which the beam 18C supporting the bottom plate 12 is constructed in the same manner as that of FIG. The box-shaped beam 18D is considerably stronger than the individual J-shaped beams 18C even when the beams 18C are connected to each other by the string 80, and in FIG. 14, the beam that supports the bottom plate 12 is similar to the hollow beam 18D that supports the top plate. A stronger construction is shown which is a box beam 18E. Support between the hollow beam 18E and the bottom plate 12 is provided by a row of hangers shown in FIG. Each hanger is a metal string that passes over the beam on which it hangs and hangs on the opposite side of the beam. A transverse groove at the lower end of the hanger is supported by hooking a reinforcing bar or wire of the first grid 26 to provide the necessary support for the width of the bottom plate 12.

It can be seen that instead of the metal of the string hanger 70 shown in FIG. 15, the reinforcing lattice 26 of the bottom plate is supported by a line from the hollow beam 18E. Depending on the length and diameter of the support line, sound propagation between the hollow beam 18E and the bottom plate 12 is very limited, as each transverse beam 18 supports the top plate shown in FIG. Gives the possibility of an embodiment (not shown) formed as a hollow box beam that also supports.
Although not shown, a sound absorbing material is filled in all or part of the hollow box beams 18D and 18E shown in FIGS.

  Instead of the beam 18 of FIG. 12 and the beams 18D and 18E of FIG. 14 formed as a hollow box shape as shown, it is placed back to back as compared to the simple J beams 18B and 18C of FIGS. The strength can be improved by making each beam of FIG. 12 or FIG. 14 from two identical J-shaped beams fixed to each other by point soldering.

  Another improvement (not shown) is to place a soundproof rubber layer on the box 18D, or single or back-to-back J, and between the molded concrete of the top plate 14 and the formwork 10. It is also possible to attach a soundproof rubber. This makes it possible to obtain a floating floor without sacrificing the excellent hardness and soundproofing performance of the prefabricated floor material described and illustrated so far.

  16 and 17 show a portion of the mold 10 that replaces the mold members 24 and 30. FIG. FIG. 16 shows that the outward flange 148 on the formwork member 30 is slightly lower than the top surface of the concrete plate 14. 3A, the formwork member 30 is made of two parts, 30a and 30b, and the outer plate 30A forms an outward flange 148. FIG. 17 shows that the outward flange is flush with the top surface of the concrete top plate 14. The usefulness of the lower flange 148 of FIG. 16 in the actual construction of a building using flooring according to the present invention is shown in FIG. Reference numeral 140 denotes an upper part of a building wall, on which two flooring materials according to the present invention are supported. FIG. 18 shows one flooring 142 on the right side of the upper wall 140 and another 144 on the left side. A rubber sheet 146 is placed on the wall top 140 to reduce sound propagation in the final building when the upper flooring is suspended on the outward flange 148 before it is in place. A self-tapping screw or fixing screw 150 is passed through a downwardly extending fixing plate 152 that is soldered or welded to the side plate 32 of FIG. The building is now one floor higher. If the flange is not recessed below the upper surface of the upper floorboard, there cannot be a convex line to place the next higher wallboard 154. Due to the recessed shape of the flange 148, the next wall plate 154 is convexly disposed in a shallow groove formed between adjacent floors 142 and 144, and is preferably metal directly to the flange 148 by another rubber piece 156. Protected from contact. If necessary, a rubber, plastic, or metal filler piece may be placed between the upper ends of adjacent floorings 142 and 144 and the wallboard 154 to be placed in order to place the wallboard 154 in a completely accurate manner. it can.

FIG. 18 also shows a pair of flexible hangers 158 for the wallboard 154, to which a plasterboard 160 has been added in a conventional manner. Inflatable pieces 162 are placed along the bottom of each set of gypsum board 160 to fill the gap between the floor of the building under construction and the gypsum board.
Since the architectural details shown in FIG. 18 reduce the amount of sound propagation in the vertical direction of the building, it will be appreciated that the soundproofing performance of the flooring of the present invention is extremely effective.

