JP2000517416A - Processes and articles for measuring the residence time of food strips - Google Patents

Processes and articles for measuring the residence time of food strips

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Publication number
JP2000517416A
JP2000517416A JP50395598A JP50395598A JP2000517416A JP 2000517416 A JP2000517416 A JP 2000517416A JP 50395598 A JP50395598 A JP 50395598A JP 50395598 A JP50395598 A JP 50395598A JP 2000517416 A JP2000517416 A JP 2000517416A
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JP
Japan
Prior art keywords
article
food
fluid
strip
density
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
JP50395598A
Other languages
Japanese (ja)
Inventor
シザー,チャールズ
パラニアパン,セバガン
ボトス,マッツ
Original Assignee
テトラ ラバル ホールデイングス エ フイナンス ソシエテ アノニム
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US08/667,124 priority Critical patent/US5750907A/en
Priority to US08/667,124 priority
Priority to US08/722,441 priority
Priority to US08/722,441 priority patent/US5876771A/en
Priority to US08/769,811 priority patent/US5739437A/en
Priority to US08/769,811 priority
Application filed by テトラ ラバル ホールデイングス エ フイナンス ソシエテ アノニム filed Critical テトラ ラバル ホールデイングス エ フイナンス ソシエテ アノニム
Priority to PCT/IB1997/001241 priority patent/WO1998000694A2/en
Publication of JP2000517416A publication Critical patent/JP2000517416A/en
Pending legal-status Critical Current

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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23LFOODS, FOODSTUFFS, OR NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES A23B - A23J; THEIR PREPARATION OR TREATMENT, e.g. COOKING, MODIFICATION OF NUTRITIVE QUALITIES, PHYSICAL TREATMENT; PRESERVATION OF FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS, IN GENERAL
    • A23L3/00Preservation of foods or foodstuffs, in general, e.g. pasteurising, sterilising, specially adapted for foods or foodstuffs
    • A23L3/16Preservation of foods or foodstuffs, in general, e.g. pasteurising, sterilising, specially adapted for foods or foodstuffs by heating loose, unpacked materials
    • A23L3/18Preservation of foods or foodstuffs, in general, e.g. pasteurising, sterilising, specially adapted for foods or foodstuffs by heating loose, unpacked materials while they are progressively transported through the apparatus
    • A23L3/22Preservation of foods or foodstuffs, in general, e.g. pasteurising, sterilising, specially adapted for foods or foodstuffs by heating loose, unpacked materials while they are progressively transported through the apparatus with transport through tubes
    • A23L3/225Preservation of foods or foodstuffs, in general, e.g. pasteurising, sterilising, specially adapted for foods or foodstuffs by heating loose, unpacked materials while they are progressively transported through the apparatus with transport through tubes in solid state
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01KMEASURING TEMPERATURE; MEASURING QUANTITY OF HEAT; THERMALLY-SENSITIVE ELEMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G01K7/00Measuring temperature based on the use of electric or magnetic elements directly sensitive to heat ; Power supply, e.g. by thermoelectric elements
    • G01K7/42Circuits for reducing thermal inertia; Circuits for predicting the stationary value of temperature
    • G01K2007/422Dummy objects used for estimating temperature of real objects

Abstract

(57) Abstract: An article of the present invention is an analog of a specific object, having substantially the same size, shape and rotational inertia as the medium, while having the density of the medium in which the object is contained. . The analog includes a signal generator that can be used to analyze various properties of the object. More specifically, the articles of the present invention are analogs of food strips that are subjected to aseptic processing, wherein the food strips are components of a heterogeneous food product, such as a soup or fruit-filled yogurt. This analog has substantially the same size, shape and rotational inertia as the actual food strip, while the article has the density of a fluid. The analog includes a signal generator that can be used to measure the residence time of the analog in a holding tube of a sterile processing machine. The article also has the thermal conductivity of the food strip. The process of the present invention measures the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing, the food strip being a component of a heterogeneous food product, such as a soup or fruit-filled yogurt. This process uses the article of the present invention to generate a signal representing the residence time of this analog. This signal generator may be a magnet, more particularly a samarium-cobalt permanent magnet.

