JP2008215863A - Concentration analyzing method of stable isotope - Google Patents

Concentration analyzing method of stable isotope Download PDF

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JP2008215863A
JP2008215863A JP2007050075A JP2007050075A JP2008215863A JP 2008215863 A JP2008215863 A JP 2008215863A JP 2007050075 A JP2007050075 A JP 2007050075A JP 2007050075 A JP2007050075 A JP 2007050075A JP 2008215863 A JP2008215863 A JP 2008215863A
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concentration
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alkali metal
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JP4857148B2 (en
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Toshibumi Abe
Kenji Fukuda
Hidetoshi Yoshida
秀俊 吉田
健治 福田
阿部  俊文
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Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corp
大陽日酸株式会社
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Abstract

<P>PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a concentration analyzing method of a stable isotope effective for determining the concentration of the isotope of a hardly volatile substance such as an amino acid or the like labelled in a low concentration of below 50 atom% in isotope labelling ratio. <P>SOLUTION: When the concentration of the isotope of a low concentration labelled sample is analyzed, a matrix solution wherein an acid aqueous solution and an alkali metal ion-containing aqueous solution are added is used as a matrix solution of an FAB method and this matrix solution is mixed with a sample to perform mass analysis. The concentration of the stable isotope is calculated from the intensity ratio of the first peak of an alkali ion added molecule ions, wherein an alkali metal is added to a molecule highest in presence probability, and a second peak, which is the peak of an alkali metal ion added molecule ions next high in presence probability and appears on the high mass number side by one mass number of the first peak, in the obtained mass spectrum. <P>COPYRIGHT: (C)2008,JPO&INPIT

Description

The present invention relates to a method for analyzing a stable isotope concentration, and more specifically, it is hardly volatile, such as a stable isotope uniformly labeled amino acid, and one element of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in the molecule is present. The present invention relates to a stable isotope concentration analysis method for labeling with 13 C, 2 H, 15 N and 17 O or 18 O at a low concentration of 50 atom% or less and determining the isotope concentration of the labeled element.

  Currently, mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy are used to determine the isotope labeling rate of a specific element in a compound. Specifically, in mass spectrometry, a pretreated sample or an untreated sample is analyzed with a mass spectrometer such as GCMS (Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry), LCMS (Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry), or IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). The peak ratio between the molecular ion peak and mass number + α (α is the difference in mass number between two nuclides that are isotopes) or the peak ratio between a specific fragment ion and mass number + α is The isotope concentration (isotope labeling rate) is obtained because it is equal to the abundance ratio of the nuclide as a body. By performing mass spectrometry in combination with GC or LC, the isotope concentration of a specific compound in the mixture can also be determined.

In particular, in the case of IRMS, mass spectrometry specialized for gas samples such as CO 2 , N 2 , O 2 , and SO 2 is performed to determine the isotope concentration of each element. Sample Otherwise CO 2, N 2, O 2 , SO 2, firstly, CO 2, N 2, O 2, it is necessary to gasification to SO 2. The method of gasification, the CO 2, NO 2, O 2 , SO 2 by combustion in the combustor which is connected to the IRMS, by further reduction, combustion method and from NO 2 to obtain the N 2, a chemical such as decarboxylation There is a method of obtaining CO 2 , N 2 , O 2 , SO 2 by a typical pretreatment. IRMS can be combined with GC, and a method combined with the above-described gasification: combustion method is called GC-C-IRMS (GC Combustion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry).

In infrared spectroscopy, existing techniques exist only for the analysis of carbon isotopes of CO 2 and CH 4 . For example, in the case of CO 2, 12 CO 2 and the intensity ratio of the light absorption of each characteristic wavelength of 13 CO 2 to analyze the isotopic ratios by measuring (e.g., see Patent Document 1.).

  Further, in the isotope analysis, particularly in the isotope analysis of light elements such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, the mass fractionation effect in the device (the mass fractionation effect in the device is particularly referred to as the mass discrimination effect) is large. It is difficult to determine the absolute value of the isotopic composition. For this reason, the isotope ratio is often discussed as a relative deviation from a certain standard (relative method). In stable isotope mass spectrometry, the analytical elements are subjected to isotope fractionation not only during mass analysis, but also during sample processing and extraction of analytical elements, and also during removal of interfering elements. Therefore, it is important to analyze the unknown sample and the standard substance under the same conditions as much as possible. In order to match the analysis conditions of unknown samples and isotope standards as much as possible, a so-called dual inlet method, which is equipped with two pairs of sample introduction systems of the same shape and size, is used, and samples and standard samples are measured alternately. (For example, see Non-Patent Document 1). High-accuracy isotope analysis of light elements is often performed by a combination of the relative method using the dual inlet method and the IRMS described above. Especially when the sample is a hardly volatile substance such as an amino acid, it is burned as a pretreatment. IRMS combined with the law is used.