  The most significant advantage of all embodiments of the composite flooring according to the present invention shown in FIGS. 1-18 is its fire resistance. In the case of a fire, there is very little distortion of the flooring. This includes fixing the two reinforcing plates to the formwork by soldering or welding the internal reinforcing bars or wires, and various embodiments of the beams 18, 18A, 18B, 18C, 18D, and 18E by soldering or welding. By fixing to the formwork. The beams 18-18E of the various illustrated embodiments described above are cold rolled steel shapes. Further, the embodiment shown in FIGS. 19 to 21 uses a hot metal beam 18F having a parallel flange groove shape. Another hot shape is an I-beam or hot box shape. The prefabricated composite flooring described with reference to FIG. 19 has undergone extensive fire resistance tests and surprisingly withstands the 240 minute test of the BS476 Part 21: 1987, Chapter 7 test.

  19-21, the side surface of the mold 30 is made of two parts as shown in FIG. The parallel flange groove beam 18F is soldered or welded to the mold 30 at its end. A hanger 70 in the form of FIG. 15 straddles the beam 18F and supports the soldered mesh grid 26 of reinforcing bars that reinforce the bottom surface molded plate 12 (ceiling plate). All ends of the soldered mesh grid 26 are soldered or welded to the upward and inward flanges of the mold 30. Therefore, the center portion of the soldered mesh reinforcing grid 26 is supported by the hanger 70 and is firmly fixed to the mold 80 over the entire circumference. At this stage, the ceiling plate 12 is molded with a cement or gypsum-based molding material that flows into the end grooves of the mold 30 at the entire periphery of the flooring and at the center of the reinforcing grid 26. The bottom of each hanger 70 is incorporated into the molded plate 12, but the beam 18 </ b> F is above the surface of the molded plate 12.

Then, an insulating material 50 such as a high-density asbestos insulating mat (commercially available under the trademark BEAMCLAD) is packed in the gap between the beams 18F on the molded plate, and one or more solid plates 95 are placed on the beams 18F. It is burned. A very suitable material for these boards 95 is a bitumen impregnated fiber board, available under the trademark BITROC. If necessary, additional support for the plate 95 is made by first placing a transverse beam 96 between a pair of adjacent beams 18F spaced along the length of the beam 18F. Each of the transverse beams 96, shown only in the perspective view of FIG. 20, comprises a box-shaped support portion of a solid plate 95 and a pair of mounting plates 97 at each end thereof.
As shown in FIG. 19, the mounting plate 97 is on the beam 18F and is fixed in place by an automatic tapping screw (not shown) or spot soldering if necessary.

  The solid board 95 serves as a supporting base for the concrete top board 14 molded on the composite flooring. However, before the concrete is poured, the reinforcing bar grid 28 is fixed in place. As already shown in FIGS. 13 or 13a and 13b, the mesh fixing member 60 or 60a is fixed on each beam 18F with a space between them, and an automatic tapping screw 62 entering the beam through a solid plate 95 is provided. And fixed to the beam 18F. The soldered reinforcing bar grid 28 is supported in the grooves of the fixing member 60 or 60a and is kept spaced on the plate 95 over the entire width of the composite flooring. The mold 30 is made up of two parts 30a and 30b which are themselves soldered together as shown in FIG.

  Although not shown in FIG. 19, a single polyolefin sheet is hung on the plate 95. The end of the polyolefin sheet is folded into the C-shaped part 30b of the mold 30 by the expanded polystyrene string 30c inserted into the C-shaped part 30b between the upper and lower flanges. Therefore, the molded floor board 14 is an effective floating floor and is supported by the parallel flange groove beam 18F over the entire width thereof, but is isolated from the mold 30 by the foamed polystyrene string 30c. The resulting improvement in soundproofing performance of the composite flooring is significant. Due to the installation of the expanded polystyrene string 30c and the structure of the floor plate 14 floating freely, the propagation of sound from the floor plate 14 to the building framework (for example, the upper wall portion 140 in FIG. 18) is very small. The fire performance is of course improved by soldering or welding the ends of the reinforcing bars of the grid 28 of the floorboard 14 just as the ends of the reinforcing bars of the reinforcing grid 26 of the ceiling panel are soldered or welded. But it comes at the cost of soundproofing gained by freeing the floorboard. Surprisingly, the same end connection of the top reinforcement grid is not necessary because the fire performance is remarkably good simply by soldering or welding only the bottom reinforcement grid to the mold 30.

