JP2006505744A - Improved exhaust control internal combustion engine - Google Patents

Improved exhaust control internal combustion engine Download PDF

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Publication number
JP2006505744A
JP2006505744A JP2004551676A JP2004551676A JP2006505744A JP 2006505744 A JP2006505744 A JP 2006505744A JP 2004551676 A JP2004551676 A JP 2004551676A JP 2004551676 A JP2004551676 A JP 2004551676A JP 2006505744 A JP2006505744 A JP 2006505744A
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Prior art keywords
piston
oil
air
cylinder
engine machine
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JP2004551676A
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Japanese (ja)
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フレディー, レイ ロバーツ,
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フレディー, レイ ロバーツ,
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Priority to US42498102P priority Critical
Application filed by フレディー, レイ ロバーツ, filed Critical フレディー, レイ ロバーツ,
Priority to PCT/US2003/034944 priority patent/WO2004044393A1/en
Publication of JP2006505744A publication Critical patent/JP2006505744A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M1/00Pressure lubrication
    • F01M1/06Lubricating systems characterised by the provision therein of crankshafts or connecting rods with lubricant passageways, e.g. bores
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01BMACHINES OR ENGINES, IN GENERAL OR OF POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT TYPE, e.g. STEAM ENGINES
    • F01B9/00Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by connections between pistons and main shafts and not specific to preceding groups
    • F01B9/02Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by connections between pistons and main shafts and not specific to preceding groups with crankshaft
    • F01B9/026Rigid connections between piston and rod; Oscillating pistons
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/36Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear peculiar to machines or engines of specific type other than four-stroke cycle
    • F01L1/38Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear peculiar to machines or engines of specific type other than four-stroke cycle for engines with other than four-stroke cycle, e.g. with two-stroke cycle
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/36Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear peculiar to machines or engines of specific type other than four-stroke cycle
    • F01L1/40Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear peculiar to machines or engines of specific type other than four-stroke cycle for engines with scavenging charge near top dead centre position, e.g. by overlapping inlet and exhaust time
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L11/00Valve arrangements in working piston or piston-rod
    • F01L11/02Valve arrangements in working piston or piston-rod in piston
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/005Other engines having horizontal cylinders
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/02Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/16Engines characterised by number of cylinders, e.g. single-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/18Multi-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/24Multi-cylinder engines with cylinders arranged oppositely relative to main shaft and of "flat" type
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/32Engines characterised by connections between pistons and main shafts and not specific to preceding main groups
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/02Valve drive
    • F01L1/024Belt drive
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01LCYCLICALLY OPERATING VALVES FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01L1/00Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear
    • F01L1/34Valve-gear or valve arrangements, e.g. lift-valve gear characterised by the provision of means for changing the timing of the valves without changing the duration of opening and without affecting the magnitude of the valve lift
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01MLUBRICATING OF MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; LUBRICATING INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; CRANKCASE VENTILATING
    • F01M1/00Pressure lubrication
    • F01M1/06Lubricating systems characterised by the provision therein of crankshafts or connecting rods with lubricant passageways, e.g. bores
    • F01M2001/066Connecting rod with passageways
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/02Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke
    • F02B2075/022Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle
    • F02B2075/025Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle two

Abstract

A two-stroke cycle internal combustion engine that does not need to mix lubricating oil with fuel, thus resulting in higher efficiency, higher power-to-weight ratio, lower operating temperature, wider speed range, higher simplicity, and less harmful emissions than those of the prior art Machine, many of these improvements can be transferred to a four-stroke cycle engine.

Description

(Cross-reference of related applications)
This application is based on provisional application No. 60/424981 filed on Nov. 8, 2002.

(US Federal Government Contract Research or Development Statement)
Not applicable

(Description of attached document)
Not applicable

(Background of the Invention)
The present invention relates generally to the field of internal combustion engines, and more particularly to internal combustion engine machines that incorporate significant improvements in power, efficiency, and exhaust emission control.

  The present invention has been accomplished in response to the desire for improved simplicity, efficiency, and power output in internal combustion piston engine designs.

  Two-stroke cycle engine technology has a number of advantages, but it has resulted in extensive legal restrictions on its use, and in the United States the disadvantage that caused it to be totally banned by the Environmental Protection Agency by 2006. Have.

  Furthermore, in countries where the development of publicly available technology is slow, the prevailing two-cycle technology results in a high level of air pollution and inefficient combustion causes the lubricating oil to be burned with the fuel This creates an excessive consumption of fuel and lubricating oil. However, it is the only technology that users can obtain and possess. The present invention has been accomplished to solve these problems.

  Conventional internal combustion piston engine technology is divided into two main categories: two-stroke cycle engines and four-stroke cycle engines. Conventional two-stroke cycle engine technology has several advantages over four-stroke cycle technology. These advantages are a greater power-to-weight ratio and greater design simplicity leading to lower manufacturing and maintenance costs. On the other hand, the four-stroke technique has advantages over the two-step technique in terms of efficiency, reliability, and clean operation. There was no prior art that incorporated the advantages of both types into a single engine.

Prior Art of General Two-Stroke Engine Technology Conventional two-stroke cycle engines have several drawbacks. They are inefficient and are 10 times or more inefficient than comparable 4-stroke cycle engines. They also unfortunately need to meter and mix with the fuel. As a result, the conventional two-stroke cycle engine is much cleaner in operation than the comparable four-stroke cycle engine and has several times the amount of harmful exhaust emissions compared to the comparable four-stroke cycle engine. It is well known that the rate of plug fouling is high, the reliability is low, and fuel and lubricating oil are consumed excessively.

