JP2009285805A - Rechargeable power tool - Google Patents

Rechargeable power tool Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2009285805A
JP2009285805A JP2008142707A JP2008142707A JP2009285805A JP 2009285805 A JP2009285805 A JP 2009285805A JP 2008142707 A JP2008142707 A JP 2008142707A JP 2008142707 A JP2008142707 A JP 2008142707A JP 2009285805 A JP2009285805 A JP 2009285805A
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Prior art keywords
speed
set
dc motor
operation amount
threshold value
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JP2008142707A
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JP5112956B2 (en
Inventor
Fengying Dong
Takuya Kusakawa
Jiro Suzuki
卓也 草川
風迎 董
次郎 鈴木
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Makita Corp
株式会社マキタ
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25FCOMBINATION OR MULTI-PURPOSE TOOLS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; DETAILS OR COMPONENTS OF PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS NOT PARTICULARLY RELATED TO THE OPERATIONS PERFORMED AND NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B25F5/00Details or components of portable power-driven tools not particularly related to the operations performed and not otherwise provided for
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02HEMERGENCY PROTECTIVE CIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS
    • H02H7/00Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions
    • H02H7/08Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for dynamo-electric motors
    • H02H7/0833Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for dynamo-electric motors for electric motors with control arrangements
    • H02H7/0838Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for dynamo-electric motors for electric motors with control arrangements with H-bridge circuit
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02HEMERGENCY PROTECTIVE CIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS
    • H02H7/00Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions
    • H02H7/10Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for converters; for rectifiers
    • H02H7/12Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for converters; for rectifiers for static converters or rectifiers
    • H02H7/1213Emergency protective circuit arrangements specially adapted for specific types of electric machines or apparatus or for sectionalised protection of cable or line systems, and effecting automatic switching in the event of an undesired change from normal working conditions for converters; for rectifiers for static converters or rectifiers for DC-DC converters

Abstract

PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To reliably detect an abnormal state of a tool in a rechargeable electric tool configured to perform PWM control of rotation of a DC motor according to a set speed regardless of the set speed.
SOLUTION: A DUTY of a DC motor is set according to a speed mode set by a user (any one of a high speed, a medium speed, and a low speed mode) and a pull amount of a trigger switch (S140), and according to the DUTY, A voltage detection threshold Vt and a lock determination time Tr for detecting the abnormal state of the tool are set (S150). Specifically, the voltage detection threshold Vt is set lower as the DUTY is larger, and the lock determination time Tr is set to be shorter. After the start of energization of the DC motor according to DUTY (S160), whether the lock determination time Tr elapses without updating the hall signal (S190: YES), or when the battery voltage Vb falls below the voltage detection threshold Vt (S220: YES) Then, it is determined that the state is abnormal, and energization of the DC motor is stopped (S230, S250).
[Selection] Figure 5

Description

  The present invention includes a direct current motor that is rotated by electric power from a battery (secondary battery) as a power source, and is configured to control the rotational speed of the direct current motor in accordance with the operation state of a speed setting switch such as a trigger switch. The present invention relates to a rechargeable electric tool.

  Conventionally, as this type of rechargeable electric tool, for example, as a driving circuit for a DC motor, switching elements (high-side switches) provided between terminals of the DC motor and a positive electrode and a negative electrode of a DC power source (battery) In addition, a bridge circuit (in other words, an inverter circuit) including a low-side switch is known.

  In the rechargeable electric tool having such a configuration, when the user operates a trigger switch as a speed setting switch, the controller obtains a drive duty ratio for PWM control of the DC motor based on the operation amount, and The rotation of the DC motor is controlled by turning on / off the switching element in the bridge circuit according to the drive duty ratio.

  In addition to the trigger switch described above, there is also known a speed setting switch including a speed change switch that can switch the rotation speed in two stages, for example, a high speed mode and a low speed mode. In the rechargeable power tool having such a configuration, when the user sets the speed change switch to either the high speed mode or the low speed mode (switching operation) and pulls the trigger switch, the controller The DC motor is controlled so that the rotation speed corresponds to the speed mode. The rotational driving force of the direct current motor is transmitted to the tool output shaft directly or via a speed reduction mechanism.

  By the way, in a rechargeable electric tool, when the DC motor as a power source is driven, the DC motor mechanically locks, an abnormality occurs in the controller, or the DC motor as a load is short-circuited ( When an abnormal state occurs, an overcurrent flows through the DC motor and its drive circuit, and these parts generate heat and may burn out in some cases.

  For this reason, a rechargeable electric tool normally determines whether the rechargeable electric tool is not in the above-described abnormal state when the DC motor is driven. A protective circuit for performing a protective operation such as stopping the operation is provided.

  Various configurations of the protection circuit are conceivable. For example, a current detection means for detecting the current value of the DC motor is provided, and when the current value exceeds a certain threshold value, an abnormal state (overcurrent occurrence) is determined. Of course it is also possible to do.

However, in recent years, various methods for detecting overcurrent without providing current detection means have been proposed in order to reduce the size and cost of the circuit. As an example, the battery voltage is monitored, and when an overcurrent occurs due to a load short-circuit or the like and the battery voltage drops, the power supply to the load is stopped (the switching element provided in the power supply path is turned off). (For example, refer to Patent Document 1).
JP-A-5-174874

  However, the battery voltage described in Patent Document 1 described above is applied to a tool that includes a speed setting switch, such as the above-described rechargeable electric tool, and that is configured to PWM control a DC motor according to the setting content. When the overcurrent detection technique based on the decrease is applied, there is a possibility that the abnormal state (overcurrent) cannot be accurately detected depending on the setting contents of the rotation speed.

  That is, when PWM control is performed on the DC motor, when the switching element is turned on, the energization current value of the DC motor increases and the battery voltage gradually decreases accordingly. If the ON state of the switching element continues as it is, the increase of the energization current value and the decrease of the battery voltage will eventually stop and a steady state is entered. When the switching element is turned off, the energization current value gradually decreases toward zero and the battery voltage gradually increases toward the open circuit voltage. Whether or not to enter the steady state during the ON period of the switching element depends on the time constant of the energization path and the drive duty ratio (that is, the length of the ON period).