The flooring as shown in FIGS. 19-21 was tested for fire resistance according to British Standard 476 Part 21: 1987, Chapter 7. The flooring was also tested for performance that met load-bearing performance, structural integrity, and thermal insulation behavior criteria. During the test, the floor sample to be tested was subjected to a surface load of 2 KN / m 2 evenly distributed on its upper surface. A thermocouple was attached to the top surface of the flooring to be tested, and the flooring was suspended on a furnace that could be heated from below. The test was continued for 4 hours as specified in BS476, and the samples were safe during the entire period.

  Although the furnace temperature was raised to 1,152 ° C. during the test, the maximum top surface temperature of the flooring was only 68 ° C. even after 4 hours, indicating excellent heat insulation between the upper and lower plates of the flooring. Structural integrity and load carrying capacity were maintained for the entire 4 hours of the test, although there was slight (but acceptable) sagging and deflection at the bottom of the plate at the end of the test. The test sample met the test criteria at the top temperature, load carrying capacity, and structural integrity at the end of the 4-hour test, which is a truly amazing performance characteristic and expects to pass all test items up to 90 minutes Is more than

  In addition to the unexpectedly high fire resistance of the floor samples being tested, the same flooring was subjected to a soundproofing test. It has been found to be far superior to conventional solid and hollow floors. Excellent soundproofing performance is secured to the formwork by the high density of the upper and lower plates and the soldering or welding connection between the reinforcing grids of bars or wires and the beams and formwork all around the board. This is thought to be due to a combination of the fact that this is combined with the lower density interior of the composite flooring. Good soundproofing performance can be obtained at a lower density due to the asbestos 50 and the space above the asbestos. The sound wave direct path through the upper and lower surfaces of the composite flooring is almost limited to the automatic tapping screw 62 that connects the upper plate 14 to the beam 18F and the mesh hanger 70. With the skillful arrangement of these hangers 70, the composite flooring of the present invention achieves a soundproofing level that can be expected with a total thickness or depth of 300 mm or less and at least twice the thickness of conventional flooring.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a prefabricated composite flooring having a generally square edge of the present invention.
FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line AA in FIG.
2A is an enlarged cross-sectional view of only the right end portion of FIG.
FIG. 2B is a cross-sectional view through the cold rolled sheet metal edge member of FIG. 2A and illustrates its construction method.
FIG. 2C is a cross-sectional view through one of the cold-rolled sheet metal beams seen in FIG. 2A, illustrating the construction method.
3 is the same cross-sectional view as FIG. 2A, except that it is a cross-sectional view along line BB of FIG. 1 through another cold rolled sheet metal edge member.
FIG. 3A is a cross-sectional view through the cold rolled sheet metal edge member of FIG. 3 and shows its construction method.
FIG. 4 is the same perspective view as FIG. 1, but viewed through the prefabricated composite floor before the top layer of concrete is poured.
4A is a greatly enlarged cross-sectional view seen from one of the reinforcing cross bands seen in FIG.
FIGS. 5-12 are enlarged cross-sectional views similar to FIG. 2A according to an eight embodiment of the present invention, and the order of the drawings is for the purpose of reducing sound propagation in various acoustic bands through a row of prefabricated composite flooring of the present invention. It has been chosen to illustrate the soundproofing effects and techniques used in the invention.
FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a connecting rod for connecting the hollow beam of FIG. 12 to a reinforcing bar or a top grid of lines.
FIG. 13 a is a plan view of a metal plate material that can be folded to form another connection rod.
FIG. 13b is a perspective view of another connecting rod made by folding the material of FIG. 13a.
FIG. 14 is the same enlarged cross-sectional view as FIG. 2A according to Embodiment 9 of the present invention, and another soundproofing technique used in the present invention for reducing sound propagation in various sound bands through the prefabricated composite flooring of the present invention. Is illustrated.
FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a connecting hanger that connects the lower row of the hollow girders of FIG.
16 and 17 are enlarged cross-sectional views through the sheet metal frame member of the prefabricated composite flooring according to the present invention, each side of the formwork and the frame member of the terminal, which are different from those shown in FIGS. 2B and 3A. The cold rolled sheet metal image is shown.
FIG. 18 is a vertical sectional view through the connection between two flooring materials according to the present invention installed in a building and two wallboards of the building, showing the support of the flooring by the outward flange part.
FIG. 19 is an enlarged cross-sectional view according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, similar to FIG. 2A.
20 is a perspective view of the joint tension XX used in FIG.
FIG. 21 shows the construction of the metal frame member of FIG. 19 in detail.

