JP2007519091A - System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen - Google Patents

System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2007519091A
JP2007519091A JP2006542838A JP2006542838A JP2007519091A JP 2007519091 A JP2007519091 A JP 2007519091A JP 2006542838 A JP2006542838 A JP 2006542838A JP 2006542838 A JP2006542838 A JP 2006542838A JP 2007519091 A JP2007519091 A JP 2007519091A
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Prior art keywords
cursor
price
position
method
market information
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JP2006542838A
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JP4553905B2 (en
Inventor
イェンス−ウヴェ・シュリュッター
ロバート・エイ・ウエスト
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トレーディング テクノロジーズ インターナショナル インコーポレイテッド
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Priority to US10/729,123 priority Critical patent/US7908570B2/en
Application filed by トレーディング テクノロジーズ インターナショナル インコーポレイテッド filed Critical トレーディング テクノロジーズ インターナショナル インコーポレイテッド
Priority to PCT/US2004/040708 priority patent/WO2005057353A2/en
Publication of JP2007519091A publication Critical patent/JP2007519091A/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04847Interaction techniques to control parameter settings, e.g. interaction with sliders, dials
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/04812Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction techniques based on cursor appearance or behaviour being affected by the presence of displayed objects, e.g. visual feedback during interaction with elements of a graphical user interface through change in cursor appearance, constraint movement or attraction/repulsion with respect to a displayed object
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04842Selection of a displayed object
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q20/00Payment architectures, schemes or protocols
    • G06Q20/08Payment architectures
    • G06Q20/10Payment architectures specially adapted for electronic funds transfer [EFT] systems; specially adapted for home banking systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/04Exchange, e.g. stocks, commodities, derivatives or currency exchange
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q40/00Finance; Insurance; Tax strategies; Processing of corporate or income taxes
    • G06Q40/06Investment, e.g. financial instruments, portfolio management or fund management
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S715/00Data processing: presentation processing of document, operator interface processing, and screen saver display processing
    • Y10S715/961Operator interface with visual structure or function dictated by intended use
    • Y10S715/962Operator interface for marketing or sales

Abstract

A method, system, and computer program product are provided for updating the position of a cursor within a display window on a transaction screen when an event occurs. If market conditions change, market information can be rearranged on the screen. Market information so that the cursor appears to be fixed to market information until the user moves the pointer device to reduce the chance of missing market opportunities by sending orders or managing them. The cursor moves in conjunction with.

Description

  The present invention relates to a computer-based method for displaying a cursor on a graphical interface used to display market information received by an electronic exchange for trading one or more tradeable objects.

  An exchange is a central market with established rules and rules where buyers and sellers meet and trade. Some exchanges, called auction exchanges, operate using a trading presence where buyers and sellers actually meet and trade at the location. Exchanges that do not actually meet at an witness called an electronic exchange are operated by an electronic or communications network instead of a trading witness to conduct transactions in an efficient, flexible and functional way. Facilitate.

  With respect to the electronic exchange, the purchaser and the seller log on to the electronic exchange via the user terminal. The user terminal is usually a personal computer, a laptop, or a workstation, and includes a Microsoft Windows (registered trademark) type operating system that provides a graphical interface based on a window area on the screen, and a pointing device such as a mouse. Indeed, user terminals may be traded on the market using other types of operating systems, including Unix type operating systems, including other types of computing devices.

  Once logged on to an electronic exchange, buyers and sellers typically have what trading objects, as electronic exchanges often operate different electronic markets, so that each electronic market represents a different trading object. You can choose to trade things. As used herein, the term “tradable object” simply means anything that can be traded by quantity and / or price. “Tradeable objects” includes, but is not limited to, all types of tradeable objects such as stocks, options, bonds, futures, currencies, and warrants, as well as funds, derivatives, and combinations thereof. Including, but not limited to, commodities such as grain, energy, and metal. The object that can be traded may be “genuine” such as a product listed on an exchange for trading, or may be “synthetic” such as a combination of genuine products created by a user. A tradeable object may actually be a combination of other tradeable objects, such as a class of tradeable objects.

