JP2007303960A - Rack tray - Google Patents

Rack tray Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2007303960A
JP2007303960A JP2006132552A JP2006132552A JP2007303960A JP 2007303960 A JP2007303960 A JP 2007303960A JP 2006132552 A JP2006132552 A JP 2006132552A JP 2006132552 A JP2006132552 A JP 2006132552A JP 2007303960 A JP2007303960 A JP 2007303960A
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JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
rack
rack tray
tray
engagement
plurality
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Withdrawn
Application number
JP2006132552A
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Japanese (ja)
Inventor
Masahito Deguchi
Shigeru Fujii
Atsushi Matsushita
将人 出口
敦 松下
茂 藤井
Original Assignee
Olympus Corp
オリンパス株式会社
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Publication date
Application filed by Olympus Corp, オリンパス株式会社 filed Critical Olympus Corp
Priority to JP2006132552A priority Critical patent/JP2007303960A/en
Publication of JP2007303960A publication Critical patent/JP2007303960A/en
Application status is Withdrawn legal-status Critical

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L9/00Supporting devices; Holding devices
    • B01L9/06Test-tube stands; Test-tube holders
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01LCHEMICAL OR PHYSICAL LABORATORY APPARATUS FOR GENERAL USE
    • B01L2200/00Solutions for specific problems relating to chemical or physical laboratory apparatus
    • B01L2200/02Adapting objects or devices to another
    • B01L2200/025Align devices or objects to ensure defined positions relative to each other

Abstract

It is a first object of the present invention to provide a rack tray that can easily set a rack at a desired position regardless of a single or a plurality of racks and can reduce a rack overturning accident. In addition to the first object, a second object is to provide a rack tray from which a plurality of set racks can be removed at once.
A rack tray 20 provided with a guide portion 20b for holding and arranging a plurality of racks supporting a plurality of sample containers and movably guiding the racks along the arrangement direction. When the rack is mounted, the guide portion 20b is provided with a plurality of engagement holding portions 21 that engage with the engagement portions of the rack and hold the rack.
[Selection] Figure 1

Description

  The present invention relates to a rack tray that holds a plurality of racks and is mounted on an automatic analyzer.

  2. Description of the Related Art Conventionally, dispensing apparatuses and automatic analyzers use a rack tray that can hold a plurality of racks that support a plurality of sample containers when a sample is supplied or collected (see, for example, Patent Document 1).

JP 2002-90378 A

  However, the rack tray disclosed in Patent Document 1 is a type that transports a rack along a guide rail, and the rack is attached and detached using a narrow oblique portion provided in the middle of the guide rail. For this reason, the rack trays of Patent Document 1 can only be set one by one, and since it is difficult to set, it takes time and labor to arrange a plurality of racks, and the rack can be easily set at a desired position. There was a problem that I could not. Moreover, since the rack tray of Patent Document 1 is difficult to set, there is a concern that there is a high possibility of causing an accident that the sample in the supported sample container flows out when the rack is overturned during setting. It was.

  The present invention has been made in view of the above, and provides a rack tray that can easily set a rack at a desired position regardless of a single or a plurality of racks and can reduce a rack overturn accident. This is the first purpose. In addition to the first object, a second object is to provide a rack tray from which a plurality of set racks can be removed at once.

  In order to solve the above-described problem and achieve the first object, a rack tray according to claim 1 holds a plurality of racks supporting a plurality of sample containers in an array and holds the racks in the array direction. A rack tray provided with a guide unit that is movably guided, and the guide unit includes an engagement holding unit that engages with an engagement unit of the rack and holds the rack when the rack is mounted. A plurality are provided.

  Further, in the rack tray according to claim 2, in the above invention, the engagement holding portion is detachable in a direction opposite to a direction in which the rack is mounted with respect to an engagement portion provided in the rack. Features.

  Further, in the rack tray according to claim 3, in the above invention, the plurality of engagement holding portions are formed with a removal portion for removing the rack by removing the engagement holding portion therebetween. It is characterized by.

  According to a fourth aspect of the present invention, there is provided the rack tray according to the above invention, wherein the guide portion is provided along the arrangement direction of the rack at a position displaced from the center of the rack tray in the width direction or from the center of the width direction. It is characterized by being.

  The rack tray according to claim 5 is characterized in that, in the above invention, the guide portions are guide walls provided on both sides in the width direction of the top surface of the rack tray.