  Previous attempts to improve the two-stroke technique have provided a linear engine configuration in which the pistons of each piston pair are placed diametrically opposite each other as practiced by the present invention. One such general configuration is commonly known as the “Bourke” engine. However, such a conventional linear design has a relatively narrow rotation speed range per minute. Such speeds are unsatisfactory for many applications and also complicate engine performance and various internal component design parameters.

  The prevailing conventional engine technology causes wear on many moving machine parts, mainly due to the articulating components. Such wear is particularly concentrated on pistons, piston rings, cylinders, wrist pins, connecting rod bearings, and main bearings and other related main parts.

  In current normal engine technology, higher operating temperatures add complexity and increase engine design and material selection costs.

  The current conventional technology saves significant energy by operating without using all cylinders when full power is not needed, disconnecting unused cylinders and pistons from the drive train, and resting completely until needed again It is not something that can be handled to realize

Prior Art of Cylinder Head Exhaust Valve Some cams or hydraulically controlled cylinder head exhaust valves have been taught in the conventional two-stroke technique, but what teaches a cylinder head exhaust valve applied to the spark ignition two-stroke technique is I can't find it. However, spark ignition has a greater compatibility for lightweight engines and is thus a configuration that is overwhelmingly more popular. Therefore, it is a much needed improvement to use such a cylinder head exhaust valve newly in an application example of a spark ignition type two-stroke technique to realize an increase in efficiency and a reduction of harmful exhaust substances.

  US Patent No. 2,098,883 to Johansson teaches an exhaust valve for a two-stroke cycle diesel engine (ie, not a spark ignition). The valve in this patent is specifically designed to control the pressure in the combustion chamber of a compression ignition engine.

Prior art of oil storage ring It is not found in the prior art that a ring is used for the purpose of sealing a lubricating space by providing a ring on a piston and retaining oil between the rings. In fact, U.S. Pat. No. 4,364,307 teaches not to use it in this manner, and in particular note that it is inappropriate to place sealing rings both above and below the lubrication groove. However, such an arrangement is a feature of one design of the present invention.

Dynamic pressure pumps, double-acting piston rods, and multi-function pistons that transport, distribute and recover lubricating oil Some patents distribute piston rods and / or oil transported by such rods Teaching the transportation of lubricating oil using a structured piston. Some use kinetic energy to propel the oil. (The general principle of dynamic energy / pressure pumps is to give dynamic energy to the medium by scooping and propelling the medium such as oil by high-speed periodic motion).

  However, none of the above patents provide a complete “reciprocal” oil circulation by this method. They transport oil in only one direction. This method is unavoidable because the oil needs to be metered in slowly or completely shut out of the cylinder to prevent burning in large quantities with normal engine combustion. In particular, the use of oil for engine cooling is limited.

  Furthermore, it is consistently taught that dynamic propulsion oil pumps and oil transfer piston rod systems are used only for piston wrist pin lubrication or piston bottom lubrication / cooling. As the patent teaches, in addition to the primary purpose of lubricating the cylinder wall, it is not designed to provide a return path for oil for a complete circulation loop. Examples include U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,693,103 and 2,645,213 (to Huber); U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,466,387, 4,502,421, and 4,515,110 (Perry); U.S. Pat. US Pat. No. 3,633,468 (Burck); US Pat. No. 3,992,980 (Ryan et al.); US Pat. No. 3,930,472 (Athenstaedt); and US Pat. No. 2,899,016 ( Sways) are included.

  Additional embodiments of systems incorporating piston rod oil transport also include a pressure sealing wall at the base of the cylinder, as this patent application does. (These sealing walls are also known as “crossheads.”) However, as in the patents described above, none provide a complete oil circulation cycle that includes the return of oil from the engine cylinder to the sump. These examples include US Pat. Nos. 12,680,56 (Ruther), 1827661 (Kowarick), 2064913 (Hedges), 2244706 (Irving), and No. 3710767 (Smith).

(Summary of Invention)
The object of the present invention is that the engine achieves increased efficiency, reduced harmful emissions, reduced extinction, and improved reliability, while ease of manufacturing and maintenance and high output per unit weight. It is to provide an improved two-cycle reciprocating internal combustion engine that eliminates the previous disadvantages of two-cycle technology compared to four-cycle technology.

  Yet another object of the present invention is to increase the power or torque ratio over weight by more than 100 percent compared to 4-cycle technology without increasing the caliber and stroke, pressure ratio, and number of cylinders. At the same time, special considerations are given to frictional heat and reciprocating movements, in particular to maintain a wide practical range of revolutions per minute, including the most desirable or recommended operating engine speed, and thereby the most desirable intake air. It is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine that maintains conditions and reciprocating valve performance characteristics and provides a more efficient fuel consumption rate as compared to conventional general or linear two-cycle engines.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a two-cycle engine that does not have the inconvenient need to mix lubricating oil with fuel, either in the same tank or in the combustion chamber, unlike the two-cycle engine under the prior art. Is to provide.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a two-stroke cycle internal combustion engine in which lubricating oil circulates and is reused separately from fuel, thus reducing the amount of lubricating oil used.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a two-cycle engine that is not exposed to excessive amounts of pollutant exhaust resulting from the need to mix lubricating oil with fuel in the combustion chamber, unlike the two-cycle engine under the prior art. Is to provide.

  Yet another object of the present invention, unlike the two-stroke engines under the prior art, is bothered by low reliability and frequent spark plug loss resulting from the need to mix lubricating oil with fuel in the combustion chamber. It is to provide a two-cycle engine that is not.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a fundamentally symmetrical, simple and compact engine configuration in which the opposed components are substantially identical except for the drive train.

  Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an internal combustion engine that is simple and economical to manufacture and maintain.