  After selecting an electronic marketplace, the trader typically has access to a market order book that lists unfulfilled buy and sell orders for the tradeable object. Referring to FIG. 1, an example of communication that occurs between an electronic exchange and a user terminal is shown. During a trading session, message data 104 in the form of messages is relayed over a communication link 108 to a user terminal, generally indicated at 100. An intermediary device such as a gateway can also be used to facilitate communication over communication link 108.

  For illustrative purposes, the market data 104 characterizes the market order book and includes the inside market, where the inside market is the lowest selling price (also referred to as the best or lowest bid) and the highest purchase price (also known as the best or highest bid). Called). In some electronic markets, the market data 104 may include market depth, which is generally the amount available in the market at a certain purchase price level, and some sales price level. Means the amount available in the market. In addition to providing market order book information such as price and quantity information, electronic exchanges also offer open price, set price, net change, quantity, latest trading price, latest trading volume, and other order processing Other types of market information such as information can be provided.

  As market data 104 is received by the user terminal, information is presented to the trader on computer screen 102. Looking at market information or parts of it, you may want to take action such as sending an order to the market, canceling an order to the market, changing an order to the market, or contacting an exchange. unknown. To do so, the trader enters a command or signal, for example, by typing a keyboard, by entering a command with a mouse or touch screen, or generally indicated at 110, with some other input device Thus, various instructions or signals can be input to the user terminal 100 using one or more conventional means for inputting information.

  At 110, upon receiving one or more instructions or signals from the trader, the user terminal 100 can generate a message that reflects the action to take, generally indicated at 106. In addition to or instead of manual input, the trader may use automated trading software that generates transaction information automatically or semi-automatically. Of course, there are many different types of messages and / or order types that can be sent to an electronic exchange, all of which can be considered as various types of transaction information. Once generated, the action message 106 is transmitted from the user terminal 100 to the appropriate electronic market.

  It should be noted that usually multiple elements of an order must be entered before the order is sent to the market. Such factors or order parameters include, among other things, the desired price, the desired quantity, and whether a buy / sell order is desired. The longer it takes for a trader to enter an order, the more likely the price the trader wants to bid or offer will change or become unacceptable to the market. The market is fluid because many traders send orders to the market at the same time. In fact, a successful market has a large number of orders such that any trader wishing to enter an order to the market finds a match and the order is processed quickly or otherwise. In such a fluid market, the set of prices fluctuates rapidly. On the trading screen, the results fluctuate rapidly in the price and quantity fields on the display.

  Thus, modern trading software applications use a pointing device to perform multiple actions so that orders can be sent to the market with only one or two clicks on the pointing device. One of the most common pointing devices is a mouse, which typically includes a body and left and right buttons, and some more advanced includes a wheel located between the left and right buttons. Other types of pointing devices can also use a keyboard cursor or trackball, to name a few. Regardless of the actual pointing device used, an arrow-shaped pointer or on-screen cursor, or other identifier, is displayed on the screen, highlighting information, sending order to set order parameters Can be used for, and for canceling orders. The movement of the cursor on the screen is controlled by the relative movement of the pointing device by the user.

  Pointers or on-screen cursors are important for traders interested in making fast and accurate transactions. For most traders, the market data 104 is quickly updated on the trader's screen 102 to reflect fast fluctuations in the market, and thus the values on the screen 102 move or fluctuate rapidly. Usually, it is up to the trader to quickly and accurately move the cursor on the screen to the desired position, for example to set order parameters or enter a buy / sell order. To further illustrate this, FIGS. 2 and 3 show the types of graphical user interfaces that can be used to trade a particular tradeable object.