  On the other hand, a method of using the FAB method (Fast Atom Bombardment = fast atom bombardment method) as an ionization method is known as mass spectrometry of thermally decomposable and hardly volatile substances such as amino acids. In the FAB method, a sample is mixed with a viscous organic compound (matrix) such as glycerol, and atoms such as xenon or argon collide with the solution to perform ionization. As the matrix, glycerol, thioglycerin, 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol, etc. are known as practical matrices, and selecting a matrix according to the properties of the sample is very effective in obtaining a high-quality mass spectrum. It can be said that it is an important factor (for example, refer nonpatent literature 2).

However, since both matrices are very viscous substances and the sample is a solid sample, it is difficult to obtain a uniform sample solution even if it is directly mixed with the matrix. Is often performed via a solvent in which both are dissolved (hereinafter, a mixture of a solvent in which the sample and matrix are dissolved and the matrix is referred to as a matrix solution). Also, the FAB method has a softer ionization mechanism than the EI method (Electron Ionization), which is the most common ionization method, and molecular ions (exactly protonated molecular ions: [M + H] + and deprotonation). The molecular ion: [M−H] , the same applies hereinafter) is likely to appear. Of the ions generated by ionization, fragment ions give information only about specific sites in the molecule. On the other hand, molecular ions give information on the whole molecule. That is, in the molecular ion, information is reflected even if any part of the element in the molecule is labeled with a specific isotope. For this reason, the FAB method is a versatile and excellent method for obtaining the isotope labeling rate of a substance whose isotope labeling rate is unknown.

In addition, in the FAB method, when alkali metal ions such as Na + and K + are present in the matrix solution, not only molecular ions but also sodium ion-added molecular ions added with alkali metal ions: [M + Na] + or potassium ion addition It is known that molecular ions: [M + K] + appear (peaks appear in the mass number of the sample +23 or +40 mass number).

  As described above, in the isotope analysis of hardly volatile substances such as amino acids, IRMS combined with a combustion method is generally used, but IRMS also has the following problems.

(1) The apparatus becomes complicated because a combustion and reduction apparatus is incorporated in the previous stage of mass spectrometry.

(2) Eventually, mass spectrometry is performed by converting into substances present in the environmental atmosphere such as oxygen gas, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide gas, and therefore there is a high possibility of causing an analysis error due to contamination from the environmental atmosphere. In particular, in the measurement of samples labeled with 13 C, 15 N, 17 O, and 18 O, which are very little present in the ambient atmosphere, the adverse effects of this contamination are significant.

(3) When chemical impurities are present in the sample, CO 2 , SO 2 , O 2 and N 2 generated as pretreatment are derived from a combination of the sample and the chemical impurities, and as a result, accurate It is difficult to reflect the isotope ratio of only the target object.

(4) Since the mass spectrometry is specialized for CO 2 , N 2 , O 2 , and SO 2 , the hydrogen isotope concentration cannot be measured.

  In addition, in high-accuracy light element isotope analysis, the “relative comparison method between the reference material and the sample” has been implemented in order to eliminate the influence of the mass discrimination effect, but this also has the following problems. is there.

(5) Although reference materials for samples whose isotope abundance ratio is approximately equal to the natural abundance ratio are established internationally, reference materials for samples whose isotope concentrations deviate from the natural abundance ratio are internationally Are not maintained and cannot be obtained.

  Furthermore, the dual inlet method used in the relative method also has the following problems in view of the current situation that there is no international standard for reference materials for samples whose isotope concentration deviates from the natural abundance ratio.

(6) If the isotope composition of the reference material and the sample differ only slightly, this is a very good method for high-precision isotope analysis, but the isotope composition of the reference material and the sample is different. The memory to the shared part of the device (when the dual inlet method is used for mass spectrometry, the sample introduction system is independent for the standard substance and the sample, but the part after the ion source is shared) Highly accurate isotope analysis cannot be performed due to the effect (the other residue after the ion source).