  Another object of the present invention is to effectively eliminate piston side wall loads and consequent piston and cylinder wear, resulting in friction-induced pistons, piston rings, cylinders, wrist pins, connecting rod bearings, and main bearings. And an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine in which wear on the engine and other major parts of the engine is greatly reduced compared to wear in a normal 2-cycle or 4-cycle engine having the same caliber, stroke, pressure ratio, and number of cylinders It is to be.

  Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine in which each cylinder can provide one combustion stroke for each revolution of the crankshaft. This is two strokes for each piston pair for each rotation of the shaft and one stroke for each movement of the piston rod.

  Another object of the present invention is that the piston rod movement between combustion strokes is less than 50 percent of the current normal two-cycle technology engine of the same caliber and stroke, pressure ratio, and number of cylinders, and thus in the prior art. To provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine that saves wasted energy and saves a significant amount of fuel.

  Another object of the present invention is an improved internal combustion reciprocating engine that operates significantly cooler than that of the current art, thus reducing corrosion and wear, and increasing the choice of available manufacturing materials to improve economy. Is to provide. The improvement in cooling derives from an increase in the flow of supplied lubrication / cooling oil and also from the expansion cooling of the exhaust gas.

  Another object of the present invention is that the engine may be overloaded to meet torque and / or horsepower requirements, or the number of revolutions per minute exceeds the originally intended or recommended design capability. It is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine with improved service life by reducing the need to operate in the speed range.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide a linear two-stroke cycle internal combustion engine that operates smoothly and efficiently over a wide speed range of revolutions per minute.

  Yet another object of the present invention is to operate without using all cylinders, especially when full power is not required, disconnect unused cylinders and banks of pistons from the drive train and be completely re-used until needed. To save energy and to have the same explosive power for any given fuel setting, i.e. when a pair of multiple pistons are in "pause" mode, It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine in which the load applied to each end of the piston rod is ensured to be substantially equal in that unit forces acting on both ends of the piston are equal by successive explosions.

  Another object of the present invention is to provide an internal combustion engine that can operate using a wide range of fuels, including alcohol, gasoline, diesel fuel, and others.

  Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an internal combustion engine that is easily adapted for preheating plug, spark ignition, or compression ignition.

  It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine technology that is compatible with two-cycle and four-cycle technologies, with improved simplicity compared to the respective current technology or above.

  Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein the three embodiments of the invention are disclosed by way of illustration or example.

  In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it incorporates significant improvements in power, efficiency, and emissions control, primarily by eliminating the mixing of lubricating oil and engine fuel and always isolating the lubricating oil and fuel. A reciprocating internal combustion engine machine is disclosed.

  The drawings form a part of this specification and include exemplary forms of the invention that can be implemented in various forms. It should be understood that in some cases, various aspects of the invention may be exaggerated or enlarged in order to facilitate understanding of the invention.

Detailed Description of Preferred Embodiments
The main novelty of the present invention resides in its oiling means in combination with its intake and exhaust means. Several alternative forms are presented, which can be “combined and adapted” as needed. Note that in all described forms, performance is improved, but fuel injection can be substituted for vaporization at the expense of increased system complexity and economic expense.

  Referring to FIG. 1, an engine in a first preferred form, namely a two-stroke cycle dynamic pressure lubrication arrangement (100), includes an upper and upper plate (101a) and a combined end wall / cylinder pressure wall (101b). And a combined oil sump / crankcase (101) comprising a side wall (101c) and a bottom (101d). It includes an air / fuel intake manifold (102), a carburetor (102a), a fuel inlet (102b), a throttle cable (102c), a carburetor air intake (102d), and a one-way air intake reed valve (102e). It has.

  At both ends of the combined oil sump / crankcase, there are a side wall (103a), a cylinder head (104), an exhaust assembly block (105), an exhaust cam block (106) having an exhaust port (107) to the atmosphere, Located is a cylinder (103) with an air or air / fuel transfer lid (115) and an exhaust cam passive sprocket (108). Each cylinder head is also fitted with an air / fuel transfer passage lid and a spark plug (113) fitted with a spark plug wire (114).

  An exhaust cam power sprocket (109) connected to an exhaust cam passive sprocket (108) by an output drive shaft (112) and two exhaust cam drive belts (110) tensioned by an exhaust cam drive belt tension pulley (111). Extending from the front side wall of the oil sump / crankcase.

  Referring to FIG. 2 and looking at the engine of FIG. 1 from the opposite side, here an exhaust assembly block (105), an exhaust cam block (106), a combined flywheel / starting gear (201), and for starting The starter motor (202), shown in mesh with the exhaust valve cam (206), and the magnetic pickup (207) connected to the spark plug wire (114) are further clearly shown.

  Referring to FIG. 3, which is a partially cutaway view with the multi-function piston in perfect condition, some provide systems that are cleaner, more efficient, reliable, powerful, and operate better than existing in the prior art. This feature can be confirmed.

  The gist of the present invention is a characteristic configuration that allows engine oil and fuel to remain separated throughout the combustion process. In conventional two-cycle engine designs in the prior art, it was necessary to meter in lubricating oil and mix it with the fuel. This caused the engine to "burn dirty", creating an extraordinary level of hazardous emissions, low efficiency, and unreliability due to constant plug and system loss. The present invention overcomes these problems by incorporating improved intake and oil circulation systems that allow lubrication and isolate the lubricating oil from fuel and combustion.

  One preferred form of using a dynamic pressure lubrication pump system (as all preferred forms implement) is illustrated in FIG. Each cylinder (103) has a sidewall (103a) and an oil sump / crankcase combination end wall that isolates fuel and / or air in the compression chamber (317) from oil (301) in the crankcase / sump (101). / Cylinder pressure wall (101b). This wall is an important point to prevent oil from entering the combustion chamber (316). In the prior art, this wall is not present and the cylinder remains open in the crankcase. This wall (101b) and its pressure seal (318) also serve as a guide for the piston rod (304), which keeps the rod moving in a strictly linear motion and reduces cylinder wear.