  FIG. 2 shows a window 200 that is normally displayed on the computer screen 102 and shows the trader market order book information. In particular, window 200 shows the total number of buy and sell orders currently on the market, such orders corresponding to prices along a price column ("Prc"). For example, the best bid is the price “140” and the quantity “20”, and the best bid is the price “141” and the quantity “75”. Other bid amounts and bid amounts are also shown for illustration. Further, what is included in the window 200 is a cursor on the screen in the form of an arrow 202. Of course, the cursor on the screen may have any shape. Arrow 202 is controlled by the relative movement of the pointer device by the user. For the sake of explanation, it is assumed that an arrow is located in the third cell from the top of the price column indicating the price “143”. Using the typical trading application and trading screen shown in FIG. 2, once the user presses the button with the cursor on “143”, the sell order is a pre-set amount. And then waits with the last command sent to the exchange at the price “143”. In other types of trading applications, sell orders can also be sent to the exchange by pressing a button very similar to a buy order.

  FIG. 3 shows the same window 200 as in FIG. 2, where only the market condition is quickly changed so that the price of the inside market increases. As a result, the series of prices automatically maintains the current inside market series price (eg, the best bid is “144” and the best bid is “142”) in the middle of the window 200. Move automatically to. Assuming that the user does not move the pointer device during a sudden change in the market, the arrow 202 is held in a fixed position on the window, which is currently placed on the price “145”. Just as the trader reflects on the previous market conditions shown in Figure 2, the trader decides to send an order to the trader at the price “143” (the price at which the cursor was previously located). To do. As such, although the trader has submitted the order, the screen has just been updated to reflect the changing market conditions. Unfortunately, the cursor is on “145” and instead the order is loaded at the unwanted price “145”. Traders made the wrong price.

  Although FIGS. 2 and 3 show one market price movement for one type of trade display, many price movements that can occur during a trading session can be imagined. This means that the purchaser or seller will always be aware of price movements and the cursor will be ready to act as if the trader is trying to enter an order at a certain price, but the order is entered Because market prices fluctuate before trading, prices can be wrong and traders can lose hundreds, thousands, or even hundreds of thousands of dollars. Because prices fluctuate, the same can happen when a trader makes a mistake in canceling an order. The higher the trader can trade, the lower the chance that the trader will make a mistake.

  This embodiment includes a method, system, and computer program product for updating the position of a cursor on a transaction screen. In the present embodiment, the trader can use software for creating an interactive transaction screen, and in addition to various functions, the trader can input orders, obtain market information, and monitor positions. The software frequently updates the trading screen as market conditions change. Meanwhile, the cursor moves with movement of the item of interest in the market information so that the cursor is maintained in a fixed position relative to the item of interest until the trader moves the pointer device.

Embodiments of the present invention can be better understood with reference to the following figures. The components in the figures are not necessarily drawn to scale, but instead are emphasized to show exemplary embodiments of the invention.
I. Overview

  This embodiment includes a method, system, and computer program product for updating the position of a cursor on a transaction screen. In the present embodiment, the trader can use software for creating an interactive transaction screen, and in addition to various functions, the trader can input orders, obtain market information, and monitor positions. The software frequently updates the trading screen as market conditions change. Meanwhile, the cursor moves with movement of the item of interest in the market information so that the cursor is maintained in a fixed position relative to the item of interest until the trader moves the pointer device.

  In an embodiment of the invention, the cursor moves with a series of prices shown on the trader. According to this embodiment, the software allows the trader to set an order price by selecting a price from the transaction screen using the input device. This also allows the trader to easily manage working orders related to prices (deleting or changing order parameters). When the price (and order) information is updated on the transaction screen, the cursor position automatically moves in conjunction with the price movement. As such, if the trader enters an order at a certain price, for example, the cursor is preferably maintained in a fixed position for a series of prices, so the trader has an increased chance of selecting a price. In addition, when a trader deletes or cancels an order at a price, the order icon moves in conjunction with the price, so the trader has more opportunities to choose to delete the exact order.