Claims (35)

  1. A formwork consisting of a cold sheet metal frame member that is soldered or welded to form an end dam with the correct dimensions and ratio for the flooring;
    Cement-based or gypsum-based molded ceiling board that is molded in this formwork and fits the first grid of reinforcing bars or wires,
    A cement-based molded floor board that is molded in the mold and fitted with a second grid of reinforcing bars or wires that are soldered or welded to opposing frame members in the mold, and is placed away from the ceiling board A prefabricated composite flooring for a ground floor of a building comprising:
    Each of the ceiling and floorboard is supported across the entire width by a row of metal beams extending parallel to each other on the flooring between the molded boards and soldered or welded to opposite frame members of the formwork at both ends,
    Prefabricated composite flooring for the ground floor of buildings that have a space between the ceiling and flooring that contains a lower density of soundproofing material than molded ceilings and flooring.
  2.   The flooring according to claim 1, wherein the soundproofing material completely or substantially completely fills the inter-beam space between the molded ceiling and the floorboard.
  3.   The flooring according to claim 2, wherein the soundproofing material comprises a row of raw materials having a lower density than the material of the molded ceiling and floorboard.
  4.   The block is a burned or porous aggregate cement wall, polystyrene foam, asbestos, compressed firewood or balsa wood, or asbestos, shredded newspaper, paper clay, cut firewood, glass fiber mat or recycled granulate The flooring according to claim 3, which is a plastic or cardboard box filled with coarse granular material such as rubber.
  5.   The flooring according to claim 3 or 4, wherein the molded floor board is directly molded on the row of blocks and flows around or between the rows of blocks.
  6.   The soundproofing material is supported by a layer of lightweight sound-absorbing material placed on the molded ceiling board and between the beams, a solid board or a row of solid boards placed on the sound-absorbing material, and the sound-absorbing material or beams The flooring according to claim 2, comprising one or more plates.
  7.   The flooring according to claim 5, wherein the molded floor board is molded on one or more solid boards.
  8.   The flooring according to claim 1, wherein the soundproofing material is packed only in a part of the space between the molded ceiling and the floorboard.
  9.   From a layer of lightweight sound-absorbing material on which the soundproofing material is placed on and between the beams, and from a solid plate or a row of solid plates supported by the beam at a distance from the layer of sound-absorbing material The flooring according to claim 8 comprising.
  10.   The flooring according to claim 9, wherein the molded floorboard is molded on one or more solid boards.
  11.   The flooring according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein one end of each beam is embedded in the material of the molded ceiling board and the other end is embedded in the material of the molded floorboard.
  12.   The flooring according to claim 11, wherein the beam is made of a cold-rolled steel sheet having a c-section.
  13.   In an alternating series of beams or a pair of beams on the flooring, each beam is embedded with one end in the length direction in one piece of molded board and the other end in the space between the molded floorboards. The flooring according to any one of claims 1 to 10.
  14.   The flooring according to claim 13, wherein the beam is made of cold-rolled J-shaped steel, and the lengthwise ends bent inward of each portion are in the space between the molded plates.
  15.   The beam with the end in the length direction embedded in the material of the molded ceiling board is moved laterally away from the beam with the end in the length direction embedded in the material of the molded floor board, and the wall part of each beam is molded. The flooring according to claim 13 or 14, which extends to more than half of the space between the ceiling and the floorboard.
  16.   A pair of adjacent beams of an end beam embedded in the material of the molded ceiling panel and another beam having an end embedded in the material of the molded floor panel are adjacent to each other and the same The flooring of claim 15, wherein the flooring is further away from a pair of beams.
  17.   Free ends of adjacent beams with ends embedded in the same molded plate material, where the free ends are in the space between the plates, and the ends are beamed by a string that transfers the buckling load between the beams The flooring according to claim 16, wherein the flooring is joined together at intervals along the length of.
  18.   The flooring according to any one of claims 1 to 4, 8, 9, and 10, wherein the beam is a hollow box beam or a hot-rolled PFC (parallel flange groove) beam.
  19.   19. The molded ceiling panel is supported by a hanger supporting a reinforcing bar or a first grid of lines across the entire width of the molded ceiling panel, with a beam or hanging from the beam or several beams over its entire width. Flooring.