  In this configuration, oil (301) is scooped up by the nozzle (302a) of the pick-up pipe (302) reaching from the piston rod (304) into the crankcase / sump (101). These nozzles move through the sump oil (301) so that the movement of the piston rod (304) on which they are mounted reciprocates. With each propulsion, oil is pushed into one or the other nozzle by dynamic pressure. These nozzles may be trumpet shaped to increase the applied dynamic pressure. The oil enters the sump oil pick-up pipe (302) through the nozzle and then travels through it to the multi-function piston (308), where the oil flows out through the oil inlet (308a) of the piston. Circulates around the multi-function piston (308) between the oil reservoir (308c) that prevents the oil (301) from contacting the combustion fuel and air or combustion products above or below the multi-function piston (308) To do. When oil circulates, in addition to constant static pressure due to additional oil supply, the dynamic pressure caused by the reciprocating movement of the piston rod causes the oil to function via the piston oil outlet (308b) and the multifunction piston. From this outlet, the oil returns to the piston rod (304) again via the oil return outlet pipe (303) and cranks again via the piston rod sump outlet (303a). It drops into the case / sump (101) where it is cooled. Thus, the lubricating oil circulation is completed without any contact of the oil with the combustion fuel or air.

  The oil (301) rests in the sump (101), where cooling of the oil is facilitated through agitation by movement of the sump oil pick-up pipe (302) until the oil enters the circulation system again.

  This figure illustrates means for further improving engine performance by adding an exhaust valve (311) in each cylinder head (104). Note that each cylinder (103) has a suction port (317d) that resembles that of currently popular two-cycle engines and functions in exactly the same manner. However, the exhaust valve (311) of the cylinder head (104) replaces the standard prior art exhaust on the cylinder sidewall. The operation of this valve can be adjusted separately in such a way as to obtain the maximum scavenging effect, optimal combustion, and optimal compression time and pressure, causing the engine to burn more cleanly than in the prior art and Make the engine easily adaptable to a wider range of fuels.

  3 further includes an oil sump / crankcase (101), oil in the sump (301), sump oil pick-up pipe (302), sump oil pick-up nozzle (302a), oil return outlet pipe (303), and piston. The oil return outlet (303a) of the rod is clearly shown.

  The piston rod (304) is connected to the crank plate (306) by the push rod (305), which rotates the cam drive shaft (306a) and drives the output drive shaft (112). ). As the various internal components move, the oil (301) contained in the oil sump / crankcase will splatter, thus allowing complete lubrication of all contained components.

  A multi-function piston (308) with piston oil inlet (308a), piston oil outlet (308b), oil reservoir ring (308c), piston head (308d), and piston base (308e) is located at each end of the piston rod. It is connected to the part.

  Each cylinder (103) includes a head (104) having an exhaust valve (311), an exhaust valve rod (312), an exhaust valve rod ball (313), an exhaust valve spring (314), an exhaust valve cam (315), and the atmosphere. Exhaust port (107) and spark plug (113).

  Each cylinder includes a combustion chamber (316); a compression chamber (317); a compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet (317a); a compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet one-way reed valve (317b) Compression chamber air or air / fuel outlet (317c); combustion chamber air or air / fuel inlet (317d); and air / fuel transfer passage lid (115), air reaching the combustion chamber from the compression chamber or It has an air / fuel transfer passage (309). At the base of each cylinder is a pressure seal (318) in the oil sump / crankcase combination end wall through which the piston rod (304) passes and in the cylinder compression wall (101b).

  FIG. 3A illustrates another preferred form for air or air / fuel transfer passageway. Instead of equipping each cylinder with a small elongate air or air / fuel transfer passage and lid (as described in the form presented above) with a mouth reaching the cylinder at both ends, this form A donut-shaped annular lid (319) surrounding the cylinder is substituted. Under this lid, in the cylinder, the outlet (320) and the inlet (321) are looped around both ends to smooth the flow of a large amount of uniformly distributed air.

  FIG. 3B is an enlarged view of a part of FIG. 3A, showing a donut-shaped annular lid (319) surrounding the cylinder, and a cylinder having an outlet (320) and an inlet (321) in a ring shape at both ends. Yes.

  3C further exemplifies the characteristic configuration shown in FIG. 3B, and includes a donut-shaped annular lid (319) surrounding the cylinder, and a cylinder having an outlet (320) and an inlet (321) in a ring shape at both ends. Pay attention.

  FIG. 3D shows the overall external arrangement of the engine using a donut shaped annular lid (319) surrounding the cylinder.

  Referring now to FIG. 4, for an engine constructed in the first or second preferred form, a combined end wall / cylinder compression wall (101b), sump oil pick-up pipe (302), sump oil pick-up pipe nozzle ( 302a), oil return pipe (303), piston rod (304), push rod (305), crank plate (306), cam drive shaft (306a), output drive shaft gear (307), output drive shaft (112), And pressure seal (318) is further specified.

  Referring to FIG. 5, which further illustrates what is shown in FIG. 4, the combined end wall / cylinder compression wall (101b), oil (301), sump oil pick-up pipe (302), sump oil pick-up pipe nozzle (302a ), Oil return pipe (303), piston rod sump oil outlet (303a), piston rod (304), push rod (305), crank plate (306), cam drive shaft (306a), output shaft gear (307) The output drive shaft (112), the multifunction piston (308), and the pressure seal (318) can be seen.