Description

Description: FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a process and an article for analyzing a specific object using an analogue. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process and an article for measuring the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Many processes invented require reliable data on certain aspects of the process before the process can be validated by regulatory agencies or industry. Often, this method of obtaining reliable data is beyond the state of the art, thereby rendering the useful process commercially unavailable. For example, if an object is a component of a heterogeneous phase throughput system, there is currently no way to obtain reliable dwell time data for that object being analyzed. This makes many useful processes that rely on such data unavailable. An example of such a process is aseptic processing to produce a low acid storage stable food. Prior to distribution to consumers, low acid (pH> 4.6) shelf stable food products must be sterilized through heat treatment or other processes to render the food products microbiologically inert. No. An example of sterilization of heterogeneous foods (foods with different phase components) is the heat treatment of canned soups with food (vegetable and / or meat) pieces. Divide the soup into cans and airtightly seal. Next, these cans are placed on a rotating device and heated to a temperature of about 121 ° C. while rotating. This heat treatment is necessary to make the product appropriately microbiologically inert in order to produce a storage-stable product. This rotation of the can promotes external heating of the liquid medium and the solid strip. However, heating of the center of the food strip is a much slower process, as it occurs only with conduction heating. The heating time of the center of the food strip increases as the cross-sectional ratio (width to thickness) of the food strip decreases. Thus, heating the central portion of the potato cube takes longer than heating the central portion of the green beans (having a pseudo-cylindrical shape). This is because the surface area by volume of green beans is larger than the surface area by volume of potato cubes. An alternative microbiological inactivation method for food particles in a liquid medium is aseptic processing. In aseptic processing, the heterogeneous food is transported through a number of first heat exchangers for heating to a holding tube for a defined residence time to sterilize these food strips, and then before packaging. To a large number of second heat exchange sections for cooling. Thermal process design for such products requires the use of mathematical models that require residence time distribution data to optimize product quality and microbial safety. However, this process was much faster than the latter, and it was difficult to determine the dwell time of the food strip, as the current method of tracking the food strip is uncertain. In order to ensure that a safe microbial killing level has been achieved for the center of this food strip, ensure that the residence time of the food strip in the holding tube and in the heat exchanger at a given temperature is ensured. You have to prove it with data. Microbiological confirmation may be performed at the end of this confirmation on a batch of heterogeneous foods (batch), but without reliable data on the residence time of the food particles in the holding tube. For example, the level of safe killing would remain unknown or at best uncertain. Accordingly, government and industry enforcement agencies do not recognize the safety of such processes, and consequently render the process unusable for sterilizing heterogeneous food products for sale to the public. The food industry is spending enormous amounts of time and money analyzing this process and trying to obtain reliable data on the residence time of the food pieces undergoing the process. From the analysis of this process, we have learned and accepted much in fact. First, there is a clear difference between the residence time distribution of the food particles and the liquid medium, which generally move faster than the average speed of this heterogeneous food. The size and concentration of these strips affects the residence time, as does the flow rate and viscosity of the heterogeneous food product. This residence time must be measured on the fastest strip to ensure microbiological inactivation. Knowing this, some in the food industry have sought to measure the residence time of food strips or otherwise prove the effectiveness of this process. One such method uses magnetic resonance imaging to create a temperature map of the food strip and verify that the center is properly heated. Other methods attempt to calculate the residence time by placing tracers on the actual food strip and tracking these tracers. However, placing the tracer on the actual food strip changes the size, shape, density and rotational inertia of the food strip. This results in data that is not reliant on what is being tracked differently, and thus different residence times from the actual food pieces. Also, the strip may be broken and the tracer may fall out of the strip, which also affects the data. Therefore, the industry still has to provide a reliable way to establish the residence time of an object under analysis when that object is a component of a heterogeneous phase system. The lack of such a method has prevented the use of various processes that require robust data on object dwell times to demonstrate effectiveness. DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION The present invention fulfills this industry by providing a process and articles for measuring the residence time of an object, when the object is a component of a heterogeneous phase system, to be analyzed. Not satisfy the demands. The present invention fulfills this need in a way to demonstrate the effectiveness of many processes. One embodiment of the present invention is an article for measuring the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing when the food strip is a component of a heterogeneous fluid. The heterogeneous fluid comprises at least the food particles and the fluid. The article includes a signal generator and an analog of the food strip having substantially the shape, size and rotational inertia of the food strip. The analog includes the signal generator. The article may have a density approximately between the density of the fluid and the density of the food strip. The food strip may be selected from the group consisting of fruit, meat, fish, pasta, vegetables and bread. The signal generator may be a magnet, and more particularly, a samarium-cobalt permanent magnet. The analog may consist of a mixture of epoxy and microglass bubbles. The analog may also consist of a chicken alginate component and a plurality of fine glass bubbles. The article may also be inoculated with bacterial