  In order to solve the above-described problem and achieve the second object, the rack tray according to claim 6 arranges a plurality of racks supporting a plurality of sample containers and arranges the racks in the arrangement direction. A rack tray provided with a guide unit that is movably guided, wherein the guide unit is disposed on a top surface of the rack tray so as to face the rack tray in the arrangement direction of the rack, and the support member is disposed to face the rack tray. An elevating member provided with a plurality of engagement holding parts which are supported so as to be movable up and down and are detachably engaged with an engaging part provided in the rack to hold the rack; And an operation member that raises and lowers the elevating member. The elevating member is lowered by the operation member, and the support member collectively releases the engagement between the engagement portion and the engagement holding portion. With features That.

  In the rack tray according to claim 1 of the present invention, the guide tray is provided with a plurality of engagement holding portions that detachably engage with the engagement portions provided on the rack to hold the rack. Regardless of this, it is possible to easily set the rack at a desired position, and it is possible to reduce an accident of falling the rack.

  In the rack tray according to a fourth aspect of the present invention, the guide portion is supported on the upper surface of the rack tray so as to face the rack tray in the arrangement direction of the rack, and is supported so as to be movable up and down between the support members. An elevating member provided with a plurality of engagement holding portions that detachably engage with the engaging portion provided on the elevating member, and an operating member that elevates and lowers the elevating member. When the elevating member is lowered, the support member collectively releases the engagement between the engagement portion and the engagement holding portion. Therefore, in addition to the effect of claim 1, a plurality of set racks are collectively displayed. And can be removed.

(Embodiment 1)
Hereinafter, a first embodiment of the rack tray of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings. FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to the first exemplary embodiment. FIG. 2 is a plan view of the rack tray shown in FIG. FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line C1-C1 in FIG. FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a rack held by the rack tray shown in FIG.

  As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the rack tray 20 is provided with a guide rail 20b in the longitudinal direction at the center of the substrate 20a, and guide walls 20c on both sides of the substrate 20a, and between the two guide walls 20c. A plurality of racks 25 are arranged and held. At this time, the guide rail 20b and the guide wall 20c are guide portions that guide the plurality of racks 25 movably along the longitudinal direction as the arrangement direction, and the guide rail 20b is provided on both sides of the opening having the top plate 20d. A plurality of engagement convex portions 21 serving as engagement holding portions are provided along the longitudinal direction.

  Each of the engaging projections 21 has a width corresponding to the thickness of one rack, and engages with the engaging portion 25e (see FIG. 4) of the rack 25 at least when the rack 25 is mounted. 25 is held. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the plurality of engaging protrusions 21 are formed with gaps S serving as detaching portions for removing the rack 25 upward by removing the intermediate engaging holding portion 21. As shown in FIG. 3, the engaging convex portions 21 are opposed to each other, and the upper portions are supported on both sides of the lower portion of the top plate 20 d of the guide rail 20 b so as to be rotatable. 22 is urged so as to protrude outward from the guide rail 20b.

  As shown in FIG. 4, the rack 25 is provided with a plurality of concave portions 25b for supporting the sample container along the longitudinal direction at the upper portion of the main body 25a, and penetrates in the thickness direction at the center of the lower portion to become an engaging portion. An engaging recess 25c is formed. The engaging recess 25c has an insertion portion 25d extending in the vertical direction through which the guide rail 20b is inserted, and an engagement portion 25e with which the engagement protrusion 21 of the rack tray 20 is engaged.

  In the rack tray 20 configured as described above, a rack 25 supporting a plurality of sample containers is disposed above a desired engaging convex portion 21 along the guide rail 20b, and as shown in FIG. The rack 25 is lowered vertically from above so that 25d is inserted through the guide rail 20b. Then, as the rack 25 descends, as shown in FIG. 6, the slope of the engagement convex portion 21 is pressed by the lower end of the insertion portion 25 d, and the engagement convex portion 21 resists the biasing force of the torsion coil spring 22. Is pushed into the guide rail 20b.

  When the lower surface of the rack 25 is lowered to the upper surface of the substrate 20a, the rack tray 20 is released from pressing the slope of the engaging convex portion 21 by the insertion portion 25d. Then, in the rack tray 20, the engaging convex portion 21 is pushed outward by the urging force of the torsion coil spring 22, and the engaging convex portion 21 engages with the engaging portion 25e as shown in FIG. . As a result, in the rack tray 20, the engaging convex portion 21 is detachably engaged with the engaging concave portion 25 c provided in the rack 25, and the engaging convex portion 21 holds the rack 25. At this time, since the click sound is generated when the engagement convex portion 21 is engaged with the engagement portion 25e, the rack tray 20 confirms the engagement between the engagement convex portion 21 and the engagement portion 25e by the click sound. can do. Thereafter, the other racks 25 are sequentially attached in the same manner, whereby the rack tray 20 is arranged with a plurality of racks 25 supporting sample containers.