  FIG. 6 presents closer details of the multi-function piston configured in relation to the first preferred lubrication configuration: sump oil pick-up pipe (302), oil return outlet pipe (303), piston oil inlet (308a), The piston oil outlet (308b), oil reservoir ring (308c), piston oil inlet channel (601), and piston oil outlet channel (602) are shown.

  FIG. 7 is a more detailed view of the multi-function piston shown in FIG. 6, showing a piston oil inlet (308a) and a piston oil inlet channel (601).

  FIG. 8 is a more detailed view of the multi-function piston shown in FIG. 6, showing a piston oil outlet (308b) and a piston oil outlet channel (602).

  Referring to FIG. 9, the main part of the third preferred form is shown. This is a “pop-top piston” system, and this configuration is the most effective means of separating fuel and lubricating oil in that it does not allow any shared parts in the lubrication and suction systems. FIG. 9 illustrates the entire system for one cylinder and shows the relationship of the components of the “pop top” piston system, including the control peg (902b).

  The system includes a piston (950), air or air / fuel port (906), piston rod (911), piston oil supply port (907), piston oil return port (908), air or air / fuel intake valve. A head (900), a valve seat (901), a valve stem (902), a valve spring (903), a valve spring collar (903a), and a valve guide (904) are provided. The system also includes a valve stem (902a) and a control peg (902b).

  The multifunction piston constructed in relation to the third preferred embodiment will be described in detail. In this configuration, an air or air / fuel mixture inlet valve head (900) and inlet (905) are actually located on each piston head. By using these valves and ports instead of the fixed inlets in the cylinder side wall (103a), it becomes possible to improve the control over the intake of air / fuel. In this figure, the piston suction valve head (900) is open. Note that the valve stem (902) extends into the piston head and the valve head (900) is in close contact with the seating surface in the piston head valve seat (901).

  The suction valve head (900) is pushed open by a valve rod (902a), one end of which is attached to the valve stem (902) of a given valve (900) and the other end is a valve rod (902a). The piston rod (911) hits a control peg (902b) that prevents it from moving its entire stroke. When the piston (950) and the piston rod (911) start their work stroke, the valve rod (902a) is pushed together by the valve stem (902), and the inertia of the valve rod (902a) causes the valve spring (903) Bends and moves with the piston and piston head.

  The valve rod (902a) contacts the control peg (902b) before the piston rod (911) completes its work stroke. This control peg prevents the valve rod (902a) from moving further. The valve rod stops moving, but the piston rod (911) slides over the now stopped valve rod (902a) and continues to move to the bottom of its work stroke. As a result, one end of the now stopped valve rod presses the valve stem (902) to compress the valve spring (903) and push the valve head (900) open. Air or an air / fuel mixture enters through an open valve and passes through the piston through the air or air / fuel port (906). Immediately thereafter, the piston rod (912) ends its work stroke by "pushing the bottom", reversing the direction and starting its compression stroke.

  When the piston rod (911) begins its compression stroke, its movement slides the valve rod (902a) away from the control peg (902b), and the valve spring (903) pulls back the valve head (900) again to close it. . As the piston (950) continues its compression stroke, the pressure in the combustion chamber above it also serves to keep the valve head (900) firmly seated and closed. The piston stroke continues through compression, combustion, and exhaust and repeats this cycle.

  Lubrication for each piston is accomplished by the dynamic pressure lubrication system described above, and oil distribution is accomplished via the piston oil supply port (907) and the piston oil return port (908). (Details of the lubrication system are not illustrated for the sake of brevity, but they are essentially the same as the dynamic pressure system described above.)

  This configuration improves control over the combustion process because it allows the cylinder head exhaust valve and the air or air / fuel intake valve to be controlled separately. Such control leads to cleaner and more efficient combustion and results in improved compatibility with a wide range of fuels. While this configuration provides significant performance advantages, its manufacture and maintenance are at the same time more complex than the first and second preferred configurations.

  FIG. 10 illustrates in more detail how the various parts of the “pop top” piston correlate and function. In this drawing, a valve rod (902a) coaxial with the piston rod (911) pushes the valve stem (902), and the valve spring (903) is compressed by the valve spring collar (903a) to push the valve head (900). is open. The valve stem is held in place by a valve guide (904). The piston is lubricated by oil ejected from the oil supply port (1006) of the piston.

  The piston is positioned at the center of the cylinder by an oil reservoir ring (1008) that prevents lubricating oil from leaking from above or below the piston. When the valve head (900) is opened, air or a fuel / air mixture is spouted from the piston base (1010) via the air or air / fuel valve port (905) and passes through the valve seat (901) to the piston. Ejected from the head (1009).

  FIG. 11 shows a “pop top” piston system looking at the opposite side of FIG. 10 so that the oil return port (1107) of the piston is visible. Oil is pushed through this port by the static pressure of the additional oil pumped up to the piston. Oil enters this port and returns to the engine sump / crankcase. This illustration shows that the valve head (900) is closed and the valve spring (903) is in its rest position without being compressed.

  FIG. 12 shows the end view of the piston air or air / fuel port (905) and the piston oil supply port (1006) and the piston oil return port (1007) reciprocating and delivering oil, The end view of the oil supply flow path (1206) and the oil return flow path (1007) of the piston for sending a small amount of oil so as to lubricate the valve stem at the center of the piston is shown. The relationship between the valve seat (901), the valve stem (902), the valve guide (904), and the air or air / fuel valve port (905) is defined relative to the rest of the piston.

  In FIG. 12a, the central portion of FIG. 12 is viewed in more detail, but facing the base of the piston oil supply channel (1206) and the piston oil return channel (1207) and the sump oil pick-up tube (1201) and There is a valve stem pinhole (1203) extending from the sump oil return outlet pipe (1202), passing through the valve guide (904) to the valve stem (902) located in the center of the piston rod (911), A small amount of oil can pass through it to lubricate the valve stem (902).