spores when it comprises a chicken alginate component and a plurality of fine glass bubbles. The signal generator may be located at the geometric center of the article. In a very specific example, a food strip is a potato. Further, the signal generator may generate a signal by passing through a sensor. In another specific example, the heterogeneous food product is a soup. In yet another specific example, the heterogeneous food product is a yogurt with fruit. The article may have the thermal conductivity of the food strip. Another embodiment of the present invention is a process for measuring the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing when the food strip is a component of a heterogeneous fluid. The process comprises: (1) using an article instead of a food strip to be aseptically processed; and (2) receiving a signal from the article that indicates the residence time of the article during aseptic processing. Including. The process further comprises the steps of: (1) receiving a first signal generated from the article at a first point during aseptic processing; and (2) receiving a second signal during aseptic processing. And receiving a second signal generated from the article. The process may still further include calculating the residence time of the article by measuring the time between the first signal and the second signal. The process may further include the step of receiving multiple signals generated by the article throughout the aseptic processing of the food strip. The signal generator of this embodiment may also be a magnet, generating the first, second and multiple signals by passing the article through a conductive coil that induces an electromotive force. These signals may be viewed as changes in coil voltage. In a very specific example, the first and second points are the entry and exit points to the holding tube of the aseptic processing machine. In another particular example, the heterogeneous fluid may be a heterogeneous food such as a soup or pudding. The process may still further include transmitting these signals to a data acquisition system for computational processing. Another embodiment of the present invention is an article for measuring the residence time of an object that undergoes a temporal analysis when the object consists of a heterogeneous phase system. In this embodiment, the article includes a signal generator and an analog of the article having substantially the shape, size and rotational inertia of the article. The approximate density range of the article lies between the density of the object and the density of the carrier medium. The analog includes the signal generator. As in the previously described embodiment, the object may be a food strip that is a component of a heterogeneous fluid that is subjected to aseptic processing. However, the scope of the present invention is not limited to food strips only. Whether a food strip or other object, the analog may consist of a mixture of epoxy and fine glass bubbles, and may even have a magnet as a signal generator. The article may have the thermal conductivity of the object. Yet another embodiment of the present invention is a process for measuring the residence time of an object being analyzed when the object consists of a heterogeneous phase system. The process includes: (1) using an article in place of the object under analysis; and (2) receiving a signal generated from the article and indicating a residence time of the article under analysis. The article includes a signal generator and an analog of the article having substantially the shape, size, and rotational inertia of the article. The analog includes the signal generator. The approximate density range of the article lies between the density of the object and the density of the carrier medium. It is a primary object of the present invention to provide a process and an article for measuring the residence time of an object as it undergoes analysis. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a process and an article for measuring the residence time of a food strip when the food strip is subjected to aseptic processing. It is a further object of the present invention to provide an analog of a food strip having a certain density while undergoing aseptic processing. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a process for collecting the strips used in measuring the residence time of food strips that undergo aseptic processing. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a process for initiating a process for measuring the residence time of a food strip undergoing aseptic processing while maintaining the sterility of the process. Having briefly described the invention, the foregoing and other objects, features, and advantages will be apparent to those skilled in the art when the following detailed description of the invention is considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Some features of the present invention will be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings. In these drawings: FIG. 1 shows a side view of one embodiment of the article of the present invention. FIG. 2 shows a side sectional view of the article of FIG. FIG. 3 shows a front sectional view of an embodiment of the article of the present invention. FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of the aseptic processing system. FIG. 5 shows a graph of the retention time ratio of potato, chicken alginate analogs and synthetic analogs. FIG. 6 shows a flow chart of the process of the present invention. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The present invention is particularly applicable for measuring the residence time of food strips during the aseptic processing of heterogeneous foods. However, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the present invention is applicable in many fields. Accordingly, the invention will be described in the following sections, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in anticipation that this description will not limit the use of the invention. Regulatory agencies and industry have demonstrated the sterility of aseptic processing by verifying that the fastest food strips have a specified residence time at a specified temperature in the holding tubes and heat exchangers of the aseptic processing machine Determined that it may be. Food strip analogs, which generate a signal as they enter and exit the holding tube, may be used to measure the food strip residence time with a mathematical model for this process implemented. The analog should also be able to simulate the fastest strip through the system to ensure that the fastest strip has sufficient residence time. However, the food analogue has substantially the same shape and size as the actual food strip, while having the density of the fluid or medium conveyed when the food strip passes or undergoes aseptic processing. And have a rotational inertia. Regulatory