Other systems, methods, features, and advantages of this embodiment will be apparent to those skilled in the art upon evaluation of the following figures and description. All such additional systems, methods, features, and advantages are within the scope of the invention and are protected by the appended claims.
II. System architecture

  As will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, the present embodiment can operate with a fully software embodiment, a completely hardware embodiment, or a combination thereof. However, for purposes of explanation, the preferred embodiment will be described with software-based embodiments running on a computing device. As such, the preferred embodiment takes the form of a computer program product stored on a computer-readable storage medium and executed by a suitable instruction execution system of the computing device. Any suitable computer readable storage medium may be utilized such as a hard disk, CD-ROM, optical storage device, magnetic storage device, and the like.

  Referring to FIG. 4, there is shown a computing device 400 with layers that define different stages that can be used to implement embodiments of the present embodiment. These layers include a dynamic cursor controller 402, an operating system 404, and hardware 406. In addition to the necessary components, the computing device 400 includes at least one processor and a storage mechanism for storing and executing the functions described herein (both of which are not shown, but are well-known computer components).

  The operating system 404 is used to manage the hardware 406 and software resources of the computing device 400. Common functions of the operating system 404 include processor management, memory management, device management, storage management, application interface, and user interface. Any type of operating system can be used to implement this embodiment, and examples of common operating systems include Microsoft Windows® family operating system, UNIX® family operating system, and There is a Macintosh® operating system. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that it is not necessary to add complex functions to the operating system to perform these functions. For example, if the present embodiment is implemented in hardware using a hardware component such as an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), no operating system is required.

  The hardware 406 includes special programs or drivers required for peripheral input devices that mediate with the operating system 404, such as a mouse or keyboard shown at 408. In particular, the hardware 406 converts the electrical signal generated by the input device 408 into the operating system 404 programming language and vice versa. The input device 408 is used for controlling a cursor on the screen. Examples of input devices are a mouse, keyboard, game pad, virtual reality gloves, joystick, or trackball. The cursor on the screen includes any indicator or icon that moves as the input device 408 moves. Exemplary types of on-screen cursors include arrows or other graphic icons.

  The dynamic cursor controller 402 is preferably a software application that cooperates with the operating system 404 to update the cursor position on the screen. The dynamic cursor controller 402 looks for changes in the display of market information and automatically updates the cursor position on the screen to a new position for a particular transaction display. The dynamic cursor controller 402 is preferably implemented by a C + or C ++ based software program. In addition, programming languages such as Java can be used. The dynamic cursor controller 402 can be configured to operate with any type of transaction display to provide the functionality described herein.

The dynamic cursor controller 402 can be housed in a computer program product and loaded into the computer device 400 using a removable storage drive, hard drive, or communication interface such as a serial port or USB connection. Alternatively, the computer program product can be downloaded to the computer device 400 via a network. When the control logic (software) is executed by the processor, the processor performs the functions of the present invention described here.
III. System characteristics

  In the following, the characteristics of a preferred embodiment providing specific functions and usefulness necessary for electronic transactions are described. This feature includes the ability to update the cursor position in conjunction with the movement of the item of interest moving on the transaction display screen to reduce the likelihood that the trader will miss a market opportunity. More particularly, the preferred embodiment can reduce the time it takes for a trader to trade or manage an order when trading electronically via a transaction display screen. That is, conversely, it can increase the likelihood that the trader can process an order with the desired series of prices and series.

  Turning now to FIG. 5, a flowchart of an exemplary embodiment for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen is shown. The flowchart of FIG. 5 illustrates the possible implementation functions and operations of this embodiment. Each block represents a module, segment, or portion of code and includes one or more executable instructions that implement a particular logical function or step. As understood by those skilled in the art of the present invention, depending on the functions included, the execution order of a plurality of functions can be executed in an order other than the order shown in the embodiment, for example, simultaneously or in the opposite order.