  At this time, the rack tray 20 moves the rack 25 along the guide rail 20b in a state in which the engagement convex portion 21 is engaged with the engagement portion 25e, whereby a plurality of racks 25 in which new racks 25 are already arranged are arranged. Or the rack 25 moved along the guide rail 20b is lifted at the gap S or moved to the end of the guide rail 20b, thereby moving the rack 25 to the guide rail. It can be easily removed from 20b.

  In this way, the rack tray 20 can set the rack 25 at a desired position on the guide rail 20b by using the engagement convex portion 21, and can the rack tray 20 move to the position of the gap S along the guide rail 20b? By moving the rack 25 to the end of the guide rail 20b, the rack 25 can be easily detached from the guide rail 20b. In particular, since the rack 25 can be easily set by simply lowering the rack tray 20 from above the guide rail 20b, it is possible to reduce the occurrence of an accident in which the rack 25 falls during setting.

  The rack tray 20 of the present invention configured as described above holds, for example, a rack 25 in which a sample container 26 containing a specimen such as blood collected in a blood collection chamber or the like is sequentially supported by each recess 25b. The automatic analyzer 1 shown in FIG. 8 is used as follows.

  Here, as shown in FIG. 8, the automatic analyzer 1 includes a sample supply unit 2, a sample analysis unit 3, and a sample recovery unit 4.

  As shown in FIG. 8, the sample supply unit 2 includes a transport mechanism 5 that transports the rack tray 20 and a belt conveyor 6. The sample supply rack tray 20 is placed on the pedestal 1a. The transport mechanism 5 transports the plurality of racks 25 set on the rack tray 20 in the first direction indicated by the arrow D1 by the pusher 5a, and sequentially sends the plurality of racks 25 to the belt conveyor 6. The pusher 5a is conveyed by conveying means such as a belt conveyor (not shown). The belt conveyor 6 conveys the rack 25 sent out by the conveyance mechanism 5 to the sample collection unit 4 while advancing along the second direction indicated by the arrow D2.

  As shown in FIG. 8, the sample analysis unit 3 includes a reaction table 7 and a dispensing mechanism 8. The reaction table 7 has a plurality of reaction vessels 9 arranged in the circumferential direction, and is driven by a driving means (not shown) to carry the reaction vessels 9. The dispensing mechanism 8 dispenses the samples in the plurality of sample containers 26 held by the rack 25 conveyed by the belt conveyor 6 into the reaction container 9 at a predetermined dispensing position. In the reaction container 9 into which the sample has been dispensed, the reagent is dispensed by a reagent dispensing mechanism (not shown), the reagent and the sample react while being conveyed by the reaction table 7, and the reaction solution is optically measured. Washed.

  The sample collection unit 4 collects the rack 25 conveyed by the belt conveyor 6 on the rack tray 20 by the conveyance mechanism 11. The sample collection rack tray 20 is placed on the pedestal 1b. The transport mechanism 11 is configured in the same manner as the transport mechanism 5, and transports the sample-dispensed rack 25 sequentially transported by the belt conveyor 6 in the third direction indicated by the arrow D 3 by the pusher 11 a, and then onto the rack tray 20. to recover.

  The rack tray 20 that has collected the rack 25 in this manner is moved by moving the rack 25 along the guide rail 20b and lifting it at the gap S or by moving the rack 25 to the end of the guide rail 20b. 25 is removed, replaced with a rack 25 that supports a new sample container 26, and set in the automatic analyzer 1.

  As described above, the rack tray 20 according to the first embodiment can easily set the rack 25 to a desired position regardless of the number or number of rack trays 20 and can easily remove the rack 25 after use. Since it is very simple, it is possible to reduce the accident of the rack 25 falling over.

  Here, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment may be provided at a position where the guide rail 20 b is displaced leftward from the center in the width direction of the substrate 20 a. As described above, when the position of the guide rail 20b is displaced, the rack tray 20 can restrict the orientation of the rack 25 to be set, and restrict the rack 25 so that the rack 25 having the wrong orientation cannot be set. Alternatively, it can be restricted so that only a dedicated rack can be set, and the rack tray 20 can be classified according to use.

  In addition, as shown in FIG. 11, the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment has an engaging convex portion 23 made of a leaf spring that is curved outwardly of the guide rail 20b instead of the engaging convex portion 21. You may provide in the guide rail 20b. At this time, the rack 25 forms an engaging portion 25f having a shape corresponding to the engaging convex portion 23 in the engaging concave portion 25c instead of the engaging portion 25e. When the rack tray 20 is provided with the engagement projection 23, the engagement projection 23 can detachably engage with the engagement recess 25c of the rack 25 to hold the rack 25, and the rack 25 can be moved in the vertical direction. Can be easily attached and detached.