agencies and the industry have used the distribution free statistics to determine the residence time of the 299 analogues in sterile processing systems to prove that the residence time of the fastest strips is minimal. It was also determined that calculations should be made in one test. Since the fastest strip would move in the middle of the media, we also decided to avoid collisions with the inner walls of the system. Thus, the density of the analog should substantially match the density of the fluid. If the density is too high, analogues will tend to fall to the bottom of the system. If the density is too low, analogues will tend to rise to the top of the system. FIG. 1 shows a side view of one embodiment of the article of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 1, there is an item in the form of a diced potato, indicated generally at 10. The article 10 is formed into a potato from a mixture of epoxy and fine glass cells. An alternative composition for this article 10 may be a chicken alginate composition and fine glass cells, as described in Table 2. A suitable epoxy is "Power Poxie" epoxy adhesive from Power Pox Adhesives of New Berlin, Wisconsin, USA. A suitable fine glass bubble is a "resin accessory" fine glass bubble from Fiberglass Evacote, Inc. of Cincinnati, Ohio. This mixture of epoxy and fine glass bubbles may be shaped to resemble a number of food pieces, including potatoes, carrots, beans, beef pieces, chicken pieces, and the like. The article 10 may be shaped to resemble a number of non-food objects. The density of the article 10 can be adjusted to substantially match the density of the fluid or medium by increasing or decreasing the ratio of epoxy to fine glass bubbles in the mixture. To simulate the potato soup fluid density, the article 10 is molded from a mixture of about 52.5 g epoxy to 1 g fine glass cells. A preferred dice cut potato is a cube with a side length of 12.7 mm. The article 10 has a hole 12 drilled to allow access to its geometric center. A magnet 14 (not shown) is placed through the hole 12 and is centered on the article 10. This magnet 14 is placed at the geometric center of the article 10 to minimize the rotational inertia of the article 10. Once the magnet 14 is in place, the holes 12 are filled with a mixture of epoxy and fine glass bubbles similar to the mixture of the article 10. FIG. 2 shows a side sectional view of the article of FIG. As shown in FIG. 2, the article 10 is in the form of a dice potato. The geometric center of article 10 is exposed, thereby exposing magnet 14. As described above, the magnet 14 is centered on the article 10 by the hole 12. The magnet 14 must be strong enough to generate an electromotive force in a coil surrounding the outside of the holding tube of the aseptic processing system. However, the attraction of this magnet 14 to the components of the processing system, usually made of stainless steel, should be minimal. This attractive force is shielded by the article 10 surrounding the magnet 14. Another parameter of the magnet 14 is that its size, weight and shape are small enough so that the magnet 14 allows for excessive replacement of food pieces. Although a wide variety of magnets satisfies the present invention, preferred magnets are rare earth magnets, especially Sm Three Co Five Is a samarium-cobalt alloy having the formula: A source of such magnets is Arnold Engineering, Ogallala, Nebraska, USA. A preferred samarium cobalt permanent magnet is 2 mm Three And a density of 8. 35g / cm Three , And a residual magnetic flux density of 8,800 G (Gauss). The magnets 14 are substantially geometrically shaped so as to minimize the effect, if any, on the rotation of the article 10 as it moves through the medium through the aseptic processing machine. Should be centered. As noted above, the attraction of the magnet to the components of the processing system should be minimal, otherwise the flow of the article 10 will be less than the true value of the food strip or other object for which the article 10 is a proxy. It will change from the nature of. For comparison, if the magnet 14 is placed in the upper quarter of the article 10, the rotation of the article 10 as it moves through the fluid medium through the aseptic processing machine is substantially affected. Such rotation is not true to the true rotation of a food strip for which the article 10 is analogous. FIG. 3 shows a front sectional view of an embodiment of the article of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 3, the article 10 is in the form of green beans. As in FIG. 2, the article 10 is formed into green beans from a mixture of epoxy and fine glass cells. The center of the article 10 is exposed, thereby showing a pair of magnets 14. Unlike FIG. 2, where the article 10 is potato-shaped, the oval shape of green beans requires a pair of magnets to be arranged. These magnets 14 are located at different positions to minimize imbalance due to the rotational inertia of the magnets. The arrangement of these magnet pairs may be the center of gravity of the ellipsoid. In this way, article 10 maintains the true rotational inertia of the actual food strip or object. Although the potato and bean-shaped article 10 is described in detail, it is readily apparent that the article 10 may take the form of a number of food strips or other objects. However, the article 10 can have substantially the same shape, size and rotation as the desired food strip or other object, while still having substantially the density of the fluid or medium if the article 10 is to serve as a suitable surrogate. Should have inertia. Thus, the article 10 can simulate the desired fluid density by modifying the epoxy and fine glass cell mixture. For example, the article 10 should simulate a potato in a soup and the potato density is 1.05 g / cm Three And soup density is 1.02g / cm Three If so, the article 10 should have a density greater than or equal to soup and less than potato. The preferred density range of the article 10 is 1. 01g / cm Three And 1.05g / cm Three Between. However, if the density of the food strip or object is lower than the soup or carrier (carrier) medium, the article 10 should have a density below the soup or carrier medium and above the food strip or object. Such density adjustment ensures that the article 10 is the fastest strip through the system, which provides invaluable data about the residence time of the food strip or object being analyzed. Another important factor in determining the residence time of a food strip being analyzed is the thermal conductivity of the food strip. The article 10 representing the food strip should have substantially the same thermal conductivity to ensure that the heating inside the article 10 is the same as the actual food strip undergoing aseptic processing It is. By substantially matching the thermal conductivity, the article 10 will be subjected to thermal forces that may affect the actual food strip. To make an article 10 that simulates the thermal conductivity of the food strip or object, the thermal conductivity of the food strip or object should be measured using generally accepted methodology. Such generally accepted methodologies are described in Murakami, "Thermal Process Affects Commercial Shrimp and Scallops," Journal of Food Science, 59 (2), incorporated herein by reference. 