  In block 500, the operating system 404 moves the cursor on the graphic display screen shown on the transaction screen 514 of the computing device. For illustration purposes, many graphic output devices are of the raster type and consist of plot points. Each dot (or pixel) making up the display is mapped onto the memory, which can be accessed directly from the processor. The number of pixels on the screen 514 is called the resolution, and each pixel can be addressed using the “x” and “y” coordinates. The cursor can be positioned at a specific (x, y) coordinate. Alternatives to the coordinate system of the mapping points on the display can be incorporated into this embodiment by those skilled in the art.

  At block 502, an input signal is received from hardware, in particular from an input device such as a mouse or keyboard. By physically moving the input device, the cursor can be moved to different positions on the (x, y) coordinates. In addition, the user can move the cursor to a desired position on the screen, such as a price (or to a position associated with a price), and click a button after the position is selected. This identifies, for example, the pixel that sends the order at a price associated with the pixel or coordinate. For position selection, a single click of the input device is common, but can be programmed to select the position with one or more clicks.

  At block 504, market information is received and displayed. Market information is displayed on the trader on screen 514 by the trading software application. Market information can be arranged in a graphical window, which can be included as part of a computer screen and can be resized in a desired direction and in a desired dimension. In addition, the trading software moves the cursor to a specific position in the window and clicks a button to send an order to the electronic exchange or to initiate an order (and then order using eg a confirmation box) Can be sent). The present invention is not limited to the type of trading window, but by way of example, trading windows are shown in FIGS. When the signal repositions the market information on the computer display, market fluctuations are indicated in the window. The signal can be any type of signal (software and / or hardware based), for example, automatically generated by software or manually generated by a trader.

  At block 506, the dynamic cursor controller 402 obtains the current coordinates of the cursor from the operating system 404 as the market moves. Assume that the current coordinates of the cursor are (X, Y). Here, X and Y are values or units measured from known points determined by the computer software or operating system 404.

  In block 508, the dynamic cursor controller 402 determines whether the cursor is located in a “hot zone (important range)”. The hot zone here is determined by the programmer of the trading application or by the user. Referring to FIG. 6, a hot zone may include a series of price cells “137” through “145”, where the trader selects a position corresponding to one of these series of prices. An order is established at a price corresponding to the selected cell. A cell is a uniquely specified part, for example, a rectangular space in which text, a numerical value, or a formula is displayed. Other hot zones may include, for example, a bid amount cell, or a bid amount cell. If the cursor is not within the predetermined hot zone, no action is taken at block 510 to update the cursor position. That is, the cursor is outside the valid trading area. Note that the hot zone definition does not require cells. A hot zone can be defined in any shape or size, and can be defined down to the pixel (or smallest unit) level of the graphic display.

At block 512, if the cursor is in the hot zone, the operating system 404 moves the cursor to coordinates corresponding to market movements. In block 506, the price displayed at the coordinate position (X + 1, Y) (in this case, the cursor is at the coordinate position (X, Y)) has moved to the coordinate position (X + 1, Y + 2). In this case, the cursor is updated and moved to the corresponding coordinate position without operating the input device (in this case, the cursor is moved from the coordinate position (X, Y) to (X, Y + 2)).
IV. System example

  An example is given here to illustrate some of the characteristics of this embodiment. The description of these examples provides convenience. It is intended that the present invention is not limited to these screen display environment applications. In fact, after reading the following description of these examples, it will become apparent to those skilled in the art how to implement the present invention in various transaction screen environments.