And in FABMS which has the possibility of solving the above problem,
(7) Although molecular ion peaks appear, there are many trace impurities in the sample and matrix, noise peaks derived from the apparatus (see Non-Patent Document 2), and the concentrations of nuclides that are isotopes are not equal to each other. In the case where the peak of one is much smaller than the other peak, the peak is buried in the noise peak described above, so the quality required for the determination of the isotope concentration with high accuracy, that is, the target molecule There is a problem in that it is difficult to obtain a mass spectrum in which the intensity of only ion peaks is very large and other unnecessary peaks are suppressed as much as possible.

Further, as a means for obtaining a mass spectrum in which only the intensity of the molecular ion peak is increased and other unnecessary peaks are suppressed as much as possible, a method of measuring FABMS using a novel matrix has been proposed (for example, (See Patent Document 2). However, when this method is used, the molecular ion peak increases,
(8) No effect is obtained until it can withstand the calculation of the isotope concentration with higher accuracy than the peak.

  Finally, in the above-mentioned FABMS measurement, by appropriately selecting the type and concentration of the matrix and the additive to the matrix, the intensity of only the molecular ion peak obtained in the FABMS measurement is increased, and high accuracy is obtained from the peak. There has also been proposed a method that makes it possible to calculate an isotope concentration (see, for example, Patent Document 3).

However, this method is a method for a compound in which one kind of element is labeled at a high concentration with 13 C, 2 H, 15 N and 17 O or 18 O, that is, the strongest of the molecular ion peaks. This is a method of calculating the isotope concentration by using the intensity ratio of the peak (main peak) and the peak having the next lowest intensity by 1 MASS from the main peak.

On the other hand, in the compound in which one kind of element is labeled with 13 C, 2 H, 15 N and 17 O or 18 O at a low concentration of 50 atom% or less, the second strongest peak is the strongest peak. 1 MASS (2 MASS for 18 O labeling) has a high mass number peak, and isotope concentration is calculated using these intensity ratios. Therefore,
(9) Even if an unnecessary peak appears on the high mass number side of the main peak (especially on the high mass number side by 1 MASS or 2 MASS), one kind of element is 13 C, 2 H, 15 N and 17 O or 18 O. In the analysis of compounds labeled at a high concentration at 1, one element is labeled at a low concentration of 50 atom% or less at 13 C, 2 H, 15 N and 17 O or 18 O. In the analysis of chemical compounds, the effect on the accuracy of isotope analysis was great, which hindered high-precision analysis.

As described above, for substances which are hardly volatile substances such as amino acids and whose isotope composition deviates from the natural abundance ratio and whose concentration is 50 atom% or less, the isotope concentration is accurate. In the past, it has often been conducted to analyze precursors, intermediates or raw materials, and to use these isotope concentrations to obtain isotope concentrations such as amino acids. Was the current situation.
JP 2005-30816 A JP-A-9-113485 Japanese Patent Application No. 2006-316545 Hirata, Analytical Method for Measuring Isotope Ratios, Bunkeki, 2002 No. 4, pp. 152-160 YOKUDEL-FAB-Matrix [Matrix for FAB measurement]-Know-how of FAB measurement, JEOL Datum Co., Ltd., July 1, 2004 (2nd edition)

  Therefore, the present inventor uses the FAB method as an ionization method for mass spectrometry of a sample having low volatility without using an IRMS having many problems and without performing comparative analysis with a standard substance. When analyzing the stable isotope concentration by the adopted FABMS, only the peaks that are derived from the target substance in the sample and are necessary for the calculation of the isotope concentration are greatly increased, and the appearance of unnecessary peaks is suppressed as much as possible. Therefore, it is possible to improve the quality of the obtained mass spectrum and make it effective for highly accurate determination of isotope concentration. Determination of isotope concentration of low-volatility substances such as amino acids labeled at low concentration The present invention has been found to be very effective.