Here, when the rechargeable power tool is in an abnormal state and an overcurrent is generated when the DC motor is energized, the battery voltage is further lowered as compared with the normal time.
Therefore, for example, the protective circuit is set with a predetermined voltage value lower than the battery voltage when the DC motor is in a steady state as a voltage detection threshold for overcurrent determination, and the battery voltage is set higher than this voltage detection threshold. If the voltage becomes lower, it can be determined that an overcurrent has occurred and a protection operation is performed.

  However, the lower the speed set by the speed setting switch, the smaller the drive duty ratio and the shorter the ON period of the switching element. Therefore, in a transient state after the start of energization due to the switching element being turned on, the lower the set speed, the smaller the amount of decrease in battery voltage. That is, the increase in energization current and the decrease in battery voltage depend on the drive duty ratio in PWM control, and the lower the drive duty ratio (that is, the lower the set speed), the shorter the time during which the battery voltage decreases. The amount of decrease is also reduced.

  For this reason, if the voltage detection threshold is set to a low value, for example, when the drive duty ratio is large (that is, when the set speed is high), an abnormal state occurs when the set speed is low, and the voltage detection threshold is exceeded when the switching element is on. Even if the current is generated, the switching element is turned off before the battery voltage falls below the voltage detection threshold value, and the battery voltage starts to rise again. Therefore, there is a possibility that the overcurrent cannot be detected.

  To prevent this, if the voltage detection threshold is set to a high value when the drive duty ratio is small (that is, when the set speed is low), conversely, when the drive duty ratio is large, the normal state is assumed. Therefore, there is a possibility that the battery voltage falls below the voltage detection threshold value and erroneously detected as an overcurrent occurrence.

  On the other hand, there is a DC motor lock state as one of the abnormal states, and various methods for detecting this are known. Specifically, a rotation sensor that outputs a pulse signal every time the DC motor rotates a certain amount is provided, and the lock state is detected when the pulse signal from the sensor is not output within a preset lock determination time. There is a way.

  Even in this case, if the lock determination time is set to a longer time, for example, when the drive duty ratio is small (that is, when the set speed is low), the lock state increases as the set speed by the speed setting switch increases. When this happens, the time during which the overcurrent continues to flow becomes longer.

  To prevent this, if the lock determination time is set to a short time when the drive duty ratio is large (that is, when the set speed is high), conversely, even when the drive duty ratio is small, it is normal. There is a possibility that the pulse signal is not output from the sensor within the lock determination time, and the lock state is erroneously detected.

  The present invention has been made in view of the above problems, and in a rechargeable electric tool configured to PWM-control the rotation of a DC motor according to a set speed, the abnormal state of the tool is reliably detected regardless of the set speed. The purpose is to do.

  The rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1, which has been made to solve the above problems, includes a DC motor for driving a tool output shaft, a battery pack incorporating a secondary battery as a power source of the DC motor, and a secondary battery. A switching circuit comprising at least one switching element provided on a current-carrying path from the motor to the DC motor, at least one speed setting means operated by a user to set the rotational speed of the DC motor, and a switching circuit Via the control means for setting the drive duty ratio for PWM control of the DC motor based on the rotation speed set by the operation of the speed setting means, and the switching circuit according to the drive duty ratio set by the control means Driving means for turning on / off the switching element in the inside and rotating the DC motor, and the driving means An operation amount detection means for detecting at least one type of operation amount that directly or indirectly indicates an operation state of the rechargeable power tool, excluding an energization current value of the DC motor, when the motor rotates. An abnormality determination means for determining whether the operation state of the rechargeable electric tool is abnormal by comparing the operation amount detected by the operation amount detection means with a determination threshold set for the operation amount; and a determination threshold Determination threshold value setting means for setting.

In particular, in the present invention, the determination threshold value setting means sets the determination threshold value continuously or stepwise according to the rotation speed set by the speed setting means.
In the rechargeable electric tool configured as described above, when the DC motor is rotating, the rechargeable electric tool is based on the operation amount detected by the operation amount detecting unit and the determination threshold set by the determination threshold setting unit. Is determined. At this time, if the determination threshold value is fixed to a constant value, the determination by the abnormality determination unit is performed accurately depending on the rotation speed set by the speed setting unit (and the drive duty ratio set by the control unit). There is a risk of being lost.

  Therefore, in the present invention, the determination threshold value is not fixed to a constant value, but is changed (continuously or stepwise) according to the rotation speed set by the speed setting means (and according to the drive duty ratio). To set).

  Although it can be considered as appropriate how the determination threshold is specifically changed according to the set rotation speed (drive duty ratio), for example, the DC motor rotates at the set rotation speed at that rotation speed. The determination threshold value may be set so that the change in the operation amount can be reliably detected in consideration of the degree of change in the operation amount that is assumed when an abnormal state occurs.

  Therefore, according to the rechargeable electric tool of the first aspect, the determination threshold value is set so as to change continuously or stepwise according to the set rotation speed. An appropriate determination threshold value is set. Therefore, it is possible to reliably detect an abnormal state of the rechargeable electric tool regardless of the set rotational speed.

  Next, the invention according to claim 2 is the rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1, wherein the operation amount detecting means detects the voltage of the secondary battery as the operation amount, and the determination threshold setting means is the determination threshold value. Is set so that the voltage threshold value becomes lower as the rotational speed set by the speed setting means is larger. Then, the abnormality determination unit determines that the operation state of the rechargeable power tool is abnormal when the voltage of the secondary battery detected by the operation amount detection unit is lower than the voltage threshold.

  When an abnormal state in which an overcurrent flows through the DC motor occurs, the voltage of the secondary battery is lower than normal. As the set rotational speed is larger (that is, the drive duty ratio is larger and the on-time is longer), the degree of decrease in the secondary battery voltage at the time of overcurrent becomes larger.

  Therefore, as described in claim 2, the voltage threshold is set to a lower value as the set rotational speed is larger, and the voltage threshold is used to thereby reduce the secondary battery voltage regardless of the set rotational speed. It is possible to reliably determine the abnormal state.

  Next, the invention according to claim 3 is the rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1, wherein the operation amount detection means outputs a detection signal as an operation amount every time the DC motor rotates by a certain amount and makes a determination. The threshold value setting means sets the time threshold value as the determination threshold value so that the time threshold value becomes shorter as the rotational speed set by the speed setting means is larger. The abnormality determining unit determines that the operation state of the rechargeable power tool is abnormal when the time during which the detection signal is not output from the operation amount detecting unit is equal to or greater than the time threshold.