  FIG. 6 shows a screen display and order entry system according to a preferred embodiment. In particular, the current inside market of the exemplary market is shown in the screen display shown at 600. Although the display 600 is a preferred display because it simplifies the trading system so that market information can be entered and tracked in an efficient manner, the display according to the present invention is not so limited. This type of display is arranged along a common price axis so that the amount of bids and the amount of bid are linked to the common price axis, and is devised so that market information is easy to read. The representative price of a tradeable object is shown in the price column, where a series of prices are arranged in ascending numerical order. The series of prices may be static display (the series of prices will not move until a relocation command is received) or dynamic display (the series of prices will move), but the trading software It is only possible until an instruction to relocate information is received.

  In the example shown, the highest bid is “140” and the lowest bid is “141”. The cursor 602 is currently at the position of coordinates (X, Y), and is positioned above the price “143”. Here, X and Y represent any number or unit of length measured from a known point. A display such as 600 allows the trader to enter orders directly into the window, for example, by selecting price cells located along a common axis. Thus, for example, clicking a button places an order with a preset amount and a selected price (eg, in this example, the selected price is equal to the price “143”).

  FIG. 7 shows a screen display using the same order input system as FIG. 6 except that the inside market moves, the highest bid price is “141” and the lowest bid price is changed to “143”. In order to keep the inside market near the center of the window, the trading application can rearrange the market information on the display. When doing so, the price “143” moves to (X ′, Y ′) on the screen, and X ′ and Y ′ represent positions different from (X, Y). Assuming the trader has not moved the cursor to another position in accordance with the preferred embodiment, the dynamic cursor controller 402 moves the cursor position from (X, Y) to (X ′, Y ′). Thus, the cursor on the screen is “fixed” to the price “143” in conjunction with the price “143”. It is worth noting that the displayed market information may be rearranged or configured for any reason, and therefore, this embodiment is not limited to the middle or near center of the trading software displaying the inside market. It is not limited when rearranging.

  Referring to FIG. 6, if the market information is changed but the market information is not rearranged, the (X, Y) position of the cursor 602 is maintained at the position corresponding to the price “143”. That is, even if the market information fluctuates and the screen is updated, if the contents of the designated hot zone do not move, the cursor on the screen continues to be fixed until the user moves the input device. For example, as the fluctuation of the market information in this case, the quantity “75” of the best bid “141” is reduced to “35” and the quantity “40” is matched (the scenario in this example is not shown). There is a case.

  FIG. 8 shows another type of screen display and order entry system according to a preferred embodiment. A type 800 screen display always maintains the inside market in the center of the screen (this type of screen display always simply maintains the inside market in the same location of the display. Another example of this type of screen Is a Market Grid commercially available from Trading Technologies International, Inc. of Chicago, Illinois). Therefore, when the inside market fluctuates, a series of price values also fluctuate within the designated position. In order to facilitate the comparison of the screen types in the figure, the market information shown in the screen display 800 is the same as the market information shown in FIG. Similarly, referring to FIG. 8, the cursor 802 is currently positioned above the price “143”.

  FIG. 9 shows the screen display of FIG. 8 except that the highest bid price in the inside market is changed to “141” and the lowest bid price is changed to “143”. In this example, the trading application that generated the screen display 800 reconstructed the market information and displayed the new market information. Therefore, the dynamic cursor controller 402 automatically updates the cursor position to a position related to “143”. As in the previous description, it is assumed that the cursor is not moved by the trader.

  Of course, the present invention can constitute the present embodiment including any market information screen for moving the market information by those skilled in the art, and can inform the trader of the current state of the market. For example, a market information screen can show a series of prices along an axis so that a market “gap” can be displayed (eg, a series of prices where there is no bid amount or bid amount). Also good. This can provide a more intuitive display of the market. Examples of this type of display are shown in FIGS.