  FIG. 13 shows an engine configured to operate with only one set of cylinder and piston. In particular, pay attention to the reciprocating power shaft (1301) operating only in a linear "in / out" manner and a single unpaired magnetic pickup (1302).

  In addition to the feature configurations presented in these drawings, further advantages may be derived by incorporating various ignition means, including not only spark plugs, but alternatively preheat plugs and / or explosion compression in the combustion chamber.

  Further, for example, instead of the crank plate system described herein, various drive trains that substitute rack and pinion, toothed wheel drive, or unidirectional or segmented gear arrangements may be incorporated. The system can be reduced in weight and size, and by providing a wider range of piston dwell times (in that case in a rotary power transmission system), it is possible to increase the flexibility of fuel selection and thus fuel Further promotes complete and efficient combustion. Engines also benefit greatly from the addition of oil coolers and also from turbochargers, superchargers, intake air compressors, ventilators or blowers. Although the invention has been described with reference to the preferred embodiments, the scope of the invention is not limited to the specific forms described, but is, instead, the spirit of the invention as defined by the appended claims. It is intended to cover alternatives, modifications, and equivalents that may be included within the scope and range.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the engine in a first preferred form, viewed from the back or “cam drive” side. It is a perspective view which shows the engine in the 1st desirable form seen from the front or the "output shaft" side. FIG. 2 is a cutaway view showing the engine in a first preferred form as viewed from the front or “output shaft” side. FIG. 5 is a cutaway view showing the engine in a second preferred form, viewed from the front or “output shaft” side. FIG. 3B is an enlarged cutaway view illustrating a part of the engine illustrated in FIG. 3A. FIG. 6 is a semi-transverse perspective view showing the inside of a cylinder of an engine in a second preferred form in an imaginary view. FIG. 6 is a semi-transverse perspective view showing an engine in a second preferred form. It is a figure which shows the engine oil sump / crankcase comprised by the 1st or 2nd preferable form, and is the figure which removed the upper plate from the upper part and looked at the gearwheel. FIG. 4 is a cutaway view showing an engine sump / crankcase configured in the first or second preferred form as viewed from the back or “cam drive” side. It is a partially broken side view which shows the multifunction piston comprised by the 1st or 2nd preferable form. It is a top surface broken view which shows the multifunctional piston comprised by the 1st or 2nd preferable form. It is a bottom broken view showing a multifunction piston constituted by the 1st or 2nd desirable form. FIG. 7 is a cutaway view of a portion of an engine incorporating a “pop top” multi-function piston used in a third preferred form. FIG. 6 is a side view of a “pop-top” multi-function piston with an air / fuel intake valve at the valve head used in a third preferred configuration, with the valve in an open position. FIG. 11 is a side view of the same first preferred form “pop-top” multifunction piston as in FIG. 10, but with the air or air / fuel intake valve in a closed position. FIG. 12 is a top view of the “pop top” multifunction piston used in the third preferred form shown in FIGS. 10 and 11. FIG. 13 is an enlarged top view showing a central portion of the multifunctional “pop top” piston illustrated in FIG. 12. 1 is a perspective view showing an engine of a single cylinder configuration that is inhaled and lubricated according to a first preferred mode of embodiment.