  One of the abnormal states is a DC motor lock state. When the DC motor is in a normal state other than the locked state, the number of detection signals output per certain time each time the DC motor rotates by a certain amount corresponds to the set rotational speed. That is, the higher the set rotational speed, the more detection signals output per certain time. On the other hand, when the DC motor is in a locked state, the number of detection signals per fixed time decreases rapidly (or is not detected at all).

  Therefore, a locked state can be determined by setting a time threshold and determining whether or not the time during which the detection signal is not output has continued for the time threshold. In this case, the number of detection signals output per fixed time in the normal state increases during high-speed rotation with a high set rotation speed, and conversely decreases during low-speed rotation.

  Therefore, as described in claim 3, the larger the set rotational speed, the shorter the time threshold is set, and by using the time threshold, the locked state as one of the abnormal states can be set regardless of the set rotational speed. It is possible to make a reliable and quick decision.

  Next, the invention according to claim 4 is the rechargeable power tool according to claim 1, wherein the operation amount detecting means detects the voltage of the secondary battery as one of the operation amounts and the DC motor is constant. It is configured to output a detection signal as one of the operation amounts each time the amount is rotated. The determination threshold value setting means sets the voltage threshold value and the time threshold value as the determination threshold value. The voltage threshold value is set by the speed setting means so that the voltage threshold value becomes lower as the rotation speed set by the speed setting means is larger. The higher the rotation speed, the shorter the value is set. And the abnormality determination means, when the voltage of the secondary battery detected by the operation amount detection means is lower than the voltage threshold, or when the time when the detection signal is not output from the operation amount detection means is equal to or more than the time threshold, The operating state of the rechargeable power tool is determined to be abnormal.

  That is, the rechargeable power tool according to claim 4 includes the configuration (abnormal state determination function based on the secondary voltage voltage) provided in the rechargeable power tool according to claim 2 and the rechargeable power tool according to claim 3. It also has a configuration (lock state detection function) provided.

Therefore, according to the rechargeable power tool of the third aspect, it is possible to more reliably determine the abnormal state.
Here, various specific configurations of the speed setting means are conceivable. For example, a configuration having a speed change switch as described in claim 5, a configuration having a trigger switch as described in claim 6, further a request, for example, As described in Item 7, the configuration may include both a speed switch and a trigger switch.

  That is, the invention according to claim 5 is the rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein the speed setting means selectively selects at least two types of rotational speeds of the DC motor by the operation of the user. Has a speed changeover switch. Then, the control means sets the drive duty ratio based on the operation state of the speed change switch.

  The invention according to claim 6 is the rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein the speed setting means sets the rotational speed of the DC motor according to the operation amount of the user. It has a trigger switch. The control means sets the drive duty ratio according to the operation amount of the trigger switch.

  The invention according to claim 7 is the rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4, wherein the speed setting means selectively selects at least two types of speed modes of the DC motor by a user's operation. And a trigger switch for setting the rotational speed of the DC motor according to the operation amount of the user. Then, the control means sets the drive duty ratio according to the operation amount of the trigger switch so that the maximum drive duty ratio, which is the drive duty ratio when the operation amount is maximum, differs for each speed mode. .

  Which configuration is adopted among the above claims 5 to 7 can be appropriately determined according to specifications required for the tool. In any configuration, the rotation speed is set (the drive duty ratio is set) by the user's operation, and the determination threshold is appropriately set according to the setting content. Therefore, the abnormal state can be reliably determined.

  The rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 7 is a DC motor when, for example, the abnormality determining means determines that the operating state of the rechargeable electric tool is abnormal, as described in claim 8. It can be configured to include a protection means for protecting the DC motor by stopping energization of the DC motor.

  As a specific method for stopping energization to the DC motor, for example, by setting the drive duty ratio to 0, all the switching elements in the switching circuit are turned off, or on the energization path from the secondary battery to the DC motor. Various methods are conceivable, for example, by providing a switch in the switch and forcibly cutting off the power supply to the DC motor by turning off the switch.

  According to the rechargeable power tool configured as described above, since the energization of the DC motor is stopped when the operation state is determined to be abnormal, it is possible to reliably protect the DC motor from the abnormal state. The rechargeable electric tool can be reliably protected.

Preferred embodiments of the present invention will be described below with reference to the drawings.
FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating an appearance of a rechargeable impact driver 1 according to an embodiment to which the present invention is applied.

  The rechargeable impact driver 1 of the present embodiment is formed by assembling left and right half housings 2 and 3, and a main body housing 5 having a handle portion 4 extending downward, and a lower end of the handle portion 4 of the main body housing 5. The battery pack 6 is detachably attached to the battery pack 6.

  Further, the rear side of the main body housing 5 (left side in FIG. 1) is a motor storage portion 7 that stores a DC motor 20 (see FIG. 2) that is a power source of the rechargeable impact driver 1. Further, a speed reduction mechanism and a striking mechanism are accommodated in front of the vehicle.

  A chuck sleeve 8 for projecting a tool bit (not shown) is provided at the tip of the main housing 5 so as to be attached to the tip of the striking mechanism. The chuck sleeve 8 corresponds to the tool output shaft of the present invention together with the tool bit.

  Here, the striking mechanism includes, for example, a spindle that is rotated via a speed reduction mechanism, a hammer that rotates together with the spindle and that can move in the axial direction, and an anvil in which a tool bit is attached to the front end of the hammer. And operates as follows.

  That is, in the striking mechanism, when the spindle rotates as the DC motor 20 rotates, the anvil rotates through the hammer to rotate the tool bit (for example, driver bit), and then the screw tightening by the tool bit proceeds and the anvil is rotated. As the load on the hammer increases, the hammer moves backward against the urging force of the coil spring and disengages from the anvil, and then rotates with the spindle while moving forward with the urging force of the coil spring to re-engage with the anvil. Add an intermittent blow to the anvil and tighten it.

Since this striking mechanism is conventionally known (see, for example, Japanese Patent Application Laid-Open No. 2006-218605), detailed description thereof is omitted here.
The handle portion 4 of the main body housing 5 is provided with a trigger switch 10 that can be operated while the user holds the handle portion 4.