  Further, as shown in FIG. 12, the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment may be provided with a diamond-shaped engaging convex portion 24 made of a leaf spring on the guide rail 20b instead of the engaging convex portion 23. At this time, the engaging convex part 24 is fixed to the bottom part of the V-groove 20e formed on the guide rail 20b by a hinge (not shown) at the lower end, and is configured to be able to expand and contract in the horizontal direction. Accordingly, when the rack 25 is mounted from above, the rack tray 20 presses the two inclined surfaces of the engaging convex portion 24 by the lower end of the insertion portion 25d as the rack 25 descends as shown in FIG. . As a result, the engaging convex portion 24 is subjected to a stress inward in the horizontal direction indicated by an arrow on each of the two inclined surfaces, and as shown by a dotted line in the figure, the vertical central portion is bent inward in the horizontal direction. , Extending in the vertical direction. When the rack 25 is pushed down to the lower part of the rack tray 20, the engaging convex part 24 is detachably engaged with the engaging concave part 25 c of the rack 25. As a result, the rack 25 is held by the rack tray 20, but when pulled upward, the engagement between the engagement convex portion 24 and the engagement concave portion 25 c is released by the reverse operation to the above, and the rack tray 20 can be easily Can be removed.

(Embodiment 2)
Next, a second embodiment of the rack tray of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings. In the rack tray of the first embodiment, only when the rack is attached, the engaging convex part moves and engages with the engaging concave part of the rack. On the other hand, in the rack tray of the second embodiment, when the rack is attached / detached, the engaging convex part moves and engages / disengages with the engaging concave part of the rack, so that the rack is easily attached / detached. FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the rack tray according to the second embodiment. 14 is a cross-sectional view of the rack tray shown in FIG. Here, the rack tray according to the second embodiment has the same main part as the rack tray according to the first embodiment. Therefore, the same reference numerals are used in the following description and drawings, and only the engaging protrusions having different shapes are used. It explains about.

  As shown in FIG. 13, the rack tray 30 is provided with a guide rail 20b in the longitudinal direction in the center of the substrate 20a. The guide rail 20b is an engagement protrusion that serves as an engagement holding portion on both sides of the opening having the top plate 20d. A plurality of portions 31 are provided along the longitudinal direction.

  Each of the engaging protrusions 31 has a width corresponding to the thickness of one rack, and detachably engages with an engaging portion 27e (see FIG. 15) of the rack 27 to hold the rack 27. As shown in FIG. 13, the plurality of engaging protrusions 31 are formed with gaps S serving as detaching portions for removing the rack 27 upward by removing the intermediate engaging holding portion 31. As shown in FIG. 14, the engaging convex portions 31 are opposed to each other, and the upper portions are rotatably supported on both sides of the lower portion of the top plate 20d of the guide rail 20b. 22 is urged so as to protrude outward from the guide rail 20b. Further, the lower end of the engaging convex portion 31 is locked to the upper inner side of the guide rail 20b so as not to protrude outward beyond the position shown in FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 15, the rack 27 is provided with a plurality of recesses 27b along the longitudinal direction for supporting the sample container in the upper part of the main body 27a, and penetrates in the thickness direction at the center of the lower part to become an engaging part. An engaging recess 27c is formed. The engaging recess 27c has an insertion portion 27d extending in the vertical direction through which the guide rail 20b is inserted, and an engagement portion 27e with which the engagement protrusion 31 of the rack tray 30 is engaged.

  In the rack tray 30 configured as described above, the rack 27 is disposed above the desired engagement convex portion 31 along the guide rail 20b, and the insertion portion 27d is inserted into the guide rail 20b as shown in FIG. As shown, the rack 27 is lowered vertically from above. Then, as the rack 27 descends, the rack tray 30 is pressed against the urging force of the torsion coil spring 22 by the inclined surface of the engaging projection 31 being pressed by the end of the insertion portion 27d as shown in FIG. Then, the engaging convex portion 31 is pushed into the guide rail 20b.

  When the lower surface of the rack 27 is lowered to the upper surface of the substrate 20a, the rack tray 30 is released from the pressing of the inclined surface of the engaging convex portion 31 by the insertion portion 27d. Then, in the rack tray 30, the engaging convex portion 31 is pushed outward by the biasing force of the torsion coil spring 22, and the engaging convex portion 31 engages with the engaging portion 27e as shown in FIG. . As a result, in the rack tray 30, the engaging convex portion 31 is detachably engaged with the engaging concave portion 27 c provided in the rack 27, and the engaging convex portion 31 holds the rack 27. Thereafter, by similarly mounting other racks 27 in the same manner, a plurality of racks 27 are arranged on the rack tray 30.