That is, the stable isotope concentration analysis method of the present invention is a method for analyzing the stable isotope concentration in a sample by mass analyzing a low concentration labeled sample having an isotope labeling rate of 50 atom% or less. The FAB method is used as an ionization method for the sample of the sample, and the mass solution is prepared by mixing an aqueous acid solution and an aqueous solution containing alkali metal ions into a matrix solution obtained by dissolving the matrix used in the FAB method in a solvent. Among the obtained peaks, there are a first peak of an alkali metal ion-added molecular ion obtained by adding an alkali metal to a molecule having the highest existence probability, and a peak of an alkali metal ion-added molecular ion having the next highest existence probability. And the intensity ratio with the second peak appearing on the high mass number side by 1 mass number (1MASS) of the first peak. It is one and calculates the constant isotope concentration, when the label is a 18 O instead peak appearing only 1 mass number higher mass number of the first peak, the first peak 2 It is characterized by using a peak that appears on the high mass number side by the mass number (2MASS).

  In the stable isotope concentration analysis method of the present invention, the matrix is a matrix containing at least one of glycerol, thioglycerol, 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol, dithiothreitol, diethanolamine, and triethanolamine as a main component. It is preferable to use a solvent mainly composed of at least one of pure water, methanol, ethanol, hexane, benzene, and N, N′-dimethylformamide. Furthermore, the acid aqueous solution is preferably an aqueous solution of at least one of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid, and the alkali metal of the alkali metal-containing aqueous solution is at least one of lithium, sodium, and potassium. It is preferable.

  In particular, the matrix solution is preferably 5 to 30% by volume glycerol aqueous solution. When the acid aqueous solution is a 1N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution, the mixed amount of the aqueous acid solution with respect to the matrix solution is preferably set in the range of 0.5 to 2.5 for the aqueous hydrochloric acid solution to 6 of the matrix solution by volume ratio. The mixed amount of the alkali metal ion-containing aqueous solution with respect to the matrix solution is such that when the alkali metal ion-containing aqueous solution is a 1N sodium chloride aqueous solution, the sodium chloride aqueous solution is 0.5 to 2.5 by volume ratio with respect to 6 of the matrix solution. It is preferable to set in the range.

According to the stable isotope concentration analysis method of the present invention, it is not necessary to incorporate a combustion apparatus or a reduction apparatus in the previous stage of the mass spectrometer, and the apparatus can be simplified. Further, since the labeled amino acid or the like is not converted into oxygen, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide, there is no possibility of an analysis error due to the contamination from the ambient air. Furthermore, even if chemical impurities are present in the sample, the chemical impurities and the sample (target product) can be separated by mass separation, so that they are not affected by the chemical impurities. In addition, since the isotope concentration determination using protonated molecular ion peaks and alkali metal ions added molecular ion peak including the molecular information only by adding the alkali metal ions such as protons and sodium ions in the molecule, 2 H Concentration information can be obtained, and hydrogen isotope analysis is also possible.

  In addition, since the concentration can be calculated by measuring only the sample, there is no risk of a decrease in analysis accuracy due to the memory effect as in the dual inlet method. In addition, even if one peak is much smaller than the other peak, a small peak is not buried in impurities in the sample and matrix, noise peaks derived from the device, etc. It is possible to acquire a mass spectrum that can be used sufficiently for the determination.

Furthermore, in the FABMS measurement, when an alkali metal ion is added, the alkali metal ion appears on the high mass number side of the peak derived from the molecule having the highest existence probability among the molecules. Since the effect of suppressing unnecessary peaks is very remarkable, it is possible to determine a more accurate isotope concentration particularly for a low-concentration labeled compound as compared with a method of detecting molecular ions as M + H.

  In addition, this invention is utilized when the isotopic concentration of one element is unknown. However, even when the isotope concentrations of multiple elements are unknown, other means such as IRMS, IR (Infrared Spectroscopy), NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) etc. It is possible to determine all of the elements even if the isotope concentrations of multiple elements are unknown by using the present invention in a state where the elements of which the isotope concentration is unknown are used. It is.

  First, in order to carry out the method of the present invention, it is very important to prepare a matrix solution appropriately when FABMS analysis is performed on the isotope concentration of a hardly volatile substance such as an amino acid. Specifically, when the matrix is dissolved in a solvent to form a matrix solution, it is necessary to set the matrix concentration appropriately. The matrix concentration can be adjusted according to the type of the matrix and the solvent, but it is usually preferable to adjust the matrix concentration to be in the range of 7 to 25% by volume. If the matrix concentration is too high, the matrix peak appears stronger than the sample, the sample peak used for calculating the isotope concentration becomes relatively small, and the analysis accuracy decreases. On the other hand, since the matrix is a substance necessary for ionizing the sample in the form of molecules, if the matrix concentration is too low, the peak intensity of the molecular ions in the sample will be reduced, and the analysis accuracy will be reduced or analysis will be impossible. May be. In consideration of these matters, it is most desirable to prepare so as to be 10% by volume.