  A push button type speed change-over switch 9 for setting the speed mode of the DC motor 20 (and hence the speed mode of the tool bit) is provided below the handle portion 4 in the main body housing 5. .

  The rechargeable impact driver 1 according to the present embodiment is configured such that the speed mode is switched and set to three types of a high speed mode, a medium speed mode, and a low speed mode when the user operates the speed change switch 9. . The maximum rotation speed (maximum drive duty ratio) of the DC motor 20 is different for each speed mode, the maximum rotation speed (maximum drive duty ratio) in the high speed mode is the largest, and in the low speed mode. The maximum rotation speed is the smallest.

  When the user operates the trigger switch 10, the maximum rotation speed corresponding to the speed mode set by the speed change switch 9 is set as the upper limit, and the set rotation speed corresponding to the operation amount (pull amount) of the trigger switch 10. The DC motor 20 rotates at.

  The battery pack 6 includes a battery 18 (see FIG. 2) in which secondary battery cells having a predetermined voltage are connected in series. In the handle portion 4, there is housed a driving device that operates by receiving power supply from the battery 18 in the battery pack 6 and rotates the DC motor 20 when the trigger switch 10 is operated.

FIG. 2 is an electric circuit diagram showing the configuration of the driving device.
As shown in FIG. 2, the DC motor 20 of the present embodiment is configured by a three-phase brushless motor, and a terminal of each phase of the DC motor 20 is a battery as a DC power source via a motor drive circuit 12. It is connected to the pack 6 (specifically, the battery 18).

  The motor drive circuit 12 corresponds to the switching circuit of the present invention, and includes three switching elements Q1 to Q3 as so-called high-side switches that connect terminals of each phase of the DC motor 20 and the positive side of the battery 18. Similarly, it is configured as a bridge circuit including three switching elements Q4 to Q6 as so-called low-side switches that connect the terminals of the respective phases of the DC motor 20 and the negative electrode side of the battery 18.

  Further, the switching elements Q1 to Q6 constituting the motor drive circuit 12 are constituted by n-channel FETs, and a driving voltage higher than a threshold value is applied between the gate and the source for each switching element Q1 to Q6. The gate circuits 21 to 26 for turning on the switching elements Q1 to Q6 are connected. The gate circuits 21 to 26 are for individually turning on / off the switching elements Q1 to Q6 in the motor drive circuit 12, and correspond to drive means of the present invention.

The gate circuits 21 to 26 are controlled by a microcomputer (hereinafter abbreviated as “microcomputer”) 13.
That is, the microcomputer 13 switches each switching in the motor drive circuit 12 through the gate circuits 21 to 26 based on the detection signal from the rotational position sensor 14 provided in the DC motor 20 when the trigger switch 10 is operated. By turning on / off the elements Q1 to Q6, the energization current to each phase winding of the DC motor 20 is controlled, and the DC motor 20 is rotated. A control signal for driving switching elements Q1 to Q6 is input.

  The rotational position sensor 14 includes one or a plurality of Hall ICs, and outputs a pulse signal to the microcomputer 13 according to the rotational position of the DC motor 20 (that is, every time the DC motor 20 rotates by a predetermined amount). The microcomputer 13 calculates the rotational position and rotational speed of the DC motor 20 based on the pulse signal from the rotational position sensor 14, and the rotational speed is determined by the operation state of the speed change switch 9 and the trigger switch 10. The DC motor 20 is PWM controlled so that

  In addition, although not shown in the drawing, the driving device is provided with a constant voltage power supply device that generates a constant voltage power source that steps down the voltage of the battery 18 to a predetermined constant voltage Vcc (for example, 5 V). This constant voltage power supply (Vcc) is used as a power supply for operating a predetermined circuit in the driving apparatus including the microcomputer 13.

  The speed change switch 9 is a known push switch that is normally open. One end of the speed change switch 9 is connected to a constant voltage power supply line having a constant voltage Vcc, and the other end is connected to a ground line (ground potential) via a resistor R1. At the same time, it is connected to a predetermined port (speed switching signal input port) of the microcomputer 13. That is, a speed switching signal corresponding to the operation state of the speed switching switch 9 is input to the speed switching signal input port of the microcomputer 13.

  With such a configuration, since the contact of the speed change switch 9 is normally open, the speed change signal input port of the microcomputer 13 is grounded via the resistor R1. That is, the speed switching signal input from the speed switching switch 9 to the speed switching signal input port of the microcomputer 13 is a low level (0 V) signal. On the other hand, when the user presses the speed change switch 9 to close the contact, the speed change signal input port of the microcomputer 13 becomes the same potential as the constant voltage Vcc of the constant voltage power source via the speed change switch 9. That is, the speed switching signal input from the speed switching switch 9 to the speed switching signal input port of the microcomputer 13 is a high level (5 V) signal. When the user stops the pushing operation, the speed changeover switch 9 is again opened by the elastic force of the spring.

  In the microcomputer 13, the speed mode of the DC motor 20 is set according to the operation of the speed change switch 9 by the user. That is, when the user presses the speed change switch 9 once, the speed change signal input to the microcomputer 13 changes from the low level to the high level for the time of the pressing operation. The microcomputer 13 sets the high speed mode as a default state, and changes the speed mode from the high speed mode → the medium speed mode → the low speed mode → every time the speed switching signal changes from low level to high level (that is, every time the user performs a pressing operation). The high-speed mode will be switched in order.

  As a method for informing the user of which speed mode the rechargeable impact driver 1 is currently set to, for example, a notification sound corresponding to the set speed mode is generated every time the speed change switch 9 is operated. Alternatively, a method of providing an LED or the like and lighting it according to the set speed mode is conceivable. Of course, these methods are examples.

  More specifically, the trigger switch 10 includes a drive start switch 16 and a variable resistor 17 as shown in FIG. One end of the drive start switch 16 is connected to the constant voltage Vcc via the resistor R2, and is connected to a predetermined port (drive start signal input port) of the microcomputer 13, and the other end is connected to the ground line.

  The variable resistor 17 is configured as a so-called potentiometer, and a voltage (trigger operation amount signal) corresponding to the operation amount (pull amount) of the trigger switch 10 is input to the microcomputer 13 as a trigger operation amount signal. Enter the port.