1994. Thus, the thermal conductivity of the article matches the thermal conductivity of the food strip or object. As is evident from the above parameters of the article 10, the magnet 14 must be able to integrate with the article 10 without substantially interfering with any of these parameters. However, the magnet 14 must be able to generate a sufficiently strong signal to calculate the residence time of the article 10 when it undergoes aseptic processing or other processing that may dissipate its magnetic force. According to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, when a magnet is moved toward or away from a conductive coil (e.g., copper), a current is induced in this coil (Haliday and Lesnick, 1970). This current generates an electromotive force. As the magnet moves relative to the coil (comprising several turns), a current is induced in each turn and the electromotive force is added. Thus, the electrical effect is a function of the number of turns in the coil wire. Moreover, this electrical effect is a function of the orientation of the magnet as it passes through the coil and, obviously, the magnitude of the relative motion between the magnet and the coil, as well as the magnetic strength of the magnet used. Thus, the magnet 14 must have sufficient induction to generate an electromotive force in the coil wrapped around the outside of the holding tube or other parts of the aseptic processing machine. FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of the aseptic processing system. Such systems are well known in the pertinent art, and will only generally describe a modification of such a system for practicing the present invention. As shown in FIG. 4, the aseptic processing system is generally indicated at 20. The aseptic processing system 20 generally includes a mixing tank 22, a pipe 24, a forward pump 26, a first heater 28, a second heater 30, a plurality of holding tubes 32, a first cooler 34, a second cooler 36, and Machine 40. A heterogeneous food product, such as a fruit soup or yogurt, is placed in the mixing tank 22 and then pumped by a first pump 26 through a pipe 24 to a first heater 28. The food product is heated by the first heater 28 to a liquid temperature of about 99 ° C. Next, the food product is advanced to the second heater 30, where it is heated to a liquid temperature of about 140 ° C. The food product is advanced from the second heater 30 through the pipe 24 to the plurality of holding pipes 32. To achieve substantial bacterial kill, the minimum residence time of the food crystal in the holding tube should be about 180 seconds. The liquid temperature exiting the plurality of holding tubes 32 should be about 135 ° C and the strip temperature should be 130 ° C. From these plurality of holding tubes 32, the food product is advanced to a first cooler 34, where it is cooled to a liquid temperature of about 83 ° C. Next, the food product is advanced to the second cooler 36. In this second cooler 36, the food product is cooled to a liquid temperature of about 21 ° C. From the second cooler 36, the food product is sent to the filling machine 40 through the pipe 24, and is packed and delivered. The present invention is primarily designed to measure the residence time of food tube retention tubes and system components in a fluid medium. To accomplish this, the aseptic treatment system 20 is modified by adding sensors located throughout the system 20, but primarily at the inlet and outlet of the plurality of holding tubes 32. These sensors may take a variety of forms, but must be able to detect an analogue of an object such as a food strip as it passes by these sensors. A suitable sensor for food strip analogs having a magnet as a signal generator would be a coil of conductive wire, such as a varnished 24 copper wire wound about 600 to 800 turns. The first sensor 42 and the second sensor 44 are at the inlet and outlet of the plurality of holding tubes 32, respectively. The residence time of the analog in the plurality of holding tubes 32 may be measured as the analog passes by the sensors 42 and 44. The measurement of the residence time is of the utmost importance, but other sensors 46 are located at the inlet and outlet of the first heater 28, the second heater 30, the first cooler 34 and the second cooler 36, and The heating and cooling times of this analog at these stages may be measured. In the case of food strip analogues, it is important to measure the heating and cooling times for mortality purposes. The sensors 42, 44 and 46 are connected to a data collection system 48 (not shown). As the analog passes through the sensors 42, 44 and 46, signals are transmitted to the data collection system 48 for further processing. In the alternative, sensors 42 may surround the entire exterior of these holding tubes and provide a continuous signal to data collection system 48. Although a wire coil has been described as a sensor, those skilled in the art will recognize that many other sensor means are applicable to the present invention. The aseptic processing system 20 may be modified by providing a flow divider 50 and a collection hopper 52. The shunt 50 is responsive to the transmission of signals from the analog 10 received by a sensor 46 positioned after the cooler 36 and in front of the shunt 50. Upon receiving this signal, a flow divider 50, which may be a valve, diverts this fluid flow to a collection hopper 52, where the analog 10 is collected. Once the analog 10 has been collected, the fluid is redirected to the aseptic filling machine 40 for aseptic packaging. This fluid redirection adjusts the timing according to the flow rate to open and close the valve with minimal fluid loss. To verify that the analog has been deflected, the sensor 46 may be placed on the hopper 52 to communicate a signal that the analog 10 has been recovered. This signal may also control the redirection of fluid to the aseptic stuffer 40. In this way, for each batch test of a heterogeneous fluid to be sterilized, such as potato soup, a similar residence time is required for this fluid to utilize the analog and render the fluid sterile. Can be proved. The analog 10 can then be recovered without having to worry about packaging the analog 10 with a product such as a soup. FIG. 6 shows a flow chart of the process of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 6, an analog of the object is prepared at step 60 for analysis. If the analysis is to measure the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing, the analog 10 may be