  As the matrix used in the present invention, those commonly used can be used, and specifically, glycerin (glycerol), thioglycerin, diethanolamine, triethanolamine and the like can be used. Of these matrices, glycerol is optimal.

  As the solvent, any substance can be selected as long as the matrix and the sample to be measured are dissolved together. Specifically, pure water, methanol, ethanol, hexane, benzene, N, N′-dimethylformamide or the like can be used, but a combination of glycerol and pure water is optimal.

  Furthermore, the effect can be drastically improved by adding an appropriate amount of acid aqueous solution to the matrix solution prepared as described above. As the acid aqueous solution, an aqueous solution of at least one of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid can be used. The concentration of the aqueous acid solution varies depending on the components and concentration of the matrix solution and the type of acid. However, if the concentration is too low, the amount of the aqueous acid solution added to the matrix solution increases, and the aqueous acid solution is mixed when preparing the matrix solution. In consideration of the amount, the matrix concentration must be increased, and there are inconveniences such as taking a long time to sufficiently dissolve the matrix in the solvent. In addition, when the concentration of the acid aqueous solution is high, care must be taken in handling the acid aqueous solution. The acid concentration of the acid aqueous solution is suitably in the range of 0.5 to 2.5N, and is preferably set to about 1N in consideration of operability during addition and mixing.

  The mixing amount of the aqueous acid solution into the matrix solution varies depending on the components and concentration of the matrix solution and the components and concentration of the aqueous acid solution. For example, when 1N aqueous hydrochloric acid solution is used as the aqueous acid solution, Aqueous solution = 6: The range of 0.5 to 2.5 is preferable, and it is particularly preferable to set the matrix solution: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution = about 6: 1. At this time, if the amount of the hydrochloric acid aqueous solution is too small, the effect of adding the acid aqueous solution cannot be obtained sufficiently, and if it is too large, the matrix solution is diluted, leading to a decrease in peak intensity.

  In addition, by adding a trace amount of alkali metal ions to the matrix solution prepared as described above, the effect can be greatly improved. Addition of alkali metal ions is usually performed by adding an alkali metal ion-containing aqueous solution containing at least one of lithium, sodium, and potassium, specifically, an aqueous sodium chloride solution. The concentration of the alkali metal ion in the alkali metal ion-containing aqueous solution can be arbitrarily set according to the conditions such as the component and concentration of the matrix solution, the component and concentration of the acid aqueous solution, the mixing ratio of both, and the type of alkali metal ion. However, like the acid aqueous solution, the range of 0.5 to 2.5N is appropriate, considering the operability during preparation and the peak intensity during measurement, and is preferably about 0.1N.

  The mixing amount of the aqueous solution containing alkali metal ions into the matrix solution varies depending on the components and concentration of the matrix solution, the components and concentration of the aqueous acid solution, the mixing ratio of both, and the type and concentration of the alkali metal ions. When the ion-containing aqueous solution is a 1N sodium chloride aqueous solution, the matrix solution has a volume ratio of matrix solution: sodium chloride aqueous solution = 6: 0.5 to 2.5, particularly matrix solution: sodium chloride aqueous solution = 6: It is preferable to set to about 1.

  In this way, stable isotope concentrations in low-concentration labeled samples can be analyzed efficiently and with high accuracy by dissolving the sample in a matrix solution in which an aqueous acid solution and an aqueous solution containing alkali metal ions are added and mixed. Can do.

Comparative Example 1
First, high-purity glycerol is used as a matrix, ultra-pure water produced by an ultra-pure water production apparatus is used as a solvent, and mixing is performed so that the volume ratio is glycerol: ultra-pure water = 1: 9 at room temperature. After that, the mixture was well stirred to obtain a uniform matrix solution. The sample used four amino acids, glycine, serine, histidine and tryptophan. All of these amino acids are those in which the nitrogen atom in the molecule is labeled with about 4 atom% and 15 N. These samples were prepared by diluting all the nitrogen atoms in the molecule with a high purity of 15 N and diluting with an unlabeled one. The dilution rate, the purity of the labeled product, and 15 of the unlabeled product were prepared. The exact 15 N concentration of each sample calculated strictly from the N concentration is glycine: 4.03 atom%, serine: 4.07 atom%, histidine: 4.03 atom%, tryptophan: 4.11 atom%.