  With such a configuration, when the user starts pulling the trigger switch 10 (for example, when pulling a small amount), the drive start switch 16 is turned on, and a drive start signal indicating that is input to the microcomputer 13. When this drive start signal is input, the microcomputer 13 follows the trigger operation amount signal from the variable resistor 17 and rotates at a rotation speed corresponding to the operation amount (pull amount) of the trigger switch 10 indicated by the trigger operation amount signal. In order to rotate the DC motor 20, PWM control of the DC motor 20 is started.

  That is, with the maximum rotation speed corresponding to the speed mode set by the speed changeover switch 9 as the upper limit, the rotation speed increases as the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10 increases (that is, the drive duty ratio increases). The drive duty ratio of the drive circuit 12 is set. In a state where the user fully pulls the trigger switch 10, the drive duty ratio becomes a value corresponding to the maximum rotation speed of the set speed mode.

  FIG. 3 shows an outline of a change in DUTY (drive duty ratio) with respect to the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10 for each speed mode. In the present embodiment, the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10 is set to 20 levels (LEBEL1 to LEVEL20), and DUTY is set for each level (LEVEL). The DUTY with respect to the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10 is set so that the DUTY increases (partially unchanged) as the pull amount increases in each speed mode.

  However, the increasing tendency of DUTY differs for each set speed mode. When the high speed mode is set, the maximum DUTY is set to NHmax (100% in this example), and the trigger switch 10 is pulled more. DUTY increases toward NHmax. When the user fully pulls the trigger switch 10, DUTY becomes the maximum NHmax. When the medium speed mode is set, the maximum DUTY is set to NMmax (65% in this example), and the DUTY increases toward the NMmax as the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10 increases. When the user pulls the trigger switch 10 completely, DUTY becomes the maximum NMmax. When the low speed mode is set, the maximum DUTY is set to NLmax (38% in this example), and the DUTY increases toward the NLmax as the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10 increases. When the user pulls the trigger switch 10 completely, DUTY becomes the maximum NLmax.

  Note that the change in DUTY shown in FIG. 3 schematically shows the tendency of the change in DUTY with respect to the pull amount of the trigger switch 10, and the specific value of DUTY with respect to the pull amount is as shown in FIG. It is. FIG. 4 is an explanatory diagram showing DUTY (drive duty ratio), lock determination time, and voltage detection threshold for the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10 for each speed mode. The lock determination time and the voltage detection threshold will be described later.

  Thus, the microcomputer 13 corresponds to the control means of the present invention, and is based on the speed mode set by the speed change switch 9 and the rotation speed corresponding to the trigger operation amount signal from the trigger switch 10. A drive duty ratio for PWM control of the motor 20 is set, and the switching elements in the motor drive circuit 12 are duty driven according to the drive duty ratio. As a result, the current flowing through each phase of the DC motor 20 is controlled, and the DC motor 20 rotates at a rotation speed corresponding to the set speed mode and the operation amount of the trigger switch 10. Note that both the speed changeover switch 9 and the trigger switch 10 correspond to speed setting means of the present invention.

  Further, the drive device of the present embodiment is provided with a battery voltage detection circuit 11 for detecting the battery voltage Vb (corresponding to the operation amount of the present invention). The battery voltage detection circuit 11 is a very general circuit including two voltage-dividing resistors R3 and R4 connected in series for dividing the battery voltage Vb. The battery voltage after voltage division by the two voltage dividing resistors R3 and R4 is input to the battery voltage detection signal input port of the microcomputer 13 as a battery voltage detection signal. Further, as described above, the pulse signal (corresponding to the operation amount of the present invention) from the rotational position sensor 14 is also input to the microcomputer 13. Both the battery voltage detection circuit 11 and the rotational position sensor 14 correspond to the operation amount detection means of the present invention.

  Then, the microcomputer 13 performs an abnormal operation in which an overcurrent is generated in the DC motor 20 in the rechargeable impact driver 1 based on both the battery voltage detection signal from the battery voltage detection circuit 11 and the pulse signal from the rotational position sensor 14. Determine whether a state (abnormal state) has occurred. Hereinafter, the determination of the abnormal state will be described in detail.

  First, the determination of the abnormal state based on the battery voltage detection signal from the battery voltage detection circuit 11 will be described. When the rechargeable impact driver 1 is in an abnormal state and an overcurrent flows through the DC motor 20, the battery voltage Vb becomes lower than normal. Therefore, a voltage detection threshold value Vt is set in advance with respect to the value of the battery voltage Vb indicated by the battery voltage detection signal, and when the battery voltage Vb falls below the voltage detection threshold value Vt, it can be determined that the state is abnormal. .

  However, if the voltage detection threshold Vt is fixed to a constant value as in the conventional overcurrent detection method based on the battery voltage, the abnormal state can be determined (detected) accurately depending on the set speed (drive duty ratio). Disappear.

  Here, considering the change in the battery voltage with respect to the drive duty ratio, the larger the drive duty ratio, the longer the energization period (ON period of the switching element) in the PWM control, and the correspondingly the battery voltage becomes lower.

  For this reason, even if an overcurrent state occurs, if the drive duty ratio is small, the battery voltage does not decrease so much, so that the voltage detection threshold Vt can be set to a relatively large value accordingly. If the voltage detection threshold Vt is too low and the drive duty ratio is small, as described above, the battery voltage Vb does not fall below the voltage detection threshold Vt despite the overcurrent state, and the overcurrent The status may not be detected.

  On the other hand, the greater the drive duty ratio, the greater the drop in battery voltage, so the voltage detection threshold Vt can be set to a relatively small value accordingly. If the voltage detection threshold Vt is too large and the drive duty ratio is large, as described above, the battery voltage Vb falls below the voltage detection threshold Vt even though it is in a normal state, and an overcurrent is mistakenly caused. There is a risk of being judged as a state.

  Therefore, in the present embodiment, the voltage detection threshold value Vt is not fixed to a constant value, but is set to a lower value as the drive duty ratio is larger. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, for each speed mode (high speed / medium speed / low speed mode) set by operating the speed changeover switch 9, DUTY is set according to the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10. The voltage detection threshold value Vt is set to be lower as the value increases. In other words, the voltage detection threshold Vt is set so as to increase as DUTY decreases.