a substitute for diced potatoes. This analogue 10 has the same density, shape, rotational inertia, mass and size as potatoes. The analog 10 may also be subjected to a heat treatment to prevent a change in the density of the analog 10 during processing. In step 62, the object is used in place of the object. At step 64, the analysis begins. At step 64, if the analysis is to measure the residence time of the food strip subject to aseptic processing, some modifications are made to this initial process to ensure adequate processing of the fluid. You may. This is very important if this measurement is performed simultaneously with the actual processing of the fluid for distribution to the consumer. This is intended when a shunt is utilized to collect the analog 10 as described above. The modification may be to reduce the initial flow rate of the fluid. Alternatively, the modification may be to increase the temperature of the initial volume of fluid until the fluid flow rate is constant. Further, the holding time of the fluid in the holding tube 32 may be increased relative to the initial amount of fluid until the fluid flow rate is constant. Further, the initial volume of the fluid may be more viscous, thereby reducing the flow rate of the fluid. At step 66, a first signal is received at sensor 46. At step 68, a second signal is received at sensor 46. The residence time of the analog for a particular part of the analysis can then be calculated at step 70 by measuring the time between the first and second signals. At step 72, the analog may be recovered, as intended above in the discussion of flow divider 50. In practicing one aspect of the present invention, the article 10 described above, with the magnet 14 located at the geometric center, is placed in the aseptic processing system at the strip loading station 50. The article 10 generates a signal when passing through the sensor 46 before entering the first heater 28. If the sensor 46 is a coil of copper wire, a voltage drop will occur as the article 10 passes through it. The detection of this voltage drop is sent to the data collection system 48 for further processing. As the article 10 passes through each of the sensors 42, 44 and 46 at the entrance and exit of a plurality of heating tubes, heaters and coolers, a signal is generated and sent to a data collection system 48. As food strips pass through sensors 42, 44 and 46, they generate a small voltage drop, which is easily distinguishable from article 10 passing through sensors 42, 44 and 46. Having described the residence time of food strip analogs, it is readily apparent that the present invention embodies the temporal analysis of multiple object analogs moving through the system in media in a different phase than the objects. It is. As is also readily apparent, various signal generators and sensors may be used in practicing the present invention for measuring the residence time of food strips and analyzing other objects. The present invention is illustrated by the following examples, which further demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel process and article, but the scope of the invention should not be limited by these examples. Example 1 A data acquisition system and system tracer continued to work in the lab prior to actual testing. These articles simulated a 12.7 mm cubic potato strip with a density of about 1.02 g and a samarium-cobalt magnet placed directly in the center. The detection system consisted of two counter-wound coils using line 24. The coils were wound around a 50.8 mm diameter tube to a width of 50.8 mm with 25.4 mm between the coils. The tubes were located at the inlet and outlet of each component of the aseptic processing system. For this test, the system consisted of a total of three sets of coils, with each individual pair of coils connected in series. Each set of coils had its own channel on the data acquisition board. By arranging the coils in series, the entry and exit of each magnetic strip could be recorded on the same channel. A set of these coils was placed at the inlet and outlet of the preheater, final heater, and holding tube, and the time each strip spent in each was measured. The 10 simulated strips injected into the system were numbered and injected at 3 minute intervals. Each strip was then collected at the end of the system. The magnetic strip that passed through the system generated a bipolar millivolt signal. The millivolt signal was amplified and recorded using "Casely Metrabyte" hardware and "Love Tech 9.0" software. The time spent by each strip passing through the pre-heater, final heater, and holding tube was calculated from the time difference when each signal was recorded for the exit and entrance of any system component. Combinations of 2% and 4% by volume "THERMTEX" starch (starch) and "THERMFLO" starch were used as strip carrier fluids. The starch was mixed with a small amount of cold water to dissolve, and then the concentrated starch solution was added to the remaining water. The whole starch solution was heated to 68 ° C. for gelatinization at 805 kg. Next, the 6% starch solution was cooled until it reached 63 ° C. and potatoes were added (15% by weight). These potatoes were 12.7 mm dice cubes purchased from “Lady Cut” food. The potatoes were allowed to equilibrate in the starch solution for 20 minutes, and the mixing of the solution was kept constant using a horizontal mixing tank. FIG. 4 shows a schematic diagram of this process flow. A dual-lobe “WAUKESHA” pump was used to feed the product into the process system. The process system consisted of a preheater (contherm), a final heater, a 4-minute holding tube, a precooler, and a tubular final cooler. The product was processed at 138 ° C. Samples of the starch solution were taken before, after the potato was added, and from the end of the system. Potato damage during processing was assessed by visual inspection. Each simulated strip was collected at the end of the test, identified by its number, and collected in the order in which all strips were placed. The residence time of the 371 articles was recorded with the final heater, holding tube and pre-cooler. Table 1 shows the average time, maximum time and minimum time. Table 2 describes alternative compositions of articles that can be used to measure the residence time of diced potatoes in food strips, especially soups. The chicken alginate article may also be inoculated with bacterial spores to confirm the microbiological effect of the aseptic treatment. About 10 6 Of spores was added to the chicken alginate composition. A preferred spore is the spoilage anaerobic bacterium PA3679. After this aseptic treatment, the inoculated article is incubated and then incubated for 30 days, during which time a positive (no growth) or negative (growth) result is obtained, thereby determining the effect of this temperature. . The process is carried out at four different temperatures in order