  Mass spectrometry was performed on a mixture of 1 mg of each sample and 30 μL of the matrix solution, and a mass spectrum was obtained. The spectrum acquisition conditions in mass spectrometry were xenon for collision gas, 1 kV for acceleration voltage, 50 to 250 for mass scanning range, and low resolution measurement for mass resolution (M / δM = 500). ).

As a result, the peak derived from the molecule having the highest existence probability (main peak: the first peak (hereinafter the same)) from the obtained mass spectrum and the molecule having the next highest probability of existence (there are a plurality (the same applies hereinafter)). ))) (The second peak that appears on the 1MASS high mass number side of the main peak (hereinafter the same)), the concentration of 15 N is determined to obtain glycine: 4.08 atom%, serine : 4.15 atom%, histidine: 4.98 atom%, tryptophan: 4.76 atom%.

Comparing this result with the concentration calculated from the dilution rate etc., it can be seen that both glycine and serine show very good agreement. On the other hand, for histidine and tryptophan, it can be seen that the 15 N concentration calculated from the measured value is shifted to a higher concentration side as compared with the value calculated strictly from the dilution rate and the like.

Comparative Example 2
A high-purity glycerol as a matrix and an ultrapure water produced by an ultrapure water production apparatus as a solvent, respectively, and a volume ratio of glycerol: ultrapure water = 1: 7 at room temperature and glycerol: Solution B with ultrapure water = 1: 1 was used as the matrix solution. Two amino acids, serine and histidine, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

From the obtained mass spectrum, the concentration of 15 N is determined from the intensity ratio between the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the next highest probability of existence. In solution A, serine: 4.14 atom% and histidine: 4.96 atom%, and in solution B, serine: 4.16 atom% and histidine: 4.97 atom%. From this result, it can be seen that the same result can be obtained even if the concentration of the matrix solution is not strictly 10%.

Comparative Example 3
High purity glycerol was used as a matrix, ethanol was used as a solvent, and the mixture was mixed at room temperature so that the volume ratio was glycerol: ethanol = 1: 9 to obtain a matrix solution. Two amino acids, glycine and tryptophan, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

When the concentration of 15 N is obtained from the intensity ratio of the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of existence from the obtained mass spectrum, : 4.07 atom%, tryptophan: 4.74 atom%, and the same results as in Comparative Example 1 were obtained. From this result, it can be seen that the solvent used in the matrix solution need not be pure water.

Comparative Example 4
A 1N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution was added to the matrix solution (solution C) prepared in Comparative Example 1 so that the volume ratio of solution C: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution was 6: 1 to obtain a matrix solution. Two amino acids, serine and histidine, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

When the concentration of 15 N is obtained from the intensity ratio of the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of existence from the obtained mass spectrum, serine is obtained. : 4.09 atom%, histidine: 4.81 atom%. When this result is compared with the result of Comparative Example 1, it can be seen that the result of this example is closer to the calculated value calculated strictly from the dilution rate and the like. That is, it can be seen that the effect of improving the accuracy of measurement can be obtained by adding a small amount of acid.

Comparative Example 5
A matrix solution obtained by adding a 2N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution to the solution C so that the volume ratio is solution C: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution = 6: 1; and a volume ratio of 1N nitric acid aqueous solution to the solution C is solution C: nitric acid aqueous solution = 6: 1. The matrix solution added so as to be used was used. Two amino acids, serine and histidine, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

When the concentration of 15 N is obtained from the intensity ratio between the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of existence from the obtained mass spectrum, 2N When the hydrochloric acid aqueous solution was added, serine: 4.08 atom%, histidine: 4.83 atom%, and when the 1N nitric acid aqueous solution was added, serine: 4.10 atom%, histidine: 4.80 atom%, Comparative Example 4 And almost the same result. From this result, it can be seen that the amount of acid to be added is not strict and the type is not limited to hydrochloric acid.