  At this time, when the rack tray 30 in which the plurality of racks 27 are arranged is pulled up at the position while pressing the rack tray 30, the engagement with the engaging convex portion 31 is released by the reverse operation. The rack 27 can be easily removed. Similarly to the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment, the rack tray 30 can move the rack 27 along the guide rail 20b in a state where the engagement convex portion 31 is engaged with the engagement portion 27e. The rack 27 can be removed from the rack tray 30 even if it is lifted at the gap S or moved to the end of the guide rail 20b.

  Thus, the rack tray 30 can attach and detach the rack 27 to a desired position of the guide rail 20b by using the engaging convex portion 31, and the occurrence of an accident in which the rack falls over during the attachment and detachment is also reduced. be able to. In particular, the rack tray 30 is easier to use than the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment because the rack 27 can be easily removed from the rack tray 30 at the position where the rack tray 30 is attached. Here, since the rack 27 can be detachably attached to the rack tray 30 by using the engagement convex portion 31, it is not necessary to form the gap S, and the plurality of engagement holding portions 31 are arranged along the guide rail 20b. You may provide it continuously.

(Embodiment 3)
Next, a third embodiment of the rack tray of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings. In the rack trays of the first and second embodiments, the engagement protrusions are provided on the guide rails. However, in the rack tray of the third embodiment, the engagement protrusions are provided on the guide walls on both sides. FIG. 18 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to the third embodiment. FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a rack held by the rack tray shown in FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 18, the rack tray 35 is provided with guide walls 35b on both sides of the substrate 35a, and a plurality of racks 38 are arranged and held between the two guide walls 35b. At this time, the guide wall 35b is a guide portion that guides the plurality of racks 38 movably along the arrangement direction, and is an engagement holding portion that is configured similarly to the engagement convex portion 21 and protrudes inward. A plurality of engagement protrusions 36 are provided along the longitudinal direction.

  As shown in FIG. 18, the engagement protrusions 36 are provided inside the guide wall 35 b in a continuous manner along the longitudinal direction with a gap S corresponding to the thickness of one rack. . The engaging convex portion 36 is urged so as to protrude from the guide wall 35b by a torsion coil spring (not shown).

  As shown in FIG. 19, the rack 38 is provided with a plurality of concave portions 38b along the longitudinal direction for supporting the sample container at the upper portion of the main body 38a, and penetrates in the thickness direction at both lower portions to become engaging portions. An engagement recess 38c is formed in which the engagement protrusion 36 is engaged.

  The rack tray 35 configured as described above has a rack 38 disposed above a desired engagement convex portion 36 along the longitudinal direction, and when the rack 38 is vertically lowered from above as shown in FIG. The slopes of the engaging protrusions 36 are pressed by the lower portions on both sides in the longitudinal direction of the main body 38a, and the engaging protrusions 36 are pushed into the guide wall 35b against the urging force of the torsion coil spring.

  When the lower surface of the rack 38 is lowered to the upper surface of the substrate 35a, the rack tray 35 is released from the pressing of the inclined surface of the engaging convex portion 36 by the main body 38a. Then, the rack tray 35 is expanded by the biasing force of the torsion coil spring in a direction in which the engaging convex portion 36 protrudes from the guide wall 35b, and as shown in FIG. 21, the engaging convex portion 36 is engaged with the engaging concave portion 38c. Engage with. As a result, the rack tray 35 is detachably engaged with the engagement concave portion 38 c provided in the rack 38, and the engagement convex portion 36 holds the rack 38. Thereafter, by similarly mounting other racks 38 in the same manner, a plurality of racks 38 are arranged on the rack tray 35.

  At this time, the rack 38 can be moved along the guide wall 35b between the two guide walls 35b in a state where the engagement convex portion 36 is engaged with the engagement concave portion 38c, It can be removed from the rack tray 35 by moving to the end of the guide wall 35b.

  In this way, the rack tray 35 can be removed by setting the rack 38 at a desired position along the longitudinal direction between the two guide walls 35b by using the engaging projection 36. In particular, since the rack 38 can be easily set by simply lowering the rack tray 35 from above the guide wall 35b, it is possible to reduce the occurrence of an accident in which the rack 38 falls. Further, since the rack tray 35 is in contact with the rack 38 only by the guide walls 35b on both sides and does not have the guide rail, friction with the rack 38 is reduced, and the rack tray 20 of the first embodiment and the implementation of the rack tray 35 are implemented. Compared with the rack tray 30 of the form 2, the rack 38 can be moved smoothly along the guide wall 35b. The rack tray 35 uses the engagement projection 31 of the second embodiment instead of the engagement projection 36, and the engagement recess 38c of the rack 38 corresponds to the shape of the engagement projection 31. Then, the rack 38 can be detached from the engagement convex portion 31 at that location.