  Next, the determination of the abnormal state based on the pulse signal from the rotational position sensor 14 will be described. When the DC motor 20 is locked due to an abnormality in the impact mechanism or the like while the rechargeable impact driver 1 is in use, an abnormal state in which an overcurrent flows through the DC motor 20 is entered. Therefore, when the locked state is reached, it is necessary to quickly detect it and perform a protective operation such as stopping energization.

  In order to determine the lock state, a lock determination time Tr that is a determination time is set in advance, and when a pulse signal from the rotational position sensor 14 is not input during the lock determination time Tr, The lock state can be determined.

  However, as described above, if the lock determination time Tr is fixed to a constant value, the lock state cannot be determined (detected) accurately and quickly depending on the set speed (drive duty ratio).

  Here, considering the change in the rotational speed with respect to the drive duty ratio, the greater the drive duty ratio, the greater the rotational speed, and the greater the number of pulse signals input from the rotational position sensor 14 to the microcomputer 13 per unit time. Become. Therefore, when the drive duty ratio is large, the lock determination time Tr can be set to a relatively short time accordingly. If the lock determination time Tr is too long, if the drive duty ratio is large, as described above, the lock state is detected immediately even though the overcurrent continues to flow due to the lock state. The DC motor 20 may be adversely affected.

  On the other hand, the smaller the drive duty ratio, the lower the rotational speed, and the fewer pulse signals input from the rotational position sensor 14 to the microcomputer 13 per unit time. Therefore, when the drive duty ratio is small, the lock determination time Tr can be set to a relatively long time accordingly. If the lock determination time Tr is too short, when the drive duty ratio is small, as described above, the lock state is erroneously determined even though it is rotating normally at a low speed instead of the locked state. The actual work by the user may be affected.

  Therefore, in the present embodiment, the lock determination time Tr is not fixed to a constant value, but is set to be shorter as the drive duty ratio is larger. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, for each speed mode (high speed / medium speed / low speed mode) set by operating the speed changeover switch 9, DUTY is set according to the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10. The lock determination time Tr is set to be shorter as the value becomes larger. In other words, the lock determination time Tr is set longer as the DUTY becomes smaller.

  Note that the values of DUTY, lock determination time, and voltage detection threshold for the speed mode and the pull amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10 shown in FIG.

  Hereinafter, control processing executed by the microcomputer 13 will be described based on a flowchart shown in FIG. In the rechargeable impact driver 1 of the present embodiment, when the battery pack 6 is attached to the lower end of the handle part 4 and power is supplied to each part of the driving device (FIG. 2), the microcomputer 13 is activated when the microcomputer 13 is activated. The control process shown in FIG. 5 is executed according to the control process program stored in the memory 19.

  When this control process is started, an initial process is first performed (S110). Here, various initialization processes necessary for the operation of the microcomputer 13 are performed, including a process of clearing a counter described later. When this initial process is completed, it is determined whether or not the rechargeable impact driver 1 is in an abnormal state (S120).

  This determination is made based on an abnormality flag set in advance in the microcomputer 13, and since this abnormality flag is OFF as long as it is in a normal state, the process proceeds from S120 to S130. On the other hand, if the abnormality flag is turned ON in the processing of S240 or S260 described later due to the abnormal state, the abnormality flag is set unless the microcomputer 13 is initialized again (that is, while the microcomputer 13 continues to operate as it is). Remains held ON. For this reason, after the abnormality flag is turned ON, an affirmative determination is continued in S120, and the process does not proceed to S130 and subsequent steps.

  When it is determined in the determination process of S120 that the state is not the abnormal state, the process proceeds to S130, where it is determined whether or not the trigger switch 10 is operated by the user to be in the ON state. Specifically, this determination is made based on whether or not the drive start switch 16 constituting the trigger switch 10 is in the ON state. If the trigger switch 10 is not in the ON state (that is, the drive start switch 16 is in the ON state), the process returns to S120. If the trigger switch 10 is in the ON state, the process proceeds to S140.

  In S140, the drive duty ratio (DUTY) is set based on the speed mode (any one of the high speed, medium speed, and low speed modes) set by the speed change switch 9 and the pull amount of the trigger switch 10. The setting of DUTY is performed according to the value (see FIG. 4) stored in the memory 19 as described above. For example, when the trigger switch 10 is pulled to LEVEL 10 in the state set to the high speed mode, DUTY is set to 58%.

  When the DUTY is set, the lock determination time Tr and the voltage detection threshold Vt corresponding to the set DUTY are set in the subsequent S150. These values (Tr, Vt) are also set according to the values stored in the memory 19 (see FIG. 4). For example, when the trigger switch 10 is pulled to LEVEL 20 in the state set to the medium speed mode, the lock determination time Tr is set to 0.2 seconds and the voltage detection threshold Vt is set to 9.3V. And so on.

  When the lock determination time Tr and the voltage detection threshold value Vt are set, a voltage corresponding to the DUTY set in S140 is applied to the DC motor 20 in S160. That is, the energization to the DC motor 20 is PWM-controlled with the set DUTY.

  Then, in S170, the value of the counter is updated (counted up), and in subsequent S180, it is determined whether or not the Hall signal, that is, the pulse signal from the rotational position sensor 14 including the Hall IC has been updated. That is, it is determined whether or not a hall signal is newly input after the counter is cleared in S110 or S200. At this time, if the hall signal is updated, the counter is cleared in S200 and the process proceeds to S210. If the hall signal is not updated, the process proceeds to S190 and the current counter value (that is, the hall signal is updated). It is determined whether or not the continuation time of the state of not being performed and the elapsed time since the previous hall signal was updated is equal to or longer than the lock determination time Tr.

  If the current counter value has not yet reached the lock determination time Tr, the process proceeds to S210, and the battery voltage Vb is detected. In subsequent S220, it is determined whether or not the detected battery voltage Vb is lower than the voltage detection threshold value Vt. Here, if the battery voltage Vb is equal to or higher than the voltage detection threshold value, the process returns to S120, and proceeds to the process after S120 again.

  On the other hand, if the state where the hall signal is not updated exceeds the lock determination time Tr, the counter value also reaches the lock determination time Tr. In that case, an affirmative determination is made in S190 and the process proceeds to S230, where an abnormal state (here, the DC motor 20 is locked) is determined, and each switching element of the motor drive circuit 12 is turned off, whereby the DC motor 20 is turned on. Energization is stopped. In S240, the abnormality flag is turned on, and the process returns to S120.