Example 1
A 1N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution and a 1N sodium chloride aqueous solution were added to the solution C so that the volume ratio was solution C: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution: sodium chloride aqueous solution = 6: 1: 1 to obtain a matrix solution. Three amino acids of serine, histidine and tryptophan used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

From the obtained mass spectrum, a first peak derived from a molecule having the highest existence probability (a peak appearing at a mass number of molecular weight +23 because sodium ions were added as alkali metal ions), followed by the highest existence probability. When the concentration of 15 N was determined from the intensity ratio with the second peak derived from the molecule (the 1MASS high mass number side of the first peak), serine: 4.09 atom%, histidine: 4.09 atom%, tryptophan: 4 It became 18 atom%. Moreover, the mass spectrum about histidine is shown in FIG.

  When this result is compared with the result of Comparative Example 1, it can be seen that the result of this example is closer to the calculated value calculated strictly from the dilution rate and the like. In particular, the effect is remarkable in histidine and tryptophan. That is, by adding a small amount of alkali metal ions and calculating the isotope concentration using the resulting peak intensity detected as an alkali metal ion addition molecule, it is more accurate especially for high molecular weight amino acids. It can be seen that accurate measurement can be performed.

Example 2
1N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution and 2N sodium chloride aqueous solution are added to the solution C so that the volume ratio is solution C: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution: sodium chloride aqueous solution = 6: 1: 1; A 1N potassium chloride aqueous solution and a matrix solution to which a volume ratio of solution C: hydrochloric acid aqueous solution: potassium chloride aqueous solution = 6: 1: 1 was used were used. Two amino acids, serine and histidine, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

From the obtained mass spectrum, the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest existence probability (appears at a mass number of molecular weight +23 when sodium chloride is added, and molecular weight +40 when potassium chloride is added), and then the existence probability. When the concentration of 15 N is determined from the intensity ratio of the second peak derived from a high molecule, when a 2N sodium chloride aqueous solution is added, serine: 4.08 atom%, histidine: 4.13 atom%, and a 1N potassium chloride aqueous solution When serine was added, serine: 4.10 atom% and histidine: 4.10 atom% were obtained, and the same results as in Example 1 were obtained. From this result, it can be seen that the amount of alkali metal ions to be added is not strict and the type is not limited to sodium ions.

Example 3
The same matrix solution as in Example 1 was used, and four types of amino acids of glycine, serine, histidine, and tryptophan, in which carbon atoms in the molecule were labeled with about 3 atom% and 13 C, respectively, were used as samples. These samples were prepared by diluting all carbon atoms in the molecule labeled with 13 C with high purity with an unlabeled one. The dilution rate, the purity of the labeled product, and 13 of the unlabeled product were prepared. The exact 13 C concentration of each sample calculated strictly from the C concentration is glycine: 3.02 atom%, serine: 3.08 atom%, histidine: 3.04 atom%, tryptophan: 3.08 atom%.

Mass spectrometry was performed on a mixture of 1 mg of each sample and 30 μL of the matrix solution, and a mass spectrum was obtained. The spectrum acquisition conditions in mass spectrometry were the same as those in Comparative Example 1. From the obtained mass spectrum, the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence (molecular weight + 23), and the second peak derived from the molecule having the next highest probability of existence (1 MASS high mass number of the first peak) The concentration of 13 C was determined from the intensity ratio with respect to the side) and found to be glycine: 3.05 atom%, serine: 3.12 atom%, histidine: 3.11 atom%, and tryptophan: 3.12 atom%.

Example 4
As a sample, two amino acids, glycine and histidine, in which about 2 atom% of hydrogen atoms in the molecule were labeled with 2 H were used. These samples were prepared by diluting all of the hydrogen atoms in the molecule labeled with high purity with 2 H with an unlabeled one. The dilution rate, the purity of the labeled product, and 2 of the unlabeled product were prepared. The exact 2 H concentration of each sample calculated strictly from the H concentration is glycine: 5.05 atom% and histidine: 5.01 atom%.

  The same matrix solution as in Example 1 was used, mass spectrometry was performed by performing mass analysis under the same conditions as in Comparative Example 1 for a mixture of 1 mg of each sample and 30 μL of the matrix solution.

When the concentration of 2 H is determined from the intensity ratio of the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of existence from the obtained mass spectrum, : 5.09 atom%, histidine: 5.09 atom%.

Example 5
As a sample, the oxygen atom in the molecule is about 2 atom%. Two amino acids, serine and tryptophan labeled with 17 O, were used. These samples were prepared by diluting all of the oxygen atoms in the molecule labeled with high purity with 17 O with an unlabeled one. The dilution rate, the purity of the labeled product, and the 17 of the unlabeled product were prepared. The exact 17 O concentration of each sample calculated strictly from the O concentration is serine: 2.13 atom% and tryptophan: 2.35 atom%.