(Embodiment 4)
Next, a fourth embodiment of the rack tray of the present invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings. The rack trays according to the first to third embodiments of the present invention can provide a rack tray that can easily set a rack at a desired position regardless of a single or a plurality of rack trays and can reduce a rack overturn accident. The first objective was achieved. On the other hand, the rack tray of the fourth embodiment achieves the second object of the present invention that provides a rack tray capable of removing a plurality of set racks at once in addition to the first object. It is. FIG. 22 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to the fourth embodiment. FIG. 23 is a longitudinal sectional view of the rack tray shown in FIG. 24 is a cross-sectional view taken along line C2-C2 of FIG.

  As shown in FIG. 22, the rack tray 40 is provided with guide walls 40b on both sides of the substrate 40a, and holds a plurality of racks 50 (see FIG. 25) arranged and held at the center of the substrate 40a. A guide part Pg is provided for guiding the movement along the longitudinal direction.

  As shown in FIGS. 22 to 24, the guide portion Pg includes two support plates 41, an elevating block 42, and an operation lever 44.

  The support plate 41 is a support member made of an L-shaped plate material. As shown in FIG. 22, the support plate 41 is opposed to the center of the width direction of the substrate 40a with a predetermined interval, and the lifting block 42 can be raised and lowered therebetween. It is supported.

  As shown in FIG. 22, the elevating block 42 is arranged along the longitudinal direction of the substrate 40a, and the lift blocks 42 are arranged in a series of five along the longitudinal direction with a gap S corresponding to the thickness of one rack. Joint convex portions 43 are provided on both side surfaces. The engagement convex part 43 is an engagement holding part which consists of a leaf | plate spring, and as shown in FIG.22 and FIG.24, it is curvedly formed so that it may protrude outward of the guide rail 20b. The engagement convex portion 43 detachably engages with an engagement portion 50e provided on the rack 50 (see FIG. 25) to hold the rack 50. Therefore, the rack tray 40 can be easily attached and detached by moving the rack 50 in the vertical direction.

  The operation lever 44 moves the lifting block 42 up and down. As shown in FIG. 23, the operating lever 44 is connected to a connecting shaft 42a of the lifting block 42 via a link 45, and a lock piece 44a is rotatably attached to the end. ing. The lock piece 44a locks the elevating block 42 in the lowered position, and rotates as shown by an arrow in FIG. 22 and is locked by a locking member 40d provided on the lower surface of the substrate 40a. The link 45 is a plate material bent in an L-shape, and a bent portion is rotatably supported by a pin 45a in an opening 40c provided substantially at the center of the substrate 40a. The link 45 is provided with long holes 45b and 45c at both ends, the pin 42b provided on the connecting shaft 42a is connected to the long hole 45b at one end, and the operation lever 44 is provided at the long hole 45c at the other end. The pin 44b is connected. The link 45 is urged counterclockwise by a tension spring 46 provided between the vicinity of the long hole 45b and the opening 40c, and always presses the lifting block 42 upward.

  As shown in FIG. 25, the rack 50 is provided with a plurality of recesses (not shown) for supporting the sample containers in the upper part of the main body 50a along the longitudinal direction. An engaging recess 50c is formed as a joint portion. The engaging recess 50 c includes an insertion portion 50 d extending in the vertical direction through which the support plate 41 is inserted, and an engagement portion 50 e with which the engagement protrusion 43 of the rack tray 40 is engaged.

  In the rack tray 40 configured as described above, the rack 50 is disposed above a desired engagement convex portion 43 along the longitudinal direction, and the rack 50 is vertically lowered from above as shown in FIG. Then, in the rack tray 40, as shown in FIG. 26, the insertion portions 50d are arranged on both sides of the two support plates 41, and the engagement convex portion 43 is engaged with the engagement portion 50e of the engagement concave portion 50c. To do. Thus, in the rack tray 40, the engaging convex portion 43 is detachably engaged with the engaging concave portion 50c provided in the rack 50, and the engaging convex portion 43 holds the rack 50 by a spring force. Thereafter, by similarly mounting other racks 50 in the same manner, a plurality of racks 50 are arranged on the rack tray 40.

  At this time, the rack 50 held on the rack tray 40 can be moved in the longitudinal direction along the guide portion Pg, so that another rack 50 can be interrupted, or the moved rack 50 can be part of the gap S. It can be easily removed from the rack tray 40 by lifting it up or moving it to the end of the guide wall 40b.