to guarantee this residence time and the killing of the temperature. The first temperature is an estimated processing temperature. Once the temperature is calculated, the process is performed at a high temperature that should be completely killable. This process is then performed at two lower temperatures where spores should grow after culture. These low temperatures ensure that the spores were free of defects that would invalidate the results for the first temperature. In this way, the microbiological effect of this process (and thus this residence time) can be ascertained. Example 3 Example 3 relates to the preparation of the strip, and more particularly to heat treatment to stabilize the density of the article such that the article responds to changes in the density of its similar food strip. Table 3 below shows a preferred embodiment of this article. Table 4 shows the densities of the potato, an article consisting of the formulation of Table 3, and a composite article consisting of epoxy and fine glass cells. In preparing this article, 19.2 g of calcium sulfate (dihydrate) and 4.8 g of trisodium citrate (dihydrate) were stirred into 576 g of distilled water in a 18900 liter container. Melted. 6400 g of strained chicken baby food was mixed into this solution using a hand mixer. Using this hand mixer, 120 g of fine glass bubbles were mixed. Next, the spore suspension was added. 320 g of alginic acid (sodium salt) was slowly added to the mixture. First, a hand mixer was used, and then the remaining alginic acid was kneaded into the dough-like mixture. The chicken alginate portion was stretched to 254 mm × 152 mm with a 12.7 mm thick plate. Next, a 12.7 mm cubic space grid was pressed against the plank. The top was leveled to ensure that these interior spaces were completely filled with this chicken alginate. A grid containing about 2540 cubes was immersed in a 2% calcium chloride solution and frozen for 20 hours. The cubes were then removed from the grid, placed in a 18.926 liter container containing a 2% calcium chloride solution, and frozen for another 20 hours. Prior to aseptic treatment, these chicken alginate cubes were boiled in distilled water for 10 minutes. Article 1 is a chicken alginate analogue according to the formulation in Table 3. Article 2 is a synthetic analog consisting of epoxy and fine glass bubbles. The average density before treatment was recorded before sterile treatment in grams per cm 3. The average density after treatment was also recorded in grams per cm 3 after aseptic treatment. Time is expressed as the average residence time in seconds. As is evident, this heat treatment changes the density of the article such that the density of the food strip changes during the aseptic processing. In this way, the analog, or article, can more closely mimic the food pieces that are being aseptically processed. As is also evident from Table 4, these analogs have much lower average residence times than potatoes. The short residence time of this analog is intentional. Because the fastest strips get the least amount of aseptic treatment. Fastest strip tracking ensures that the aseptic process to be adjusted has completely processed all strips. The residence time ratio is also shown in FIG. From the foregoing, those skilled in the art will recognize valuable advances in the present invention, and have described the invention in connection with preferred embodiments thereof and other embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings, to which numerous changes, modifications, and improvements have been made. It will be readily appreciated that substitutions can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, which is not intended to be limited thereby except as set forth in the claims below. Accordingly, embodiments of the invention, which claim exclusive ownership or privilege, are set forth in the following claims.

────────────────────────────────────────────────── ─── Continuation of front page    (31) Priority claim number 08 / 769,811 (32) Priority date December 19, 1996 (December 19, 1996) (33) Priority country United States (US) (81) Designated countries EP (AT, BE, CH, DE, DK, ES, FI, FR, GB, GR, IE, IT, L U, MC, NL, PT, SE), OA (BF, BJ, CF) , CG, CI, CM, GA, GN, ML, MR, NE, SN, TD, TG), AP (GH, KE, LS, MW, S D, SZ, UG, ZW), EA (AM, AZ, BY, KG) , KZ, MD, RU, TJ, TM), AL, AM, AT , AU, AZ, BA, BB, BG, BR, BY, CA, CH, CN, CU, CZ, DE, DK, EE, ES, F I, GB, GE, HU, IL, IS, JP, KE, KG , KP, KR, KZ, LC, LK, LR, LS, LT, LU, LV, MD, MG, MK, MN, MW, MX, N O, NZ, PL, PT, RO, RU, SD, SE, SG , SI, SK, TJ, TM, TR, TT, UA, UG, US, UZ, VN (72) Inventor Botos, Mats             United States 60540 Napel, Illinois             Building, River Road 405 [Continuation of summary] No.

Claims (1)

  1. [Claims]   1. An article for measuring the residence time of a food strip subject to aseptic processing, The food strip is a component of a fluid composed of a foreign component, and the fluid composed of the foreign component. Comprises at least the food strip and a fluid, wherein the article comprises:   A signal generator;   The signal generator having substantially the shape, size and rotational inertia of the food strip; Comprising an analog of the food strip; Wherein the approximate density is in a range between the density of the fluid and the density of the food strip. An article.   2. 2. The article according to claim 1, wherein the food pieces are fruit, meat, fish, pasta, Goods selected from the group consisting of vegetables and bread.   3. 2. Article according to claim 1, wherein said signal generator passes through a sensor. An article that generates a signal by:   4. A process for measuring the residence time of food strips that undergo aseptic processing. Wherein the food strip is a component of a fluid composed of foreign components, and A fluid comprising at least said food particles and a fluid, the process comprising:   An article is used instead of the food strip to be aseptically processed, and the article emits a signal. The food having substantially the shape, size and rotational inertia of the greige and the food strips; An analog of the article strip, said analog including said signal generator, and The approximate density is in the range between the density of the fluid and the density of the food strip;   Receiving a signal from the article indicating the residence time of the article during aseptic processing When, Including the process.   5. In the process according to claim 4, the step of receiving the signal comprises:   Receiving a first signal generated from the article at a first point during the aseptic processing; ,   Receiving a second signal generated from the article at a second point during the aseptic processing; , Process divided into.   6. The process according to claim 4, further comprising:   Multiple signals generated by the article throughout the aseptic processing of the food strip Receiving, Including the process.   