Explanation of symbols

FIG.
100 Engine 101 Oil sump / crankcase 101a Oil sump / crankcase top and top plate 101b Oil sump / crankcase combined end wall / cylinder compression wall 101c Oil sump / crankcase side wall 101d Oil sump / crankcase bottom 102 Air / fuel intake manifold 102a carburetor 102b fuel intake 102c throttle cable 102d carburetor intake 102e one-way intake reed valve housing 103 cylinder 103a cylinder side wall 104 cylinder head 105 exhaust assembly block 106 exhaust cam block 107 exhaust to the atmosphere 108 Exhaust cam passive sprocket 109 Exhaust cam power sprocket 110 Exhaust cam drive belt 111 Exhaust cam belt tension 2 112 Output drive shaft 113 Spark plug 114 Spark plug wire 115 Air / fuel transfer passage cover Fig. 2
105 Exhaust assembly block 106 Exhaust cam block 114 Spark plug wire 201 Combination flywheel starting gear 202 Starting motor (meshing state)
206 Exhaust valve cam 207 Magnetic pickup FIG.
DESCRIPTION OF SYMBOLS 101 Oil sump / crankcase 101b Oil sump / crankcase combination end wall / cylinder compression wall 103 Piston cylinder 103a Cylinder side wall 104 Cylinder head 107 Exhaust port to atmosphere 112 Output drive shaft 113 Spark plug 115 Air / fuel transfer passage cover 301 Oil 302 Sump Oil Pickup Pipe 302a Sump Oil Pickup Nozzle 303 Sump Oil Return Outlet Pipe 303a Piston Rod Sump Outlet 304 Piston Rod 305 Push Rod 306 Crank Plate 306a Cam Drive Shaft 307 Output Drive Shaft Gear 308 Multifunctional Piston 308a Piston Oil inlet 308b Piston oil outlet 308c Oil storage ring 308d Piston head 308e Piston base 30 Air / fuel transfer passage 311 Exhaust valve 312 Exhaust valve rod 313 Exhaust valve rod ball 314 Exhaust valve spring 315 Exhaust valve cam 316 Cylinder combustion chamber 317 Cylinder compression chamber 317a Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet 317b Cylinder compression chamber air or Air / fuel inlet one-way reed valve 317c Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel outlet 317d Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet 318 Pressure seal FIG. 3A
319 Air / fuel transfer passage annular lid 320 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel outlet wheel 321 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet wheel diagram 3B
319 Air / fuel transfer passage annular lid 320 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel outlet wheel 321 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet wheel diagram 3C
319 Air / fuel transfer passage annular lid 320 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel outlet wheel 321 Cylinder compression chamber air or air / fuel inlet wheel diagram 3D
319 Air / fuel transfer passage annular lid
101b Oil sump / crankcase combination end wall / cylinder compression wall 112 Output drive shaft 302 Sump oil pickup pipe 302a Output drive shaft 303 Oil return outlet pipe 304 Piston rod 305 Push rod 306 Crank plate 306a Cam drive shaft 307 Output drive shaft gear 318 Pressure seal Fig. 5
101b Oil sump / crankcase combination end wall / cylinder compression wall 112 Output drive shaft 301 Oil 302 Sump oil pickup pipe 302a Sump oil pick-up nozzle 303 Oil return outlet pipe 303a Piston rod sump outlet 304 Piston rod 305 Push rod 306 Crank Plate 306a Cam drive shaft 307 Output drive shaft gear 308 Multi-function piston 318 Pressure seal FIG.
302 Oil pickup pipe of sump 303 Oil return outlet pipe 308a Oil inlet of piston 308b Oil outlet of piston 308c Oil storage ring 601 Oil inlet passage of piston 602 Oil outlet passage of piston
308a Piston oil inlet 601 Piston oil inlet flow path Fig. 8
308b Piston oil outlet 602 Piston oil outlet flow path
103a Cylinder side wall 900 Air or air / fuel intake valve head 901 Valve seat 902 Valve rod 902a Valve rod 902b Control peg 903 Valve spring 903a Valve spring collar 904 Valve guide 905 Air or air / fuel valve port 907 Piston oil supply port 908 Piston Oil return port 911 Piston rod 950 Multifunctional piston Fig. 10
900 Valve head 901 Valve seat 902 Valve rod 902a Valve rod 903 Valve spring 903a Valve spring collar 904 Valve guide 905 Air or air / fuel valve port 911 Piston rod 1006 Piston oil supply port 1008 Oil storage ring 1009 Piston head 1010 Piston base view 11
900 Valve head 903 Valve spring 1107 Oil return port of piston 12
901 Valve seat 902 Valve rod 904 Valve guide 905 Air or air / fuel valve port 1006 Piston oil supply port 1007 Piston oil return port 1206 Piston oil supply channel 1207 Piston oil return channel 12a
902 Valve rod 904 Valve guide 911 Piston rod 1201 Sump oil pickup pipe 1202 Oil return outlet pipe 1203 Valve pin oil pin hole 1206 Piston oil supply flow path 1207 Piston oil return flow path
1301 Reciprocating power shaft 1302 Single unpaired magnetic pickup

Claims (26)