However, a market information screen showing no “gap” may be used. Examples of this type of display are shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 (although the type of display shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 may be changed by those skilled in the art to include a “gap”). it can). Further, in a situation where a series of prices is excluded from the display (for example, when there is no more quantity in the series of prices), the cursor may be fixed to the current item of interest. For example, in FIG. 8, the item of interest may be “price”, and the cursor may be set to move in conjunction with a specific price “142”. In this case, if the market display is updated next, and the price “142” moves out of the display range and does not appear anymore (see FIG. 9), instead of moving the cursor, the cursor is now priced. The current position of the cursor may be associated with the movement of “144”. Thus, the cursor tracks the movement of “144” until “144” also disappears from the display, at which point the cursor tracks the movement of the new alternative price. Based on what has been described herein, one skilled in the art can recognize many other methods of cursor movement based on such screens.
IV. Conclusion

  This embodiment provides a mechanism used for electronic trading that reduces the likelihood that a trader will make a wrong trade at an undesired price, especially when using trading software that allows single click trading. Preferably, the trader can specify the item of interest, and once specified, a cursor is displayed on the transaction screen to automatically track the movement of information. In the example above, price information was used as the feature of interest, but other features such as the bid amount or bid amount, the trader's current order, the latest transaction price, or any other feature of the trader Items can also be selected.

  Although various embodiments of the invention have been described above, they have been described by way of example only and not limitation. Those skilled in the art can make various changes in form and detail without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is not limited by any of the exemplary embodiments described above, but should be defined only in accordance with the claims and their equivalents.

A block diagram illustrating a conventional user terminal that receives market data from an electronic exchange and transmits transaction information to the electronic exchange. Block diagram of a trading screen showing arrows used to receive and display market data, used to receive trader inputs, and controlled by conventional mechanisms Block diagram of a trading screen showing arrows used to receive and display market data, used to receive trader inputs, and controlled by conventional mechanisms Exemplary schematic diagram of a dynamic cursor controller with an operating system and hardware components of a computing device A flowchart illustrating a method for updating the position of a cursor on a display based on market movements. Block diagram of one type of transaction screen showing arrows controlled by the type of method shown in FIG. Block diagram of one type of transaction screen showing arrows controlled by the type of method shown in FIG. Block diagram of another type of transaction screen showing arrows controlled by a method of the type shown in FIG. Block diagram of another type of transaction screen showing arrows controlled by a method of the type shown in FIG.

Explanation of symbols

100 user terminal 102 screen 104 market data 106 message 108 communication link 110 action taken by user 200 window 202 arrow 400 computer device 402 dynamic cursor controller 404 operating system 406 hardware 408 input device 514 screen 600 display 602 cursor 802 cursor

Claims (18)