  When the battery voltage Vb falls below the voltage detection threshold Vt, an affirmative determination is made in S220 and the process proceeds to S250, where an abnormal state (here, a battery voltage drop due to overcurrent) is determined, and each switching element of the motor drive circuit 12 is When the power is turned off, the energization to the DC motor 20 is stopped. In S260, the abnormality flag is turned on, and the process returns to S120.

  As described above, the rechargeable impact driver 1 according to the present embodiment can set the speed mode to any one of the high speed mode, the medium speed mode, and the low speed mode by operating the speed change switch 9 by the user. As shown in FIG. 4, the drive duty ratio of the DC motor 20 is set according to the speed mode and the pulling amount (LEVEL) of the trigger switch 10 by the user. Moreover, it is comprised so that the abnormal state of the said tool can be detected based on the pulse signal (Hall signal) from the rotational position sensor 14, or the battery voltage Vb, and the threshold value used in the detection changes with drive duty ratios. Is set to a value. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, the voltage detection threshold Vt used for detecting the abnormal state based on the battery voltage Vb is set to be lower as the drive duty ratio is larger. Further, the lock determination time Tr used for detecting the abnormal state (lock state) based on the hall signal is set to be shorter as the drive duty ratio is larger.

  Therefore, according to the rechargeable impact driver 1 of the present embodiment, in order to determine an abnormal state in which the overcurrent flows through the DC motor 20 in the rechargeable impact driver 1 based on both the battery voltage Vb and the hall signal. The abnormal state can be determined reliably.

  The voltage detection threshold Vt used when determining the abnormal state based on the battery voltage Vb is set to a lower value as the set rotational speed is larger (as the drive duty ratio is larger). It is possible to reliably determine the abnormal state based on the decrease in the battery voltage Vb.

  Further, the lock determination threshold Tr used when judging the abnormal state based on the hall signal is also set to a shorter value as the set rotational speed is larger (as the drive duty ratio is larger), so regardless of the set rotational speed. Thus, it is possible to reliably and promptly determine the abnormal state based on the hall signal.

  In the present embodiment, the microcomputer 13 corresponds to the abnormality determination unit and the determination threshold setting unit of the present invention. The voltage detection threshold Vt corresponds to the voltage threshold of the present invention, and the lock determination time Tr corresponds to the time threshold of the present invention.

[Modification]
Although the embodiments of the present invention have been described above, the embodiments of the present invention are not limited to the above-described embodiments, and can take various forms as long as they belong to the technical scope of the present invention. Needless to say.

  For example, the present invention can also be applied to a rechargeable impact driver that does not include the speed change switch 9 and is configured so that the drive duty ratio is simply set according to the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10. Specifically, for example, using any one of (a) to (c) of FIG. 4 (for example, the value in the high speed mode of (c)), the drive duty ratio, the lock determination time Tr, and the voltage detection threshold Vt. Can be set. In other words, the drive duty ratio may be set to increase as the trigger switch pull amount increases, and the lock determination time Tr may be set to be shorter and the voltage detection threshold value to be decreased as the drive duty ratio is increased.

  In addition, the trigger switch 10 is configured as a switch that simply turns on / off the driving of the DC motor 20, and the rotational speed of the DC motor 20 is set only by the speed changeover switch 9 regardless of the pulling amount of the trigger switch 10. For the rechargeable impact driver configured as described above, for example, in the low speed mode, each value in the LEVEL 20 in FIG. 4A is set, and in the medium speed mode, in the LEVEL 20 in FIG. 4B. In the high-speed mode, the present invention can be applied by setting the values at LEVEL 20 in FIG. 4C. That is, as the speed mode increases from the low speed mode to the medium speed mode and the high speed mode, the drive duty ratio may be set to be large, the lock determination time Tr may be short, and the voltage detection threshold value may be low.

  In the above embodiment, if the abnormal state is detected based on the battery voltage Vb and the hall signal and the hall signal is not updated within the lock determination time Tr, or if the battery voltage Vb falls below the voltage detection threshold Vt. Although it is determined that the state is abnormal, for example, the detection of the abnormal state based on the Hall signal (lock state detection) may not be performed, and only the abnormality detection function based on the battery voltage Vb may be provided. Only the abnormal detection (lock state detection) function based on the hall signal may be provided without detecting the abnormal state based on the battery voltage Vb.

  In the above embodiment, as shown in FIG. 4, the pull amount of the trigger switch 10 is divided into 20 levels of LEVEL 1 to 20, and the DUTY, the lock determination time Tr, and the voltage detection threshold Vt are set for each LEVEL. However, this is only an example. That is, the numerical example shown in FIG. 4 is merely an example, and the DUTY, the lock determination time Tr, and the voltage detection threshold Vt are set more finely (to be different values) for each LEVEL. Or, conversely, for example, the same value may be set for LEVEL 1 to 7, the same value for LEVEL 8 to 14, and the same value for LEVEL 15 to 20.

  In short, as a whole, as the DUTY increases, the lock determination time Tr tends to be shortened, and as long as the voltage detection threshold Vt tends to decrease, what value is set, or how finely it is set. This can be determined as appropriate.

  In the above embodiment, the speed mode can be switched to three stages of the high speed, medium speed, and low speed modes. However, the switching of the three stages is merely an example, and may be, for example, two stages or four or more stages. It is good. Or it can also be set as the structure which can be switched continuously (steplessly).

  In the above embodiment, the rotational position sensor 14 is described as being composed of a Hall IC. However, this is only an example, and as long as the rotational position and rotational speed of the DC motor 20 can be detected, the rotational position sensor 14 is not limited. The specific configuration of is not particularly limited.

  In the above embodiment, the switching elements in the motor drive circuit 12 are all configured by n-channel FETs. For example, a p-channel FET may be used for the high-side switch. Alternatively, a bipolar transistor may be used for each switching element.