  1. An internal combustion engine machine incorporating significant improvements in power, efficiency, and exhaust emission control,
    One or more cylinders each having a head, a combustion chamber, a base, a compression chamber, and side walls;
    One or more means for igniting fuel in the one or more cylinders;
    One or more intake sources;
    Means for containing and / or cooling the lubricating oil between cycles of circulation;
    A drive train;
    Means for sealing, protecting, cooling and lubricating the drive train;
    Means for isolating the oil in the sump and / or crankcase from the air or air / fuel mixture in the cylinder;
    Means for dispersing oil on the cylinder wall, then recovering excess and returning it to the oil sump;
    Means for transferring energy to and from the piston;
    Means for guiding each piston rod so that it always moves in a straight line along the same line;
    Means for drawing air or air / fuel mixture into the engine machine, propelling it into the cylinder combustion chamber, compressing and igniting it, and propelling its removal after ignition;
    Means for introducing air and fuel or an air / fuel mixture into each cylinder;
    Means for efficiently eliminating exhaust gases resulting from combustion of the air / fuel mixture after energy is extracted;
    Means for transferring energy from the piston rod to the drive train;
    Means for cooling the engine;
    An engine machine comprising means for transporting, dispersing, recovering and returning the lubricating / cooling oil in isolation from the combustion air and fuel.
  2.   The internal combustion engine machine of claim 1, comprising a plurality of cylinders in one or more banks for every two opposing cylinders.
  3.   Said means for transferring energy to and from said respective pistons is a piston rod fitted with a piston at one end, said each piston rod penetrating said base of its cylinder and working of its associated piston. Power of the stroke is transmitted to the drive train, and the piston rod is connected to the drive shaft by a push rod in the crankcase / oil sump so that power such as a crank plate or other rotating or linear device that drives the drive shaft The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the engine machine propels a transmission device.
  4.   The means for cooling the engine is by expansion of exhaust gas, by cooling fins on the engine machine, and further serves as a heat sink for oil circulating in and from the cylinder. The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the engine machine is due to a large amount of oil contained in the sump.
  5.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for transmitting energy from the piston rod to the drive train is a rotating device connected to the piston rod by a push rod, such as a crank plate.
  6.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for transmitting energy from the piston rod to the drive train is a rack and pinion type power transmission system, an assembly gear driving device, a pawl wheel device or the like.
  7.   Said means for introducing air or air / fuel mixture into each cylinder comprises a valve in the piston head which opens to introduce new air or fuel / air mixture during each cycle, and thus said cylinder The engine machine of claim 1, which is a “pop-top” piston that eliminates the need for one or more conventional air or air / fuel inlets in the sidewall.
  8.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for introducing the fuel component of the air / fuel mixture into each cylinder is by a fuel injector for each cylinder.
  9.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for introducing air or air / fuel mixture into each cylinder is realized by an inlet in the side wall of each cylinder.
  10.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for efficiently exhausting exhaust gas upon completion of combustion and extraction of energy is a cylinder head exhaust valve that exhausts exhaust through the head of the cylinder.
  11.   The means for drawing air or air / fuel mixture into the system, propelling it into the cylinder combustion chamber, compressing and igniting it, and rejecting it after ignition, Air or an air / fuel mixture is drawn from the intake source into the compression chamber below the piston, and during the down stroke it is propelled from the compression chamber into the cylinder combustion chamber above the piston, immediately after The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the engine machine is a “multifunctional piston” that compresses the air or air / fuel mixture in a combustion chamber and then combusts during a rising stroke that takes place.
  12.   The means for guiding it is a compression wall so that each piston rod always moves in a straight line along the same line, and the piston rod compression seal holds each piston in the proper position inside its cylinder. The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the engine machine serves as a piston rod guide.
  13.   Each cylinder is provided with a multi-function piston that performs lubrication in addition to the four “drive” functions. The “drive” function includes: (1) suction of new air or air / fuel mixture (2) propelling the new air or air / fuel mixture into the combustion chamber, (3) compressing the air / fuel mixture in the cylinder combustion chamber, (4 2) receiving the combustion force of the work stroke and transmitting it to the piston rod; and (5) receiving, dispersing and collecting the lubricating oil and returning it to the oil sump / cooler. The engine machine described.
  14.   The means for dispersing the oil on the cylinder wall and then recovering the excess and returning it to the oil sump is an oil storage ring, which stores any oil dispersed between them. And adjacent to the head and base of each piston, and in operation, pushes the oil forward in front of them, wiping it substantially away from the cylinder wall and thinning as they move The engine machine of claim 1, wherein only the membrane is left.
  15.   The means for isolating the oil in the sump and / or crankcase from the air or air / fuel mixture in the cylinder is in the form of a compression wall of the respective cylinder and a piston rod pressure seal at the base. And the compression wall isolates the fuel and air in the cylinder from the lubrication / cooling oil in the oil sump / crankcase so that the air or fuel / air mixture is initially from the vaporizer or breather The piston rod passes through the compression wall at the base of each corresponding cylinder, creating an isolated and sealed suction chamber that is then introduced into and then discharged into the cylinder combustion chamber. The engine machine of claim 1, reaching the sump / crankcase through the compression wall and pressure seal. .
  16.   The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the means for sealing, protecting and lubricating the drive train is a combined crankcase / oil sump.
  17.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the means for containing and / or cooling the oil during a cycle of circulation is a combined crankcase / oil sump.
  18.   The engine machine according to claim 1, wherein the intake source is a carburetor.
  19.   The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the means for igniting the fuel is an electric spark.
  20.   The means for transporting, dispersing, recovering and returning the lubricating / cooling oil from the combustion air and fuel while being separated from the combustion air and fuel is provided by means for transmitting force to and from the piston and by a multi-function piston. A dynamic pressure lubrication pump comprising a piston rod / lubricating assembly that serves as both a means for transferring lubricating / cooling oil to its cylinder, said assembly being fitted with a multifunction piston at each end A piston rod having an oil pickup port and a discharge port in an intermediate portion thereof; and an oil transport passage in the piston rod that reaches the multifunction piston assembly from the oil pickup nozzle and reaches the oil exhaust port again. The piston assembly uses an oil reservoir ring adjacent to each piston head and base Lubricating oil flows through and around the piston rod and piston, lubricates and cools the piston wall, piston ring and cylinder wall, and further penetrates the piston and piston rod through the oil sump / Disperses the oil so that it is cooled back to the crankcase, then helps to recover and return it to the cooling sump, distributes the oil to the associated cylinder, and recovers the oil to recover the sump. A multi-function piston with one or more radially positioned oil inlets and outlets back to the crankcase, the piston rod and drive train being lubricated by splash distribution in the crankcase / oil sump The engine machine according to claim 1.
  21.   Means are provided in the form of a flywheel to collect, store and transfer inertial energy from one drive stroke to the next, thereby facilitating the compression stroke and reducing overall engine vibration. The engine machine according to claim 1.
  22.   The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the wrist pin connects each piston to its piston rod and reduces the rigidity of the combination.
  23.   The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the means for igniting fuel in the cylinder comprises an explosion compression in the cylinder head.
  24.   The engine machine of claim 1, wherein the means for igniting fuel in the cylinder includes a preheat plug.
  25.   The means for transmitting energy to and from the piston is a piston rod between and joining each piston pair in each cylinder bank, such that each piston rod has a piston at each end. The piston rod passes through the base of each associated cylinder, and each piston rod transmits the work stroke force of each piston to the drive train and to the opposite associated piston to transmit the piston. The piston rod is connected to the drive shaft by a push rod in the crankcase / oil sump to propel a crank plate or other rotational or linear power transmission that meshes with the drive shaft; The engine machine according to claim 2.
  26.   A plurality of banks of cylinders are provided, each bank comprising two or more cylinders, and the drive train of each bank is separated from each of its one or more adjacent banks. The manner in which the bank is joined to the drive train of one or more of its adjacent banks and can be shut off individually or automatically by an operator, The engine machine of claim 2, wherein the engine machine is one or more manual clutches, centrifugal clutches, or pawl wheel devices.
JP2004551676A 2002-11-08 2003-11-03 Improved exhaust control internal combustion engine Pending JP2006505744A (en)

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US42498102P true 2002-11-08 2002-11-08
PCT/US2003/034944 WO2004044393A1 (en) 2002-11-08 2003-11-03 Improved emissions control internal combustion engine

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EP1573180A1 (en) 2005-09-14
US7104227B2 (en) 2006-09-12
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WO2004044393A1 (en) 2004-05-27
US20040099228A1 (en) 2004-05-27

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