  1. In a method for displaying a cursor on a computer screen used in an electronic transaction system,
    Identifying a cursor at a first position within the display area and associated with a first portion of market information of a tradeable object; and receiving the signal and responding to the signal, the cursor Updating the display area by automatically moving the cursor to a second position in conjunction with the first part of the market information so that it moves with the movement of the first part of the market information Including methods.
  2.   2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the first part of market information is a price region representing a certain price value of the tradeable object.
  3.   3. The method according to claim 2, wherein the first position is a point in the price area in a first display arrangement, and the second position is in the second display arrangement. A method that is one different point in the price domain.
  4.   3. The method according to claim 2, wherein the first position is a point outside the price area in the first display arrangement, and the second position is in the second display arrangement. A method that is one different point outside the price range.
  5.   The method of claim 1, wherein the distance between the first position and the second position in the display area is determined by the first portion of market information from the first display arrangement. A method equal to the distance moved to a display arrangement of 2.
  6.   2. The method of claim 1, wherein the movement of the cursor from the first position to the second position is the first of the market information from the first display arrangement to the second display arrangement. A method that is parallel to the movement of parts.
  7.   The method of claim 1, wherein the signal represents a rearrangement command for rearranging market information associated with an inside market of the tradeable object in the display area.
  8.   The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving a second signal from an input device and moving the cursor to a third position.
  9. The method of claim 8, wherein
    Identifying a cursor at a third position within the display area and associated with a second portion of the market information of the tradeable object; and receiving the signal and responding to the signal, Updating the display area by automatically moving the cursor to a fourth position in conjunction with the second part of the market information so as to move with the movement of the second part of the market information. Including methods.
  10.   The method of claim 1, wherein the display area includes a price column.
  11.   The method of claim 1, wherein the display area includes a bid column, a bid column, and a price column, and wherein the first portion of market information represents a price cell in the price column.
  12.   The method of claim 1, wherein the cursor maintains a fixed position relative to the portion of the market information before and after updating the display.
  13. In a method of displaying a cursor on a computer screen used in an electronic trading system,
    Identifying a cursor in a display area that is displayed along a series of price axes and that is in a first position associated with a particular price for buying and selling a tradeable object; and receiving a signal; In response to the signal, the cursor is automatically moved to a second position in conjunction with the specific price so that the cursor moves in parallel with the price movement along the price axis. Updating the display area by moving the display.
  14.   14. The method according to claim 13, wherein the cursor is fixedly displayed with respect to the display area by moving the cursor along with the movement of the price along the series of price axes. Method.
  15.   14. The method of claim 13, wherein the cursor maintains a fixed position relative to the price before and after the update of the display.
  16.   The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving a signal at the first location or the second location and placing an order to buy or sell the tradeable object at the price.
  17.   The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving a second signal from the input device and moving the cursor to a third position associated with another price.
  18.   A computer-based system for displaying a cursor on a screen of a computer used in an electronic trading system, the system comprising a dynamic mouse controller for identifying a cursor at a first position in a display area, wherein the first The position of is linked to a first part of the market information about the tradeable object, and when the dynamic mouse controller receives a signal, in response to the signal, the position of the first is linked to the first part of the market information. A system in which the display area is updated by automatically moving the cursor to position 2, and the cursor is moved with the first portion of market information.
JP2006542838A 2003-12-05 2004-12-03 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen Active JP4553905B2 (en)

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US10/729,123 US7908570B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2003-12-05 Method and system for displaying a cursor on a trading screen
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JP2006542838A Active JP4553905B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2004-12-03 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen
JP2010108369A Active JP5329476B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2010-05-10 How to send trading orders to an electronic exchange for buying and selling goods
JP2013113181A Active JP5667661B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2013-05-29 Method for sending orders for traded goods, computer program for causing the processor to execute the method, and computer-readable medium storing instructions for causing the processor to execute the method
JP2014203424A Active JP5947853B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2014-10-01 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen
JP2016023867A Active JP6026686B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2016-02-10 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen
JP2016162926A Withdrawn JP2016219050A (en) 2003-12-05 2016-08-23 System and method for displaying cursor on trading screen

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JP2013113181A Active JP5667661B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2013-05-29 Method for sending orders for traded goods, computer program for causing the processor to execute the method, and computer-readable medium storing instructions for causing the processor to execute the method
JP2014203424A Active JP5947853B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2014-10-01 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen
JP2016023867A Active JP6026686B2 (en) 2003-12-05 2016-02-10 System and method for displaying a cursor on a transaction screen
JP2016162926A Withdrawn JP2016219050A (en) 2003-12-05 2016-08-23 System and method for displaying cursor on trading screen

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US10241664B2 (en) 2019-03-26
CA2548234A1 (en) 2005-06-23
US9087360B2 (en) 2015-07-21
AU2004298004B2 (en) 2008-08-28
JP2016106319A (en) 2016-06-16
AU2008249531B2 (en) 2011-04-07
WO2005057353A3 (en) 2006-04-27
CA2781755C (en) 2017-01-03
US20050125328A1 (en) 2005-06-09
GB0610762D0 (en) 2006-07-12
US7908570B2 (en) 2011-03-15
JP5947853B2 (en) 2016-07-06
CA2781755A1 (en) 2005-06-23
US20060265240A1 (en) 2006-11-23
JP4553905B2 (en) 2010-09-29
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