  20.   The flooring according to claim 19, wherein the hanger is a wire hanger.
  21.   A metal string that passes over the beams on which the hangers hang down, hangs down on opposite sides of the beams, and has a transverse groove at the lower end of the hangers to hook and support the reinforcing bars or wires of the first grid. The flooring according to 19.
  22.   The flooring according to any one of claims 18 to 21, wherein the flooring is supported by the beam by being molded over a solid plate that rests directly on the beam over its entire width.
  23.   23. A molded floor slab is secured to the beam supporting it by a row of fixing members connected to a support bar or a second grid of wires over its entire width and screwed to the beam supporting the molded floor slab through a solid plate. The flooring described in 1.
  24.   24. A flooring according to any of claims 18 to 23, wherein each box beam supports both a molded ceiling and a floorboard.
  25.   24. A flooring according to any one of claims 18 to 23, wherein alternate one of the box beams supports the molded ceiling board and the middle one of the box beams supports the molded floor board over the entire width of the flooring.
  26.   The flooring according to any one of claims 18 to 25, wherein the box-shaped beam includes a soundproofing material.
  27.   The flooring according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein a reinforcing diagonal strut soldered to the end of the formwork is embedded in the molded ceiling board and / or molded floorboard.
  28.   19. A floor covering according to claim 18, wherein the reinforcing diagonal strut comprises a ribbon of sheet metal which is unwound from the roll and prevented from being wound by pleating longitudinally.
  29.   A flooring according to any preceding claim, wherein each molded ceiling and floorboard has a thickness of 50 to 100 mm, and the distance between the molded ceiling board and floorboard is 150 to 300 mm.
  30.   30. The flooring of claim 29, wherein each molded ceiling and floorboard has a thickness of about 65 mm.
  31.   229. A flooring according to claim 29 or 230, wherein the molded ceiling board and floor board are separated by about 225 mm.
  32.   The flooring according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the surface finish of the lower surface of the molded ceiling board is paper or a fiber material attached to the molded surface on which the ceiling board is molded.
  33.   The flooring according to any one of claims 1 to 22, wherein the surface finish of the lower surface of the molded ceiling board is a surface finish of a board covered with a release agent before the ceiling board is molded.
  34.   The flooring according to any one of the preceding claims, wherein the surface finish of the upper surface of the molded ceiling board is a power floating finish.
  35. Form the form by soldering or welding the cold rolled sheet metal frame member,
    Solder or weld a row of metal beams isolated in parallel to each other to the formwork,
    Solder or weld the ends of the reinforcing bars or wires of the first grid to the formwork,
    Reinforcement rods by molding the ceiling board by injecting wet concrete or gypsum-based cement into the weir plate made of formwork to a depth sufficient to incorporate the first inwardly directed end of the formwork Or incorporate a first grid of wires and embed some or all of the lower longitudinal ends of the parallel isolated beams of cold-rolled sheet metal or hangers hanging from the beam,
    Place cold-rolled sheet metal parallel, isolated in parallel, with molded concrete, and, if appropriate, lower density acoustic insulation than a single row of solid boards to form the foundation of the molded ceiling,
    Solder or weld the ends of the reinforcing bars or wires of the second grid to the formwork,
    Pour wet concrete on top of the soundproofing material or solid board to a depth sufficient to incorporate the second inwardly directed end of the formwork,
    Incorporate a second grid of reinforcing bars or wires, if appropriate, embed some or all of the upper longitudinal ends of parallel-isolated beams of cold rolled sheet metal, and form floorboards using power floats Give the top surface a smooth surface finish,
    The manufacturing method of the flooring material in any one of Claim 1 to 34.
JP2008534063A 2005-10-08 2006-09-20 Prefabricated composite flooring Pending JP2009511775A (en)

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GB0520482A GB2430945A (en) 2005-10-08 2005-10-08 Modular composite floor units
PCT/GB2006/003474 WO2007042748A1 (en) 2005-10-08 2006-09-20 Modular composite floor units

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EP (1) EP1943396A1 (en)
JP (1) JP2009511775A (en)
AU (1) AU2006300995A1 (en)
GB (1) GB2430945A (en)
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EP1943396A1 (en) 2008-07-16
GB0520482D0 (en) 2005-11-16
WO2007042748A1 (en) 2007-04-19
GB2430945A (en) 2007-04-11
ZA200803877B (en) 2010-07-28
US20090217612A1 (en) 2009-09-03
AU2006300995A1 (en) 2007-04-19

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