  The same matrix solution as in Example 1 was used, mass spectrometry was performed by performing mass analysis under the same conditions as in Comparative Example 1 for a mixture of 1 mg of each sample and 30 μL of the matrix solution.

When the concentration of 17 O is determined from the intensity ratio between the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of existence from the obtained mass spectrum, serine is obtained. : 2.18 atom%, tryptophan: 2.42 atom%.

Example 6
As samples, two types of amino acids, histidine and tryptophan, in which oxygen atoms in the molecule were labeled with about 10 atom% and 18 O were used. These samples were prepared by diluting all of the oxygen atoms in the molecule labeled with 18 O with high purity with an unlabeled one. The dilution rate, the purity of the labeled product, and the 18 of the unlabeled product were prepared. The exact 18 O concentration of each sample calculated strictly from the O concentration is histidine: 10.31 atom% and tryptophan: 9.85 atom%.

  The same matrix solution as in Example 1 was used, mass spectrometry was performed by performing mass analysis under the same conditions as in Comparative Example 1 for a mixture of 1 mg of each sample and 30 μL of the matrix solution.

From the obtained mass spectrum, the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the second highest probability of occurrence (appears on the 2MASS high mass number side of the first peak). The concentration of 18 O from the intensity ratio with respect to the peak) was glycine: 10.45 atom% and histidine: 9.98 atom%.

  In Examples 3-6, when each concentration calculated from the dilution rate and the like is compared with each measurement result, it can be seen that, as in Example 1, both have very good agreement with each amino acid. . That is, it is understood that it is very effective regardless of the type of the labeled nuclide.

Example 7
Using a thioglycerol as a matrix and pure water as a solvent, a 1N hydrochloric acid solution and a 1N sodium chloride aqueous solution were added and mixed in a volume ratio of 1: 9 in the same volume ratio as in Example 1 to a matrix. A solution was obtained. Two amino acids, serine and histidine, used in Comparative Example 1 were used as samples.

From the obtained mass spectrum, the concentration of 15 N is determined from the intensity ratio between the first peak derived from the molecule having the highest probability of existence and the second peak derived from the molecule having the next highest probability of existence. Serine: 4.08 atom%, histidine: 4.16 atom%. From this result, it can be seen that the same result can be obtained even when thioglycerol is used as the matrix.

It is a mass spectrum in case the sample is histidine in Example 1.

Claims (6)

  1.   In a method for analyzing a stable isotope concentration in a sample by mass-analyzing a low-concentration labeled sample having an isotope labeling rate of 50 atom% or less, the FAB method is adopted as a sample ionization method in mass analysis, A molecule having the highest probability of existence among the peaks obtained by mass spectrometry by mixing an aqueous acid solution and an aqueous solution containing alkali metal ions into a matrix solution obtained by dissolving a matrix used in the FAB method in a solvent. A first peak of an alkali metal ion-added molecular ion having an alkali metal added thereto, and a peak of an alkali metal ion-added molecular ion having the next highest probability of existence, and only one mass number of the first peak. Stable isotope concentration analysis characterized by calculating the stable isotope concentration from the intensity ratio with the second peak appearing on the high mass number side Law.
  2. The second peak for obtaining the intensity ratio with respect to the first peak is replaced with a peak that appears on the high mass number side by 1 mass number of the first peak when the label is 18 O. 2. The stable isotope concentration analysis method according to claim 1, wherein a peak appearing on the high mass number side by 2 mass numbers is used.
  3.   3. The matrix according to claim 1, wherein the matrix is mainly composed of at least one of glycerol, thioglycerol, 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol, dithiothreitol, diethanolamine, and triethanolamine. Analysis method of stable isotope concentration.
  4.   4. The solvent according to claim 1, wherein the solvent contains at least one of pure water, methanol, ethanol, hexane, benzene, and N, N′-dimethylformamide as a main component. 2. The method for analyzing a stable isotope concentration according to claim 1.
  5.   5. The stable isotope concentration analysis method according to claim 4, wherein the acid of the acid aqueous solution is at least one of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid.
  6.   6. The stable isotope concentration analysis method according to claim 1, wherein the alkali metal in the alkali metal-containing aqueous solution is at least one of lithium, sodium, and potassium.
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