7. 5. The process according to claim 4, wherein said first point and said second point are A process that is an entry point and an exit point into the holding tube of an aseptic processing machine.   8. The process according to claim 4, further comprising:   A step of detecting the article before aseptically filling the container with the food composed of the different components When,   Comprising the heterogeneous component to remove the article from the heterogeneous fluid Switching the fluid flow to a collection hopper;   Redirecting the flow of the heterogeneous fluid to aseptic packing, Including the process.   9. 5. The process according to claim 4, further comprising the flow of the heterogeneous fluid. Modifying the aseptic treatment until it is at a constant flow rate.   10. 10. The process according to claim 9, wherein the initial flow of the heterogeneous fluid is performed. A process that achieves the step of modifying the process by reducing speed.   11. 10. The process according to claim 9, wherein said initial heterogeneous fluid is The process of achieving the step of modifying the process by increasing the temperature.   12. 10. The process according to claim 9, wherein said heterogeneous components in a plurality of holding tubes. Achieving the step of modifying said process by increasing the retention time of said fluid ,process.   13. 10. The process according to claim 9, wherein during the initial period the more viscous foreign component A process of modifying said process by using a fluid consisting of .   14. An article for measuring the residence time of an object to be analyzed, said article comprising: Are components of the heterogeneous phase system, and the heterogeneous phase system is A rear medium, wherein the article is   A signal generator;   Substantially having the shape, size, and rotational inertia of the object and enclosing the signal generator; Including analogs of the object, Wherein the approximate density is in the range between the density of the object and the density of the carrier medium. Articles within.   15. 15. An article according to claim 14, wherein said object is subjected to aseptic processing. Food strips that are components of a fluid consisting of At the same time having substantially the density of the fluid An article having the shape, size and rotational inertia of the food strip.   16. Process for measuring the dwell time of an object to be analyzed The object is a component of a heterogeneous phase system, and this process   An article is used in place of the object to be analyzed, and the article is used as a signal generator. And an analogue of said object having substantially the shape, size and rotational inertia of said article Wherein the analog encompasses the signal generator, and wherein the approximate density of the article is A step in the range between the density of the object and the carrier medium;   Receiving a signal from the article indicating the residence time of the article under analysis When, Including the process.   17. 17. The process according to claim 16, wherein receiving the signal comprises: Receiving a first signal generated from the article at a first point during the analysis;   Receiving a second signal generated from the article at a second point during the analysis; Process divided into.   18. 18. The process according to claim 17, further comprising:   Receiving a number of signals generated by the article throughout the analysis; , Including the process.   19. An article according to claim 1 or said article in a process according to claim 4. The product is compacted in response to changes in the food strip when the food strip undergoes aseptic processing. Articles or processes of varying degrees throughout aseptic processing.   20. An article according to claim 1 or said article in a process according to claim 4. An article or process in which the density of the article is adjusted by heat treatment.   21. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, wherein the signal generator is magnetic. An article that is a stone.   22. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, wherein the analogue is an epoxy. Articles consisting of a mixture of glass and a plurality of fine glass bubbles.   23. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, wherein the signal generator is arranged in front of the article. An article placed at the geometric center of the article.   24. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, wherein the analogue is chicken meat. An article comprising a lugate component and a plurality of fine glass bubbles.   25. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, wherein the signal generator is a duplicate. An article that is a number magnet.   26. An article according to claim 1 or said article in a process according to claim 4. Articles or processes inoculated with bacterial spores.   27. A process according to claim 4 or claim 16, further comprising:   Measuring the time between the first signal and the second signal Calculating the residence time of the Including the process.   28. 20. The process according to claim 6 or claim 19, wherein the signal generator Are magnets, and the article passes through a conductive coil that induces an electromotive force. Generating said first, second and multiple signals.   29. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, or claim 4 or 17. The process according to claim 16, wherein said heterogeneous fluid or said heterogeneous phase is Goods selected from the group consisting of soups, puddings and yogurt or Is a process.   30. An article according to claim 1 or claim 14, or claim 4 or 17. The process according to claim 16, wherein the analog substantially comprises the food strip or front. Article or process having the thermal conductivity of the object.
JP50395598A 1996-06-20 1997-06-17 Processes and articles for measuring the residence time of food strips Pending JP2000517416A (en)

Priority Applications (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08/667,124 US5750907A (en) 1996-06-20 1996-06-20 Process and article for determining the residence time of a food particle
US08/667,124 1996-06-20
US08/722,441 1996-09-09
US08/722,441 US5876771A (en) 1996-06-20 1996-09-09 Process and article for determining the residence time of a food particle
US08/769,811 1996-12-19
US08/769,811 US5739437A (en) 1996-06-20 1996-12-19 Process and article for determining the residence time of a food particle TRX-371
PCT/IB1997/001241 WO1998000694A2 (en) 1996-06-20 1997-06-17 Process and article for determining the residence time of a food particle

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AT279125T (en) * 1998-12-18 2004-10-15 Symrise Gmbh & Co Kg Encapped aroma and / or smell preparations
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AU4317397A (en) 1998-01-21
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