  In this way, a plurality of racks 50 each having a sample container supported by each of the recesses are arranged in the sample supply rack tray 40, and the rack tray 40 is set in the automatic analyzer 1 to analyze the sample. . Then, the sample collection rack tray 40 that has collected the plurality of racks 50 after the completion of analysis puts a finger on the lock piece 44a and pulls the operation lever 44 against the spring force of the tension spring 46. As shown, the link 45 rotates clockwise as the operating lever 44 moves to the left, and the elevating block 42 connected via the connecting shaft 42a is lowered.

  As a result, as shown in FIG. 28, the rack tray 40 is inserted between the two support plates 41 with the engaging projections 43 facing each other together with the elevating block 42. The engagement between the portion 43 and the engaging portion 50e is released at once. As a result, the plurality of racks 50 held on the rack tray 40 can be collectively removed from the rack tray 40. At this time, as shown in FIG. 29, the rack tray 40 rotates and locks the locking piece 44a to the locking member 40d. As a result, the rack tray 40 is restrained from returning the operation lever 44 by the spring force of the tension spring 46, and the state in which the engagement between the engagement convex portion 43 and the engagement portion 50e is released is maintained. . The rack 50 can be moved along the two guide walls 40b in a state where the engaging convex portion 43 is engaged with the engaging concave portion 50c, and can be removed individually by lifting at the gap S, or Even if it is moved to the end of the guide wall 40b, it can be removed from the rack tray 40.

  As described above, the rack tray 40 of the fourth embodiment can remove the plurality of held racks 50 in a batch in addition to the effects of the rack trays 30 and 35 of the second and third embodiments. Easy to operate. However, when the rack tray 40 is used, the automatic analyzer 1 changes the shapes of the bases 1a and 1b so as not to interfere with the locking member 40d, the operation lever 44, and the link 45 protruding below the substrate 40a. There is a need.

  In addition, the rack tray of Embodiments 1-4 uses an engagement convex part as an engagement holding part, and the rack uses an engagement concave part as an engagement part. However, conversely, the rack tray may use an engaging concave portion as the engaging holding portion, and the rack may use an engaging convex portion as the engaging portion. Moreover, although the raising / lowering block 42 provided the engagement convex part 43 as an engagement holding part, you may provide the engagement convex part 31 as an engagement holding part.

  As described above, the rack tray according to the present invention can easily set a rack at a desired position regardless of one or a plurality of rack trays, and is useful for reducing a rack overturning accident.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to the first exemplary embodiment. It is a top view of the rack tray shown in FIG. FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line C1-C1 in FIG. It is a perspective view of the rack hold | maintained at the rack tray shown in FIG. It is a front view which shows the step before attaching a rack to a rack tray, making a rack tray a cross section. It is a front view which shows the intermediate state which attaches a rack to a rack tray by making a rack tray into a cross section. It is a front view which shows the state which attached the rack to the rack tray by making a rack tray into a cross section. It is a perspective view explaining the usage condition in the automatic analyzer of a rack tray. It is a top view which shows the modification of a rack tray. FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional front view of the rack tray of FIG. 9. It is a front view which shows the other modified example of a rack tray with a rack tray as a cross section and a rack. FIG. 10 is a front view showing still another modified example of the rack tray together with the rack with the rack tray as a cross section. FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to the second exemplary embodiment. It is sectional drawing of the rack tray shown in FIG. It is a front view which shows the step before attaching a rack to a rack tray, making a rack tray a cross section. It is a front view which shows the intermediate state which attaches a rack to a rack tray by making a rack tray into a cross section. It is a front view which shows the state which attached the rack to the rack tray by making a rack tray into a cross section. FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to a third exemplary embodiment. It is a perspective view of the rack hold | maintained at the rack tray shown in FIG. It is a front view which shows the step before attaching a rack to a rack tray. It is a front view which shows the state which attached the rack to the rack tray. FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a rack tray according to a fourth exemplary embodiment. It is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the rack tray shown in FIG. FIG. 24 is a cross-sectional view taken along line C2-C2 of FIG. It is a front view which shows the step before attaching a rack to a rack tray, making a rack tray a cross section. It is a front view which shows the state which attached the rack to the rack tray by making a rack tray into a cross section. It is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the rack tray in a state where the rack is attached to the rack tray. It is a front view of the rack tray of FIG. It is a principal part enlarged view of FIG. 22 which shows the state which locked the operation lever with the lock piece.