  In the above embodiment, the case where the present invention is applied to a rechargeable impact driver has been described. However, the present invention is, for example, a rechargeable impact that is used by attaching a socket or the like to an anvil for fastening bolts or screws. A wrench, a rechargeable driver drill that is used with various bits and drills attached to the drill chuck to drill holes in the workpiece, a rechargeable hand saw that cuts the workpiece with a saw blade, and a grindstone to sharpen the blade If it is an electric tool provided with a DC motor as a power source, such as a rechargeable grinder used by being attached to a shaft, the same effect can be obtained by applying the same as in the above embodiment.

It is explanatory drawing showing the structure of the rechargeable impact driver of embodiment. It is an electric circuit diagram showing the structure of the drive device of the DC motor of the embodiment. It is explanatory drawing showing the outline of the change of DUTY (drive duty ratio) with respect to the pulling amount (LEVEL) of a trigger switch for every speed mode. It is explanatory drawing showing DUTY (drive duty ratio) with respect to the pull amount (LEVEL) of a trigger switch for every speed mode, a lock determination time, and a voltage detection threshold value. It is a flowchart showing the control processing performed with a microcomputer in order to drive a direct-current motor.

Explanation of symbols

  DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 1 ... Rechargeable impact driver, 2, 3 ... Half housing, 4 ... Handle part, 5 ... Main body housing, 6 ... Battery pack, 7 ... Motor storage part, 8 ... Chuck sleeve, 9 ... Speed change switch, 10 ... Trigger Switch 11 battery voltage detection circuit 12 motor drive circuit 13 microcomputer 14 rotational position sensor 16 drive start switch 17 variable resistor 18 battery 19 memory 20 DC motor 21-26 ... gate circuit, Q1-Q6 ... switching element, R1, R2 ... resistor, R3, R4 ... voltage dividing resistor

Claims (8)

  1. A rechargeable power tool,
    A DC motor that drives the tool output shaft;
    A battery pack incorporating a secondary battery as a power source of the DC motor;
    A switching circuit comprising at least one switching element provided on the energization path from the secondary battery to the DC motor;
    At least one speed setting means operated by a user to set the rotational speed of the DC motor;
    Control means for setting a drive duty ratio for PWM control of the DC motor via the switching circuit based on the rotational speed set by the operation of the speed setting means;
    Driving means for turning on / off the switching element in the switching circuit and rotating the DC motor according to the driving duty ratio set by the control means;
    When the DC motor is rotated by the driving means, an operation for detecting at least one type of operation amount that directly or indirectly indicates an operation state of the rechargeable electric tool, excluding an energization current value of the DC motor. A quantity detection means;
    An abnormality determination means for determining whether or not the operation state of the rechargeable power tool is abnormal by comparing the operation amount detected by the operation amount detection means with a determination threshold set for the operation amount;
    Determination threshold setting means for setting the determination threshold;
    With
    The determination threshold setting means sets the determination threshold continuously or stepwise according to the rotational speed set by the speed setting means.
  2. The rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1,
    The operation amount detection means detects a voltage of the secondary battery as the operation amount,
    The determination threshold value setting means sets a voltage threshold value as the determination threshold value such that the voltage threshold value becomes lower as the rotational speed set by the speed setting means is larger,
    The abnormality determination unit determines that the operation state of the rechargeable electric tool is abnormal when the voltage of the secondary battery detected by the operation amount detection unit is lower than the voltage threshold value. tool.
  3. The rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1,
    The operation amount detection means outputs a detection signal as the operation amount every time the DC motor rotates by a certain amount,
    The determination threshold value setting means sets a time threshold value as the determination threshold value such that the time threshold value becomes shorter as the rotational speed set by the speed setting means increases.
    The abnormality determination unit determines that the operation state of the rechargeable power tool is abnormal when a time during which the detection signal is not output from the operation amount detection unit is equal to or greater than the time threshold. Electric tool.
  4. The rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1,
    The operation amount detecting means is configured to detect a voltage of the secondary battery as one of the operation amounts and output a detection signal as one of the operation amounts every time the DC motor rotates by a certain amount. Has been
    The determination threshold value setting means sets the voltage threshold value and the time threshold value as the determination threshold value, and the voltage threshold value is set to be lower as the rotation speed set by the speed setting means is larger. Set so that the larger the rotation speed set by the setting means, the shorter the value,
    The abnormality determination unit is configured such that when the voltage of the secondary battery detected by the operation amount detection unit is lower than the voltage threshold, or the time during which the detection signal is not output from the operation amount detection unit is equal to or greater than the time threshold. The rechargeable power tool is characterized in that the operation state of the rechargeable power tool is determined to be abnormal.
  5. The rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4,
    The speed setting means has a speed changeover switch for selectively setting the rotational speed of the DC motor to at least two types by a user operation,
    The rechargeable power tool, wherein the control means sets the drive duty ratio based on an operation state of the speed change switch.
  6. The rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4,
    The speed setting means has a trigger switch for setting the rotational speed of the DC motor according to the operation amount of the user,
    The rechargeable power tool, wherein the control means sets the drive duty ratio according to an operation amount of the trigger switch.
  7. The rechargeable electric tool according to any one of claims 1 to 4,
    The speed setting means includes
    A speed changeover switch for selectively setting at least two speed modes of the DC motor by a user's operation;
    A trigger switch for setting the rotational speed of the DC motor according to the operation amount of the user;
    Have
    The control means sets the drive duty ratio in accordance with the operation amount of the trigger switch so that the maximum drive duty ratio, which is the drive duty ratio when the operation amount is maximum, differs for each speed mode. A rechargeable electric tool characterized by setting.
  8. The rechargeable electric tool according to claim 1,
    Charging characterized by comprising protection means for protecting the DC motor by stopping energization of the DC motor when the abnormality determining means determines that the operating state of the rechargeable electric tool is abnormal. Power tool.
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JP2008142707A JP5112956B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2008-05-30 Rechargeable power tool
CN 200910133699 CN101590640B (en) 2008-05-30 2009-04-22 Rechargeable power tool
US12/453,830 US8324845B2 (en) 2008-05-30 2009-05-22 Rechargeable power tool, control unit and recording medium
EP09007022.8A EP2127824B1 (en) 2008-05-30 2009-05-26 Rechargeable power tool, control unit and program
RU2009120629/02A RU2508182C2 (en) 2008-05-30 2009-05-29 Rechargeable driven tool, control unit and record medium

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JP (1) JP5112956B2 (en)
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