Explanation of symbols

20, 30, 35 Rack tray 20a, 35a Substrate 20b Guide rail 20c, 35b Guide wall 21, 23, 24 Engaging convex part 22 Torsion coil spring 25 Rack 25a Main body 25b Recessing part 25c Engaging concave part 25d, 25g Insertion part 25e Engagement Part 25f, 25h engaging part 27, 38 rack 27a, 38a main body 27b, 38b concave part 27c, 38c engaging concave part 27d insertion part 27e engaging part 31, 36 engaging convex part 40 rack tray 40a substrate 40b guide wall 40c opening 40d Locking member 41 Support plate 42 Elevating block 42a Connecting shaft 42b Pin 43 Engaging protrusion 44 Operation lever 45 Link 46 Tension spring 50 Rack 50a Main body 50c Engaging recess 50d Insertion part 50e Engaging part S Gap Pg Guide part

Claims (6)

  1. A rack tray provided with a guide portion for arranging and holding a plurality of racks supporting a plurality of sample containers and movably guiding the racks along the arrangement direction,
    The rack tray is provided with a plurality of engaging and holding portions for holding the rack by engaging the engaging portion of the rack when the rack is mounted.
  2.   The rack tray according to claim 1, wherein the engagement holding portion is detachable in a direction opposite to a direction in which the rack is mounted with respect to an engagement portion provided in the rack.
  3.   The rack tray according to claim 1 or 2, wherein the plurality of engagement holding portions are formed with a removal portion for removing the rack by removing the engagement holding portion therebetween.
  4.   2. The rack tray according to claim 1, wherein the guide portion is a guide rail provided along the arrangement direction of the racks at a position displaced from the center of the rack tray in the width direction or from the center of the width direction.
  5.   The rack tray according to claim 1, wherein the guide portions are guide walls provided on both sides in the width direction of the top surface of the rack tray.
  6. A plurality of racks supporting a plurality of sample containers are arranged, and a rack tray provided with a guide portion for guiding the racks movably along the arrangement direction,
    The guide part is
    A support member disposed on the upper surface of the rack tray so as to face the rack tray in the arrangement direction;
    An elevating member provided with a plurality of engagement holding portions that are supported between the opposing support members so as to be movable up and down, and are detachably engaged with an engagement portion provided in the rack to hold the rack;
    An operation member that raises and lowers the elevating member with respect to the support member disposed oppositely;
    With
    The rack tray according to claim 1, wherein the elevating member is lowered by the operation member, and the support member collectively releases the engagement between the engagement portion and the engagement holding portion.
JP2006132552A 2006-05-11 2006-05-11 Rack tray Withdrawn JP2007303960A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2006132552A JP2007303960A (en) 2006-05-11 2006-05-11 Rack tray

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
JP2006132552A JP2007303960A (en) 2006-05-11 2006-05-11 Rack tray

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2148206A1 (en) 2008-07-25 2010-01-27 F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ag A laboratory system for handling sample tube racks, an alignmemt element for sample tube racks and a rack tray receiver assembly
WO2010054799A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2010-05-20 Pvt Probenverteiltechnik Gmbh Rack device for a sample distribution system
JP2010139370A (en) * 2008-12-11 2010-06-24 Beckman Coulter Inc Rack tray, rack and rack transport system
JP2010139371A (en) * 2008-12-11 2010-06-24 Beckman Coulter Inc Rack conveying system
JP2010139501A (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-06-24 Sysmex Corp Transport device, and specimen analyzer using the same
JP2010139502A (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-06-24 Sysmex Corp Transport device, and specimen analyzer using the same
ITBO20100475A1 (en) * 2010-07-27 2012-01-28 Everex S R L for the analysis of samples System

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2148206A1 (en) 2008-07-25 2010-01-27 F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ag A laboratory system for handling sample tube racks, an alignmemt element for sample tube racks and a rack tray receiver assembly
EP2530025A1 (en) 2008-07-25 2012-12-05 F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ag Alignment element for sample tube racks
US8580195B2 (en) 2008-07-25 2013-11-12 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Laboratory system for handling sample tube racks, an alignment element for sample tube racks and a rack tray receiver assembly
US9297822B2 (en) 2008-07-25 2016-03-29 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Laboratory system for handling sample tube racks, an alignment element for sample tube racks and a rack tray receiver assembly
WO2010054799A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2010-05-20 Pvt Probenverteiltechnik Gmbh Rack device for a sample distribution system
US8940252B2 (en) 2008-11-14 2015-01-27 Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc. Rack apparatus for a sample distribution system
JP2010139501A (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-06-24 Sysmex Corp Transport device, and specimen analyzer using the same
JP2010139502A (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-06-24 Sysmex Corp Transport device, and specimen analyzer using the same
JP2010139370A (en) * 2008-12-11 2010-06-24 Beckman Coulter Inc Rack tray, rack and rack transport system
JP2010139371A (en) * 2008-12-11 2010-06-24 Beckman Coulter Inc Rack conveying system
ITBO20100475A1 (en) * 2010-07-27 2012-01-28 Everex S R L for the analysis of samples System
WO2012028913A1 (en) * 2010-07-27 2012-03-08 Everex S.R.L. System for the analysis of samples

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